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1  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: What percentage of retirees ... on: September 20, 2014, 08:30:31 pm
I've seen the T-shirts that say "Retired:  no worries, no commitments, no money" and the like.  Most of the folks wearing them didn't seem particularly ornery.

I'm trying to think of all the retired people I know.  I can come up with eleven.  Of those, only two are ill-tempered.  I'm certain that one of those two was already an ill-tempered individual long before retirement.

That's about 10% if we exclude the one who was already a nasty cuss. 

It probably depends upon your line of work.  Many people in my field work till 65, 67, even 70.  I know one guy who's 71 and has no intention of retiring.  I have mixed feelings.  On the one had, I'm opposed to age discrimination and forced retirement.  He's more or less good at what he does and he definitely enjoys what he does.  On the other had, he definitely doesn't need the money and he's clearly occupying a position that is probably desired by many recent graduate school graduates.  I want to tell him, "Dude, retire already!  Give some young guy a chance to do your job!"  On the other hand, I know I'd never tell him that either privately or publicly.



2  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Do You Live in an Urban, Suburban, Exurban, or Rural Area? on: September 20, 2014, 07:56:16 pm
I went with sub, although I'm not well versed in the parameter.  (MT has ~1500 people per sq. mi.)
3  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: would you make a capable engineer? on: September 20, 2014, 07:47:14 pm
no doubt. 

Moreover, I'm actually hoping the boy pursues that course. 

"Are you an engineer, or are you a nigger?"
   --Tibeats, chapter 7 Twelve years a slave (I think it was chapter 7)

I sort of resent the question.  Solomon is impaled upon the horns of a dilemma.  As he reveals early on, he can't say that he's an engineer.  Still, as a former freeman, he won't concede that he's a "nigger."  Tibeats' intent is crystal clear:  he intends to put "Platt" in his place.

What's your point here, Walter?
4  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Buffalo Wild Wings on: September 20, 2014, 07:38:03 pm
Hey man, if you like rioja, the Campo Viejo reserva ($11.99 this week) is about a million times better than the Campo Viejo normal.  They're typically aged about three years longer.  Complex.  Elegant.  Excellent balance between fruit and wood.  Of course, it's from Spain, so expect the palate to contain pepper and clove, but I always eat chiles and spice, so it's all good.  Check it out.
5  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Buffalo Wild Wings on: September 20, 2014, 06:26:22 pm
We were out of bokchoy, so it was broccoli instead.  And pork, thai chilis, jalapenos from my garden, and green onions were all introduced to the To Fu.  Mmmmmm.

Can't stomach a "touch of the grape?"  Who am I kidding?  I had no trouble finishing a bottle of Hayes Cabernet.  Well, nearly finishing.  By the time I retire, I'm sure it'll be history.  And so will the olives at the bottom of the martini which I'm sure will follow that last glass.

Anyway, I can no longer detect any taste of the Buffalo Wild Wings experience in my mouth.  I suppose I could have brushed my teeth, but a home-cooked meal and a bottle of savory red wine is a much more satisfying way to dispense with the flavor of my lunch. 

Anyway, I'm going to go with option 3 on this one.  It's probably not, to use waltermitty-speak, a horrible restaurant (HR), but it's not an experience I want to repeat any time soon.  If I ever find myself herded into a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in the future, I may just take the wise advice offered by DemPGH and go for a large chicken salad.  I'm sure my evacuation will be just as spectacular and as well-turned as it was following the meal I ate today, but probably it will be more satisfying. 

File all this under "white people problems" and go about your business, boys and girls.

Good day.
6  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Buffalo Wild Wings on: September 20, 2014, 04:30:46 pm
Never did crack that heavy book.  I took it off the shelf and lugged it around to the Rainbow Loom room, then to a sofa where I sat it down beside me, and then grabbed it and headed toward the men's room, but the sign on the door reminded me that "NO BOOKS OR OTHER LIBRARY MATERIALS ALLOWED IN THE REST ROOMS UNLESS THEY HAVE BEEN CHECKED OUT."  Presumably they understand that once people take them home they read them on the throne.  Then I forgot all about the book.  

The ride home was a slow one.  We cut through the golf course and dodged balls and carts.  Got screamed at by a few golfers.  Probably cut half a mile off the journey that way.  

The shrimp survived.  I gave it to my wife and she put it in the toaster oven for a few minutes and ate it.  She said that she liked it.  

I'm still bloated from lunch, so it'll be light dinner tonight.  To Fu and bokchoy in garlic.  I don't even think I'd enjoy a touch of the grape tonight.  Probably just have a martini or two.  

Maybe we'll try Chipotle Grill next time we're in that neighborhood.
7  Forum Community / Forum Community / Buffalo Wild Wings on: September 20, 2014, 01:07:13 pm
The boy and I cycled to the public library after swimming a bit this morning, arriving about 11:45 AM.  We were hungry and about 3.5 miles from home so I said I'd buy us something in this neighborhood.  Lots of choices in a ten-block radius.  Chinese, Vietnamese, pizza, Chipotle, Tom+Chee, burgers, Buffalo Wild Wings, etc.  He wanted Buffalo Wild Wings.  I asked, "are you sure?" and he was quite sure.  He's been wanting to go there for some time.  We'd never been there so I didn't know what to expect.  There's no bicycle rack so we locked up to a bench in the front.  As soon as we entered we were hit with a very high noise level.  A referee's voice and crowds cheering.  It was a football game:  Michigan State at Eastern Michigan.  (Spartans winning 49-0 at the moment.)  But that wasn't all.  There were at least 15 big screen televisions mounted on the wall.  Luckily only one had the volume turned up.  There was college football, soccer, auto racing, and some other stuff.  An epileptic's nightmare.  Not only that, they give each person a little tablet computer on which you can play videogames or Texas Hold 'Em while awaiting the arrival of your food.  It's definitely an unusual ambiance, and an acquired taste.  After a few minutes, I think I managed to acquire it.  Or at least enough of it to tune out the speakers blaring above our heads.  Although I couldn't help being mesmerized the constant barrage of video from all directions.

The serving wench came and I ordered a Caribbean Jerk Chicken sandwich (comes with fries) and a 22-ounce Dogfish IPA.  The boy ordered peppercorn popcorn chicken (comes with fries) and a mango lemonade.  We also had a bucket of onion rings with some smoky, creamy, spicy orange-colored sauce.  Heavy, greasy food.  I got most of the way through mine.  He got about a quarter of the way through his.  The bill came to $35.81.  Upon receiving the check, I left 40 dollars on the table and quickly headed to the john for a giant, bowl-staining, gut-wrenching dump, but not before spending about three minutes washing the oil off my hands and fingers.  My gut is really cramped right now, even after that huge movement.  I knew we couldn't handle the 3.5-mile ride home immediately, so I unlocked our bicycles and we headed to the library.  We're going to hang out here at the library for a while.  Being that it's International Peace Day (who knew?), the kids are making Peace Pinwheels and there will be Rainbow Loom Bracelets starting in a couple of minutes.  That'll keep the boy busy.  I may just take a nap.  That beer alone was probably about a thousand calories, and my eyelids are droopy.  I think I'll grab a fat, boring nonfiction book to help put me to sleep.  There's a huge volume entitled "The Decline and Fall of the British Empire 1781-1997" just to my right.  That should do it.  

The serving wench gave us a little box to put the remainder (the majority) of his shrimp in before we left, which I deposited in the fridge in the breakroom at the public library.  If I remember to snag it on the way out, and if it doesn't go nasty on the ride home, I'll probably finish that later.

I can't imagine ever eating there again under any circumstances.  
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Your actual party affiliations on: September 20, 2014, 08:17:37 am
Democrat, till about 1999
Unaffiliated, 1999 till about 2003
Republican, 2003 - 2004
Unaffiliated 2004 - 2008
Republican, a few months in 2008
Unaffiliated 2008 - 2012
Republican, a few months in 2012
Unaffiliated, 2012 - 2014
Democrat, April 2014 to present (I haven't gotten around to changing it back to unaffiliated with the county registrar, but when I do I'll be Unafilliated till an interesting primary comes along)

I'd be interested in the reasoning behind all these...

closed primaries. 


Well, pre-1990s I have no control over any of it.  My parents were very loyal Democrats.  Minnesota Democrats at that.  For them the Republicans could do no right and the Democrats could do no wrong.  They were against the Viet Nam war and against capital punishment, they'd never cross a picket line to enter a shop, even if it meant driving to a different store miles away, they were for socialized medicine, the New Deal, the Great Society, and all the rest.  They brainwashed me so thoroughly that until I was 30 I thought Nixon was a dirty word.  Reagan too.  I dutifully voted in all Democrat primaries and for the Democrat candidate in all elections, odd years and even, May and November.  At some point after I reached my 30th birthday I started to think for myself. 

Generally I'm what this forum calls a moderate hero.  I suspect that it is meant as vulgar and derogatory, but I like to own it.  Not unlike Yankee Doodle Dandy.  Also, I'm generally not keen on signing up with any faction, so even if I were a left-wing nut or a fire-breathing fascist, I'd probably still prefer to remain unaffiliated.  But if one wants to affect the process, one must get dirty.  For example, I liked Tom Wolfe early on, and wanted to do what I could to see that he was his party's nominee.  Only way to do that in a state like PA is actually become a Democrat at least three weeks in advance of the primary election.  Usually I change it right back to unaffiliated immediately.  Similarly, in January of 2008 I was living in Iowa and wanted to register my support for Ron Paul in the GOP caucus, so I made my way through the three-feet-thick snowdrifts and the negative twenty degree wind and blowing snow on that January night to the Black Hawk County GOP caucus at Central Middle School to vote for Ron Paul.  Now, Iowa has "Same Day Registration" meaning that you can change yourself from Unaffiliated to Republican or Democrat at the door, or even register to vote at the door, but you still have to go to the county clerk's office in person to change it back.  Of course within a couple of months I changed my registration back to unaffiliated, and of course faced with the choice of McCain and Obama, I voted for Obama. 

By contrast, in California, there's a modified open/closed system, so you can actually stay formally unaffiliated but vote in any party's primary.  When I lived in California 2001-2004 I remained unaffiliated (until december of 2003 when I became a Republican for psychological reasons.  Being a newly-minted Republican, only recently liberated from my parents one-party agenda I looked for a venue in which to preach and spout, and I stumbled upon this place, but enough digression.)

Anyway, I'm generally with the No Party people, but from time to time I feel compelled to pimp myself out in order to muck about in the primary elections.  In most states, that requires a formal conversion.  Kinda like if you want to take communion in the Catholic church, you have to become a catholic.  California primaries operate more like a Dao temple.  Every been to one of those?  I've been to a few of them.  They give everyone three incense sticks at the door.  Even if you're white.  No one asks any questions.  You can light yours and bow before your dead ancestors even if you've never contemplated any of it before.  But in Pennsylvania, it's a little more tight.  Ah, well.  It could be worse.  At least they don't require us to have our foreskins knifed by a mohel prior to voting in primaries. 

The thread does remind me that I need to change formally back to unaffiliated. 

9  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: How Would Your State Vote on Secession? on: September 19, 2014, 01:00:12 pm
I have no idea.  What's odd is that so far all the states posted for secession are the poor ones and those against are the rich ones.  That seems illogical.  

I did a little searching and found that 24% of Americans recently polled favor the idea of their state seceding and that 53% oppose.  According to that poll, Western states favor it more than Eastern ones.  That seems a bit more logical but even there some of the poorest ones (e.g., New Mexico) are some of the strongest supporters while some of the richest ones (e.g., Connecticut) are most in opposition.

Here's a link:

http://blogs.reuters.com/jamesrgaines/2014/09/19/one-in-four-americans-want-their-state-to-secede-from-the-u-s-but-why/

Click on the map and you can filter it by income, educational attainment, state of residence, party affiliation, etc.  They claim an error of only 1.2%, but I find that claim a bit dubious since it's an internet poll.
 
In no state is it over 50%, so I guess that's the bottom line, if this poll is to be believed.
10  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of this Gordon Brown speech on: September 19, 2014, 12:24:03 pm
Typical campaign speech.  Our party is right, and look at all the wonderful things we have accomplished.  The other guys suck.  Not only haven't they ever delivered, but they are wholly incapable of delivering.  Vote with us, not them.

I watched it.  Not a bad speech, really, but I can't see quite what sets this speech apart from any other campaign speech by any other politician, except that he repeated himself more often.  He had maybe four minutes of material, and repeated it all three times to make it a twelve-minute speech.

That's probably okay, though, since his goal wasn't so much to sway as to get the opposition crowd  out there to vote.  In that sense, you could call it successful.  The turnout, after all, was 85%, astonishingly high by US standards.  (Not sure what a typical turnout is Scotland is.)

Anyway, "mediocre" not being an option, I voted FS.


11  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 19, 2014, 11:46:27 am
A more interesting analysis, also from WaPo.  An excerpt:

Now, with the voting done and the crowds dispersed, the Lion and the Unicorn sit down in the dining room of the humble home they have officially shared for three hundred years, not including the reign of King James, a courtship period during which they were still feeling each other out.

A hush falls.

“Is there anything I can get you?” England asks. “Foot rub? More autonomy?”

Scotland ignores it.

“That kilt looks lovely,” England says. “Really lovely. Love kilts.” England’s fork clatters against its plate. “This haggis is great,” England adds. “I didn’t bring it up a lot during the referendum campaign but I was going to really miss it.”

“Thanks,” Scotland says, unenthusiastically.

“And the sound of bagpipes,” England says. “You look lovely today. Did I mention that? Your heaths especially. And bogs.”

“Calm down,” Scotland says.

“I know you’ve been threatening to leave for years,” England says. “But I didn’t think you’d really — I mean, other territories have come and gone, but I thought we were still strong. What we have is special, I thought.”

“Oh, a special relationship?” Scotland asks. “Like you have with the United States?”

“You know it’s not like that,” England says. “They haven’t been with us for almost 250 years. Listen, you’ve given us so much. Peter Capaldi, there’s a man. The poet Burns. Golf. Mel Gibson.”

“Are you just going to list things?” Scotland says. “I could do without you just listing things like that.”

“I just don’t want you to feel that I don’t notice and appreciate all that you do,” England says, moving the haggis around on its plate. “Because I do. James Macavoy, now there’s a fellow. John Loudon McAdam, the man with the nuts and the roads. And Macbeth. The Scottish play.”

“You’re just saying things with Mac in them,” Scotland says. “You could be guessing.”

“I’m not guessing!” England says. “I appreciate you. Think what I’d be without you. Where would we keep the royals during some seasons of the year?”

“Really?” Scotland says. “Balmoral? Really, that’s the first thing that occurred to you?”

“No,” England says. “Of course not. Other things occurred to me. I was trying for a note of levity.”

“Oh,” Scotland says. “Levity.”

“It would have been really awkward if you’d left,” England says, after a silence. “I mean, Ireland has its own island, so that made a certain sort of sense, but for you to go — it would have sent the wrong message. We would still be occupying the same space, and it really isn’t a huge island when you come right down to it, I say, what?”

“That’s true,” Scotland says.

“I mean, we’d still shop at the same places, and we share a border — I mean, you have to consider the border, it’s not going anywhere. At any rate, I intend not to take you for granted any longer. Things will be different. I want you to know that.”

“Do you mean that?” Scotland asks. “Do you really?”

“Oh yes,” England says. “You know I do. We’re the Lion and Unicorn, just like the poem. The lion and the unicorn were fighting for the crown–”

“I know the poem,” Scotland says. Scotland pours itself a large glass of Scotch and sips it, staring out the window. “I think I made the right decision. It just wasn’t a good time to leave, financially.”

“Quite right,” England says
12  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Opinion of people who purchase vinyl records nowadays on: September 19, 2014, 11:06:42 am
the experience of it...
 it's often very distracting to listen to music while using the computer.

agreed.  When I want to become one with the music I use my 25 year old Kenwood modular upright stereo, big wood and glass case, with 4 huge tower speakers.  Partly because I somehow regard that as the appropriate experience (you can take the boy out of the 80s but you can't take the 80s out of the boy?) and partly because the computer is distracting.  I'm the only one I know that still has a big old stereo as a prominent piece of furniture in my living room.

Still, even when I do sit back and listen to music on my stereo I prefer digital.  If I have a choice--and I have many albums on CD, record, and cassette tape, so often I have a choice--I go for the CD over any other form.  The digital invariably sounds better than the record or the tape.  Even different CD versions have different quality.  There is analogue recording with digital mastering, digital mixing with digital mastering, etc.  I guess the AAD, ADD, and DDD labels only applies to about 1990 and before, because the source material was often out there before digital recording was possible, but digital recording, when available, is my preference when I have a choice in formats, and I'd always look for those CDs back in the day when I was purchasing them. 

Obviously records look cool, and the cover art is larger than on any other format, and there were many times that I'd pull out the record album to study and read while actually listening to the album on CD. 

Folks a little older than I may even own a fourth format, eight-track tapes.  I remember them well, but by the time I was old enough to buy music, they were no longer sold in stores.  My guess is that they're the worst of the lot.  Like cassettes, they warp and stretch and come out of the case, and unlike cassettes, they do not even offer the advantage of being compact. 

13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Your actual party affiliations on: September 19, 2014, 10:27:49 am
Democrat, till about 1999
Unaffiliated, 1999 till about 2003
Republican, 2003 - 2004
Unaffiliated 2004 - 2008
Republican, a few months in 2008
Unaffiliated 2008 - 2012
Republican, a few months in 2012
Unaffiliated, 2012 - 2014
Democrat, April 2014 to present (I haven't gotten around to changing it back to unaffiliated with the county registrar, but when I do I'll be Unafilliated till an interesting primary comes along)
14  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 19, 2014, 10:10:09 am


English pain ... a drug I can't get enough of


haha.  Here's a succinct analysis from this morning's WaPo. 

Unionists sought to portray the nationalist agenda, modeled on Scandinavian countries that spread their wealth broadly, as a fantasy.  Many independent economists have agreed, questioning whether Scotland can build the sort of egalitarian society that its leaders envision, especially with declining oil revenues and uncertainty hovering over the newly independent nation’s currency.  The “no” side’s warnings of economic doom spurred a backlash among Scots, however, and prompted the pro-union camp to recalibrate its message. In the final days, unionists emphasized their love for Scotland — not their prophecies of failure. Polls suggested the shift may have helped halt growing momentum for independence.

Moral:  you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.  Or, perhaps more appropriately, you catch more midges with haggis than with neeps.
15  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 19, 2014, 06:50:43 am
pounding headache this morning.  A little hair o' the dog should fix it.  Ah, Monkey Shoulder, the breakfast of champions.  Maybe a little coenzyme Q-10 as well.

I see it was fifty-something percent yes to forty-something percent no.  Any surprise there?  Probably to the close-watchers, but as I recall this was basically the mainstream prediction.

Not sure how I'd have voted since I don't live there, but I imagine I'd have voted yes no matter the cause or issue, just because it's always satisfying to stick a finger in the eye of authority.  According to WaPo this morning, all the UK and Scotish politicians are kissing and hugging.  Even the biggest supporters of independence are making calls for peace and love and harmony, so I don't think that the stock market will crash after all, and planes won't fall out of the sky, and we can go back to arguing about important things like whether Miley Cyrus is a virgin or whether David Cameron is hot or not.

It was fun, though, waiting to see if there'd be a new country.  You scots should do this again soon.
16  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 09:56:54 pm
Hashemite
17  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 09:54:00 pm
Hashemite,

Get rid of that horrible moving picture that you posted when you edited my post.  Doing so implies that I would post such a thing.  I would never post such a thing.  All I said in that post is that you should get a grip on your authoritarian tendencies and let this thread evolve.  If any poster other than a moderator misrepresented another poster in that way, he would receive death points.  Your actions are unethical, even by the standards of this forum, and I challenge you to either rectify the situation or defend your actions here and now in this thread.
18  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 09:21:28 pm

I thank you for quoting me, because for some mysterious reason I got "error occurred" when I tried to quote my own thread.

That's the whole fucking point, in case no one actually gets it, by the way.  Something like 45+% of these people don't like the Hashemites of the world, and certainly would at least like to have their opinions registered in the ether, whether or not they win.

Also, much of the world is watching this election.  Sure, it was likely that the NO vote would win, and I think most of us posted as much earlier, but the mere possibility of a peaceful secession was very interesting to many.  The whole thread was going swimmingly before Hashemite's post.  Let's be honest about that, at least.  (I add that only to answer your implied question.  Hope I haven't misinterpreted.)
19  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 08:55:50 pm
Sure, I understand that. But if the No vote is rather decisive, as in +5% or so, I don't really see the need to make reforms as extensive as they're making it sound. Perhaps they're just dramatizing in their tweets and statements and press releases. But it just seems like the Conservatives and the No camp in general have betrayed a shocking lack of confidence or belief in the United Kingdom as it is. Their last-minute desperation offer of "devo-max" to Scotland was truly pathetic, and it's not so clear to me that it helped their cause much at all.

That's a prescient, and more subtle, question than I at first apprehended.  My parents spent some time in Scotland and brought back lots of souvenirs when I was young, but I've never been there myself.  I don't have a good feel for how things work there.

I will say that on my last trip to Puerto Rico I arrived just after a referendum on that island's status.  They have those about once every seven years, by the way, and the results are always exactly the same.  About 55% vote for the status quo, to remain a Commonwealth of the United States, and about 40% vote for statehood, and about 5% vote for complete independence, a divorce from the United States, a la South Carolina 1861.  Not sure why, well, actually I have a pretty good idea about it but that's far beyond the scope of this thread, anyway the results are always thus.  Now, suppose they one day decided to vote 51+% in favor of something other than status quo, such as either statehood or independence.  Do you think that the US government would immediately (or ever) act upon its wishes?  I doubt it.  Still, I get the impression that the London government operates under a different set of rules.  I expect that it would be expected to unchain Scotland should it decide in a binding referendum to divorce itself form the UK.  For that reason, and for the reason that unlike PR, the Scots opinion does seem to be monotonically changing (in favor of nationalism), the UK recognizes that it would do well to satisfy some of its demands.

As for the theory that a diminished UK would necessarily result in a diminished US on the world stage, I'm not sure I buy into that, nor do I think that an severed Scotland necessarily amounts to a diminished British presence in the UN in the first place, so I'm not a kneejerk NO supporter (like most Americans).  On the other hand, I'm not a kneejerk YES supporter either.  I'm just along for the ride.  That said, I do enjoy throwing monkey wrenches in the clockworks at every opportunity, so I must admit that I'm just a tiny bit disappointed that it seems to be decided so decisively at this early hour.
20  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 08:45:42 pm
Wow this count is slow....

yeah man, I thought we'd "know" by early evening EST.  then again, we more or less already know.

EDT.  It ain't the autumnal equinox yet.  Not that I'm a big fan of daylight savings time--Oh, don't get me started on that!--but at least let me ease into the whole clock-changing thing when I turn the page on the calendar and have a few weeks to prepare for it.
21  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 08:37:53 pm
Can someone explain why all these British politicians are now insisting variously that things need to change ASAP and fast reform is necessary and the Act of Union should be renegotiated and more powers should be devolved to England and Wales etc etc?? Especially given the fact that it looks like No will win handily.

haha.  Because they're politicians, of course.  What would you do if you were president Lincoln and the legislatures of SC and 12 other states just narrowly decided that they wanted to remain part of the US?  Unfortunately for the US--but perhaps fortunately for the 12 million or so negro servants in the US at the time--the legislatures of SC and those 12 other states did not narrowly decide that they wanted to remain, but if they did then you'd probably try to figure out what pissed them off in the first place.

If a part of your household is irked enough by you to make a scene in public about it, but not so enraged at you that it packs its collective bags and divorces you outright, you'd be smart to make amends, right?
22  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 08:31:27 pm
Just for the sake of argument, if Yes did win, would Scotland remain part of the EU? Would they have to apply and wait years for admission? Would they be forced to adopt the Euro?

The more important question regards the opt-out that UK negotiated.  My guess is that it does not, although that has to be decided by lawyers in Bussels, and they're at least as litigious as those in Washington.  I think it could easy join as a new state (assuming that it would want to do so), although it would clearly have to apply, but whether it could join upon the condition of keeping its own new-and-improved Bank of Scotland currency--presumably invented upon its secession--is the main question.

Hey, maybe bitcoin could be the new Scots currency.  Cheesy
23  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 08:01:33 pm
Okay, so it maybe happens much more often that I expected.  How was my estimate that there probably aren't more than a dozen countries in the world born of a modern peaceful secession, O wise one?

The breakup of the USSR netted 15 countries alone.

I thought about that, but I'm going to have to call foul.  First, it wasn't peaceful secession.  Well, there's really no second.  It's just that it doesn't really amount to the phenomenon which we're observing herein.  Or, more accurately, the phenomenon that we're not observing.  Breakup of USSR was just more like a pantbutton popping off when a fat guy eats one too many microwaveable convenience store chimichangas.

24  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 07:39:54 pm
Clackmannanshire:

No: 19,036
Yes: 16,350

yep, did y'all hear 'em scream when they announced it?  Very enthusiastic.  "AAAAAAAAAAAAh" Mel Gibson-style, just like on that movie.  I guess that's scots-gaelic for "Yee haw!"  Pretty exciting stuff.  

'Tis going to be fun, lads.  

They're showing 1/32 accounted for.  Maybe they'll sort this thing out by morning.

Shall we go with the Malbec for the yes and Monkey for the no?  I like long, drawn-out recounts, but I'm not sure my liver could handle it, so this is probably for the best.

Cheers!

25  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum results thread (Sept 18, 2014) on: September 18, 2014, 07:16:35 pm
I'm at my laptop for the evening now as I finish writing a test. My drink will be Dalwhinnie 15 years old. I don't have much left so I'll rely on some Sam Adams Octoberfest as well.

Ah, Dalwhinnie.  That's a throatier one.  Not bad.  My eponymous, the original Angus McCloud of the Outer Hebrides (RIP and God rest his soul), introduced me to that one, although he generally was a greater fan of the peatier island single malt whisky.  Laphroaig was often his weapon of choice, as I recall.

I actually spent much of the afternoon grading an exam, and haven't been really watching this.  I just a few minutes ago switched on BBCW.  It's really the only story they're covering right now so I assume it'll update regularly.  Listen to that woman's voice.  Man, she's hard to understand.  She sounds like a caricature of Willy the Groundskeeper, except that he was already meant to be a caricature.
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