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News: Atlas Hardware Upgrade complete October 13, 2013.

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26  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Places where "right-to-work" is actually popular on: December 21, 2015, 11:29:34 am
Right to work laws are incredibly popular, having like 70% support from the American public in general.

Hahaha. No.

"Right-to-work" lost a referendum in Colorado just a few years ago.
27  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: Ohio 8 (John Boehner) Special Election candidate list on: December 21, 2015, 12:41:36 am
From politics1.com these are the occupations of some of the Republicans who don't hold elected office
1.Scott George, Human Resources Executive
2.Eric Haemmerle, Teacher
3.Kevin White, Airline Pilot and Retired U.S Air Force Officer
4.J.D Winteregg, Teacher, 2014 candidate for nomination and Tea Party activist

Tea Party activist is an "occupation"?
28  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Places where "right-to-work" is actually popular on: December 21, 2015, 12:35:52 am
Half the states have a "right-to-work" law, but are there are any states where it's actually popular?

I can see something like Utah, since Utah has been so deep in right-wing causes for such a long time. What about counties in other states? Some suburban counties in some Southern states I can definitely see. Think Shelby County, Ala., and the like.

The county in Kentucky where I would think it would be most popular is Boone County, but recently when they passed their own "right-to-work" ordinance, pretty much all the townsfolk in the room opposed it.
29  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Bevin (R) sworn in as new KY Governor on: December 17, 2015, 12:51:37 pm
Will Bevins repeal of Kynect cause some hardship? Probably.

Sounds like a mighty good reason not to repeal it.
30  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Jimmy Carter's airline deregulation on: December 17, 2015, 12:31:03 pm
Unfortunately, today's airline industry is now also run by cabal of a few airlines, who work extremely hard to keep out competition and prices are hugely inflated. Before deregulation, the government set fares and decided which airlines would have exclusive (or near-exclusive) rights over certain routes.

Giving airlines exclusive "rights" was a problem, but I know they were still doing this even after deregulation.
31  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Jimmy Carter's airline deregulation on: December 17, 2015, 12:29:32 pm
However I have to say on balance it was a Freedom Act. Prior to it the airline industry was ran by a cabal of a few who made it almost impossible to get a federal license and keep out competition, and prices were hugely inflated. Adjusted for inflation a plane ticket for a NYC-LA round trip cost over $1000 prior to it. Seems like the sort of thing that was just simply necessary.

This is probably true, but we do need to have some new regulations today, and the big airlines that have merged in recent years should be broken up.

There should be some regulation on airfares. Everyone is always talking about how expensive it is to fly out of the Cincinnati airport, but nothing is ever done about it. There should also be laws against overbooking and stranding passengers on the tarmac for hours on end. I remember reading about how New York state had a law against stranding passengers on the tarmac, but some right-wing activist judge overturned it, because libertea.
32  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Kentucky "right-to-work" opponent switches to GOP on: December 16, 2015, 02:16:27 pm
I wouldn't say Romney's or Obama's percentages are the best indicators of how local Democrats will do in KY.

The Democrats still do much, much better at the local and state level than at the federal level. I don't know if it's enough to save them, when they don't fight for it.

The Kentucky GOP is beatable, but their scandals have to be highlighted. There was a Republican official in eastern Kentucky who was beaten by 3-to-1 once his scandals came to light. The problem is that the Democrats usually don't have the guts to capitalize on Republican scandals.
33  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Kentucky "right-to-work" opponent switches to GOP on: December 16, 2015, 10:36:51 am
They said the special election probably won't be until March, so the Democrats have months to straighten up. I'm not confident that they will, since they don't even have a challenger to Thomas Massie yet!
34  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Kentucky "right-to-work" opponent switches to GOP on: December 16, 2015, 10:30:39 am
Another Democrat Representative, Tanya Pullin, has resigned to take a job offer:

http://m.dailyindependent.com/news/pullin-appointed-to-law-judge-position/article_a22cfa78-a39c-11e5-9c9e-bb13381f8faf.html?mode=jqm

One more such departure and control of the House of Representatives is potentially at stake, if the Republicans sweep all the special elections.

This might not be a big problem except that I don't have much faith in the Democrats actually fighting for these seats. If they actually fought, they wouldn't have lost other seats.

Nonetheless, Romney didn't carry Tilley's district by an overpowering margin, so that one could stay Democratic if people actually bother to vote. I could actually see Quarles's seat flipping back to the Democrats if people, you know, voted.
35  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: If McConnell wins re-election in 2014, do you see him re-elected in 2020? on: December 13, 2015, 06:23:59 pm
He'll retire in 2020, but I think that he would lose anyway.

What was I thinking? He's guaranteed to win for as long as he wants.

He'll be practically fossilized by 2020.
36  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Houston mayoral runoff held today on: December 12, 2015, 10:53:34 pm
Much worse than any of this, it appears Houston extends into Montgomery County, which can't be good at all.
37  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Houston mayoral runoff held today on: December 12, 2015, 10:49:37 pm
Houston just barely enters Fort Bend County. The Fort Bend County portion is tiny compared to the Harris County portion.

Unless of course Houston recently annexed a bunch of Fort Bend County.
38  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Bevin (R) sworn in as new KY Governor on: December 10, 2015, 04:29:22 pm
So are people going to complain about it - or do something about it?
39  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Rural vs urban voting patterns on: December 07, 2015, 11:15:43 am
In the US that's mostly not correct. With the exception of the Deep South, poor rural whites mostly vote democrat. Wealthy suburbs are much more republican than democrat in almost all parts of the country.

Before 2000, I always used to think of the Democrats as sort of an urban/rural coalition. The Republicans would only win when the suburbs carried it for them.

There used to be a lot of people who lived in urban areas who were sort of rural-oriented. They lived in the city, but they liked rural themes. They were probably Democratic back then, but are there really many folks like this remaining now? Those who lived in the cities have probably become more urban-themed. Plus, I think a lot of rural Democrats have simply moved to the cities. (Cities are growing faster than rural areas.)
40  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: State Legislatures 1993-2017 on: December 05, 2015, 10:03:07 am
They'll take it next time its up unless Bevin does something too crazy.

He's done enough crazy stuff already, but that doesn't necessarily stop the GOP.

Remember, they've got the media.
41  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: State Legislatures 1993-2017 on: December 05, 2015, 09:19:20 am
Now that it is clear that Kentucky is Republicanizing at the state and local levels now, how soon will it be before Republicans claim the whole legislature, particularly the House?

I would have said quicker than I thought before, but then I realized Donald Trump is basically the leader of the Republican Party now.
42  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: What exactly is the Tea Party? on: December 02, 2015, 06:21:17 pm
Is there an official "Tea Party" designation or is it just the post-2009 term for right-wing populist Republican?

They're hardly what I'd call populist. Their policies favor the wealthy, and the movement is bankrolled largely by the Kochs (and the CIA and criminal gangs).
43  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Presidential Election Trends / Re: Democrats Planning Effort to Take Back State Legislatures on: December 02, 2015, 02:13:20 pm
Probably the best thing to do would have a progressive version of the Tea Party. Too bad The Media won't allow it.
44  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Presidential Election Trends / Re: Democrats Planning Effort to Take Back State Legislatures on: December 02, 2015, 02:07:31 pm
I think it may be too late to affect the 2020 redistricting cycle (in which we might see Republicans cementing their dominance, particularly in every southern legislature), but we can begin the process in time to affect the 2030 redistricting cycle:

2030 will be too late. I'll be 57. Most Americans my age will have grandkids by then.

Many of us won't make it that long.

Things have to start changing NOW.
45  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Which party has the most mayors? on: November 30, 2015, 05:11:06 pm
In Kentucky, cities #1 and #2 have Democratic mayors.  I'm pretty sure #5 and #8 are Democratic, and #6 is Republican. I have no clue about the other cities in the top 10.
46  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Biggest city with a Tea Party mayor on: November 30, 2015, 09:47:03 am
What is America's biggest city with a Tea Party mayor?

I initially guessed Omaha, but Albuquerque is bigger.

Some even larger cities do have Republican mayors, but are they really Tea Party?
47  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Which party has the most mayors? on: November 29, 2015, 02:29:40 pm
It probably depends a lot on whether you count cities with non-partisan mayors. In those cities, I'd say that "Republicans" have an advantage, but I doubt there's any data on that. In cities with partisan mayors, I'm guessing there's more Democrats.

I think now it's probably the opposite. Starting last year, I noticed Republicans were much more likely to win when it's a partisan election.
48  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: The South and Party Switching: on: November 29, 2015, 11:54:12 am
I would add that until 1990th, and in some cases (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, to lesser extent - Alabama)  - well into 2000th, there was a considerable number of really conservative (not what's really takes place  today when one uses term "conservaDem" - these are centrist or even moderate liberals) Democratic legislators in Southern legislatures. They really had almost nothing in common with Nancy Pelosi, and even less - with Barack Obama. Look at such present day Mississippi legislators as  Browning, Mettetal, Bounds, Shows, Smith, White, at Dial or Holley in Alabama, Ward and Fannin in Louisiana, Collins-Smith in Arkansas, and their like. No one could classify them even as "moderates" even when they were Democrats, though, by fact,  they all were first elected as Democrats. Now they can have their cake and eat it too: they are influential as members of majority caucus (which became a majority partially because of their switching too), they must not "betray" their conservative principles even on party-line voting. and so on. Even state parties (don't even speak about national one here) in their states became much more liberal (and, frequently, Black-dominated). There is at least some truth when they say "the party left me...". Both national and their state parties...

There's one in Kentucky who I can think of: State Rep. Tom Kerr of Taylor Mill. He is a Republican now, but was originally elected as a Democrat. Even when he was a Democrat, he was so conservative that he wouldn't endorse conservative Democrats like Ken Lucas, and endorsed Gex Williams instead.
49  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Which party has the most mayors? on: November 28, 2015, 05:18:57 pm
Which political party has the most mayors? Despite Republican strength in state legislatures, I'd have to guess the Democrats have more mayors, since the GOP is really a rural rump party, and more GOP supporters live in unincorporated areas.

I'd certainly guess that more people live in places with Democratic mayors, since Democrats are stronger in bigger cities. I'd bet that even in northern Kentucky, more people have a Democratic mayor.
50  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Presidential Election Trends / Re: Who Turned My Blue State Red? on: November 25, 2015, 10:19:05 pm
This is why we need to make voting compulsory.
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