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12201  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: London 'under water by 2100' as Antarctica crumbles into the sea on: March 26, 2006, 03:36:34 am
Key word in the article is COULD. Honestly, anything could happen. Tomorrow, Iraq COULD become a shining beacon of peace and democracy in the Mideast. It's just not all that likely.

The point is that there is reason to believe this will happen.

I love junk science! Smiley

And?
12202  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Report: Russia Had Sources in U.S. Command on: March 26, 2006, 03:17:07 am
So people don't have more to say about this? Hmmm, interesting..

I would have thought giving intelligence to an enemy actively at war with America was pretty much the equivalent of being an enemy combatant yourself, and the fact is that this was done not by some amorphous terrorist organization but a major world government. The fact that the foreign government has penetrated to the very top echelons of our military services is one thing; that they used it to give information to the enemy during a war that would put our own troops in harms way is another. I would have thought something like this would be a major scandal.

But I guess others are simply more jaded and realistic about things: top-level spying, giving aid to an enemy during war, should be considered routine for foreign governments, and not worth more than a day's news cycle?
12203  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Where in the world am I? on: March 26, 2006, 03:02:19 am
LOCATION THREE

Clue 2

This hot city's taipans were fought off by the Powderpuff Girls.

You mean the Powerpuff Girls? I've never even seen a single episode and I knew that was wrong... Tongue
12204  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Democrats on: March 25, 2006, 05:32:28 pm
I voted not a Dem for this poll.

Probably not.

The Democrats need to become more pro-business IMHO.

We already have one pro-business party -we don't need another. 

Pro-business and pro-labor are not mutually exclusive.

Perhaps, though I wonder whether phkn has a different interpretation on what 'pro-business' really means than you do.  It is after all a vague term that could encompass anything, and mean anything in the eye of the beholder.  Tongue

Perhaps, but there's more to it than that. Businesses have to sell their products to consumers who are also workers, and if those workers don't make enough money to buy the product, business gets hurt. Similarly, workers need businesses to be profitable to earn more. A president of GM once remarked "what was good for the country was good for General Motors and vice versa." In the 1950s and 1960s the government, the labor unions, and businesses set aside ideological combat and reached mutually beneficial agreements that allowed for free trade, rising profits, and benefits for American workers at the same time. This is the middle ground between socialism and libertarian capitalism and American liberalism will forever occupy this ground.
12205  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Democrats on: March 25, 2006, 05:08:34 pm
I voted not a Dem for this poll.

Probably not.

The Democrats need to become more pro-business IMHO.

We already have one pro-business party -we don't need another. 

Pro-business and pro-labor are not mutually exclusive.
12206  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / U.S. Presidential Election Results / Re: 1976-1980 on: March 25, 2006, 02:07:08 am
It could be relevant that Ford defeated Reagan (abeit narrowly) in both the Kentucky and Tennessee primaries in 1976. The defeats were attributed I think to comments Reagan made shortly before the primaries about privatizing the Tennessee Valley Authority.
12207  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Post.com blogger resigns on: March 25, 2006, 01:28:12 am
By Howard Kurtz
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, March 25, 2006; Page C01

A 24-year-old conservative blogger hired by The Washington Post Co.'s Web site resigned yesterday, three days after his debut, amid a flurry of allegations of plagiarism.

Ben Domenech, an editor with Regnery Publishing, relinquished the part-time position hours after a liberal Web site posted evidence that he had plagiarized part of a movie review he wrote for National Review Online. Previous allegations of plagiarism in Domenech's writing for the College of William & Mary student newspaper surfaced Wednesday, but the 2001 review was the first instance found since he attended the college.

While liberal bloggers objected to the fact of Domenech's hiring and his inflammatory language, such as calling Coretta Scott King a "communist," it was not until they gathered evidence showing he had repeatedly used material without attribution that some conservative bloggers joined in calls for his firing.

Jim Brady, executive editor of Washingtonpost.com, which operates independently from the newspaper, said he would have dismissed Domenech if the former Bush administration aide and Republican Senate staffer had not offered to quit first. He said there was "enough smoke" in the allegations of plagiarism "that we needed to sever the relationship."

Brady said his staff did "a fair amount of checking" into Domenech's background before the hiring but that "we could have and should have done a better job."

On liberal blogs and Web sites -- Salon's lead story yesterday was "A Portrait of the Blogger as a Young Plagiarist" -- many commentators said there was no equivalence between a Republican activist who co-founded the site RedState.com and Post.com journalists who are viewed as leaning to the left. Brady said that was a "fair criticism" and one he will keep in mind in looking for another conservative blogger. "We're certainly likely to look for someone with a more traditional journalism background," he said.

Domenech said yesterday he resigned because "if the firestorm gets past a certain level, there's nothing you can ever say that will be taken seriously. . . . It's reached the point where there's nothing I can really do to defend myself."

Despite the pattern of plagiarized articles, Domenech still maintains that he did not knowingly use other people's writing without attribution. He said most of the allegations, from his time at the William & Mary student paper, were from his freshman year, and that while he believes the unattributed material was inserted by his editor, he cannot prove it. "When I was 17, I was certainly sloppy," said Domenech, who did not graduate from college. "If I had paid more attention, none of these problems would have happened."

The liberal blogger Atrios (Duncan Black) found that one Domenech article at the student paper, the Flat Hat, lifted large portions of a 1999 Washington Post story on the federal investigation of the Waco siege.

Daily Kos, a Web site edited by liberal activist Markos Moulitsas, posted a comparison of Domenech's National Review piece on the film "Final Fantasy" and a review by Steve Murray of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Murray had written:

"Translucent and glowing, they ooze up from the ground and float through solid walls, wriggling countless tentacles and snapping their jaws. They're known as the Phantoms, alien thingies that, for three decades, have been sucking the life out of the earthlings of 'Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within.' "

Domenech wrote:

"Translucent and glowing, they ooze up from the ground and float through solid walls, splaying their tentacles and snapping their jaws, dripping a discomfiting acidic ooze. They're known as the Phantoms, otherworldly beings who, for three decades, have been literally sucking the life out of the earthlings of the human."

Domenech said he thought his piece appeared first, but a database review found that Murray's review was published three days earlier.

Michelle Malkin, a prominent conservative blogger, wrote before the resignation that Domenech had edited one of her books and she had been cheering for him. "But now the determined moonbat hordes have exposed multiple instances of what clearly appear to me to be blatant lifting of entire, unique passages by Ben from other writers." That, Malkin said, is "unacceptable. . . . And, painfully, Domenech's detractors are right. He should own up to it and step down. Then, the Left should cease its sick gloating and leave him and his family alone."

Rick Moran, who runs the site Right Wing Nuthouse, wrote on the American Thinker blog: "The plagiarism of Mr. Domenech cannot be chalked up to youthful indiscretion nor to some kind of unconscious parroting of something he read before putting words to paper. . . . Ben Domenech is not the kind of writer we want representing the conservative viewpoint at The Washington Post or anywhere else."
12208  General Politics / International General Discussion / Report: Russia Had Sources in U.S. Command on: March 25, 2006, 12:53:53 am
By ROBERT BURNS, AP Military Writer
Fri Mar 24, 4:31 PM ET
 
WASHINGTON - The Russian government collected intelligence from sources inside the American military command as the U.S. mounted the invasion of     Iraq, and the Russians fed information to     Saddam Hussein on troop movements and plans, according to Iraqi documents cited in a     Pentagon report released Friday.

The Russians relayed information to Saddam during the opening days of the war in late March and early April 2003, including a crucial time before the ground assault on Baghdad, according to the documents.

The unclassified report does not assess the value of the information or provide details beyond citing two captured Iraqi documents that say the Russians collected information from sources "inside the American Central Command" and that battlefield intelligence was provided to Saddam through the Russian ambassador in Baghdad.

A classified version of the Pentagon report, titled "Iraqi Perspectives Project," is not being made public.

In Moscow, a duty officer with Russia's Foreign Ministry declined to comment on the report late Friday. No one answered the phones at the Defense Ministry.

A Pentagon spokesman, Lt. Col. Barry Venable, referred inquiries seeking comment to Central Command. At Central Command headquarters in Tampa, Fla., officials did not immediately respond to a request.
12209  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: Survey USA 50 State Senate Poll on: March 24, 2006, 07:23:33 am
john kerry only 53%.  ouch.

He's had ups and downs in this poll but he's always been between 51-57% approve and 38-43% disapprove. The problem is he can't just go back to the senate after 2004 and pretend as if everything is as usual. He's never going to be able to shake the loser image that he acquired after 2004. In many ways it's better not to run at all than to run unsuccessfully ( a study of perceptions of Adlai Stevenson, for example, found that most people thought highly of him in 1952 but more people thought poorly of him in 1956, mentioning things like his divorce which occured before 1952) .

I'm more concerned with why Paul Sarbanes is so low.
12210  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / London 'under water by 2100' as Antarctica crumbles into the sea on: March 23, 2006, 09:23:13 pm
A snarky "sky is falling" comment is inevitable in a thread like this so I might as well pre-empt it, but it's a story worth posting anyway.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DOZENS of the world’s cities, including London and New York, could be flooded by the end of the century, according to research which suggests that global warming will increase sea levels more rapidly than was previously thought.
The first study to combine computer models of rising temperatures with records of the ancient climate has indicated that sea levels could rise by up to 20ft (6m) by 2100, placing millions of people at risk.

The threat comes from melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, which scientists behind the research now believe are on track to release vast volumes of water significantly more quickly than older models have predicted. Their analysis of events between 129,000 and 116,000 years ago, when the Arctic last warmed to temperatures forecast for 2100, shows that there could be large rises in sea level.


 
While the Greenland ice sheet is expected to start melting as summer temperatures in the Arctic rise by 3C degrees to 5C (5.4F-9F), most models suggest that the ice sheets of Antarctica will remain more stable.

The historical data, however, show that the last time that Greenland became this warm, the sea level rise generated by meltwater destabilised the Antarctic ice, leading to a much higher increase than can be explained by Arctic ice alone.

That means that the models of sea-level rise used to predict an increase of up to 3ft by 2100 may have significantly underestimated its ultimate extent, which could be as great as 20ft.

Such a rise would threaten cities such as London, New York, Bombay and Tokyo. Large parts of the Netherlands, Bangladesh and Florida would be inundated, and even smaller rises would flood extreme low-lying areas, such as several Pacific islands and New Orleans.

“Although the focus of our work is polar, the implications are global,” said Bette Otto-Bliesner, of the US National Centre for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, who led the study. “These ice sheets melted before and sea levels rose. The warmth needed isn’t that much above present conditions.”

Her colleague, Jonathan Overpeck, of the University of Arizona, said: “This is a real eye-opener set of results. The last time the Arctic was significantly warmer than the present day, the Greenland ice sheet melted back the equivalent of two to three metres (6ft-10ft) of sea level. Contrary to what was previously believed, the research suggests the Antarctic ice sheet also melted substantially, contributing another 6ft to 10ft of sea level rise.”

The findings, which are published today in the journal Science, have emerged from a study that used data from ancient coral reefs, ice cores and other natural records to reconstruct the climate during the last gap between Ice Ages. In this interglacial period, between 129,000 and 116,000 years ago, temperatures in the Arctic were between 3C and 5C above present levels — a similar level to that predicted for the end of this century.

The scientists found that meltwater from Greenland raised the sea level by up to 11ft, but coral records showed that the total global rise was between 13ft and 20ft. Dr Overpeck said that the melting of Antarctic ice sheets was the most likely explanation. As sea levels rose, the floating ice shelves off the coast of the continent would have become more likely to break up. That in turn would have allowed glaciers to dump more ice from the continent itself into the sea.

He said that this was particularly worrying at present as the base of the West Antarctic ice sheet lay below sea level, which would allow ice to escape to the sea easily.

Several recent studies have indicated that the Greenland ice sheet, which contains enough water to raise sea levels by 23ft, and the West Antarctic sheet, which holds enough for a 20ft rise, are thinning. Both are expected to take several centuries to melt completely, but could release substantial quantities of water by 2100.

Dr Overpeck said that the results added to the urgency of measures to control the greenhouse gas emissions contributing to global warming.
12211  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The Bronx: Now Booming, not Burning on: March 22, 2006, 03:51:17 pm
Historical note: For a interesting account of the fall of the Bronx and the greater urban problems of NYC in decades past, I suggest you check out The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York about the life and times of Robert Moses, suburban visionary and urban destroyer.
12212  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / The Bronx: Now Booming, not Burning on: March 22, 2006, 03:47:56 pm
Apologies if this has been posted before (the article's a few days old):


New construction is changing the look of many Bronx neighborhoods, but some fear the effects of gentrification and the loss of green space.

By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Published: March 19, 2006

For decades, the area known as the Hub has been the retail heart of the South Bronx, attracting throngs of people to its small family-owned stores even as the residential blocks around it were ravaged by crime and, at times, consumed by flames.

But now, those who have kept this scrappy shopping district alive are worried, and the source of their fears is not robbers or arsonists, but development. A long-vacant lot is the planned home of a major shopping center that will include national chain stores like Staples, Forman Mills and Rite-Aid. Their impending arrival has caused as much apprehension as happiness.

"We have to watch out for the mom-and-pop stores," said George Rodriguez, chairman of the local community board, who for years has sought to bring national retailers to the area. "They did not move out, they did not capitulate. They served the clients in the area."

And the Hub is just the heart of it. A few decades after it became a national symbol of urban decay, the Bronx is home to a rash of new construction projects that are changing neighborhoods that have seen little new building in half a century. Many residents are uneasy.

The anxiety extends from woodsy Riverdale, which has had a spate of new condominium construction, to the suburblike eastern Bronx, where huge homes have started popping up, and to the South Bronx, where plans for luxury condominiums and high-end stores have prompted fears of gentrification. Projects either planned or under way include thousands of units of new housing, shopping malls, an $800 million baseball stadium for the Yankees — perhaps a convention center and the borough's first major hotel.

The frantic pace has spurred opposition to small and large projects alike, resistance that only a few years ago would have been unthinkable in the borough, which includes one of the poorest Congressional districts in the country. The aversion to the boom is due to the dizzying speed of change, and has grown as New York City has become a more desirable place to live. Property values have skyrocketed, and wealthy people who in past generations might have moved to the suburbs are now staying and looking for more space. Poor people often find they cannot leave their current homes for fear that they will not find any place as affordable. And longtime businesses fear they will not be able to compete against chain stores.

Many are pleased about the rush. The Bronx borough president, Adolfo Carrión Jr., notes that construction means new jobs in a borough with the highest unemployment rate in the state, 7.6 percent. Still, that is much lower than the 11.2 percent rate in January 2003.

"It's a good problem to have when the arguments that people are having are not so much 'Why is nothing happening?' but 'Why is so much happening and how can we absorb it?' " Mr. Carrión said. "It's a fair concern that people have."

Dozens of residents who are critical of specific projects say they are not generally against new construction, saying their borough has been starved too long for restaurants, brand-name shops, even banks and grocery stores.

The Bronx remains seared in many minds as a symbol of urban decay — an image crystallized when a fire near Yankee Stadium led Howard Cosell to announce during the 1977 World Series that the Bronx was burning. That same year, President Jimmy Carter toured Charlotte Street, which was so ravaged it looked as if it had been bombed.

"We all know what happened in the 70's in the Bronx," said Anthony Perez Cassino, a Riverdale resident who grew up in the borough. "It's exciting to see all the development, but there's a downside — which is that in some areas, it's happening too much, too quickly. "

Last year, 9,168 building permits were issued in the borough, almost double the 4,955 awarded in 1995. And the 901 permits allotted for construction of new buildings last year was triple the number issued in 1996. The value of residential property in the Bronx has increased 42 percent, to $2.5 billion, since 2000. Land in the borough is at such a premium that single-family homes are being razed for multistory apartment buildings, houses are being built in alleys and in one case, a three-story apartment building is being constructed around a neighbor's tree.

"We're not paying attention to the alternatives for the people who are going to be displaced," said William Bosworth, director of the Bronx Data Center at Lehman College.

In Geneva Causey's neighborhood near Yankee Stadium, residents say they learned of definitive plans for a replacement ballpark through a news conference announcing the plan in June 2005. After 38 years of living in the South Bronx, Ms. Causey believes it finally might be time to move: The proposed new Yankee Stadium would be built across the street, 90 feet from her bedroom.

Mr. Carrión and other local politicians say the project will jump-start economic development. The City Council is expected to vote on the project in April. The Yankees want to start construction by May 1.

The proposal calls for building a stadium on two large neighborhood parks adjacent to the current stadium. Residents fear that the patchwork of new parks that will replace them will not make up for the green space, and the popular gathering spots, that they will lose.

"This is not going to be a desirable living area," Ms. Causey said. "It's kind of like, 'Where do you go?' This is affordable housing for people in this neighborhood. You will kill the community off."

Within walking distance of Yankee Stadium is the Bronx Terminal Market, a 31-acre collection of crumbling but popular warehouse shops. As part of a $400 million redevelopment plan, the market's remaining merchants and hundreds of their employees are being evicted. The market, which dates to the 1920's, will be replaced by Gateway Center, a mall that will include national chain stores.

Majora Carter, executive director Sustainable South Bronx, a community organization, said that officials had accepted projects that were not necessarily the best for the community because of an "inferiority complex" left over from the borough's leaner years.

"I'm all for development, but there's nothing in the middle at all," Ms. Carter said. "It's either they do a large-scale development or nothing at all. There are no neighborhood-scale shops."

And then there is the planned $50 million, 170,000-square-foot commercial development in the Hub, which like the proposed new Yankee Stadium, depends on government financing. It will include a Forman Mills discount retail store, a Staples and a Rite-Aid when it opens in two years. Though the area has sought chain stores for years with little luck, residents and community leaders like Mr. Rodriguez wonder if by upgrading they might upset the area's delicate economic balance. "We've got to make sure that whatever is done is done for the benefit of everyone in the community," Mr. Rodriguez said.

The eastern Bronx has similar concerns. BJ's is trying to move into the area, and City Councilman James Vacca, who represents the district, said he fears a warehouse-style store would hurt local businesses, including several new supermarkets that have opened in the area recently.

The eastern Bronx has also had an increase in the number of huge homes being built on relatively small lots, which for years has been a problem in other areas of the city but is a relatively new phenomenon there. In response, neighborhoods like City Island and Throgs Neck have successfully lobbied for zoning laws in recent months to limit new building.

"We always saw ourselves as a touch of suburbia in the Bronx," Mr. Vacca said. "You want to retain trees and open space, and you don't want to live on top of your neighbor."

In the northern Bronx — including parts of Riverdale and Kingsbridge — zoning laws have changed as well to keep out new multistory apartment buildings and homes deemed too large for their lots.

Still, modest-size houses on streets that have not been rezoned have been bought by developers and demolished to make room for huge houses in the past year. In one case, on Tulfan Terrace in Riverdale, a 20-story condominium tower was built on the space that had housed three of the cul-de-sac's eight homes.

"We are in the midst of the most intense development push since the apartment house boom that transformed large parts of Riverdale in the 1950's," said Bradford Trebach, an associate broker and general counsel for his family's real estate firm, Trebach Realty.

Sometimes large-scale development has been greeted with praise. In Kingsbridge, a proposal to build a 207,000-square-foot shopping mall has received wide support among residents, even though some shops that the developers are in talks with, like Whole Foods, have higher prices than residents in the nearby housing projects are used to.

The new stores, which could include a chain bookstore, would force nearby retailers to adapt, said Fern Jaffe, who has owned the Paperbacks Plus bookstore for 36 years.

"We can weather the storm," Ms. Jaffe said. "Would I rather they weren't there? Of course. But development is development."


12213  General Politics / International General Discussion / Blair: War of 'Values and Ideas' Needed on: March 22, 2006, 02:42:00 am
While I oppose the war on grounds of its counterproductivity and opposition to unjustified slaughter (i.e. we should spread democracy by more peaceful means that does not require direct American occupation), Tony Blair is "a guy who gets it" in my book, if this represents his true philosophy.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tue Mar 21, 1:57 PM ET

LONDON - Prime Minister     Tony Blair defended his decision to participate in the invasion of     Iraq and said Tuesday that a global war of "values and ideas" is needed to fight the threat of terrorism.

Blair told an audience of journalists in London that the struggle against terrorism was not a clash of civilizations but "a clash about civilization."

"This terrorism, in my view, will not be defeated until its ideas — the poison that warps the minds of its adherents — is met head on," Blair said in the first of three speeches on foreign policy.

Blair conceded that the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq has encountered problems but maintained that the idea that the invasion was an example of Western imperialism was a "gross over-exaggeration" and "nonsense."

Opponents have criticized Blair's willingness to back military intervention in Sierra Leone,     Kosovo,     Afghanistan and Iraq. But Blair said he rejected "the doctrine of benign inactivity" in favor of "a politics of globalization" that views the world's problems as interconnected.

Blair said the advance of democracy in Afghanistan and Iraq "is the most effective message against (terrorists') wretched propaganda about America, the West and the rest of the world."

He said terrorism would be defeated by a battle of "values and ideas set in opposition to those of the terrorists."

"This is not a clash between civilizations, it is a clash about civilization," he said.

"'We' is not the West. 'We' are as much Muslim as Christian or Jew or Hindu. We are those who believe in religious tolerance, openness to others, to democracy, liberty and human rights administered by secular courts," he said.

But Blair warned that extremism is deep-rooted and its impact felt worldwide, with some 40-50 countries subjected to regular terrorist attacks.
12214  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Your most liked state on: March 22, 2006, 02:05:49 am
California-- a state that loses 100,000+ residents per year because they cannot afford to live therein is not my favorite state. If you ask me California is developing into the American version of Brazil and that opinion has nothing to do with hispanics.

Maryland-- I guess you can't choose home state.

I'd say Massachusetts, home of a great city, Boston, plus Harvard and MIT, thinking ground to the likes of John Nash and John Kenneth Galbraith, just to name a couple of giants among hundreds. Call me an intellectual elitist if you like-- I don't claim to be a tenth as smart as those guys though.
12215  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Should pharmacists be allowed to refuse to dispense certain drugs? on: March 22, 2006, 01:50:17 am
No offense angus but I hardly think you're the typical swing voter. Like most individuals on this board, you have very strong opininons and while you consciously avoid avatars and love to constantly expound on how moderate you claim to be in practically every thread, I can think of a number of Republicans who are less consistent than yourself in taking the conservative side in their posts. That said, you do have a good point about opebo making Dems look bad.
12216  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ban the preceeding member on: March 20, 2006, 11:23:58 pm
Has an alliterative forum name.
12217  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Are people who enjoy living in urban inner cities idiots? on: March 20, 2006, 07:33:36 am
There's nothing wrong with preferring to live in the city, or even hating the suburbs. Its only that most would agree in general the suburbs are desirable place to raise a family.
12218  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: What are you listening to right now? on: March 20, 2006, 07:29:02 am
Billy Joel - Still Rock n Roll to Me
12219  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Joe Republic's car accident - Information and well-wishing on: March 20, 2006, 07:22:32 am
I hope he gets use of a computer again soon so we can know how he's doing.
12220  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Israel and NATO on: March 17, 2006, 04:44:13 pm
The only reason isreal has problems is that they didn't do the merciful thing and immediantly boot out the palestinians in one fell swoop instead of let them remain on the land and slowly disposess them. The heartbreak woudl have been less over the long runsince there wouldn't be any palestinians in Isreal's borders so less long term hatred.

Go ahead, boot them out of their homes. I would actually like to see that. Seriously. Let's see the world reaction when 1.5 million refugees are robbed of their land so the Israelis can get their lebenstraum. What a field day that would be!!
Doing it now would be politically impossible but doing it in 1948 or 1967 woudl have worked out.

I think the Israelis just dont have the guts to do what they want to do deep inside. But at least you can admit the truth.
It would cause alot of international outrage now but witohut the palestinians on occupied land to rally the world left we'd see people forgetting aobut it over time.

As I said... I'd like to see the Israelis (try to) do it if it's so good for them. But if they're not afraid of anything let the free media cameras show what's going on in precise detail
12221  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Israel and NATO on: March 17, 2006, 04:41:22 pm
The only reason isreal has problems is that they didn't do the merciful thing and immediantly boot out the palestinians in one fell swoop instead of let them remain on the land and slowly disposess them. The heartbreak woudl have been less over the long runsince there wouldn't be any palestinians in Isreal's borders so less long term hatred.

Go ahead, boot them out of their homes. I would actually like to see that. Seriously. Let's see the world reaction when 1.5 million refugees are robbed of their land so the Israelis can get their lebenstraum. What a field day that would be!!
Doing it now would be politically impossible but doing it in 1948 or 1967 woudl have worked out.

I think the Israelis just dont have the guts to do what they want to do deep inside. But at least you can admit the truth.
12222  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Israel and NATO on: March 17, 2006, 04:28:03 pm
The only reason isreal has problems is that they didn't do the merciful thing and immediantly boot out the palestinians in one fell swoop instead of let them remain on the land and slowly disposess them. The heartbreak woudl have been less over the long runsince there wouldn't be any palestinians in Isreal's borders so less long term hatred.

Go ahead, boot them out of their homes. I would actually like to see that. Seriously. Let's see the world reaction when 1.5 million refugees are robbed of their land so the Israelis can get their lebenstraum. What a field day that would be!!
12223  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Israel and NATO on: March 17, 2006, 04:23:13 pm
Who cares if they're democratic or not? I don't. Isreal is under special circumstances where it CAN'T be a democracy and survive.

They should have thought about that before setting up their country on someone else's land.
12224  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Happy Saint Patrick's Day on: March 17, 2006, 04:01:53 pm
I heartily concur



Who can guess where this is? Smiley
12225  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: 38% favor censure of Bush on: March 17, 2006, 03:50:22 pm
ARG poll has it at 46%

http://americanresearchgroup.com/

Here is a poll from January on impeachment

http://www.democrats.com/bush-impeachment-poll-2

Here are some comparison polls from 1998, remember (if you're old enough) at that time the Lewinsky scandal dominated the headlines for 1 straight year, while the wiretapping story has barely registered in the media, and discussion of it has been largely confined to the chattering elites:

American Viewpoint (R). October 9-13, 1998. N=800 likely voters nationwide.
     .
 
"Do you favor or oppose the House of Representatives' action to begin a formal impeachment inquiry against Bill Clinton?"
  %   
 Favor 43   
 Oppose 52   
 Don't know 4


 % % % %
"Last week, the full U.S. House of Representatives voted to authorize the House Judiciary Committee to begin a formal impeachment inquiry of President Clinton. Do you approve or disapprove of Congress beginning an impeachment inquiry?"
 Approve 45 75 22 47
 Disapprove 53 24 75 50
 Don't know/No answer 2 1 3 3

CBS News Poll. October 7-8, 1998. N=997 adults nationwide.
     .
 
  ALL Rep. Dem. Ind.
  % % % %
Asked on Oct. 8 only (N=526): "The full U.S. House of Representatives voted to authorize the House Judiciary Committee to begin a formal impeachment inquiry of President Clinton. Do you approve or disapprove of Congress beginning an impeachment inquiry?"
 Approve 46 72 27 51
 Disapprove 50 26 69 46
 Don't know/No answer 4 2 4 3

"Do you think the Judiciary Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives should begin holding hearings to determine whether or not to impeach President Clinton, or don't you think it's necessary?"
 Should begin hearings 31 51 17 30
 Not necessary 65 43 80 66
 Depends (vol.) 1 2 0 1
 Don't know/No answer 3 4 3 3
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