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8926  Election Archive / 2008 Elections / Re: Democrats: Is there ANY scenario in which you would possibly vote for Nader? on: September 13, 2007, 11:14:39 am
Was big business pissed off about Bush stealing it in 2000 because that meant "their guy" did get in? Or were they overjoyed?

While there is no doubt that Business preferred Bush to Gore that isn't to say they saw Gore as an evil; more like to them that Gore was the "lesser of two goods" so to speak.

Don't Believe Me? Look at these, and these show Gore's role in Occidental too. (Never his glorious hypocrisy as a 'green' campaigner.)

http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=468

Or

http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=465

Quote
Gore recommended that the Elk Hills be sold as part of his 1995 "Reinventing Government" National Performance Review program. Gore-confidant (and former campaign manager) Tony Cohelo served on the board of directors of the private company hired to assess the sale's environmental consequences. The sale was a windfall for Oxy. Within weeks of the announced purchase Occidental stock rose ten percent.

That was good news for Gore. Despite controversy over Dick Cheney's plans to keep stock options if elected, most Americans don't know that we already have a vice president with oil company stocks. Before the Elk Hills sale, Al Gore controlled between $250,000-$500,000 of Occidental stock (he is executor of a trust that he says goes only to his mother, but will revert to him upon her death). After the sale, Gore began disclosing between $500,000 and $1 million of his significantly more valuable stock.

Nowhere is Al Gore's environmental hypocrisy more glaring than when it comes to his relationship with Occidental. While on the one hand talking tough about his "big oil" opponents and waxing poetic about indigenous peoples in his 1992 book "Earth in the Balance," the Elk Hills sale and other deals show that money has always been more important to Al Gore than ideals.

Quote
The [Telecom] industry gave $10 million to Gore and the Democrats (ten percent of the total to date) have raised some eyebrows as to what exactly it is buying. So has the $98 million the industry spent on lobbying last year. Some of it is a reward for services rendered: telephone companies have had relatively free reign to merge and have seen little regulation. "The industry got what it wanted [under Clinton Gore]," David Beckwith, spokesman for the National Cable Television Association, recently told the Associated Press.

Take Gore's ugly treatment of 235 phone workers fired by Sprint for attempting to unionize in 1998. The AFL-CIO called the case one of the decade's most blatant violations of workers' right to unionize. At a meeting with the mostly Latina workers in Los Angeles, Gore promised to take on Sprint. But Sprint, led by arch-conservative Bill Esrey, had been a big supporter of Clinton/Gore in 1996 and was gearing up to support Gore in 2000. Esrey had even told a group of business leaders during the 1996 campaign that "There is a growing realization that Democrat Bill Clinton has been good for America."

Gore never lifted a finger against the company. And Sprint continues to provide the White House with much of its long-distance service. Gore even used his influence to soften a Labor Department report on the Sprint dispute, according to one of the report's authors. The National Labor Relations Board eventually ruled in favor of the workers, but the company has bogged the decision down in appeals.

This shows some of his Media Hackery too.

Quote
During the Clinton administration, the company received $27 million in research grants from the Department of Energy--more than all 17 other companies that applied for the same grants received combined. Despite a 1995 DOE report that reprocessing would not work, the contracts continued all the way up until the company went finally went bust in 1997.

It might not have made sense from a scientific or business standpoint. But it made a lot of sense to the money-men that run the Democratic party. The company was one of the first donors to the Clinton/Gore campaign in 1996, for which they received a thank you note from the presidential ticket's campaign manager Peter Knight. The note underscored that the company had earned "a special place of significance with the Vice President." The Molten Metal was also paying Knight an $84,000-a-year retainer at the time.

Less than two weeks before the donation, Gore had visited a Molten Metal factory in Falls River, Massachusetts, where he told reporters: "Molten Metal is a success story, a shining example of American ingenuity, hard work and business know-how."

Or to show more of his Media Hackery:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/US_election_race/Story/0,,387690,00.html

Quote
Al Gore, by contrast, is not only a smart-alec whose head bulges with hard-disk capacity but also a liar. Last month he told the Teamsters union that when he was a baby his mum lulled him to sleep by singing Look for the Union Label - a song which was written when Gore was 27 years old and had presumably outgrown his cradle. The story is about as plausible as Tony Blair's recollection of watching Jackie Milburn play football for Newcastle.

As with Blair, however, Gore's inventiveness isn't limited to harmless and endearing childhood anecdotes. Blair has repeatedly claimed, falsely, that he voted for Mike Foster's anti-hunting bill; Gore says that he was "the author" of the earned income tax credit, even though it was passed by Congress in 1975, two years before he entered the house. According to Andrew Rawnsley's book, Tony Blair lied about Bernie Ecclestone's £1m gift to the Labour party; Al Gore's mendacity about his own fund-raising activities is eerily similar.

Three years ago, Gore flatly denied that he had ever attended meetings at the White House to discuss illegal "hard-money" donations. When documents later surfaced showing that the vice-president had indeed been present, he told the FBI that he "drank a lot of iced tea during meetings, which could have necessitated a rest-room break". (This ingenious alibi was promptly exploded by Harold Ickes, the former deputy chief of staff, who testified that he had always stopped the meetings when the vice-president left the room.) Under interrogation by the justice department in April this year, Gore was asked about more than 30 fund-raising "coffee mornings" which he had hosted at the White House before the last presidential campaign. He said he had "no concrete recollection" of any such events. Perhaps all those cups of coffee had kept him almost permanently in the lavatory.

8927  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of the preceding song lyrics on: September 13, 2007, 10:21:11 am
Cool, though fairly typical "rebellious" song


Typical? It's classic. It's Robert Zimmerman.

LOL, Well that tells you how much I pay attention to the music buffs\the Mainstream (I had to look up Robert Zimmerman too, not ashamed too admit that) and despite that I still maintain what I said about the lyrics. Dylan's never really my type of thing anyway...
8928  General Discussion / History / Re: US Presidents, Day 9: WH Harrison on: September 13, 2007, 08:58:57 am
I think it's a little sad that the speech he gave wasn't even a memorable one.

Kind of reminds me of all the newspapers of the time praising Edward Everett's long-winded speech at the dedication of the Gettysburg cemetery and either glossing over or deploring Lincoln's. Does anyone have any idea what Edward Everett said that day?

It's right below - if you have the time and the ability to figure out those allusions, I can't imagine anyone could speak for that long (though apparently the Lincoln-Douglas debates took over 6 hours - IIRC First Speaker: 2 hours, Second Speaker: 3 hours and then another hour for the First Speakers rebuttal.)

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Gettysburg_Oration
8929  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of the preceding signuture part 2? on: September 13, 2007, 08:53:47 am
Shows his ability to support some fairly different candidates..
8930  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of the preceding song lyrics on: September 13, 2007, 04:47:51 am
Cool, though fairly typical "rebellious" song.

I just took a ride
in a silver machine
and I'm still feeling mean
I got a silver machine
Do you want to ride
see yourself going by
other side of the sky
Well I got a silver machine
It flies sideways through time
It's an electric line
To your Zodiac sign
It flies out of a dream
It's anti-septically clean
You're gonna know where I've been
In my silver machine
8931  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Australia 2007 on: September 13, 2007, 04:40:55 am
The Liberal Party is only called that as a tribute to Alfred Deakin; the name has nothing to do with ideology.

Yes and no. The Liberal party was definitely based on a foundation of economic liberalism - free enterprise etc etc. Mind you it was under Menzies in the 50s' that the Australian welfare state really was established.

The Liberal party was from it's very start under Menzies a rather Protectionist party.. there has really been nothing Liberal about it.

Oh, and I'm rooting for the Mega-ALP landslide obviously. Though I hope the Democrats and Greens can hang on. Smiley
8932  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Comedy Goldmine 3: The Mineshaft--SHAFT! on: September 13, 2007, 04:28:27 am
I wouldn't expect anything else from someone who posts on Stormfront...

Holy shit

Not really a big surprise if you read his posts.. (Amnesty, The Rockefellers, Bohemian Grove and The CFR seem to be curious obsessions with him. And of course Paul\Russo.)

Well I would like to second what Ebowed and Wixted said though I don't think he has done anything worthy of banning and we should encourage his right to spread and discuss his opinions. (Though if he posts at Stormfront then he knows how much he would be owned if he actually expressed his full views here..)
8933  Forum Community / Forum Community Election Match-ups / Re: opebo vs. LouDobbs08 on: September 13, 2007, 04:23:33 am
Uggh...

LouDobbs08/LouDobbs08

Have you looked in the Comedy goldmine recently...?

Opebo wins and sweeps every state except Idaho and Utah.
8934  Election Archive / 2008 Elections / Re: Democrats: Is there ANY scenario in which you would possibly vote for Nader? on: September 13, 2007, 04:19:31 am
*Sigh*. I support his right to run in an election for president of the United States as his is constitutional right under the US constitution.

So why not make as much of a fuss for the Constitution Party?


- I support his right not to be a media\corporate hack like Al Gore was\is\always has been in putting himself forward for the presidency.

That's why Gore was the candidate all the corporations wanted in 2000, right?

- I support his right to call for material to be banned or him to be concerned about pornography\video games\violent movies\whatever - That does not mean I want them banned; only that I believe that Nader has right to say that he wished things to be banned.

Sure he has the right to call for that. The question is whether you want someone calling for that to be President.

The Constitution Party and Libertarians have a right to call for the loony things they do too...

Plus I'm concerned about plently of those things too; even though I dabble in them.

What the hell is there to be concerned about?

Maybe because you haven't the spam forum going on about how 'fascist' and 'disgusting' either the Libertarian or Constitution parties are?

As for all the Corporations not wanting Gore, all I can say is LOL. And here I won't talk about his media slutishness.
8935  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Comedy Goldmine 3: The Mineshaft--SHAFT! on: September 12, 2007, 06:28:29 pm
I doubt we'll ever have an openly gay president.

100 years ago, nobody would have thought we'd be this close to having an openly black or an openly female president.

Given the one drop of blood rule and all that, openly black I can understand, but openly female?

Perhaps America will soon get a new Queen Hatshepsut...?

Btw, Lol@Gabu... for that monkey image, it literally made me laugh out loud.
8936  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: European Football Thread on: September 12, 2007, 06:25:50 pm
No I don't think Kilbane is that bad; I just find it amusing that's almost never, ever dropped for such an average player.

Generally I actually agree with what you say; but unless we have a replacement for Staunton what can we do? (And again who would want the Job?)
8937  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: What is your actual first name? on: September 12, 2007, 06:09:11 pm
Daniel

Smiley
8938  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: European Football Thread on: September 12, 2007, 05:59:17 pm
I don't really see how it's more appealing now.. How many of our players by 2009 really have a good record in big pressure games - by then how many will be WC2002 leftovers? Not many - will Damien Duff ever play well for Ireland again? Unlikely. Will we have a new strategy then will somehow create a forcefield around our goal during the 90th minute - because I think that's our best chance for WC2010?

So I can put you down as an undecided then to be my assistant when I submit my application then? Grin

Taking a look at the squad re:2009...
Given should still be there. At the back Finnan is now 31, so he'd be fit (and make the team) at least until 2010 - it's just a matter of making sure he doesn't retire from internationals. Kilbane at 30 is a similar concern but I suspect he'll keep playing as long as he can. Apart from that Dunne; McShane; O'Shea will be available for years. A back four of Finnan; Dunne; McShane and Kilbane should be competent.

In the middle the only realistic chance of a retirement is Carsley. The rest are all fairly young. In fact, their problem is largely lack of experience. Reid, Hunt and Duff are likely to be a part of things. Beyond that, we'll have to see how Ireland; McGeady; Douglas; Potter and Gibson develop. 4 good midfielders shouldn't be an unreasonable expectation.

Keane and Doyle will also be around for a while yet. I also have big hopes for Shane Long - i think he's potentially better than either of them.

This list contains some solid attacking players who can produce the necessary moments of flair to break a game open. I just don't think Steve Staunton is fit to lead them.


Ack... I'm sorry but we're in trouble if one of our most experienced players is Kevin Kilbane. (No doubt whoever is Irish Manager come late 2008 will continue to play him; due to the 2nd Commandment of Irish Football: "Thou Shall always Play Kevin "Zinedine" Kilbane".) Duff and Keane.. well.. their Ireland form has been patchy at best since McCarthy left and IIRC since then the best team we have beaten in a competitive game are Slovakia; then Georgia.. hardly an impressive list.

IYRC when Mick McCarthy took over after Jack Charlton we were utterly gash for the entire of France 98' Qualfying... Playing that Man U traitor as sweeper, drawing with Iceland, losing in Macedonia.. and we only managed to make the play-offs because our major rival for them in our group was Lithuania, and then we got fairly owned by Belgium. But over time McCarthy managed to dramatically improve the Irish squad, admittely he did have some of the old 94' base and that Man U playing guy in the centre of Midfield (He was quite good... I think.) but the only way we can have any success as if we stop pretending we are a big football nation and just accept that we're not likely to qualify much and that we appoint managers to last at least four years so that they and only they can build the team - The nature of International football is such that team soliditary is a huge part of success; much more than at Club level and you can't have that if you sack your manager after every game. Though perhaps I would have thought differently I hadn't been in Sligo the day we lost 5-2 to Cyprus.

But hey Given the nature of the FAI and the desirability of the Ireland Job right now, I'd say you have a good shot. Wink
8939  General Discussion / History / Re: US Presidents, Day 40: Reagan on: September 12, 2007, 05:23:01 pm
The interesting thing about all this, of course, is that virtually none of it is true. But he was such a Great Communicator that he convinced people, almost hypnotized them, into believing he was doing things that he wasn't, simply by saying that he was over and over. There weren't any big cuts in domestic spending during his administration; in fact, that was one of the problems, since he was cutting taxes without cutting spending, leading to an enormous increase in the federal budget deficit and the national debt. He increased defense spending, but much of the increase went into ill-conceived programs that never panned out, and there isn't any evidence that all that money improved the power or efficiency of the military.

But those myths pale to the ones that have been constructed about his foreign policy. There may be some truth to the claim that under Reagan we spent the USSR into the ground militarily; if so, however, it was our folly, because we wasted billions building weapons to defend ourselves against an enemy that was no longer much, if any, of a threat. And the claims that he "won" the Cold War are nonsensical. Yes, he talked a lot about how bad the Soviets were, and how they should tear down that wall, but that's like saying if I go outside right now and shout at the sun to go down, I'm responsible when it does. It's a great insult to the people of Eastern Europe who fought, suffered, and even died to liberate themselves and their countries to ignore their heroism and instead ascribe all their triumphs to Ronald Reagan. It's like giving the cheerleading crew credit for winning the game.

FF.
8940  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: would you support a regime change in syria? on: September 12, 2007, 05:08:07 pm
Wow. That would clearly be as successful as regime change in Iraq.

Admittely I am something of a Kurdophile; but this is ridiculous.

a regime change doesnt necessarily mean a military action.

syria should be put on notice.  they should immediately stop supporting hamas and hezbollah.  they should immediately stop interfering in lebanon.

i dont understand how we can have a 'war on terrorism' and give syria a free pass.

So without Military action how do you propose to change the Syrian regime? And how do you propose to replace with one who is better (ie. More Pro-American; hardly a sentiment which is very popular in the ME right now. While Assad is clearly a despot and a tyrant - though not of the Saddam Class, not quite - I imagine you wouldn't feel quite at home with alot of his Opposition.)

I actually agree with you that Syria should stop funding Hezbollah and Hamas; but the question is how do 'we' do this, without recourse to arms or severly alienating even more of the Middle East? Is that even possible?
8941  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: European Football Thread on: September 12, 2007, 05:03:33 pm
Sad

Not that it was unexpected but still...

Sad

Time for the FAI to evict Mr. Delaney and his "world class management team".

And replace them with Clueless Hack #1248 and John Aldridge.. as that is what would happen, sadly.

You never know. The job isn't as unappealing as it was when Staunton took over. Reasonable group of young players coming through, and it looks fairly certain that we'll be 3rd seeds in the next World Cup qualification draw. Qualification and success should be easier.

But, if they're really stuck, I'd do it. Smiley

I still think we should never have sacked Kerr.. (or rather; we should have shot all the Keano-loving media which hounded Mick McCarthy out of the job in the first place.)

Kerr's sacking may have been premature. I thought at the time it was a bit of a 50-50 call, myself. That though was predicated on the belief that a reasonably good manager would be brought in...

And as to Irish Civil War II, from your comments, I suspect we would have been on different sides, so I'll leave that one alone. Wink

I don't really see how it's more appealing now.. How many of our players by 2009 really have a good record in big pressure games - by then how many will be WC2002 leftovers? Not many - will Damien Duff ever play well for Ireland again? Unlikely. Will we have a new strategy then will somehow create a forcefield around our goal during the 90th minute - because I think that's our best chance for WC2010?

And who the bloody hell in the whole of Ireland is actually competent enough to run the FAI?

As I don't correspond much with traitors; I'll leave the rest of our commentary alone. Wink
8942  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: would you support a regime change in syria? on: September 12, 2007, 04:50:52 pm
Wow. That would clearly be as successful as regime change in Iraq.

Admittely I am something of a Kurdophile; but this is ridiculous.
8943  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: European Football Thread on: September 12, 2007, 04:44:21 pm
Sad

Not that it was unexpected but still...

Sad

Time for the FAI to evict Mr. Delaney and his "world class management team".

And replace them with Clueless Hack #1248 and John Aldridge.. as that is what would happen, sadly.

I still think we should never have sacked Kerr.. (or rather; we should have shot all the Keano-loving media which hounded Mick McCarthy out of the job in the first place.)

I can't believe it.. but it's six years since Jason McAteer scored against the Dutch. Sad
8944  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: European Football Thread on: September 12, 2007, 04:02:03 pm
Sad

Not that it was unexpected but still...

Sad
8945  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Death penalty supporters: Do you oppose use of the guillotine? on: September 12, 2007, 02:39:52 pm
Yes, I oppose it - b/c test have been done where the head can respond up to 15 seconds after - but not becuase it looks greusome.



Let's see how that compares to other methods of execution (here are some of the worst examples - full list here: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.php?scid=8&did=478:

Quote
April 22, 1983. Alabama. John Evans. Electrocution. After the first jolt of electricity, sparks and flames erupted from the electrode attached to Evans's leg. The electrode burst from the strap holding it in place and caught on fire. Smoke and sparks also came out from under the hood in the vicinity of Evans's left temple. Two physicians entered the chamber and found a heartbeat. The electrode was reattached to his leg, and another jolt of electricity was applied. This resulted in more smoke and burning flesh. Again the doctors found a heartbeat. Ignoring the pleas of Evans's lawyer, a third jolt of electricity was applied. The execution took 14 minutes and left Evans's body charred and smoldering

Quote
December 13, 1988. Texas. Raymond Landry. Lethal Injection. Pronounced dead 40 minutes after being strapped to the execution gurney and 24 minutes after the drugs first started flowing into his arms. Two minutes after the drugs were administered, the syringe came out of Landry's vein, spraying the deadly chemicals across the room toward witnesses. The curtain separating the witnesses from the inmate was then pulled, and not reopened for fourteen minutes while the execution team reinserted the catheter into the vein. Witnesses reported "at least one groan." A spokesman for the Texas Department of Correction, Charles Brown (sic), said, "There was something of a delay in the execution because of what officials called a 'blowout.' The syringe came out of the vein, and the warden ordered the (execution) team to reinsert the catheter into the vein."

Quote
September 12, 1990. Illinois. Charles Walker. Lethal Injection. Because of equipment failure and human error, Walker suffered excruciating pain during his execution. According to Gary Sutterfield, an engineer from the Missouri State Prison who was retained by the State of Illinois to assist with Walker's execution, a kink in the plastic tubing going into Walker's arm stopped the deadly chemicals from reaching Walker. In addition, the intravenous needle was inserted pointing at Walker's fingers instead of his heart, prolonging the execution.

Quote
April 6, 1992. Arizona. Donald Eugene Harding. Asphyxiation. Death was not pronounced until 10 1/2 minutes after the cyanide tablets were dropped. During the execution, Harding thrashed and struggled violently against the restraining straps. A television journalist who witnessed the execution, Cameron Harper, said that Harding's spasms and jerks lasted 6 minutes and 37 seconds. "Obviously, this man was suffering. This was a violent death .. . an ugly event. We put animals to death more humanely." Another witness, newspaper reporter Carla McClain, said, "Harding's death was extremely violent. He was in great pain. I heard him gasp and moan. I saw his body turn from red to purple." One reporter who witnessed the execution suffered from insomnia and assorted illnesses for several weeks; two others were "walking vegetables" for several days.

Quote
March 25, 1997. Florida. Pedro Medina. Electrocution. A crown of foot-high flames shot from the headpiece during the execution, filling the execution chamber with a stench of thick smoke and gagging the two dozen official witnesses. An official then threw a switch to manually cut off the power and prematurely end the two-minute cycle of 2,000 volts. Medina's chest continued to heave until the flames stopped and death came. After the execution, prison officials blamed the fire on a corroded copper screen in the headpiece of the electric chair, but two experts hired by the governor later concluded that the fire was caused by the improper application of a sponge (designed to conduct electricity) to Medina's head.

Quote
July 8, 1999. Florida. Allen Lee Davis. Electrocution. "Before he was pronounced dead ... the blood from his mouth had poured onto the collar of his white shirt, and the blood on his chest had spread to about the size of a dinner plate, even oozing through the buckle holes on the leather chest strap holding him to the chair. His execution was the first in Florida's new electric chair, built especially so it could accommodate a man Davis's size (approximately 350 pounds). Later, when another Florida death row inmate challenged the constitutionality of the electric chair, Florida Supreme Court Justice Leander Shaw commented that "the color photos of Davis depict a man who -- for all appearances -- was brutally tortured to death by the citizens of Florida."Justice Shaw also described the botched executions of Jesse Tafero and Pedro Medina (q.v.), calling the three executions "barbaric spectacles" and "acts more befitting a violent murderer than a civilized state."Justice Shaw included pictures of Davis's dead body in his opinion. The execution was witnessed by a Florida State Senator, Ginny Brown-Waite, who at first was "shocked" to see the blood, until she realized that the blood was forming the shape of a cross and that it was a message from God saying he supported the execution.


Quote
December 13, 2006. Florida. Angel Diaz. Lethal Injection. After the first injection was administered, Mr. Diaz continued to move, and was squinting and grimacing as he tried to mouth words. A second dose was then administered, and 34 minutes passed before Mr. Diaz was declared dead. At first a spokesperson for the Florida Department of Corrections claimed that this was because Mr. Diaz had some sort of liver disease. After performing an autopsy, the Medical Examiner, Dr. William Hamilton, stated that Mr. Diaz’s liver was undamaged, but that the needle had gone through Mr. Diaz’s vein and out the other side, so the deadly chemicals were injected into soft tissue, rather than the vein. Two days after the execution, Governor Jeb Bush suspended all executions in the state and appointed a commission “to consider the humanity and constitutionality of lethal injections.”

Admittely I used some extreme examples; but they all sound like Cruel and unusual punishment to me. Let's face it, the Death Penalty is entirely a knee-jerk reaction of crusty reactionaries who spout a very unusual and undemocratic form of justice. One which seems more focused on being punitive than either being humane or even finding out the guilt or innocence of the accused (Of course as this is America I should also add that there is a racial aspect to all this...) and is totally against the idea of civilisation (which I suppose is about making the so-called savages into whatever we consider normal..)
8946  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of the preceding song lyrics on: September 12, 2007, 12:29:11 pm
You're so literalist BRTD. Anyway your song sounds like millions of others; it's fairly pathetic and emo in it's own special way.

Given that's clear that you like some of the Music I've selected so far, I'll pick one from a band I've already used once - slightly different style though.

Sunlight bright upon my pillow
Lighter than an eiderdown
Will she let the weeping willow
Wind his branches round
Julia dream, dreamboat queen, queen of all my dreams
Every night I turn the light out

Waiting for the velvet bride
Will the scaly armadillo
Find me where I'm hiding
Julia dream, dreamboat queen, queen of all my dreams
Will the misty master break me
Will the key unlock my mind
Will the following footsteps catch me
Am I really dying
Julia dream, dreamboat queen, queen of all my dreams
 
8947  Election Archive / 2008 Elections / Re: Democrats: Is there ANY scenario in which you would possibly vote for Nader? on: September 12, 2007, 12:18:47 pm
I'd love to try and defend Nader but really there is no point given the level of hackinessness in your posts about him and your love-in type polls. So all I'll say is this:

Why would you want to defend such a pro-censorship authoritarian James Dobson lover in the first place?

*Sigh*. I support his right to run in an election for president of the United States as his is constitutional right under the US constitution.
 - I support his right not to be a media\corporate hack like Al Gore was\is\always has been in putting himself forward for the presidency.
 - I support his right to call for material to be banned or him to be concerned about pornography\video games\violent movies\whatever - That does not mean I want them banned; only that I believe that Nader has right to say that he wished things to be banned. Plus I'm concerned about plently of those things too; even though I dabble in them.

Understand?
8948  Election Archive / 2008 Elections / Re: Democrats: Is there ANY scenario in which you would possibly vote for Nader? on: September 12, 2007, 11:46:27 am
I'd love to try and defend Nader but really there is no point given the level of hackinessness in your posts about him and your love-in type polls. So all I'll say is this:



8949  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of the preceding song lyrics on: September 12, 2007, 11:44:13 am
I think you missed the point BRTD. Though I guess Zappa is the type of guy you can't judge on lyrics alone. As for your piece, it sounds too wordy to be genuinely musical - as if the artist wants to scream "OMG I'M IMPORTANT!!11" in regards to seems to be an obvious point.

In case of Sonic Attack on your district, follow these rules:

If you are making love it is imperative to bring all bodies to orgasm simultaneously.
Do not waste time blocking your ears.
Do not waste time seeking a "sound proofed" shelter.
Try to get as far away from the sonic source as possible
Do not panic
Do not panic

Use your wheels. It is what they are for.
Small babies may be placed inside the special cocoons
and should be left, if possible, in shelters.
Do not attempt to use your own limbs.
If no wheels are available - metal - not organic -
limbs should be employed whenever practical.

Remember:
In the case of sonic attack survival means
"Every man for himself"
Statistically more people survive if they think
only of themselves
Do not attempt to rescue friends, relatives, loved ones
You have only a few seconds to escape
Use those seconds sensibly or you will inevitably die
Think only of yourself
Think only of yourself
Do not panic
Think only of yourself
Think only of yourself

These are the first signs of sonic attack:
You will notice small objects - such as ornaments - oscillating
You will notice vibrations in your diaphragm
You will hear a distand hissing in your ears
You will feel the need to vomit
You will feel dizzy
You will have difficulty focussing
You will need to breathe more rapidly
There will be bleeding from orifices
There will be an ache in the pelvic region
You may be subject to fits of hysterical shouting or even laughter

These are all sign of imminent sonic destruction
Your only protection is flight
If you are less than ten years old
Remain in your shelter and use your cocoon
Remember - you can help no one else
You can help no one else
You can help no one else
Do not panic
Think only of yourself
Think only of yourself
Think only of yourself

Think only of yourself

Think only of yourself


Think only of yourself
8950  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: What's the last movie you've seen? on: September 12, 2007, 11:39:01 am
The Big Sleep

Finally got around to seeing this; there was a rerun in the major art cinema in the city. Well, the plot was truly a labyrinth but then again these things are never about plot, they're about style (and a whole PhD thesis could be written about it and similiar Film Noir's confused moral code\hypocrisy.) and Humphrey Bogart has that in spades; the dialogue of course, is typically fantastic and witty and made you wish that you could think of that. Obviously it's extremely dated, no art form dates faster than the cinema, and in the end the whole thing just becomes too confusing to be genuinely entertaining. Sadly not my favourite Film Noir.
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