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1  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 17, 2014, 04:39:32 pm
Jackson was, of course, correct. Even for his great personal popularity, declaration of Empire was, indeed, very controversial, even with many representatives of his Southern base, where traditions of Jeffersonian Republicanism were still alive. Naturally, any leader less popular wouldn't succeed with what Old Hickory just did, but it wasn't easy.

Even Napoleon did not dare to proclaim himself the Emperor of free American people! Henry Clay (who, by some weird administrative error, was not put in the protective custody, along with likes of Adams and Johnson) yelled at the rally in his native Kentucky. He knew we abbhore royalism. That's why our nation was born in first place. We rejected King George, and I'm confident we will reject King Andy!

We reject Kings too, as symbols of oppression and reaction, Minister Van Buren responded to Clay at very publicized meeting in New York. When political elites failed to emancipate common American man, the very man who made this country possible, it's up for the extraordinary leader like Marshall Jackson to stand for the common folk as the People's Emperor in the Empire of Progress and Freedom!

Soon after his famous, or infamous according to some, address in Frankfort, Henry Clay lost his life in awkward accident, felling off his horse.

Fortunately for Jackson, or Emperor Andrew I if you wish, the turmoil took less than three months with only isolated cases or resistance stronger than words. Most of the people did believe in difference between reactionary Kings and People, even if some belief was conditional.

For his side, Andrew I was quick to make sure he means business, decreeing almost universal suffrage among white males, effective "next election", as well as personally making sure that remaining roadblocks for domestic development programs are removed. The Empire has won first round.

According to famous "Fourth Imperial Decree", roughly outlying structure of the government before new constitution could be adopted, the Emperor continued to preside of the cabinet, although Andrew I, focusing on making political decisions and being averse to bureaucratic work, decided to pick a person to maintain the administrative machine, including coordinating all departments. The job went, unsurprisingly, to Minister of State Van Buren, designated by the decree as "Premier Executive Assistant to the Emperor". Thanks to this, the office became known, at first informally, as Premier of the United States, basically Prime Minister.



Presidents of the United States

1st: George Washington (N-VA), 1789-1797
2nd: John Adams (F-MA), 1797-1801
3rd: Aaron Burr (DR-NY), 1801-1805
4th: Alexander Hamilton (F-NY), 1805-1809
5th: James Madison (DR-VA), 1809-1813
6th: Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA), 1813-1814
7th: Joseph Bradley Varnum (DR-MA), 1814-1818
Acting: Interim Governing Council, 1818-1819
8th: Thomas Jefferson (DR-VA), 1819-1820
9th: John C. Calhoun (DR-SC), 1820-1821
10th: Napoleon Bonaparte (M-LA), 1821-1827
11th: Martin Van Buren (N-NY), 1827-1828
12th: Andrew Jackson (M-TN), 1828-1930

Office abolished

Nonpartisan
Federalist
Democratic-Republic
Military


NOTES:

3rd: Elected by the House of Representatives. Defeated for reelection in 1804.
4th: Defeated for reelection in 1808.
5th: Reelected by the House of Representatives in 1812. Killed. in battle.
6th: As Vice President, he succeeded Madison. Although he styled himself as "Acting President", he would later be considered the 6th President by historians. Died in office.
7th: As Senate PPT, he succeeded Gerry. Elected on his own right in 1816. Deposed and executed.
8th: Installed by the IGC as a ceremonial figurehead. "Retired."
9th: Installed by the IGC. Deposed and fleed the country.
10th: Installed by the coup. Killed in battle.
11th: As Minister of State, he served as Interim President, pending snap election.
12th: Proclaimed himself Emperor after a successfull self-coup


Constitutional Emperors of the United States

1st: Andrew I (January 30, 1830 - present)


Premiers of the United States

1st: Martin Van Buren (N-NY), February 3, 1830 - present


Vice Presidents of the United States

1st: John Adams (F-MA), 1789-1797
2nd: Thomas Jefferson (DR-VA), 1897-1805
3rd: Charles C. Pinckney (F-SC), 1805-1813
4th: Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA), 1813
Vacant, 1813-1817
5th: Wilson Cary Nicholas (DR-VA), 1817-1818
Vacent, 1817-1821

Office abolished

NOTES:

4th: Became President
5th: Deposed along with President Varnum, but not prosecuted
2  General Discussion / History / Re: "Americanism" and the US Presidential Election of 1916 on: September 17, 2014, 02:11:51 pm
You have to remember that 1916 had not only World War I in full swing, but the Easter Rising had occurred in April of that year and many Irish Americans were pissed at Wilson for his Anglophile foreign policy.  Irish Independence leaders in the US went as far as to throw their weight behind Charles Evans Hughes, a Republican (the horror), because he was at least "an honorable man".  

It's quite funny that when De Valera arrived to the United States, he was confident Wilson will receive and recognize him as "President of the Irish Republic".

On a side note, Wilson was accustomed with using term "unAmerican" well before his political career, in his academic writings, though, arguably, it wasn't that uncommon at the time.
3  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: The New America on: September 17, 2014, 12:51:47 pm
Go on.
4  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: hearts vs spades on: September 17, 2014, 12:37:41 pm
Sam Spades.
5  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum prediction thread on: September 17, 2014, 12:15:23 pm
I predict Teabaggers here in this USA will draw flimsy comparisons and demand their own Independence Referendum

Independence from what though?


Does it matter?
6  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of NJ Christian on: September 17, 2014, 11:38:26 am
Awful views, but I reserve my opinion of him as a person until he's around a little longer.
7  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 17, 2014, 11:36:53 am
It Just Had To End That Way...

To keep the short short, Jackson's first year in office, despite all his popularity, was quite difficult, with the only noteworthy success lying in the foreign affairs realm.

Interestingly, Napoleon's turned out to be a blessing in disguise for American policy. Although the former Emperor's reputation (once he was out of sight) has been steadily improving in Europe, now dominated by the reactionary Holy Alliance, somewhat out of remembrance of his enlightened policies, somewhat out of pure nostalgia, there was too much bad memories (if only) for European powers to completely bury the hatched and extend an official recognition to the new regime.

Once Bonaparte was dead, however, nothing stood in a way of formalizing already unofficial cooperation between British Empire and Washington, which resulted in formally exchanging ambassadors in mid-1828, as well as ratyfiyng several important trade pact.

To be fair, Jackson had relatively little to do with the diplomatic breakout, with Minister of Foreign Affairs John Quincy Adams handled most of it. Though Jackson had retained all of Bonaparte's cabinet, animosity between him and Adams was as strong as personal. For worse, empowered with his diplomatic successes, Adams' influence steadily grew.

Jackson also faced troubles from the right. While he and Adams were in agreement at least about one issue: domestic development programs, a conservative wing of the governing camp, still led by Richard M. Johnson, kept sabotaging the plans.

But the worst problem was Jackson's lack of influence in the Congress (as opposed to his personal popularity within the masses and loyalty of the Army). The opposition, led by stubborn Henry Clay, now again a Senator from Kentucky, made sure to block any progress of Jackson's policies.

The Constitution of 1821 failed to secure an extension of the suffrage to all (or almost all) white males, which in some way made Jackson's presidency politically impotent.  

The standoff went for a year and a half, with the President's opponents having an upper hand. But Jackson wasn't a man to be f**ked with, something his rivals seemed to forgot. What is our Constitution worth is the President, who is supposed to lead, is as powerless as some damn castrated jackass? Jackson complained. He had a good excuse to act: to protect the right of (white male, of course) masses, the "common men", against elitist grab of power.

Jackson did have a loyalty of the Army, but with internal order established under Napoleon, as well as stronger civic institutions, he couldn't repeat the "Second Revolution" on his own. He need to secure a support of, if not all then at least, some elements of the civilian administration. Fortunately, ambitious Minister of State Van Buren, was more than happy to lend a helping hand.

The opposition was not prepeared for the strike. On September 11, 1829, President Jackson had invoked his reverse special powers by placing the entire country, for the first time in history, under a martial law, which enabled him to "suspend" the Congress and place key opponents under "protective custody". The self-coup was a resounding success.

Four months later, after a long of thoughts, Jackson finally did something Napoleon, for obvious reasons, couldn't. The people are ready for freedom, he said in a special message. But the elites are not. To ensure the people's freedom and prosperity, a drastic and, I realize that, controversial measures must be taken.

With these words published on the January 30, 1830, President Jackson became "Constitutional Emperor of the United States".


Yes, I'm super cereal about this.
8  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 17, 2014, 11:11:45 am
The Frontier Napoleon



Marshall Jackson's rise to power represented both opening of a new chapter, as well as elements of continuity. He was, in many ways, surprisingly similar to his great predecessor: a great self-made military talent and charismatic leader. Yet, he was a "diffrent brand" of Napoleon. For all his popularity, Bonaparte always remained an outsider, while Jackson was an American. Despite all psychological and political similarities, he lacked the great Corsican's education and contacts with the "big world".

Yet, Jackson's accession, while a symbolical turning point, has only strengthen the new regime, making a "Napoleonic" model even more palatable to the public. His story as a frontiersman, who went from rages to riches (and power) was appealing to his countrymen, while Bonaparte, though revered, always remained somewhat of an "elitist" figure.

Jackson taking the torch was quite logical, due to his role as the number-two man of the new order. A role he, interestingly, took voluntarily. Had it not been for Bonaparte getting involved in American affairs, he would have been a natural leader of the "Second Revolution". Yet Jackson deeply admired and respected Napoleon, and keep his ambitions (growing with time) in check, until his protector was gone.

And yet, that folksy hero, who genuinely felt as a champion of the common, white man, would eventually go much more futher than cautious Bonaparte...
9  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Scottish independence - The Official Atlas Forum mock referendum on: September 16, 2014, 04:42:13 pm
I'd rather have all of the UK under a Labour government than it minus Scotland under a Tory government and Scotland under some yucky nationalist government.

You do realize SNP is basically social democratic?

From what I understand they are still to the right of Labour. Or at least the Scottish wing of Labour. I remember Bono found them OK (and said they're still a generally a pro-market party) and remember that Tory afleitch doesn't seem to mind them.

Still, putting them in the same category as f**king Golden Dawn Nazis is... bizzare, to say least.

There is a huge difference between Golden Dawn or Jobbik-style nationalism and merely wanting your country to be independent.

But why should it be independent? It's not a persecuted country or one under brutal occupation ala those Caucasus regions in Russia or East Timor under Indonesia or anything. And it has a fully devolved parliament as well, and is no less culturally distinct from the rest of the UK as New York is from Oklahoma. The only arguments I can hear are "RAR RAR NATIONALISM!" or "Let's keep the oil and use it to boost the economy forever!" which isn't going to crumble HARD in about a decade if done.

Well, we may argue whether Scotland would be better off as independent, or should remaining in the UK, but it's not our decision, as whichever decision Scottish voters make, why should respect it.

Right to self-determination is one of the basic fundamentals of the UN charter.
10  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Unofficial Atlas Census on: September 16, 2014, 08:05:20 am
OMG, we have 6 Tender Bransons...
11  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish Independence Referendum - 18 September 2014 on: September 16, 2014, 04:22:45 am
Hm, Badger has made quite a good point about danger of a country becoming independent via referendum with almost another half of the voters opposing such measure. Perhaps there ought to be higher threshold for making such decision?

The most important question that we, the Atlas Forum, should be asking is... What kind of detail of results maps can we expect to see?  By Westminster/Holyrood constituency?  By council ward??  Cheesy

Is there a word for super-duper-mapgasm? Wink
12  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The New Irony Ore Mine on: September 15, 2014, 06:15:32 pm
You just really can't resist. It's very sad. Roll Eyes

Should have known you'd do that after I (correctly) called out your usual snooty behavior.

Sometimes I feel like Phil has some type of device, alerting him about every new post related to him, so he can reply quickly Wink
13  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 15, 2014, 05:53:56 pm
I noticed I was a little chaotic with dates on some occassions, so I'll stick to this frame from now on:

Presidents of the United States

1st: George Washington (N-VA), 1789-1797
2nd: John Adams (F-MA), 1797-1801
3rd: Aaron Burr (DR-NY), 1801-1805
4th: Alexander Hamilton (F-NY), 1805-1809
5th: James Madison (DR-VA), 1809-1813
6th: Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA), 1813-1814
7th: Joseph Bradley Varnum (DR-MA), 1814-1818
Acting: Interim Governing Council, 1818-1819
8th: Thomas Jefferson (DR-VA), 1819-1820
9th: John C. Calhoun (DR-SC), 1820-1821
10th: Napoleon Bonaparte (M-LA), 1821-1827
11th: Martin Van Buren (N-NY), 1827-1828
12th: Andrew Jackson (M-TN), 1828-present

Nonpartisan
Federalist
Democratic-Republic
Military



NOTES:

3rd: Elected by the House of Representatives. Defeated for reelection in 1804.
4th: Defeated for reelection in 1808.
5th: Reelected by the House of Representatives in 1812. Killed. in battle.
6th: As Vice President, he succeeded Madison. Although he styled himself as "Acting President", he would later be considered the 6th President by historians. Died in office.
7th: As Senate PPT, he succeeded Gerry. Elected on his own right in 1816. Deposed and executed.
8th: Installed by the IGC as a ceremonial figurehead. "Retired."
9th: Installed by the IGC. Deposed and fleed the country.
10th: Installed by the coup. Killed in battle.
11th: As Minister of State, he served as Interim President, pending snap election.
14  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 15, 2014, 05:48:43 pm
Death of President Bonaparte in battle has immediately sent shockwaves thought America and the world at large. Despite initial fears (of hopes, in case of some) that his demise would mean yet another anarchy descending upon the United States, the government did not fell apart, proving that the regime created by Napoleon can be more permanent than the man himself. Some of the "notables" genuinely wanted to avoid another "era of instability", while others simply did not wish to gamble now in their own interest. So, everything was done by the book. As soon as the dreadful news reached Washington, the most senior Minister was installed as interim President, pending snap election. We're, of course, talking about...


Martin Van Buren, 11th President of the United States (ad interim)
September 18, 1827-present

Van Buren's already monstrous ego was futher stimulated with his accession to the highest office of the land, yet he had this sad realization that, for all his skills and influence, it was temporary honor only. Everybody knew the next President must command personal loyalty within the Army and, after Napoleon himself, there was only one man who could possibly could fill the fallen giant's shoes, someone who was, in many ways, surprisingly similar to Napoleon: Marshall Andrew Jackson. And he was ready to go for it.

Napoleon's state funeral was a grand affair. The former Emperor of the French and President of the United States, a man who, at diffrent times and under diffrent circumstances, left his enduring mark at two diffrent continents, was laid to rest in the National Cathedral.

Meanwhile, in the world of living, the snap election for new, full seven-years term were set on January 9, 1828 and General Jackson was running with very little opposition, so far managing to unite all elements of the new regime.


Andrew Jackson: 87%
Others: 13%



Marshall Andrew Jackson, 12th President of the United States
January 19, 1828-present
15  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Oxford School of Absurdity, Ignorance, and Bad Posts IV on: September 15, 2014, 05:17:02 pm
don't belittle memphis he has just been enlightened by THE CHART



So science could only take place in the West? Typical Occidenti-centric bias on your part.

Come on now. You can't expect too much of memphis.
16  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2014 Senatorial Election Polls / Re: NH-CNN: Dead heat on: September 15, 2014, 05:13:19 pm
This doesn't line up at all with what other polls have shown. CNN's pollster has ties to a Romney bundler, which is very interesting.

You're right: the other poll from today shows Brown up 2%. This poll doesn't jive with the Brown lead.

And here comes Mr. It's Not Over. How is Rick Santorum doing? Is he still in the race?

Stop with this anti-Italian bigotry.
17  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President on: September 15, 2014, 04:54:14 pm
New Regime's Domestic Programs

The Bonaparte's Presidency was marked by a series of highly symbolic moves, including rebuilding and enlarging the Executive Mansion (now called the Presidential Palace), introducing new uniforms and ranks to the Army, most notably Marshall of the United States, adopting a slightly former Imperial Eagle to the official presidential seal. Even hanging was replaced by the guillotine as standard for civilian executions in mid-1823, which proved to be extremely popular among American urban population.


Guillotining in Philadelphia, ca. 1826

Yet, it would be mistake to think that the new regime was focused solely on these spectacular, yet symbolic measures. Beside restoring (relative) internal stability, adopting the new constitution and introducing codified civil law, the administration fully realized the only way to rebuild America was to adopt major domestic policies, particularly on fields of infrastructure and education.

Interestingly, the major proponent of these policies was Foreign Minister John Quincy Adams who had long envisioned America with modern roads, channels and schools. Although Adams was in agreement with Education Minister, he also alienated Interior Minister Richard M. Johnson, a very stubborn fellow, who accused him of overstepping his portfolio, while Ministry of Internal Affairs was statutory responsible for "coordinating federal domestic programs in cooperation with other interested departments"). Adams-Johnson feud, as well as the fact that large sums of the nation's budget were eaten by the Army (which had to be prepeared to counter any foreign threat), limited the initial scale of these projects, though start has been made.

It was clear that, despite restoring internal order, no new beginning is fully possible without at least securing neutrality of the British Empire.


Napoleon's Presidential Style

For those remembering Napoleon's Imperial days at the Tuileries Palace, arrogant in victory, full of angry denial in defeat, the style he has adopted as President would be quite a surprise. Once in office, President Bonaparte rigorously observed all republican customs to put all fears he's intending to proclaim himself the Emperor of the United States, to rest, which he notably underlined by adding the word "Republic" to the country's name. Some believed that his European downfall and need to reinvent himself in a very diffrent environment "humbled" the Corsican, although it's far more possible he simply took a lesson from his failures. Certainly, he realized not only he must appease fervently anti-royalist sentiments prevailing in America, but also that any appearance of "returning to his old ways" would make a truce with Britain even harder than now.

A particularly memorable moment came during the cabinet meeting in March 1822, when Secretary of State for War, General Poniatowski, addressed the President "Your Majesty", to which Napoleon gave him a sharp reprimand. Oui, Mr. President[/b], another of his former Imperial Marshall, now Minister for West Soult, quickly said.


Slavery

Abolitionists were not encouraged by Napoleon's poor record on the issue, remembering that he has reintroduced slavery in the French colonies back in 1802, as well as attempted to suppress slaves uprising in Saint-Domingue.

They fears were quite understandable, especially since a large part of Napoleon's power base were made up from Southerners, attached to their way of life. While Napoleon himself did not own any slaves (though seemed to be indifferent to any moral repercussions of the issue), his regime was filled with powerful Southern slaveholders, such as Marshall Jackson, Justice Minister Taney or Interior Minister Johnson.

Accordingly, not only the President did not attempt any moves toward abolishing or restricting slavery, but gave a green light toward it's expansion to all of Louisiana.

Unsurprisingly, Napoleon's support for slavery became an issue for the British propaganda, though, ironically, the British Empire still did not completely outlawed slavery in their colonies.


Anti-American British cartoon, focusing in slavery


Diplomacy

Due to his previous record, it is hardly surprising that Napoleon's rise to power in America was not warmly received abroad, although degrees of enmity varied from open calls to mount an expedition to "destroy the Corsican monster once and for all", proposed by King Frederick William III of Prussia, to indifference, exhibited by the Austrian.

The biggest threat was, of course, represented by the British Empire, holding Canada. Like all other powers, London declined to recognize Bonaparte's government, although provided no support whatsoever for exiled President Calhoun nor ill fated Federalist uprising in Boston. Luckily for the United States, both British and Spaniards in the West were presently tied with internal conflicts within their respective Empires, but that was only temporary. By 1823, only business-minded Netherlands and two tiny German principalities exchanged diplomatic representatives with New America.

That, of course, did not prevent stubborn Adams from waging international campaign for recognition and at least truce. A golden opportunity came in 1825, as the new Whig government in London made it clear Britain is not interested in waging another war against the United States, unless their possessions, or possessions of their allies, are threatened. This, combined with a breakdown between London and Madrid regarding disputes in the Carribean, helped to establish an informal diplomatic relations between two sides with Portugal, the oldest English ally, acting as a proxy. The new Prime Minister, Marquess of Lansdowne, made it clear to Adams that while the United Kingdom cannot extend any formal recognition to the Napoleon's government at that point, he can promise a de facto recognition if Washington meet certain conditions (maintaining naval limitations and refraining from any expansion westward). With a desperate need to settlement, it was all America needed.

The truce has been tested when 1827 arrived and, after a series of naval incidents in the Carribean, Spain declared war on the United Kingdom. London offered Washington, again via the Portuguese embassy, an "OK" on conquering East Florida in exchange for help in attacking Oregon via US territory. While somewhat uneasy with a prospect of British expansion in the West, the United States took this opportunity to once and for all make peace with Britain and take Florida.


Fallen Giant

Despite advise of his ministers, President Bonaparte just couldn't resist leading his troops to the battle one more time. Leaving them behind in Washington, he quickly entered West Florida, without declaration of war, even before full mobilization was completed.

Conquering Florida was actually quite easy task, given lack of stronger Spanish garrisons there, so Napoleon was expecting a quick and easy victory, after which he can return to Washington. While breaking organized resistance from the Europeans was indeed simple, American troops meet a fierce guerrilla warfare from the Seminole Tribes. While controlling major cities, Seminoles proved to be very competitive opponent in the wilderness.

Despite Jackson's advice to return to Washington in glory, as the main objective was meet, and leave pacification of Seminoles to his generals, Napoleon got very pissed and insisted on crushing the Indian "rebellion" himself.

And so, on the day of September 18, 1827, near what would later become the city of Napoleonville (Duval County), President Napoleon was struck down by a Seminole bullet while inspecting the troops. He died later that day, the second American President killed in battle.


RIP Napoleon Bonaparte
10th President of the United States (1821-1827)
18  Questions and Answers / The Atlas / Re: Let's talk about KCDem. on: September 15, 2014, 03:19:58 pm
No Sawx Sad

Completely off-topic, but why did you change your username, Windy?
A joke about south park with Kal Tongue

Kenny-chan kawaii princessu!
19  Forum Community / Forum Community Election Match-ups / Re: hifly15 vs Alec Baldwin Twitter Account on: September 15, 2014, 03:10:32 pm
I prefeer Alec Baldwin Sh*tter Account.
20  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President on: September 15, 2014, 02:58:45 pm
Their Last Stand

Despite suspending of all political parties' activities for a period of five years, the Federalist Party managed to largely bypass the decree by remaining operative under a cover of various "clubs". These clubs were, of course, limited to New England, as Federalists' condition remained quite pitiful after disastrous War of 1813. Nevertheless, while done as a major power, Federalists retained pockets of influence there, especially in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

They probably would remain undisturbed and perhaps, just perhaps, would have a chance for a recovery in time, at least as a regional political power in the North, if not for an action that was, without a doubt, the greatest political suicide since a certain Virginia moron, named James Madison, decided to join the battle instead fleeing the hell away from burning Washington.

To be fair, party's elders were not to blame, as it was entirely an initiative of the grassroots, deeply frustrated with their decline and Napoleonic rise. Hoping, foolishly, for the active help from the British Empire (still stuck in India), a part of Federalist militia rebelled in Boston, taking over the city and proclaiming former President Alexander Hamilton the "only legitimate leader of this country just as he is the only legitimate heir to General Washington" (John Adams would disagree), and Napoleon "a foreign invader, a pirate and an usurper".

The brief, hopeless, though indisputably brave uprising of semi-paramilitary Federalist mob was easily crushed after merely a month since taking over Boston by troops dispatched under General Scott (who was given command as a test of his loyalty, which he passed with flying colors).

Although the whole "Federalist Uprising" was doing of some impatient young activist, Justice Minister Taney and War Minister Jackson took this opportunity to commence a wide purge of remaining Federalist elements in the country. Among those most screwed by "association" was former President Hamilton, who has no idea about him being proclaimed a "legitimate leader" until it was all over. He was tried before a hastily formed military tribunal and sentenced to death by firing squad (owing to his status as former General). In a grand spectacle of imperial power, President Napoleon commuted his sentence to lifetime house arrest moments, before Hamilton was to be riddled with bullets, due to "his former services to this country".


Seriously, guys, WTF is that all about?

Within less than three months since the uprising failed (July 1822, to be precise), the remnants of once mighty Federalist Party, and thus right-wing opposition to the new regime, were history.
21  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Scottish independence - The Official Atlas Forum mock referendum on: September 15, 2014, 01:23:27 pm
I'd rather have all of the UK under a Labour government than it minus Scotland under a Tory government and Scotland under some yucky nationalist government.

You do realize SNP is basically social democratic?

From what I understand they are still to the right of Labour. Or at least the Scottish wing of Labour. I remember Bono found them OK (and said they're still a generally a pro-market party) and remember that Tory afleitch doesn't seem to mind them.

Still, putting them in the same category as f**king Golden Dawn Nazis is... bizzare, to say least.

There is a huge difference between Golden Dawn or Jobbik-style nationalism and merely wanting your country to be independent.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Fredrik Reinfeldt on: September 15, 2014, 01:20:46 pm
More left-wing than Polish mainstream left.

Which is fycking depressing.
23  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Would Edward Snowden deserve the Nobel Peace Prize? on: September 15, 2014, 01:19:41 pm
More so than Barack Obama, but still no, as there are far worthier candidates.

This.

24  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Petition for Adam LeBron FitzGerald to start his own Update-equivalent thread on: September 15, 2014, 12:15:34 pm
I'm all in favor of containing Adam in a single megathread.
25  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: Buchanan: Hillary has never been right on Foreign Policy. on: September 14, 2014, 05:43:06 pm
Cuz Buchanan is such a respected authoritah on foreign policy.
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