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101  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 19, 2014, 03:20:20 pm
The People's Autocrat


Protector of the People's Liberties
Emperor of these United States


Emperor Jackson did genuinely believe in huge, practical difference between "royalism, based on inequality and privilege for few", and "modern system, where one man is entrusted by his fellow citizens to protect their liberties and combat the power of elite and unelected, hereditary aristocracy".

Due to this, as well as his aversion to "that damn posh stuff", Jackson carefully maintained a very humble style, making sure that, outside of adopting an imperial title, nothing else about his reign would bear even the slightest reminiscent of a monarchy. He was getting very angry (and we all know how hot tempered the man was) when addressed as "Your Majesty", insisting that if he must be styled, then "Your Excellency" would be more than enough (as "Mr. Emperor" would be, for obvious reasons, dumb). He held no coronation nor investiture ceremony. Furthermore, the Emperor made it clear no titles of nobility, even purely honorary and nonhereditary, are going to be permitted.

Internationally, Jackson's proclamation as Emperor has very little impact. He was, of course, being ridiculed by the European press as a "nouveau riche", but the change did not affect existing diplomatic relations.
102  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Oxford School of Absurdity, Ignorance, and Bad Posts IV on: September 19, 2014, 01:50:21 pm
Torie and his likes should be guillotined.

A motion to decapitate Torie with a mechanical device was put forward.

Someone must second the motion.
103  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Senator Previous Poster most Reminds you of on: September 19, 2014, 12:40:08 pm
I can't really pin him, so I'll go with Rand Paul as relatively closest.
104  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of this Gordon Brown speech on: September 19, 2014, 12:38:53 pm
So you're going to spam us with your new-found Britannia obsession for like two weeks?

Is that even a question?
105  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Post something you admire about the previous poster on: September 19, 2014, 12:37:49 pm
What I really like like about him is that he's staying away from the forum drama and just goes on, contributing his thoughts.
106  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Post something you admire about the previous poster on: September 19, 2014, 10:31:18 am
Hash is very knowledgeable and funny. Interactions with him are never boring. I've learned a lot of things from him over the years I'm posting here.

Also, he's a competent moderator, maintaining International Elections' board high quality.
107  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Why has the British Conservative Party been so unpopular for decades now? on: September 19, 2014, 07:00:36 am
In 2010, the Tory party won the election because of the coalition with the Liberal Democratic leader, Nick Clegg due to the election results showing a hung parliament after disgust with the Gordon Brown-lead Labour Party. Since 1997, when the Tory Party lost in a landslide over Tony Blair's Labour Party, the Tory party has been unpopular and fielded uninspiring leaders after John Major resigned. Why has the Tory party been so unpopular?

Are you implying John Major was inspiring?
108  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: How would a Free Scotland be politically different from the UK? on: September 19, 2014, 06:58:26 am
Scotland is Vermont? 

I was thinking more like West Virginia or Western Pennsylvania. 

#TypicalAtlas
109  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Favorite Hillary Clinton tribute video on: September 19, 2014, 05:25:51 am
IceSpear, only you would make a thread like this. Tongue

I disagree.
110  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Post something you admire about the previous poster on: September 18, 2014, 02:07:51 pm
He was very brave to put such a disguisting picture in his signature.
111  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Scottish independence - The Official Atlas Forum mock referendum on: September 18, 2014, 01:00:47 pm
...

Al nailed it, again.
112  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Major German newspaper: Putin talks about invading other Eastern countries on: September 18, 2014, 09:49:50 am
And if Angela Merkel wanted, she would briought her troops to Warsaw and Vilnius within two days as well. So what?
and this time, they'd be welcome!

There's first time for everything.
113  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Major German newspaper: Putin talks about invading other Eastern countries on: September 18, 2014, 08:22:28 am
And if Angela Merkel wanted, she would briought her troops to Warsaw and Vilnius within two days as well. So what?
114  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The t_host1 Institute of Comedy on: September 18, 2014, 07:25:24 am
don't belittle memphis he has just been enlightened by THE CHART



He forgot about the Baroque Age.
115  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Scottish independence/opebo's banning correlation on: September 18, 2014, 07:22:08 am
Me taking a poo three days ago/opebo's banning correlation?
116  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Post something you admire about the previous poster on: September 18, 2014, 07:19:43 am
Killing the Bishop of Banff.
117  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum prediction thread on: September 18, 2014, 06:13:44 am
No: 53%
Yes: 47%

Nobody resigns
118  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The New Irony Ore Mine on: September 18, 2014, 05:28:35 am
Can we stop acting like he is some kind of martyr?  
119  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 17, 2014, 04:39:32 pm
Jackson was, of course, correct. Even for his great personal popularity, declaration of Empire was, indeed, very controversial, even with many representatives of his Southern base, where traditions of Jeffersonian Republicanism were still alive. Naturally, any leader less popular wouldn't succeed with what Old Hickory just did, but it wasn't easy.

Even Napoleon did not dare to proclaim himself the Emperor of free American people! Henry Clay (who, by some weird administrative error, was not put in the protective custody, along with likes of Adams and Johnson) yelled at the rally in his native Kentucky. He knew we abbhore royalism. That's why our nation was born in first place. We rejected King George, and I'm confident we will reject King Andy!

We reject Kings too, as symbols of oppression and reaction, Minister Van Buren responded to Clay at very publicized meeting in New York. When political elites failed to emancipate common American man, the very man who made this country possible, it's up for the extraordinary leader like Marshall Jackson to stand for the common folk as the People's Emperor in the Empire of Progress and Freedom!

Soon after his famous, or infamous according to some, address in Frankfort, Henry Clay lost his life in awkward accident, felling off his horse.

Fortunately for Jackson, or Emperor Andrew I if you wish, the turmoil took less than three months with only isolated cases or resistance stronger than words. Most of the people did believe in difference between reactionary Kings and People, even if some belief was conditional.

For his side, Andrew I was quick to make sure he means business, decreeing almost universal suffrage among white males, effective "next election", as well as personally making sure that remaining roadblocks for domestic development programs are removed. The Empire has won first round.

According to famous "Fourth Imperial Decree", roughly outlying structure of the government before new constitution could be adopted, the Emperor continued to preside of the cabinet, although Andrew I, focusing on making political decisions and being averse to bureaucratic work, decided to pick a person to maintain the administrative machine, including coordinating all departments. The job went, unsurprisingly, to Minister of State Van Buren, designated by the decree as "Premier Executive Assistant to the Emperor". Thanks to this, the office became known, at first informally, as Premier of the United States, basically Prime Minister.



Presidents of the United States

1st: George Washington (N-VA), 1789-1797
2nd: John Adams (F-MA), 1797-1801
3rd: Aaron Burr (DR-NY), 1801-1805
4th: Alexander Hamilton (F-NY), 1805-1809
5th: James Madison (DR-VA), 1809-1813
6th: Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA), 1813-1814
7th: Joseph Bradley Varnum (DR-MA), 1814-1818
Acting: Interim Governing Council, 1818-1819
8th: Thomas Jefferson (DR-VA), 1819-1820
9th: John C. Calhoun (DR-SC), 1820-1821
10th: Napoleon Bonaparte (M-LA), 1821-1827
11th: Martin Van Buren (N-NY), 1827-1828
12th: Andrew Jackson (M-TN), 1828-1930

Office abolished

Nonpartisan
Federalist
Democratic-Republic
Military


NOTES:

3rd: Elected by the House of Representatives. Defeated for reelection in 1804.
4th: Defeated for reelection in 1808.
5th: Reelected by the House of Representatives in 1812. Killed. in battle.
6th: As Vice President, he succeeded Madison. Although he styled himself as "Acting President", he would later be considered the 6th President by historians. Died in office.
7th: As Senate PPT, he succeeded Gerry. Elected on his own right in 1816. Deposed and executed.
8th: Installed by the IGC as a ceremonial figurehead. "Retired."
9th: Installed by the IGC. Deposed and fleed the country.
10th: Installed by the coup. Killed in battle.
11th: As Minister of State, he served as Interim President, pending snap election.
12th: Proclaimed himself Emperor after a successfull self-coup


Constitutional Emperors of the United States

1st: Andrew I (January 30, 1830 - present)


Premiers of the United States

1st: Martin Van Buren (N-NY), February 3, 1830 - present


Vice Presidents of the United States

1st: John Adams (F-MA), 1789-1797
2nd: Thomas Jefferson (DR-VA), 1897-1805
3rd: Charles C. Pinckney (F-SC), 1805-1813
4th: Elbridge Gerry (DR-MA), 1813
Vacant, 1813-1817
5th: Wilson Cary Nicholas (DR-VA), 1817-1818
Vacent, 1817-1821

Office abolished

NOTES:

4th: Became President
5th: Deposed along with President Varnum, but not prosecuted
120  General Discussion / History / Re: "Americanism" and the US Presidential Election of 1916 on: September 17, 2014, 02:11:51 pm
You have to remember that 1916 had not only World War I in full swing, but the Easter Rising had occurred in April of that year and many Irish Americans were pissed at Wilson for his Anglophile foreign policy.  Irish Independence leaders in the US went as far as to throw their weight behind Charles Evans Hughes, a Republican (the horror), because he was at least "an honorable man".  

It's quite funny that when De Valera arrived to the United States, he was confident Wilson will receive and recognize him as "President of the Irish Republic".

On a side note, Wilson was accustomed with using term "unAmerican" well before his political career, in his academic writings, though, arguably, it wasn't that uncommon at the time.
121  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: The New America on: September 17, 2014, 12:51:47 pm
Go on.
122  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: hearts vs spades on: September 17, 2014, 12:37:41 pm
Sam Spades.
123  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Scottish independence referendum prediction thread on: September 17, 2014, 12:15:23 pm
I predict Teabaggers here in this USA will draw flimsy comparisons and demand their own Independence Referendum

Independence from what though?


Does it matter?
124  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of NJ Christian on: September 17, 2014, 11:38:26 am
Awful views, but I reserve my opinion of him as a person until he's around a little longer.
125  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Oui, Mr. President (RIP Nappy) on: September 17, 2014, 11:36:53 am
It Just Had To End That Way...

To keep the short short, Jackson's first year in office, despite all his popularity, was quite difficult, with the only noteworthy success lying in the foreign affairs realm.

Interestingly, Napoleon's turned out to be a blessing in disguise for American policy. Although the former Emperor's reputation (once he was out of sight) has been steadily improving in Europe, now dominated by the reactionary Holy Alliance, somewhat out of remembrance of his enlightened policies, somewhat out of pure nostalgia, there was too much bad memories (if only) for European powers to completely bury the hatched and extend an official recognition to the new regime.

Once Bonaparte was dead, however, nothing stood in a way of formalizing already unofficial cooperation between British Empire and Washington, which resulted in formally exchanging ambassadors in mid-1828, as well as ratyfiyng several important trade pact.

To be fair, Jackson had relatively little to do with the diplomatic breakout, with Minister of Foreign Affairs John Quincy Adams handled most of it. Though Jackson had retained all of Bonaparte's cabinet, animosity between him and Adams was as strong as personal. For worse, empowered with his diplomatic successes, Adams' influence steadily grew.

Jackson also faced troubles from the right. While he and Adams were in agreement at least about one issue: domestic development programs, a conservative wing of the governing camp, still led by Richard M. Johnson, kept sabotaging the plans.

But the worst problem was Jackson's lack of influence in the Congress (as opposed to his personal popularity within the masses and loyalty of the Army). The opposition, led by stubborn Henry Clay, now again a Senator from Kentucky, made sure to block any progress of Jackson's policies.

The Constitution of 1821 failed to secure an extension of the suffrage to all (or almost all) white males, which in some way made Jackson's presidency politically impotent.  

The standoff went for a year and a half, with the President's opponents having an upper hand. But Jackson wasn't a man to be f**ked with, something his rivals seemed to forgot. What is our Constitution worth is the President, who is supposed to lead, is as powerless as some damn castrated jackass? Jackson complained. He had a good excuse to act: to protect the right of (white male, of course) masses, the "common men", against elitist grab of power.

Jackson did have a loyalty of the Army, but with internal order established under Napoleon, as well as stronger civic institutions, he couldn't repeat the "Second Revolution" on his own. He need to secure a support of, if not all then at least, some elements of the civilian administration. Fortunately, ambitious Minister of State Van Buren, was more than happy to lend a helping hand.

The opposition was not prepeared for the strike. On September 11, 1829, President Jackson had invoked his reverse special powers by placing the entire country, for the first time in history, under a martial law, which enabled him to "suspend" the Congress and place key opponents under "protective custody". The self-coup was a resounding success.

Four months later, after a long of thoughts, Jackson finally did something Napoleon, for obvious reasons, couldn't. The people are ready for freedom, he said in a special message. But the elites are not. To ensure the people's freedom and prosperity, a drastic and, I realize that, controversial measures must be taken.

With these words published on the January 30, 1830, President Jackson became "Constitutional Emperor of the United States".


Yes, I'm super cereal about this.
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