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News: Atlas Hardware Upgrade complete October 13, 2013.

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1  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: Today at 11:36:28 am
Germany, of course, rules out any informal talks before Article 50 is triggered.
2  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: Today at 11:35:44 am
Seems like Boris Johnson is not in the Commons today. At least, he has not been heard from in the debate (where pretty much everybody else, of consequence or not, has spokent). Dear me, perhaps the guy is sick? What else would explain such reticense?
3  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: Today at 11:22:48 am
So, Gibraltar government is in talks with the Scottish government on maintaining the UK membership in the EU. They are also considering approaching Northern Ireland. I mean, why not let England and Wales join Jersey, Guernsey and Man as non-EU parts of the realm Smiley

Neat idea. Pity, it won´t fly.
4  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: The Pigfvcker Memorial Suppository for UK News: A Departure from EUtopia on: Today at 11:10:16 am
Boris now says the vote to leave was "not entirely overwhelming" and Gove wants the exit talks to be informal.

They're  beginning to realise what exactly they've done and they're terrified.

Plan Boris was obviously for a narrow Remain vote and for him to then ride the coattails of anger amongst Tory members in the Shires to no. 10.

What does he do now? Either he becomes PM and starts article 50 and all the economic uncertainty and probable doom that comes with it. Or he decides to sit out the leadership race and gets exposed as an opportunistic charlatan.

I mean, if he has any decency left in him, he will retire from politics NOW.

Of course, he will not.
5  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: United Kingdom Referendum on European Union Membership on: Today at 06:25:02 am
If it opts for an EEA agreement, why should Britain be excluded from having to sign up to Schengen? It'll effectively walk away from an 'immigration' based referendum having less control over it.

Oh, it will join Schengen, that is almost a given.
6  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: Is there a position for Trump in Hillary's White House? on: Today at 01:01:24 am
I guess, as a junior assistant to an associate administrator in the Small Business Administration he could be put in charge of real estate education and training. Something of that nature.
7  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: Today at 12:50:44 am
The Treaty of Utrecht says that Gibraltar if it were to leave English-owned status would automatically be ceded Spain iirc. (Just found out) so that rules out the micronation idea.

Well yes but centuries old treaties can probably be changed. If it couldn't then Gibraltar would almost certainly refuse to leave the UK and the UK government could well get them a different deal with the EU than the rest of the UK. Trust me Gibraltan's fear of Spain's attempts to destroy their unique culture by submerging them back into Spain and their visceral dislike of the Spanish government is much stronger than their love of the EU.

A joint sovereignty does not necessarily implies that the identity or culture of Gibraltar is going to be submerged. The people of Gibraltar and their Andalusian neighbours have a peaceful cohabitation. I don't know why it should have to change. The inhabitants of the Rock would be still British citizens. Also, you seem to ignore the problems that the status of Gibraltar causes on tax evasion (the Rock is a tax haven), smuggling or the occasional disputes on the waters of the Bay of Algeciras. Joint sovereignty or a fair renegotiation of the Utrecht treaties (by which Menorca island was taken off from Spain, to be later recovered) could solve some of these problems, not stupid chauvinism.

Well, up till now "joint sovereignty" has been a very dirty word/phrase for nearly all Gibraltarians. Perhaps, this is the time for the Spanish government to start working on hearts and minds Smiley
8  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Breaking: Multiple people stabbed at Neo-Nazi rally in Sacramento Capitol on: June 26, 2016, 08:17:15 pm
What the hell is the point of counter protesting groups everybody already know are horrible?

Well since Nazis are allowed to have rallies in the first place, is anyone surprised that this happens?

Not surprised. But they have as much right to have rallies as anybody else. Freedom of speach is not there in order to say only nice and reasonable things. SOBs have a right to demonstrate without needing medical help thereafter.

I mean, I do not see any difference between them and Trumpists.
9  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Could this keep the UK united and in the EU? on: June 26, 2016, 07:59:26 pm
This could be politically feasible if Lab+Lib Dem win a majority after a snap election (they won't be able to count on SNP), but only if Corbyn is replaced.

Yep. And that only if Article 50 is not invoked beforehand.
10  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:54:37 pm
The Treaty of Utrecht says that Gibraltar if it were to leave English-owned status would automatically be ceded Spain iirc. (Just found out) so that rules out the micronation idea.

Well yes but centuries old treaties can probably be changed. If it couldn't then Gibraltar would almost certainly refuse to leave the UK and the UK government could well get them a different deal with the EU than the rest of the UK. Trust me Gibraltan's fear of Spain's attempts to destroy their unique culture by submerging them back into Spain and their visceral dislike of the Spanish government is much stronger than their love of the EU.

It's a treaty that would have to be negotiated with Spain. With a likely PP government. They won't play ball. Basically Gibraltar is at the mercy of the British negotiators - if they are sold out to try and get Spain on the British side there is little legally the Gibraltar people can do about it.

Actually, yeah. Gibraltareans must really hope Rajoy does not stay. Or else, they could be exchanged for Scotland Smiley
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Northern Ireland Reunification: Support or Oppose? on: June 26, 2016, 07:13:30 pm
Support. As of last Thursday.
12  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:12:07 pm
The Treaty of Utrecht says that Gibraltar if it were to leave English-owned status would automatically be ceded Spain iirc. (Just found out) so that rules out the micronation idea.

Well yes but centuries old treaties can probably be changed. If it couldn't the Gibraltar would almost certainly refuse to leave the UK and the UK government could well get them a different deal with the EU than the rest of the UK. Trust me Gibraltan's fear of Spain's attempts to destroy their unique culture by submerging them back into Spain and their visceral dislike of the Spanish government is much stronger than their love of the EU.

Gibraltarians will stay British, no question. But making their lives comfortable will cost the Brits some.
13  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:11:05 pm
Gibralter would probably best trying to make it as a micronation. Then it could at least be sovereign over its own borders.

Actually, I do not envy Gibraltareans at all. Spain will be on a path of war.

Is this serious? Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

The only thing that I can say is: give us the monkeys back and ¡Malvinas Argentinas!

I meant it figuratively Smiley

Travel and banking transactions though, will be a prime issue in the negotiations. I mean, 30K British hostages are a nice thing to have when you are talking to their government Smiley
14  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:09:18 pm
Wow some of you seriously have zero understanding of Gibraltar or its people, they would NEVER agree to be part of Spain. The Gibraltans consider themselves to be a unique people (ethnically they are too) and not at all Spanish, they despise Spain's attempts to control them and while many may be disillusioned with the EU referendum the latter things do not change. Any Spanish attempt to exert influence over Gibraltar will cause a massive backlash on the rock, if you think they will embrace Spain with open arms you have zero idea about the Gibraltans or this issue. If they do decide to leave the UK (which I would still consider unlikely) it would be as a microstate that is either in the EU or is outside the EU but comes under the free market/most other EU rules. If you want to comment on the UK or Brexit from some distant part of the world please try to do your homework first.

Same goes for Northern Ireland, hell will freeze over before the ruling DUP even considers a referendum...

Gibraltar is trapped.

The problem in NI is not the matter of a vote, parliamentary or popular. The question is: will the violence resume. I am afraid, it will.
15  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:08:00 pm
There is very little chance of a referendum in NI, but there is a substantial chance Sinn Fein withdraw from the executive and direct law imposed again.

Yep. The main question is, if they are going to be bombs again.
16  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: UK 'Brexit' Referendum on the EU on: June 26, 2016, 07:07:23 pm
The Treaty of Utrecht says that Gibraltar if it were to leave English-owned status would automatically be ceded Spain iirc. (Just found out) so that rules out the micronation idea.

You did not know this?
17  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: United Kingdom Referendum on European Union Membership on: June 26, 2016, 07:02:44 pm
  I wonder about all those expat Brits in Spain.  I would think the Spanish government would work on finding a way to let them stay without too many problems.  Don't most of them spend money which comes from the UK into  the Spanish economy and not work?

Those who have been there for a while have likely obtained some sort of permanent residency and might be able to keep it. The new arrivals - those who have just bought their house, planning to retire, for instance, or have been only using it for vacations - there will be a problem there, unless a general agreement on population mobility is reached.

The default option would, probably, be the same it is for other "no comunitarios": having to renew a residence permit every two years, which implies, say, some 30 hours in lines snaking around the local "brigada provincial de estrangería", waiving a pile of documents nobody is going to bother reading (but without which they would not let you into the process), obtaining which would take another couple weeks of full-time effort, etc., etc. I mean, lots of Russians have settled there as well: they have been doing this all: gratefully. So, Brits will be exactly like the Russians, etc.

I do not know how is the Alicante estrangería, but, I guess, once Brits get into the system it will become overcrowded like hell. Madrid estrangería back in 2006-7 (in the old Carabanchel prison) was no fun, but I survived. No desire to repeat it, though.

In any case, if I were a Brit about to retire, I would be looking into Bournemouth right now. Until the agreements are reached, nobody can tell you what will happen.
18  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: The Pigfvcker Memorial Suppository for UK News: A Departure from EUtopia on: June 26, 2016, 06:43:04 pm
The key thing to note is the list of people who have not resigned. Not just Burnham; there are some obviously ambitious people who have stayed put today.

Which ones did so because they think this increases their chances to replace Corbyn?
19  General Discussion / Religion & Philosophy / Re: Are closed borders/immigration restrictions morally defensible? on: June 26, 2016, 06:37:36 pm
A lot of the justification for borders seem to me like the defence of apartheid gone global. Why is it moral to trap people iin poverty within an artificial creation like a nation-state for the various governments of the world to do as they wish to them

I mean on deontological grounds, closed borders are basically indefensible. People have a right to be free and own themselves (not held within the binds of a government they only have a part of).

So is there really a moral defence that says it is OK for governments to keep someone from migrating from Congo to Europe, but that it is immoral for the Soviet Union to stop Siberians moving to Moscow?

We all have different morals. It is not in my book.
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Does a place like this exist in the world? on: June 26, 2016, 06:32:30 pm
Belize?  Certainly cheaper than down under.  Not sure about crime or politics.  I'm sure they get hit by the occasional hurricane, but those are easily avoided, unlike, say, earthquakes or to a lesser extent, tornadoes.

Make sure to lock your doors so that John McAfee can't get in.

McAffee would be one of the lesser concerns there, actually. Seriously.
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Does a place like this exist in the world? on: June 26, 2016, 06:27:56 pm
Belize?  Certainly cheaper than down under.  Not sure about crime or politics.  I'm sure they get hit by the occasional hurricane, but those are easily avoided, unlike, say, earthquakes or to a lesser extent, tornadoes.

High crime, homosexuality pretty much illegal (up to 10 years in prison, though is not regularly enforced) and severly ostracized socially (enforced with rigor for anybody not deeply in the closet). Hurricanes common (and not many places within the country where you could avoid those). Pretty humid, actually.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Does a place like this exist in the world? on: June 26, 2016, 06:25:52 pm
Does a place like this exist?


1. Sunny weather, little humidity, little pollution, warm winters with little to no snow, hot summers

2. Liberal politics, both socially (ex: gay marriage, though I don't care much about a place's stance on abortion) and economically (ex: healthcare & education)

3. Chance of attack by dangerous wildlife is slim (ex: alligators, poisonous snakes, poisonous insects/spiders, great cats, bears, etc.) and little chance of getting a terrible disease (ex: malaria, Zika, West Nile virus, etc.)

4. Not in a zone for likely terrible natural disasters

5. Not overcrowded, no high crime rates or high unemployment rates, not war-torn either

6. Affordable housing and cost-of-living, including good cell service and Internet

7. Most people speak English


This would be the place of my dreams. Any places like it, or close enough, exist on Earth?




For outside of the USA... would parts of Ireland or New Zealand fit this? Canada probably too cold, unless maybe the Vancouver area in the winter isn't too bad. Great Britain probably too cold and rainy. Would parts of Australia fit, except for the gay marriage part?

For inside the USA... maybe somewhere around the San Diego area is affordable? Hawaii I hear is too expensive. Florida is affordable and warm, but it's humid and has alligators and its crime rate isn't low, unless maybe there's someplace in northern Florida that's good.

San Miguel de Allende Smiley Or another Gringotenango (say, something on Lake Chapala), but I do not know those as well. There is a reason so many Americans retire here Smiley

Most of your conditions hold. Concluding gay marriage would require either traveling to Mexico City or another Mexican state where it is legal by law, or suing locally (it will be resolved in your favor, according to the established precedent). Marraiges conducted elsewhere are recognized. There is a possibility of an earthquake, but this is not a fault zone, nor is it a lake bed (unlike Mexico City), so it should not go beyond the minor scare level. Otherwise it is pretty much the ticket.  English included Smiley
23  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: McConnell refuses to say whether TRUMP is qualified to be president on: June 26, 2016, 06:10:32 pm
Mitch, you're a loser! But TRUMP doesn't need the support of that establishment jerk.

Well, neither was, really, support from von Pappen needed by the German Trump back in 1933. But, at least, the sight of that gentleman made your ancestors happy that everything is nice and cool.
24  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Spanish elections and politics (General Election: June 26) on: June 26, 2016, 06:04:44 pm
I still think a technocrat ia most likely. That way Rajoy can still control PP for embezzlement purposes and C's/PSOE don't get roasted alive.

Remember at some point, people like the ratings agencies and the like will start to put out warnings if yet another election is called (especially as there doesn't seem to be a huge probability that a third election will be any more stable than this one).

Makes sense. Felipe should propose a name.
25  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Spanish elections and politics (General Election: June 26) on: June 26, 2016, 06:02:33 pm
And why not a minority government like in Ireland, with a sort of pact where the main opposition party abstains on the budget during 2-3 years ?

It could be a minority government, of course. But that pretty much means a PP/C coalition with PSOE on the outside. And that is exactly feasibility of what we have been discussing here. Still, it is far from clear that PSOE would abstain.
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