Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
March 29, 2017, 02:29:12 am
HomePredMockPollEVCalcAFEWIKIHelpLogin Register
News: Cast your Ballot in the 2016 Mock Election

  Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 467
1  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Westminster terrorist attack on: March 22, 2017, 04:45:39 pm
Situation is that three people were murdered and the killer himself is dead.

It's just another part of life now

There are certain things we should never just get used to...

ftr RIRA is currently involved in a gang war in Dublin, which is about drugs and also 'the struggle' apparently.
2  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: The Pigfvcker Memorial Suppository for UK News: A Departure from EUtopia on: March 20, 2017, 07:31:54 pm
The Fixed Terms Parliament Act is an abomination

Anyway, I note that A50 is being trigged on March 29th - the anniversary of the Battle of Towton, probably the biggest and most violent battle in English history.
3  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: What's More Likely? An Independent Scotland or a Reunited Ireland? on: March 20, 2017, 07:30:40 pm
Option one, and it's not even remotely close.

I think it will facilitate a united Ireland however. Northern Ireland would be isolated with no effective 'border' between it and the rest of the UK.

That's correct. I think Scottish Independence is a necessary precondition for UI to even be considered.
4  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Favorite "country" of the British Isles on: March 19, 2017, 08:41:28 pm
Tsk, Tsk... No Isle of Mann
5  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: The best Science-Fiction universe/story? (with more poll options!) on: March 19, 2017, 08:40:33 pm
Emphyrio by Jack Vance

Also honourable mention

The Drowned World by J.G. Ballard
6  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: What's More Likely? An Independent Scotland or a Reunited Ireland? on: March 19, 2017, 07:59:49 pm
Option one, and it's not even remotely close.
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Was the 1850s Democratic Party conservative/right-wing by 1850s standards? on: March 19, 2017, 07:57:45 pm
This is a meaningless question but by standards that are often applied to modern American conservatism, no. But then that's so narrow that it may exclude Eisenhower or Hoover.
8  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Will Scotland vote for independence? on: March 17, 2017, 05:29:26 pm
I think that, in recent years, Wales has very much converged with England, politically speaking. See the similar scores for UKIP, Brexit and the like on both sides of the Border. Scotland, on the other had, really diverged under Thatcher, and by 2006 already voted quite markedly different to England.

So there doesn't really seem to be the scope for Welsh polling on independence to go the way that Scotland has.

The salient fact of the recent history of Wales is this: as administrative and political devolution has occurred, Wales has actually become even more integrated culturally and economically with England.

Have the various parts of Wales ever been more economically integrated with each other than with nearby parts of England?

Even now, how much connections are there between Newport and Anglesea that there isn't between two those places and, say, Birmingham?
9  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: The Big Bad Swedish Politics & News Thread on: March 17, 2017, 05:22:31 pm
Why have the Greens plumetted so badly?

Also, if there were to happen in an election, surely one of the two remaining alliance parties would hold up S?
10  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Will Scotland vote for independence? on: March 17, 2017, 05:20:17 pm
Probably around 20-30% in favor.

Almost certainly sub-25% and probably less than that. It's not a serious possibility and there will never be vote on the matter.

'Scotland 2006.'

Things can change, obviously. But for now it makes about as much sense to talk about referendums on Yorkshire Independence as Welsh Independence.

Hypothetically speaking, in the case of such a referendum this would be the best YES would do - and same patterns do.

As for the question at hand. If the referendum is in 2018-2019, no, if it is in 2021-2023 then yeah I think so.
11  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Politics and Elections in the Netherlands: GE March 15, 2017 on: March 15, 2017, 09:35:10 pm
What exactly is the voter base of the Animal Rights' party and how is it different to GL?
12  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Politics and Elections in the Netherlands: GE March 15, 2017 on: March 15, 2017, 11:18:44 am
The Netherlands is on CET, not GMT. So polls close at 8PM GMT, if I understand correctly.
13  General Discussion / History / Re: Did the socialist victory in 1981 have a long term impact for France? on: March 05, 2017, 07:23:25 pm
Mitterand abandoned Socialism in 1983 (a key symbolic moment in the history of Europe) and after that spent the next twelve years trying to Make France Great Again in a very French Aristo way. So unless you are a fan of grand pharanoic structures and Art gallerys, not really.
14  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Are you watching the 89th Academy Awards on: February 28, 2017, 12:58:44 pm
It looks like people here are not alone:

Oscar ratings down, hit 9-year low.

In my opinion it's because they keep nominating mediocre movies, but that's probably not the whole story.

The films they are nominating now are a lot better (but a lot less known and commercial) than, say, the 90s.

That's partially because the quality of commercial films has declined. When your audience is supposed to be global, there's less room for artistry. I thought Braveheart was better than La La Land or Moonlight.

Please stop commenting on films thnx bai
15  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Are you watching the 89th Academy Awards on: February 27, 2017, 08:24:19 pm
It looks like people here are not alone:

Oscar ratings down, hit 9-year low.

In my opinion it's because they keep nominating mediocre movies, but that's probably not the whole story.

The films they are nominating now are a lot better (but a lot less known and commercial) than, say, the 90s.
16  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Vienna railway cuts free WiFi to scare young (criminal) migrants away on: February 27, 2017, 12:36:36 pm
Tender Branson, please see a psychiatrist about your rampant sexual insecurity.

Stop playing Sigmund Freud.

I'll do that moment you create several threads attacking Austrians for sexual assault or accuse them of being leaches for one reason or another.
17  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: How many of the films nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars have you seen? on: February 27, 2017, 10:31:55 am
Oscar movies for best picture are usually never the best movie . Star Wars , terminator , the dark knight never won and now they are considered better movies then the ones who won it in those years.

No, all those movies are sh!t except the Original Terminator (which may indeed have better than Out of Africa). The Dark Knight in particular is one of the worst films ever made.

Anyway, this thread is sad! But I've seen three and plan to see Fences this week. I thought all three that I saw - La La Land, Moonlight, and Manchester By the Sea - while not flawless, were all very good.
18  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Vienna railway cuts free WiFi to scare young (criminal) migrants away on: February 27, 2017, 10:19:51 am
Tender Branson, please see a psychiatrist about your rampant sexual insecurity.
19  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Chancellor Kern: UK should pay 60 Bio. (Br)exit-fee on: February 27, 2017, 10:18:41 am
(And not that's even mentioning Singapore's land use policies and the fact that's a city state, completely incoherent goal for the UK to become).

Not if you don't think there's a UK outside of London. Which appears to have been economic policy for the past thirty years.

Of course, how silly of me, the UK ends at the end of the London Green Belt. At least that's how the Singapore-ists in the May government seem to imagine it.
20  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Chancellor Kern: UK should pay 60 Bio. (Br)exit-fee on: February 26, 2017, 11:13:08 am
Alternatively, how about the UK does what they want and you get nothing?

     This seems more likely than the wishful thinking displayed by the liberal internationalists in this thread, given the success Theresa May has had in placing Britain in a position of strength. By issuing the threat of making her nation a tax haven, the EU bureaucrats are desperate to meet her demands. It's quite brilliant, really.

I'm sorry, but this is totally delusional.

For a start for the UK to become a serious tax haven they would have cut spending massively. Will this happen? Highly unlikely. Secondly, the EU can easily restrict access to the UK market for banks and individuals post-Brexit, that is in part what the debate about 'passporting' is about (and the EU already has its own tax havens like Liechtenstein, which the UK could never match). The UK is in an extremely weak position and there's no reason to think that the EU will roll over unless you are a deluded Brexiteer.

     I saw plenty of concerned European leftists, but European leftists taking something seriously is probably evidence enough that it's delusional nonsense.

What the hell are you talking about?

There is no chance of the UK becoming a serious tax haven - it would have to compete with Liechtenstein for example. It's too big.

In many ways it already is. It is really shoddy in terms of transparency, has a low corporate tax rate, has the whole non-dom farce and the City of London is basically the heart of the international tax avoidance network.

Of course though, like you said, it has way to many spending commitments (you know welfare, universities, schools, the NHS and all that yucky stuff) to match Liechtenstein's tax rates.

I mean, UK public spending is about 43% of GDP. If it wanted to even match Switzerland (which is still not anywhere close to Liechtenstein levels), where public spending is more like 34% of GDP, it would basically have to cut spending by the equivalent of the whole NHS. Imagine how that goes down.


Oh yeah, that's the other thing. Wanting to be a 'European Singapore'

The rate of Corporate Tax in the UK is the exact same as Singapore, and only slightly larger than Ireland's, who will continue to have single market access after Brexit

(And not that's even mentioning Singapore's land use policies and the fact that's a city state, completely incoherent goal for the UK to become).
21  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Chancellor Kern: UK should pay 60 Bio. (Br)exit-fee on: February 26, 2017, 09:49:40 am
Alternatively, how about the UK does what they want and you get nothing?

     This seems more likely than the wishful thinking displayed by the liberal internationalists in this thread, given the success Theresa May has had in placing Britain in a position of strength. By issuing the threat of making her nation a tax haven, the EU bureaucrats are desperate to meet her demands. It's quite brilliant, really.

I'm sorry, but this is totally delusional.

For a start for the UK to become a serious tax haven they would have cut spending massively. Will this happen? Highly unlikely. Secondly, the EU can easily restrict access to the UK market for banks and individuals post-Brexit, that is in part what the debate about 'passporting' is about (and the EU already has its own tax havens like Liechtenstein, which the UK could never match). The UK is in an extremely weak position and there's no reason to think that the EU will roll over unless you are a deluded Brexiteer.

     I saw plenty of concerned European leftists, but European leftists taking something seriously is probably evidence enough that it's delusional nonsense.

What the hell are you talking about?

There is no chance of the UK becoming a serious tax haven - it would have to compete with Liechtenstein for example. It's too big.
22  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: How would you reform the Presidency? on: February 26, 2017, 09:47:59 am
As I've said elsewhere

Strip the President to appoint ambassadors and all government functionaries except those of the Cabinet, whose membership would be restricted by law to heads of relevant government departments. Ambassadorships and certain positions like the head of the FBI or CBI should be in-house with each relevant body providing a short list of five, of whom the President and Congress jointly decide. All other appointments should be made by a public appointments board completely independent of the Government. This will require a new Civil Service Act which would give much greater independence to the administration of state than is the case at present.

That's just to start with, but it's important.

Trump's antics are a bad example, but sometimes it is good to have an outsider come in with a fresh perspective.

Can you please give one example of this happening?

As it is all those positions are given to donors and flunkies and help discredit the United States government, as well as making it possible for the President to operate his shadow government almost completely independently of Congress. Court favourites like Steve Bannon should be impossible in a genuinely democratic system.
What are some appointees that you liked under Obama, Bush, Clinton, other Bush, etc.?

Kerry and Clinton were Senators, not from the State Department. Moniz and Chu were scientists, not from the Energy department.

Not every position is given to a donor/flunkie.


You are talking about the main cabinet posts. I am talking about the head of the National Park Service  or the Secretary of the Air Force. In pretty much any other country, these positions would be for career Civil Servants. In the United States you can be picked for such a position with zero experience or knowledge for such a post, and with almost no oversight once selected. This has a toxic effect on American governance. And this isn't even mentioning the diplomatic posts, a real zone for bottom feeders and life long party donor hacks. No wonder American diplomacy and knowledge of foreign affairs is so poor.

And if you are doubting this, two words: James Comey.
23  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: How would you reform the Presidency? on: February 25, 2017, 11:23:44 pm
As I've said elsewhere

Strip the President to appoint ambassadors and all government functionaries except those of the Cabinet, whose membership would be restricted by law to heads of relevant government departments. Ambassadorships and certain positions like the head of the FBI or CBI should be in-house with each relevant body providing a short list of five, of whom the President and Congress jointly decide. All other appointments should be made by a public appointments board completely independent of the Government. This will require a new Civil Service Act which would give much greater independence to the administration of state than is the case at present.

That's just to start with, but it's important.

Trump's antics are a bad example, but sometimes it is good to have an outsider come in with a fresh perspective.

Can you please give one example of this happening?

As it is all those positions are given to donors and flunkies and help discredit the United States government, as well as making it possible for the President to operate his shadow government almost completely independently of Congress. Court favourites like Steve Bannon should be impossible in a genuinely democratic system.
24  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: How would you reform the Presidency? on: February 25, 2017, 05:46:25 pm
As I've said elsewhere

Strip the President to appoint ambassadors and all government functionaries except those of the Cabinet, whose membership would be restricted by law to heads of relevant government departments. Ambassadorships and certain positions like the head of the FBI or CBI should be in-house with each relevant body providing a short list of five, of whom the President and Congress jointly decide. All other appointments should be made by a public appointments board completely independent of the Government. This will require a new Civil Service Act which would give much greater independence to the administration of state than is the case at present.

That's just to start with, but it's important.
25  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Over 70% of young people view NAFTA as good for the U.S. on: February 25, 2017, 05:35:59 pm
The same reason support for the Wall has actually fallen since 2015.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 467


Login with username, password and session length

Logout

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines