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601  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: June 01, 2011, 11:06:11 pm
Churchill is missing from your >25% map.
Fixed.  Let me know if I missed anything else and I will fix it.  I will do Tories over 15% and over 10% tonight.  ON the weekend I plan to do the NDP and maybe the Liberals and Bloc Quebecois depending on how much time I have.
602  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Fall 2011 (provincial) elections on: June 01, 2011, 01:33:30 am
The BC Conservatives are a non-issue. What is an issue is the demographic which both that party and the BC Liberals wish to attract; voters who were enraged over the HST. With no electoral action over the tax rise since the referendum (which was tremendously successful), the Liberals will not risk being portrayed as the anti-populist party. A swing in the Interior or in the Fraser Valley towards the NDP would be significant enough to give the left a majority.

The Clark government knows the difficulty of renegotiating the HST. If the tax is here to stay, the Liberals have to keep swing voters from jumping ship with policy that would lessen the burden, such as tax cuts.

The NDP leftward shift is insignificant too. Adrian Dix, a former minister in the Glen Clark government of 1996-2000 is suffering "Red Ed" syndrome. But the demographics of the province has shifted so much that he has the chance to impress the majority of voters who have no clue about him.

In the case of the Fraser Valley, it is pretty solidly Conservative so I cannot see the BC Liberals losing here.  They won by pretty large margins.  As for the Interior, you are right about Kamloops, Prince George, and the Kootenays, but the Okanagan Valley and Peace River Country is unlikely to go NDP.  I also disagree that BC has swung to the left.  If you look at the recent federal results, it is quite the opposite.  The Tories got 46% in BC.  Now I realize there are some crossover Tory-NDP votes.  As for the BC Conservatives I don't think they will get a lot of votes, but as you saw in 1996, they don't need to get a lot to split the pro free enterprise vote and thus allow the NDP to win.  Being from BC originally, I would hardly describe it as hardcore NDP, although they do have a strong base and certainly can get over 40% without too much difficulty, although if you look at BC's history, whenever the pro free enterprise vote has united behind one party, that party has always won.  With the exception of the 2001 election, the NDP has always had a strong opposition but they only win when the pro free enterprise vote is divided. 

As for the Red Ed syndrome, Britain is a whole different ball game and never mind the Conservatives have actually generally polled at or above the 36% they got last year.  The Labour Party is only ahead as the Lib Dems have imploded and much of that has swung to the Labour Party.  There seems to be a lot of anger amongst Lib Dem voters at backing the Tories, which is really not something that can be applied to BC.  If anyting Britain is sort of like Canada federally since if you took England only, the Tories would have a majority, but Wales and especially Scotland tend to vote much more left than England much the way Quebec does.
603  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: June 01, 2011, 01:25:21 am
I will do Tories over 15% and over 10% later.  I know the Tories got over 15% in only 31 in Quebec, but all but two in English Canada (Davenport and Toronto-Danforth were the two they missed and they got 14%) while they got below 10% in 24, all in Quebec.  I will also try to work on the NDP, Liberals, and BQ over the weekend.  Since the Greens were in single digits in most ridings, I won't bother with them.  I can say the Liberals only got above 50% in two ridings which were both in Newfoundland & Labrador and the BQ failed to crack the 40% mark in any riding.
604  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: June 01, 2011, 01:22:20 am
Looking great, Miles! One correction, however - I noticed that in your final map, you've included Edmonton-Strathcona as a Conservative-held seat.

I'll edit the post to remove my mention of the correction later.
  I was going percentage of the popular vote, not who won.  In Edmonton-Strathcona the Tories got over 40%, but still lost as it was pretty much a two way race since the Liberals were pretty much non-existent.
605  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: June 01, 2011, 01:17:53 am
Here is Tories over 35%.  187 seats nationally, 178 were in English Canada while only 9 in Quebec.  By province (2 NL, 6 NS, 3 PEI, 8 NB, 9 QC, 75 ON, 11 MB, 14 SK, 28 AB, 30 BC, and NU)



Conservatives over 30%.  Only 10 in Quebec, but only 30 in English Canada where they got under 30%.  Of that 7 in Atlantic Canada (4 being in Newfoundland & Labrador), 16 in Ontario (9 in Toronto, Hamilton Centre, 4 in Northern Ontario, and 2 in Ottawa) 3 in Manitoba, and 4 in British Columbia (3 in Vancouver + Victoria)



Conservatives over 25%.  Only 15 in Quebec, but above that in all but 16 in English Canada (2 St. John's Ridings, 2 Halifax area ridings, Acadie-Bathurst, 8 in Toronto, Ottawa Centre, Victoria, and Vancouver East)



Conservatives over 20%.  Only 20 in Quebec, but all but 7 in English Canada (Halifax, Acadie-Bathurst, Parkdale-High Park, Davenport, Trinity-Spadina, Toronto-Danforth, and Vancouver East)


606  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: June 01, 2011, 12:44:11 am
Here is the Tories over 55%.  There were 70 such ridings (1 in NS, 3 in NB, 18 in ON, 7 in MB, 6 in SK, 24 in AB, 10 in BC)



Tories over 50%.  2 in NS, 1 in PEI, 4 in NB, 1 in QC (Maxime Bernier's riding), 40 in ON, 9 in MB, 10 in SK, 25 in AB, and 15 in BC a total of 107 seats



Conservatives over 45%.  134 nationally of which 131 were in English Canada so the majority there while only 3 in Quebec.  By province (3 NS, 1 PEI, 6 NB, 3 QC, 51 ON, 10 MB, 13 SK, 26 AB, 20 BC, and NU)



Cons over 40%.  161 seats so a majority.  The majority west of the Ottawa River + New Brunswick while minority elsewhere in Atlantic Canada and off course Quebec (1 NL, 4 NS, 1 PEI, 7 NB, 4 QC, 69 ON, 10 MB, 13 SK, 28 AB, 24 BC and NU)


607  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 31, 2011, 11:52:47 pm
Here is the party by percentages,  I coloured in all the ridings they got above a certain percentage as shown below.  First lets start with the Tories.  Please note these are rounded to the nearest tenth of a percent

Tories over 80%.  Only two ridings Wetaskiwin and Crowfoot



Conservatives over 75%.  Other than Portage-Lisgar, all of them are in Alberta.  Portage-Lisgar is the riding of Candace Hoeppner who promised to scrap the gun registry.  Also it was the Tories best showing outside Alberta in 2004 and 2006 so arguably the most Conservative riding outside Alberta



Conservatives over 70%

Mostly in Alberta, but three outside (Souris-Moose Mountain, Portage-Lisgar, and Provencher




Conservatives over 65%:  Mostly in the Prairies.  24 ridings nationally and everyone except Abbotsford which is the in the heart of the Fraser Valley bible belt was in the Prairies



Conservatives over 60%: 40 ridings nationally.  30 were in the Prairies, while 3 in BC, 6 in Ontario and one in New Brunswick.

608  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Liberal Leadership Convention 2012-3 thread on: May 31, 2011, 11:14:13 pm
Orchard: You're joking right?



No I am not actually.  He won't win the Liberal leadership but much like the PC leadership race he could play kingmaker.  He has about 30,000 loyal followers who will go wherever he goes.  He is almost a cult like leader in some ways.

As for joking matter here are mine though.

Joe Volpe: He can not only win amongst those eligible to vote, but is popular amongst the dead and kids.  Heck I am sure he can find a way to get cats and dogs to support him. 


Gordon Campbell:  If people get tired of the Tories perhaps they will turn to another free enterprise option.  After all he replaced the BC Liberals as the free enterprise party which was previously the Social Credit.  And he could learn French easily, after all his wife was a French teacher (and BTW I actually had her as my French teacher in elementary school and this is not a joke.  I didn't know much about politics back then, but everyone was hoping Campbell would run for premier so they could get rid of her as she gave out detentions, more homework than other teachers and had no problem failing you if you deserved it unlike some other teachers.  She taught at Queen Mary Elementary School which is on the West Side of Vancouver for those of you who are interested.)

Garth Turner: Loves to spout off and as a leader of the turd party as Chretien would say he can spout off all he wants.  In fact the Liberals needs as much media attention as possible.  The danger is being marginalized.

Jennifer Granholm:  Ignatieff didn't live outside of Canada long enough and we need someone who is both a dual citizen and lived outside of Canada for a long time.  After all she only lived her first three years of her life in Canada.  For those of you who don't recongize the name, she is the former Democrat governor of Michigan
609  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Fall 2011 (provincial) elections on: May 31, 2011, 11:05:33 pm
The BC Liberals must be afraid of the BC Conservatives. Why else would they take a page from the NDP playbook and raise the minimum wage, and promise to reduce the HST to 10% if voters keep it? With the possible emergence of the BC Conservatives, they seem to be pushing the NDP further to the left... will it work?
  That might also explain why Christy Clark is bringing out Jay Hill, Chuck Strahl, and Stockwell Day.  Another problem she faces on her right flank is it is well known she is a federal Liberal, whereas Gordon Campbell was pretty quiet about his federal affiliation although he seemed more conservative than Liberal.  Off course not all BC Conservative votes will come from the BC Liberals.  It is about 2/3 from the BC Liberals and 1/3 from the NDP as many populist types who voted Reform in the 90s but NDP provincially would vote BC Conservative, but not BC Liberal.  I think if it looks like the NDP might win, the Conservative vote will decline.  The Globe and Mail had a good discussion on this recently.
610  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 31, 2011, 07:02:47 am
Talk about the open holes for the Liberals.  Its amazing that a party that a majority a decade ago is irrelevant in much of the country while a party that barely clung to official party status a decade ago is now competitive in much of the country and even where not competitive at least they are in second and not getting blown out of the water.  I guess that should be a lesson to all parties that you can improve if weak and if in government, don't get too arrogant or what happened to the PCs in 1993 and now the Liberals can happen to your party.
611  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Atlas on: May 30, 2011, 11:46:07 pm
Now Here is Northern Canada



We'll see when the actual polls are out how they match up, but I suspect most will match based on past results and this time around's results
612  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Atlas on: May 30, 2011, 11:34:50 pm
Here are mine for Western Canada







613  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Atlas on: May 30, 2011, 11:15:05 pm
Here are my preliminary predictions for Quebec and Ontario.  I will admit Quebec is tough to predict although I think the general picture will probably look close to this.  In Ontario Hamilton and Frontenac County are the only two I am unsure about.  The others I am pretty much positive on.



614  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Atlas on: May 30, 2011, 10:55:40 pm
Here are my preliminary predictions for Atlantic Canada.  Once the polls come out I will update with the actual results







615  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Atlas on: May 30, 2011, 10:08:53 pm
Like your 2008 election map.  These are not definitive but based on the results, my guess is outside Quebec we will see the following changes.

Tories pick up one of the two Labrador divisions

Cumberland County, Colchester County, Kings County, and Queens County flip to the Tories while possibly one or two of the Cape Breton counties go Tory

Madawaska County flips to the Tories

Numerous divisions flip to the NDP in Quebec and the Liberals win zero, while the Bloc Quebecois might win a few and the Conservatives will hold most although maybe not all in the Appalaches-Chaudieres and one in the Saguenay.  Also maybe one in the Ottawa Valley as the area adjacent to Renfrew-Nippissing-Pembroke tended to vote for Lawrence Cannon in much larger margins than the other parts of the riding.  I believe the Canadian Alliance even won a few polls here back in 2000.

In Ontario, York Regional Municipality, Peel Regional Municipality, and Nipissing District flip to the Tories.  Hamilton is still unknown since although I show the NDP slightly ahead, this excludes the polls in the Niagara West-Glanbrook portion which tend to favour the Tories.  Frontenac County is a tough call since although the Liberals won Kingston & The Islands, they got clobbered pretty badly in Lanark-Frontenac-Lennox & Addington.

In Manitoba, it will be interesting to see if the Liberals hold Division 23 or if it flips to the NDP.  Pretty small population so tough to tell, although I believe Tina Keeper was from this area this why it went Liberal last time around.

In Saskatchewan, the two northern divisions probably went NDP this time around as the Liberals got in the single digits in Desnethe-Missinippi-Churchill River.

In BC, I can confirm the NDP won the Capital Regional District, but my guess is everything else stays the same. 

In Nunavut, considering the Tories won by a much larger margin this time around, they probably took all three divisions but tough to know until we see the polls.
616  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 30, 2011, 09:59:21 pm
I expect the NDP will probably take the lead at some point, although the dynamics are somewhat different as the Tories had a 22 point lead in English Canada and 18 point lead in Ontario thus while the NDP could pull ahead in either it will be a lot less common than it was for the Liberals who were usually competitive in Ontario and not that much stronger in Quebec than the Tories unlike the NDP.  I should note Dion routinely pulled even or ahead right up until the election so for whatever reason it seems the Tories always poll lower in between the writ period.  Whether the NDP will swap positions with the Liberals or not remains to be seen.  Also I expect the most unpopular policies of the Tories to be in the first two years.  As for spending cuts, they will no doubt generate a lot of opposition in Quebec, but I am not sure the impact will be totally negative in Ontario.  Harris had an approval rating close to 50% in his first term and the Liberal spending cuts in the 90s proved quite popular, so a lot depends on whether people perceive them as ideological or simply to get things back on track.  If perceived as the former, it will hurt them a lot, but if the latter it may help them.  It could also hurt them in Atlantic Canada although considering how badly wacked the Liberals got in 1997 over the EI changes I suspect the Tories will be careful to ensure any cuts don't hit the region harder than others to avoid facing losing 2/3 of their seats like the Liberals did in 1997. 
617  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Liberal Leadership Convention 2012-3 thread on: May 30, 2011, 09:54:08 pm
While it is true the Conservatives did well amongst the Italians in Ontario, that doesn't necessarily transfer over to the Quebec.  Pretty much amongst any ethnic group, they will do better in Ontario than in Quebec.  Still I think the NDP could potentially gain Bourassa if it is an open seat.  By-elections take on their own personalities so really tough to say.

As for another leader, how about David Orchard.  He loves to be a tourist in parties that were once strong but a former shell of themselves.  And unlike the NDP who promise to renegotiate NAFTA, he promises to rip it up.  And he is from the West.  Now to be serious I don't think he would win, but considering how many loyal followers he has who will follow him to any party he might play kingmaker much like he did in the PCs.
618  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Liberal Leadership Convention 2012-3 thread on: May 30, 2011, 04:15:49 am
I guess you could add Carolyn Bennett, the only problem is I don't think she speaks very much French.  Sheila Copps seems too much from the past, so unlikely if you ask me.  Anne McLellan would be an interesting choice although considering the Liberals are pretty much non-existent in Alberta, I am not sure how keen they would be on choosing someone from that province especially considering that she would face an uphill battle winning her own seat.  Heck from 1993 right through 2004 she never won her seat by very much and that was when the Liberals were much stronger.  As with Carolyn Bennett, the one plus she has is that she is a doctor and considering how important health care will be as an issue in future elections, that could help I guess.  Any others of the 34 MPs we covered who are bilingual?  Pretty much anyone who is not bilingual we can exclude.
619  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 11:54:56 pm
Nice to see the NDP win Vancouver, but it's a shame they didn't do better on the island.
  Vancouver is sort of an odd one out.  Much like Toronto it was a three way split.  Ironically the BC Liberals finished slightly ahead in both 2005 and 2009.  The NDP strength is really along the Sky Train route excluding the RAV Line.  Vancouver Centre is the only non-NDP riding the Sky Train passes through while Newton-North Delta is the only NDP riding it doesn't pass through.  In addition the areas in non-NDP ridings for both the RAV Line and Sky Train are largely underground so otherwise the areas where the Sky Train is above ground is generally NDP territory.  I've also tried applying transit types to the GTA.  Otherwise the GO Train ridings are mostly Tory.  The subway ridings were mostly Liberal prior to this election, but now a mix.  In fact this was the first election since 1988 the Tories won any of the Subway ridings.  The Streetcar is more your left leaning ridings although St. Paul's and Toronto Centre went Liberal while Etobicoke-Lakeshore went Tory.
620  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 11:34:07 pm
In the case of Vancouver Island, I agree that strategic voting hurt them in Saanich-Gulf Islands.  However in the other two ridings they failed to win, the demographics are far less favourable than 20 years ago.  In Nanaimo-Alberni, the north side of Nanaimo is the more affluent part while the south side in Nanaimo-Cowichan is the working class part thus the split.  Parksville to Qualicum Beach is full of many seniors and rapidly growing thus the Conservative strength here.  In fact I believe Qualicum Beach has the oldest median age of any Canadian municipality.  The NDP has some strength in resource towns like Port Alberni, but their share of the population is not as large as it once was.  In the case of Vancouver Island North, if you took Comox out, the NDP would have won it in all of the last four elections.  Comox also has a large seniors population, while Courtenay, Campbell River, Port McNeil, and Port Hardy have a slightly rightward tilt, but not by much, while the rest of the riding is heavily NDP.  In fact in the 2005 and 2009 provincial election, the media mistakenly called Comox Valley for the NDP as the Comox results were slower to come in, yet the BC Liberals won both times.  Nanaimo-Cowichan I think is less vulnerable as there isn't the large seniors' population and there is still a strong union base.  If anything Saanich-Gulf Islands is probably the most favourable Conservative riding they didn't win.  While the Gulf Islands lean to the left and Saanich is a real mix, Central Saanich and North Saanich are semi-rural with a weak union base, while Sidney has a large senior's population.  Victoria is really the only Vancouver Island riding the Tories have no chance at winning.  They have some support in the more affluent Oak Bay which goes BC Liberal provincially, but get clobbered in Victoria.
621  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Liberal Leadership Convention 2012-3 thread on: May 29, 2011, 11:26:44 pm
I would agree that McGuinty is centrist, while Trudeau is centre-left.  I don't know about his son, but his father was very much a supporter of bigger government.

I would add a few who are not MPs

Gerard Kennedy

Position: Centre-left

Pros: Originally from the West and a strong supporter of greater grassroots support.

Cons: A weak performer in the last parliamentary session and couldn't hold his own seat

Martha Hall-Findlay

Position: Centrist

Pros: a woman, not part of the old boys club who has long dominated the Liberal Party and has a positive vision to make people want to support the Liberals instead of running on fear of the opponents.

Cons: largely unknown and lost her own seat


Ken Dryden

Position: Centre-left

Pros: a hockey great which is Canada's national sport and also the architect behind Canada's failed childcare program.

Cons: Almost invisible in opposition and couldn't win his own seat

John McCallum

Position: Centrist to centre-right

Pros: bilingual and has a strong financial background so could help the Liberals regain their strength on the economic front which they have surrendered to the Tories.

Cons: Comes across as rather arrogant and not rather appealing, in many ways a big turn off.

John Manley

Position: Centre-right

Pros: Has much experience and very strong credentials, particularly on the economic front.

Cons: His centre-right positions might cause some left leaning Liberals to migrate to the NDP.  Also considering the amount of money he makes in the private sector, I don't see any advantage in returning to recisitate and third party

Frank McKenna

Position : Centre-right

Pros: A very successful premier who won every single seat in New Brunswick which was a province that went largely Conservative.  Also has lots of experience and knows how to win.

Cons: Been out of politics too long and may have trouble appealing to the left wing of the Liberal Party due to his strong Bay Street connections.  Also he makes way more money in the private sector than he ever would as Liberal leader thus monetarily little incentive to run for the position.
622  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 09:19:09 pm
Here is British Columbia

BC Interior

Con 52.3%
NDP 32.9%
Lib 6.6%

Northern BC (PGPR, CPG, and SKV)

Con 51.8%
NDP 36.1%
Lib 4.7%

Southern Interior

Con 52.4%
NDP 31.8%
Lib 7.4%

Vancouver Island

NDP 38.5%
Con 38.4%
Lib 7.9%

Greater Victoria (SGI, Vic, and ESQ-JDF)

NDP 33.7%
Con 33.4%
GRN 22.9%
Lib 9.9%

Rural Vancouver Island

Con 43.6%
NDP 43.4%
Lib 5.8%

Mainland BC

Con 47.4%
NDP 31%
Lib 14.8%

Lower Mainland

Con 45.4%
NDP 30.2%
Lib 18.2%

Greater Vancouver (includes WVSSC and PMM)

Con 43.8%
NDP 30.9%
Lib 19%

BC outside GVRD

Con 47.5%
NDP 34.2%
Lib 7.6%

Fraser Valley & Southern Lower Mainland (wikipedia and DS)

Con 53%
NDP 26.6%
Lib 14.9%

Vancouver & Northern Lower Mainland (wikipedia and DS)

Con 38.8%
NDP 33.3%
Lib 21.1%

Vancouver

NDP 33.1%
Con 31%
Lib 27.7%

GVRD Suburbs

Con 48.3%
NDP 30.2%
Lib 16%

Coastal BC (LWM + VI)

Con 43.5%
NDP 32.4%
Lib 15.5%

North Shore (WVSSC + NV)

Con 47%
Lib 26%
NDP 20%

Eastern Suburbs

Con 43.7%
NDP 42.1%
Lib 9.4%

Surrey (NND, SSWRC, SN & FPK)

Con 43.5%
NDP 30.5%
Lib 20.4%

Fraser Valley (Langley, Abbotsford, & CFC)

Con 62.3%
NDP 22.1%
Lib 10%
623  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 09:05:17 pm
Why does everyone include Parry Sound-Muskoka in Northern Ontario? geez. It's hardly northern.
  I agree its not really Northern Ontario, although I think in the Ontario re-distributions whereby they kept the 1996 ridings for Northern Ontario and use the 2003 boundaries for Southern Ontario, Parry-Sound-Muskoka was included.  Nonetheless I gave it with Parry Sound-Muskoka and without.  Certainly in term of voting patterns Parry Sound-Muskoka is more like Southern Ontario as the Tories usually win here much like Rural Southern Ontario and the NDP is quite weak unlike Northern Ontario.  I think Algonquin Park which runs directly to the East of much of the riding is usually seen as the dividing point between North and South.
624  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 09:02:10 pm
Here are the Prairie provinces

Manitoba

Winnipeg

Con 46.5%
NDP 27%
Lib 22.9%

Rural Manitoba

Con 63.7%
NDP 24%
Lib 7.4%

Saskatchewan

Rural Saskatchewan

Con 65.7%
NDP 26.7%
Lib 4.9%

Saskatoon (includes the rural portions of ridings that include the city)

Con 53.8%
NDP 37.1%
Lib 6%

Regina (includes the rural portions of ridings that include the city)

Con 47.1%
NDP 34.3%
Lib 15.8%

Southern Saskatchewan (wikipedia)

Con 55.3%
NDP 30.9%
Lib 11%

Northern Saskatchewan (wikipedia)

Con 57.6%
NDP 34.3%
Lib 5.2%

Alberta

Calgary

Con 65.9%
Lib 13.7%
NDP 12.4%

Edmonton (includes all 8 ridings that enter the city including rural portions)

Con 56.1%
NDP 25.6%
Lib 10.4%

Rural Alberta

Con 77.1%
NDP 13.9%
Lib 5.2%
625  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian Election Results Thread on: May 29, 2011, 08:54:15 pm
Here is Ontario outside the GTA

Midwestern Ontario

Con 50.1%
Lib 23.4%
NDP 21.4%

Kitchener-Waterloo Region

Con 47.4%
Lib 26.5%
NDP 21.5%

London (three city ridings only)

Con 39%
NDP 32.3%
Lib 25%

Southwestern Ontario

Con 45.4%
NDP 33.5%
Lib 17.4%

519 Area code

Con 48%
NDP 26.9%
Lib 20.7%

Essex County (excludes Leamington which is Chatham-Kent-Essex)

NDP 45.5%
Con 38.6%
Lib 12.8%

Windsor (includes Tecumseh which is in Windsor-Tecumseh)

NDP 52%
Con 32.7%
Lib 12%

Central Ontario (705 area code)

Con 54.9%
NDP 17.9%
Lib 15.4%

Central Ontario (DS)

Con 55.1%
NDP 21.1%
Lib 16.1%

Central Ontario (wikipedia)

Con 55.4%
NDP 19.7%
Lib 16.5%

Northern Ontario (includes Parry Sound-Muskoka)

NDP 41.6%
Con 35.6%
Lib 18.9%

Southern Ontario

Con 45.1%
Lib 25.8%
NDP 24.4%

Northern Ontario (DS)

NDP 43.9%
Con 32.9%
Lib 19.9%

Ottawa (amalgamated version)

Con 41.7%
Lib 30.9%
NDP 23%

Eastern Ontario (Wikipedia and DS)

Con 53%
Lib 21.3%
NDP 19.7%

613 area code

Con 47.6%
Lib 25.8%
NDP 21.3%
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