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76  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of this quote on: July 21, 2014, 07:00:05 pm
Freedom quote, as is her support of a two state solution.

The comparison to aparthied era South Africa is faulty as popular soverignty would mandate israel as a Jewish state just as South Africa government is multi~acial led by blacks.
77  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Bacon King Institute of Comedy on: July 21, 2014, 06:40:40 pm

I'm SOOOOO disappointed someone deleted this thread before I could enjoy whatever life tragedy it addressed. Sad
78  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: I'm Leaving...For Now on: July 21, 2014, 06:31:48 pm

79  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: NYC approves apartment building with separate entrance for poor people on: July 21, 2014, 05:54:53 pm
If you give poor people a separate building project far away from the rich people, you're socialist hero. If you give poor people a separate door on a nice building, you're satan.

The unbounded irrationality of liberal plebs is the 8th wonder of the world.

haha what



Hail!
As much as it utterly pains me to say this, AD actually makes a good point (other than the typically hyperbolic line at the end)
80  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: How in the world is Begich holding on so far? on: July 21, 2014, 05:34:45 pm
The New York Times had an article a few weeks ago about how strongly Begich has worked the Alaskan Native community over the last few years, and is now staffing up for the election.

This and the reasons illegal operation put in his post. I'd also add that Begich was a popular mayor in Anchorage and probably has a stronger base than most Democrats in that very politically swingy city.

That said, i'd like to see polls after the primary (and the ineviable post-primary bump for the eventual winner). Most non-Joe Miller Republicans will come home regadless of who they support in the primary, and I just don't see Miller winnning or runnning as an independent.
81  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Polls on Same-Sex Marriage State Laws on: July 17, 2014, 01:50:22 pm
Just because the U.S. is currently a secular society doesn't mean it should be.

Speaking as a consistory member of a Christian denomination that approves of SSM,   you post is a great example of why our government should be secular while our society need not be. Secular government is a good way of keeping those like you with a 'my Father in heaven can lick your Father in heaven' mentality from forcing the particulars of your religious worship down religious minorities' throats in the form of statute.

Keep your version of 'God's law' for your own denomination and congregation, thank yoy; the Crusades ended centuries ago.
82  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Members of Congress most likely to switch parties on: July 17, 2014, 01:35:52 pm
Manchin votes with the Democrats 73% of the time and would gain nothing from changing parties.  I don't understand all this talk about him switching.

According to the New York Times, former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell voted with the Democrats 78% of the time before switching to the Republicans in 1995.

West Virginia does seem like it is moving to the right at the state level much later than the rest of the non-coastal South, so Manchin becoming a Republican could be a benefit in regard to being more in tune with his state.

While Manchin becoming a Republican doesn't seem highly likely, it isn't necessarily out of the question, especially if the GOP wins the Senate after the midterm elections.

Yeah. Campbell's switch was a head scratcher.

Generally, it would seem that a party switch in the Senate would catch people off guard.

I don't think Shelby was so surprising.

True, but there doesn't seem to be an analogue to pre-Republican Shelby in the Senate as of 2014.

How about in the House?

Maybe, just maybe Blue Dog Democrat Dan Lipinski (IL-03). He opposes abortion, opposes same-sex marriage, voted against the final version of Obamacare, is against in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants, and opposes increases in immigration visas. Still, he represents a very Democratic district, and other Blue Dogs who are more conservative than him seem unlikely to switch parties. I suspect that polarization in Congress has reached a level making it unlikely we will see many party identification shifts.

You are dead right about Lipinski's district, which is why he'll never switch, as he'll be in about the same position as Cao or Djou if he ever does.
83  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: US uninsurance rate drops to 13.4%, record low on: July 17, 2014, 01:24:24 pm
I have insurance because of it and I am immensely grateful.

Begging for crumbs off of the master's table? Even the True Left know better than to do that.

In general, the US understands that our healthcare system is broken. ACA proposes to make the broken system cover more Americans. If voters don't see what's going on, they shouldn't be voting.

Refer to Mechaman's post.

Mechman's post essentially championed the exact opposite of every rationale ou've ever 'argued' on this forum.

You really don't have a clue what you're saying, do you? It's the debate equivilent of watching a dog chase it's tail.
84  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Paul Krugman: "The Affordable Care Act is working" on: July 17, 2014, 01:18:13 pm
Liberals are the people who order gruel at the nicest restaurant in the world. Then they brag about how nourishing it was.

Plebeians and their ridiculous sense of morality.

Using 'plebians' as an insult? Even Montgomery Burns isn't that much a caricture.
85  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Will the Republican Party eventually change its name to Obstruction Party? on: July 15, 2014, 10:43:39 am
Oh, and to the OP:

Ugh.
86  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Will the Republican Party eventually change its name to Obstruction Party? on: July 15, 2014, 10:42:42 am
I'd like to see them lose House seats this year (I'd be satisfied if they broke even and gained zero).. but that probably won't happen...
If they did, though, maybe they would *finally* get the message that they are out of touch with the ways things oughta be.
The fact that they have won majorities in 2010 and 2012 shows that they are in touch with things. Why do they keep getting elected, after all?

I'm so sick of this whining about bipartisanship. Obama won. So did John Boehnor and the Republican Congress. So no side in particular is the side of "the people."

Well, technically we lost the national popular vote for the House by either about a half-million or a million votes (can't recall which). And even that was despite there being almost twice as many uncontested Republican seats as Democratic ones (a dozen Dem seats vs. over 20 uncontested Republicans), and the average generic sacrificial lamb Democrat could probably average 20-30% of the vote just by being on the ballot, vs. probably less than 10% for similar Republicans running in the typical inner city uncontested Dem seat.

We frankly owe our congressional majorities to the geographic concentration of Democrats in urban areas, which we've augmented mightily by skillful gerrymandering 'redistricting' efforts, especially in key states like PA, OH, NC, TX, & FL. All well and good for the rest of this decade, but unless we appeal to a broader swath of the electorate, we'll be risking being cosigned to the minority in the 2020's.
87  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Members of Congress most likely to switch parties on: July 15, 2014, 10:29:10 am
Manchin votes with the Democrats 73% of the time and would gain nothing from changing parties.  I don't understand all this talk about him switching.

According to the New York Times, former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell voted with the Democrats 78% of the time before switching to the Republicans in 1995.

West Virginia does seem like it is moving to the right at the state level much later than the rest of the non-coastal South, so Manchin becoming a Republican could be a benefit in regard to being more in tune with his state.

While Manchin becoming a Republican doesn't seem highly likely, it isn't necessarily out of the question, especially if the GOP wins the Senate after the midterm elections.

Yeah. Campbell's switch was a head scratcher.

Generally, it would seem that a party switch in the Senate would catch people off guard.

I don't think Shelby was so surprising.

True, but there doesn't seem to be an analogue to pre-Republican Shelby in the Senate as of 2014.

How about in the House?
88  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Polls on Same-Sex Marriage State Laws on: July 15, 2014, 10:25:18 am
Pbrower, I genuinely appriciate the work you do on these maps, but they're completely unintelligible.



1. Legality of SSM is white.  No further distinction in approval or disapproval of SSM is shown. Local officials are required to accept applications for SSM for adults unless there is some obvious bar as insanity or incestuousness.

This does not mean solely that places under federal jurisdiction within a state (such as military bases or Indian reservations) recognize SSM. If Arizona state law prohibits SSM but Indian reservations or military bases allow SSM in accordance with federal law, then the polling applies to the state.

A state could go to some other color from white if the state outlaws SSM through legislation or initiative/referendum -- but that is highly unlikely.

2. If SSM is not legal, then a green shade applies to that state should there be plurality support of SSM. More intense shades imply stronger approval. A red shade applies to any state in which extant polling shows that SSM has greater disapproval than approval, more intense shades indicating stronger disapproval. Yellow is for a tie.

The rationale of the distinction  is that states in green could approve same-sex marriage either through legislation or initiative/referendum -- which would not happen in a state in which SSM has stronger disapproval than approval. We may see 'evolution' in the process, which is possible.

3. Blue and orange are for legal limbo. The decision is likely to be made in state or federal courts. Blue (Colorado) indicates that there is an appeal, but it is presumed that SSM could be approved by legislation or referendum before an appeal is completed. Orange indicates that legalization is unlikely based upon the most recent polls (Arkansas) or what I reasonably assume (Idaho). Tan indicates that the appeal is going to the US Supreme Court, whose decision is definitive no matter what polls indicate.

4. It all goes white if some ruling analogous to Loving v. Virginia is made by the US Supreme Court. The Supreme Court does not heed polls.        

Pbrower, if you need four paragraphs and about a page of single-spaced text to explain the key to your maps, they're WAY too busy.
89  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Plan to split California into 6 states advances on: July 15, 2014, 10:08:47 am
California splitting is grossly unnecessary, and based on silly ideological beefs more than any practical 'need'. The state has proven itself to HARDLY be ungovernable, regardless of whether their leadership is competent or not.

I'd further note that any act of succession should require, even before getting to the legislature and Congress, some super-majority margin to pass, like at least 60%, maybe 2/3. It is a huge and dramatic act that shouldn't be followed on a mere 50% + 1 in a given election.
90  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: West Virginia Megathread on: July 14, 2014, 09:26:18 pm
McDowell county sheriff launches a tirade on the "Russians" as the death spiral continues

http://wvmetronews.com/2014/06/02/mcdowell-countys-financial-struggles-building/

From reading the article, he actually seems to have a legitimate gripe.
91  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Members of Congress most likely to switch parties on: July 14, 2014, 07:40:08 pm
Manchin votes with the Democrats 73% of the time and would gain nothing from changing parties.  I don't understand all this talk about him switching.

According to the New York Times, former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell voted with the Democrats 78% of the time before switching to the Republicans in 1995.

West Virginia does seem like it is moving to the right at the state level much later than the rest of the non-coastal South, so Manchin becoming a Republican could be a benefit in regard to being more in tune with his state.

While Manchin becoming a Republican doesn't seem highly likely, it isn't necessarily out of the question, especially if the GOP wins the Senate after the midterm elections.

Yeah. Campbell's switch was a head scratcher.
92  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: DoJ investigates anti-Obama float in Nebraska on: July 14, 2014, 07:16:21 pm
Any strike against hillbillys is a victory.

I guess I forgot about that part of the Constitution where "hillbillies" aren't entitled to Freedom of Speech and the government must investigate their parade floats lest they offend anyone with delicate sensibilities.

This seems like some serious PC BS right here.

And you know what? Being a smart politician, I'm guessing Obama would've preferred these thought police had just kept to themselves.
93  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: What is your view on this immigration crisis on the border? on: July 14, 2014, 05:10:46 pm
Well, in the short term, the key thing is obviously to strengthen the border. You know, build a wall with a succession of forts along the Texas/New Mexico/Arizona/California border. After all, it sort of worked for the Romans, and their illegals had horses and sharp, pointy objects. Think about it, the Texan section of said wall could be labeled 'Rick's Wall'.  But, that won't solve the problem in the long run, since it won't stop (although it might reduce the numbers a bit) a lot of kids from heading north. And no one wants to see piles of dead children next to a putative wall anyway, so, a long term solution is needed in that case.

Of course, the simplest thing would be to establish a succession of military juntas (with lots of aid from the United States of course) in these Central American countries, give them leave to suspend human rights on a temporary basis, and have them butcher as many of these gang members as is humanly possible. However, such a solution would not be well received by a number of people, so, and alternative might be for the United States to do the job of butchering these gangsters itself by sending in ground forces. Perhaps Central America should simply be divided up into a succession of districts administered by an American Viceroy, or some such post, in order to restore order in that particular arena. Once order is restored, migration levels will drop, and the problem will be solved. Who knows?

How would increased security help when these kids are largely turning themselves over to the Border Patrol rather than sneaking past them and getting caught?

So a military junta butchering anyone suspected of being a "gang member" will lead to peace and stability from which children won't flee? That's such a stupid thing to say I assume you're merely trolling. Shame on you for wasting our time with your unclever jokes.
94  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Lawyers of Atlas -- does this sound normal to you? on: July 14, 2014, 05:05:00 pm
I can only say that work environments are as much a nature of the individual employer's/firm's culture than due to the profession itself. Even firm types (big firms, small offices, etc.) have large differences between them.

I'm sorry to hear you apparently work for $hitheads. Sad

That said, I love being a lawyer.
95  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Would you consider it acceptable to play Ingress in church? on: July 14, 2014, 04:45:02 pm
Sure if not in the middle of a service.

This. Our church youth group would play hide and seek and the like in the church on overnight stays in the church. I guess this is sorta a 21st century variation.
96  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / U.S. Presidential Election Results / Re: Did The Fall of Atlanta Really Save Lincoln in 1864? on: July 13, 2014, 10:31:09 am
It certainly didn't hurt, but what really saved Lincoln was the Radical Republicans not running their own candidate like they threatened to do.

Good point. How much support could Fremont have realistially syphoned from Lincoln?

For that matter, Fremont withdrew and endorsed Lincoln only 3 weeks after Atlanta fell; how much cause and effect was there?
97  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Let Me Be Clear: Barack Obama's War on Millenials, and One Woman's Case for Hope on: July 13, 2014, 09:46:06 am

also, I like how the first Google search suggest is "katie kiefer instagram" because god the internet is sad.  At least it isn't "katie kiefer feet"


It is almost as sad as the stats of her Instagram, lol.

How so (genuinely curious)?
98  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The Official Obama 2.0 Approval Ratings Thread on: July 13, 2014, 09:26:58 am
It's been so long coming that people probably believe the recovery is occurring in spite of Obama, not because of him.
Or, they're just not feeling the so-called "recovery." Despite all the recent employment "growth" data, labor force participation has shown no improvement, while the number of full-time jobs declined by 523,000. Most of the jobs that were created were low-wage and/or part-time, so it isn't surprising that this "recovery" hasn't translated into great approval ratings for Obama.

Most likely both combined, IMO.
99  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: US uninsurance rate drops to 13.4%, record low on: July 13, 2014, 09:24:21 am
The real good numbers in this poll is that the drop is more significant with 18-34 year olds than 35-64 year olds:



Question: Why is the uninsured rate for 25-34 year olds higher than 18-24 year olds? How does their overtaking of the youngs in 2011 in the context of the long-term numbers?

18-25 are often covered by their parents insurance.

Yes, and many people like to act like The New Economy doesn't exist.  Even after the "recovery" many people in their twenties are still living with their parents and working at Starbucks hoping that their law degree will eventually get them a job that will hopefully pay off their student loan debts by the age of 50.
Of course when you have hundreds of thousands in student loan debt and you are earning $9.25/hr and working probably 30 hours a week (if you're lucky) it's going to be hard to justify paying for a decent health insurance plan on top of all of your already large debt unless you have a plan that is already covered by your employer (if you are lucky enough to have a job to begin with and are not relying on selling rocks on ebay or something).

But yet, some of you would rather blame twenty somethings for being cocky youthful assholes who think they are invincible rather than acknowledge the crooked system that has resulted in most Americans having mountains of debt they will be lucky to have paid off by the time they are retired.  I am not blaming the ACA for this as I believe the symptoms of the problem existed long before it.  Actually, ACA, as much as I disagree with the concept of it (making more and more Americans succumb to greedy bloodsucking insurance companies), has done at least a little bit of good in allowing young adults to stay on their parents insurance until the age of 26, expanding the eligibility and funding for Medicaid, making restrictions on what insurance companies can deny coverage on, etc etc.  I'm not going to say that it is a step in the right direction, but it was better than doing nothing.  Hopefully people over the age of 26 will try to take advantage of the exchanges so they aren't forced to bend over and take it from the various companies out there.  However, the problem will continue to persist, regardless of how much percentage of a poor/middle class person's yearly income you are charging for not having the audacity to buy insurance.

So what is the problem?  People are still paying for healthcare.

Excellent post, Mech! I'd quibble with the last line because someone will ALWAYS "pay" for healthcare, whether through increased taxes for a single-payer system, a Rube Goldberg mix of higher taxes and insurance compnies trading absorbtion of previous non-insurables with pre-existing conditions in exchange for a larger market of youngs buying insurance, or whatever.

Other then that, it belongs in the Good Post thread. Smiley
100  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Polls on Same-Sex Marriage State Laws on: July 13, 2014, 08:58:36 am
Might I humbly suggest just tracking popularity/approval of same-sex marriage by state?

Legality of same-sex marriage, or court rulings that might reflect this legality, could be considered a separate issue and included on a map of "legal status of same-sex marriage." This would really simplify the map. Plus it would be interesting to know, say, whether Iowans have come around to the policies their state supreme court imposed on them, or whether they continue to resist.

You are welcome to start your 'rival' map.

Actually pbrower, Nutmeg's suggestion is a great one I sincerely hope you'll adopt.

And ftr, I get the idea that 'saturation' means intensity of color (I.e. support), but for purposes of the maps, again, it's completely unintelligible.
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