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51  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: What is the greatest ally of the United States? on: March 07, 2015, 04:00:10 pm
I think Canada is really the instantaneous, obvious answer, since other countries are further away and their interests may diverge more. Israel (an important, close ally, but not on Canada's level) just gets a lot of attention because of how frequently it conflicts with its neighbors. I'm a little confused at why everyone is overwhelmingly answering the UK -- doesn't practically every argument in its favor apply even more strongly to Canada?
52  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 07, 2015, 02:22:04 pm
Knesset Jeremy was out with his average for the week of March 1-7, 2015, today. The numbers add up conveniently to exactly 120 seats.

Zionist Union (Herzog) 23
Likud (Netanyahu) 23
Joint List (Odeh) 13
Yesh Atid (Lapid) 12
Jewish Home (Bennett) 12
Kulanu (Kahlon) 8
Shas (Deri) 7
United Torah Judaism (Litzman) 7
Yisrael Beiteinu (Liberman) 6
Meretz (Gal-On) 5
Yahad (Yishai) 4

The changes this week were very small and insignificant; the gains of the center-left made during the past two weeks seemed to stall. The only change in terms of seats was the loss of a seat by the Zionist Union to the Joint List (specifically, Eyal Ben-Reuven to Abdullah Abu Ma'aruf); this will probably make it harder on balance for the left to install a Prime Minister, since the Joint List will not participate in the government.
53  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Politicians that you disagree with but can tell are good PEOPLE and mean well on: March 05, 2015, 08:14:30 pm
After six years of his Presidency, I've come to the conclusion that Barack Obama is this.
54  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 11:01:33 pm
I'm not going to go back over the last three pages and critique ag's inane comments word-for-word, like I was doing previously, but I will just note that this conversation began as ag criticizing nationalism (while he is now rejecting certain foods on a nationalistic basis) and has shifted towards ag apparently supporting Ashkenazi traditions -- forgetting that the desire to return to Israel was (in some places, still is), of course, one of the most-treasured and important of these, expressed every year at Passover.

Well, among the important Ashkenazic traditions of recent lore has been devote Marxism. And, even as a convinced bourgeois counterrevolutionary I would not renounce that Smiley

A trait we share with many groups, though one we've moved away from more than others have. But basically, this is true Smiley
55  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Israeli Elections, 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 09:54:35 pm
Voted Yisrael Beiteinu the last time we had a poll on this, but Lieberman running to the center and back and the general decline in his support have left me unimpressed; Kahlon, too, seems to be dropping the ball. Lapid seems like a nice balance between showing a nicer face to the world and not actually giving up anything important. Yesh Atid. But I'm not particularly certain.
56  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Do you have any desire to be President (or leader of your country)? on: March 04, 2015, 07:36:25 pm
It is of course entirely unrealistic, because of my background and views and the presence of hundreds of millions of competitors, but the honest answer is 'yes', which is how I voted.
57  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 07:24:30 pm
I'm not going to go back over the last three pages and critique ag's inane comments word-for-word, like I was doing previously, but I will just note that this conversation began as ag criticizing nationalism (while he is now rejecting certain foods on a nationalistic basis) and has shifted towards ag apparently supporting Ashkenazi traditions -- forgetting that the desire to return to Israel was (in some places, still is), of course, one of the most-treasured and important of these, expressed every year at Passover.
58  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 02:13:56 am
Question: You are opposed to a Jewish state, a Jewish state in Holy Land (like the Montreal Hasidics) or just opposed to religion-based states?

Great question.

1. I think the original Zionist idea was harebrained. If some Jews wanted to be a part of a majority they always could assimilate. What made the Jewish community unique was precisely its perseverence in the Diaspora. The Zionists despised what really made Jews Jewish in my eyes, so they get no sympathy from me.

No Jew at that time would've said that what made Jews unique was their status as a minority -- it was their unique traditions and values, which they were trying (successfully) to protect.

3. I do not particularly like religion-based (or, for that matter, nation-based) states, but I realize they exist and will exist for a long time to come. Do not have any problem with that, really. As long as they do not try to imply that I somehow should have any sort of allegiance to them.

Not should -- but can, if you ever want to.



Read again, more closely. I defined Zionism for you.


And Communism, of course, is merely love for thy neighbor. If you agree with that definition, I agree with your definition of Zionism.

Why, communism is the seizure of private property, forced collectivization, shortages, and limitations imposed on internal movement, speech, and the practice of religion. We are speaking of what the two movements have actually done.


On that note, are American Jews Jewish? They are a minority, true, but not in any particular way a persecuted one.


Those of them who do not scream when they hear words "Judeo-Christian" aren't.

How many Jews in the world do you think are Jewish? (If you can understand the question.)


Конечно. Есть синагога и кнессет, куда мы приглашены.

До меня приглашение не дошло.

То что от приглашения отказался (как и моя семья), не означает что оно не дошло (и считать что не должно ни до кого не дойти, когда сам получил, довольно эгоистично). 
59  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 02:05:58 am

Would you rather they betrayed the ancestors who worked so hard to establish the Zionist movement in Europe, move it to the Middle East, and triumph, and have remained for all time under the rule of the ispravniks?


My ancestors did not. By then we have diverged. Though, I guess, one of my great grand fathers (or, may be, a generation further) - did go to Palestine, but quickly came back.

To my knowledge, neither did mine. (My grandfather went to Israel, but he quickly died there). We are speaking of the ancestors of modern Israeli Jews.



Do you not think the Jews around the world are speaking in good faith?


Of course they are speaking in good faith. And always saying different things.

But the question is whether you think, all of a sudden, they will all change their minds.


Comrade Khenin, is, obviously, Jewish.

I agree with this, though perhaps not for the same reason as you.



Wrong reasoning sometimes gives the right answer. Just try calculating 16/64 by canceling the sixes Smiley

Quite the appropriate example (if a bit simplified), since I am replying to you and working on some late-night calculus simultaneously.
60  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 01:57:57 am


Those between you and proper Israeli nationalists? I must confess I can't imagine the two of you plotted on the same line, so I don't know what comes between you.



Well, I have no problem with Israeli-born guys, who love their country, find it self-sufficient, identify with their native Hebrew - and do not want to bother about the Russians, etc. As long as they consider the Zionist project done with and would view me (if I were to come to Israel) as no different from a Thai migrant (as long, of coruse, they do not mind the Thai migrants), I am fine with them. In other words, I what I object to is Israel being called a Jewish state - because I object to the pretence Jews need a state. I do not mind Israeli Jews having their state, though.

You don't mind, I hope, Israeli-born guys who feel an attachment to other Jews around the world, who try to help them in their hour of need? (Such as Ethiopian Jews in the 1980s, soon afterward Russian Jews, etc.)

So you are saying that the Zionist left is Jewish. And that also the Ethiopians are Jewish? Does this extend to the Russian Jews also?

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. For that matter, it used to extend to Tutsis in Rwanda, you know.

Were Hutus Jews prior to Tutsis being Jews? Do any Jews live in Rwanda today?

I like this conversation: it has acquired the right shade of insanity, without which talking about Jewishness is impossible.

Me too -- I would not otherwise still be talking.


Supporting human rights is incompatible with opposing the notion of people getting a homeland in which they are free from ispravniks, prejudice, and dictatorship, and supporting that these things be torn down.


But that has exactly nothing to do with Zionism, does it?

Read again, more closely. I defined Zionism for you.



Ag, is "Jew" a synonym for "minority", or is there something more to it? I'm confused.



It is not enough to BE a member of a minority. One has to FEEL a minority to be Jewish.

On that note, are American Jews Jewish? They are a minority, true, but not in any particular way a persecuted one.

Самое важное - знать, что ни в синоде, ни в сенате тебе места нет.

Конечно. Есть синагога и кнессет, куда мы приглашены.
61  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 01:45:38 am

There are, in fact, many dozens of subdivisions of Jewish people, no one group more Jewish than any other, but that does not mean "Jewish" as a category is any less legitimate.


Everything is legitimate. I am telling you my personal characterization - the one that I have found useful. That is all.

But you just told me 6 million self-identified Jews living in Israel are not, in fact, Jews at all.


Why would you ever support a party like Hadash then? In the last Knesset, 25% of its delegation were ispravniks.

Isrpavnik, like being - or not - in a majority, is a state of mind.

So it's just entirely arbitrary, with those who agree with you not being ispravniks and those who disagree being such? In that case we're right back where we started.

Comrade Khenin, is, obviously, Jewish.

I agree with this, though perhaps not for the same reason as you.


More likely, there would be 4: the Haredim, the racists, the rabid anti-Zionists, and everyone else. I am fairly confident which would include the majority of the Jewish people, and thus would get priority over the word.


Many, many more. Sefardim, Ashkenazim, Russians, Georgians, atheists, Upper Eastsiders, etc. etc. The more the merrier!
The difference is that the Sefardi will not call the Ashkenazi any less of a Jew, nor will the Upper Eastsider to the Ethiopian, nor the Russian to the atheist. Hence they are all part of the "everyone else" category.

May be - or may be not. Today one may say one thing - tomorrow, something quite different Smiley

Do you not think the Jews around the world are speaking in good faith?

As a confirmed schismatic, this is exactly what I would like. You know, if you have 3 Jews, you should have, at least, 4 parties, shouldnīt you?

Ag, is "Jew" a synonym for "minority", or is there something more to it? I'm confused.



But they are Jews -- or, at least, some 80% of them are. Their ancestors have been through all the same tribulations and trials as yours.



Which is why I find their betrayal of the memory of our ancestors somewhat disconcerting.

Would you rather they betrayed the ancestors who worked so hard to establish the Zionist movement in Europe, move it to the Middle East, and triumph, and have remained for all time under the rule of the ispravniks?

You dodge the point. That by your own definition, they are Jewish.

By the way, are the Ethiopians Jewish, because they are also a minority in Israel? I need to figure out exactly how much of a SJW you are.

Some of them are, and some of the are not. Naturally, the most Jewish of them are the Christians.

The Christians who seemed to flee to a state full of so-called "ispravniks" for protection. Hmm...


You would read about a democratic state, with a Jewish majority and an Arab minority, that has a long record of treating all of its citizens as equal under the law (though it is defined as a state for the majority, as many states are), which is particularly impressive when you consider the atrocious records of its neighbors. You would also read about a state that has been attacked, for the identity ("race", if you will) of its people, time and time again, and then been blamed for defending itself -- the way, for instance, a child who finally snaps and breaks the schoolyard bully's arm will be suspended, not the bully.


Many thinks look good on Wikipedia, I know.

Read elsewhere, so long as it is not a biased news source.
62  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 01:25:31 am

This is the most horrible thing you've said so far. By what right do you tell someone they forfeit their ethnic identity by living somewhere, or consign a people to the status of an eternal minority? It's a shame "Israeli" isn't a race, because if it was I would know what to call your beliefs.

"Israeli" is a "race", as far as I am concerned - an "ethnic group", to be more precise, or a "people". Have nothing against them, as long as they do not pretend to be Jews.

But they are Jews -- or, at least, some 80% of them are. Their ancestors have been through all the same tribulations and trials as yours.



You are entitled to think what you want. Those who thinks only Zionists can be Jews are entitled to think what they want. Neither view has any inkling of support outside of pathos. Just something to consider.

You are absolutely right. They do not want to have anything to do with me, I do not want to have anything to do with them, so, in fact, we have a perfect coincidence of wants - no trouble whatsoever between me and proper Israeli nationalists.

It's completely the opposite -- you're invited to join them at any time, regardless of what opinions you might've held beforehand.

It is those inbetween that we all have a problem with.

Those between you and proper Israeli nationalists? I must confess I can't imagine the two of you plotted on the same line, so I don't know what comes between you.



You can start looking for one by reading the present State of Israel's Wikipedia article.

And, what is it that I would find there?

You would read about a democratic state, with a Jewish majority and an Arab minority, that has a long record of treating all of its citizens as equal under the law (though it is defined as a state for the majority, as many states are), which is particularly impressive when you consider the atrocious records of its neighbors. You would also read about a state that has been attacked, for the identity ("race", if you will) of its people, time and time again, and then been blamed for defending itself -- the way, for instance, a child who finally snaps and breaks the schoolyard bully's arm will be suspended, not the bully.



They are minority parties -- they have not yet managed to cut many beards.

And that is EXACTLY what I like about them. If they were majority parties, I would choose somebody else Smiley

You won't like them once you hand them razors.



You are entitled to think what you want. Those who thinks only Zionists can be Jews are entitled to think what they want. Neither view has any inkling of support outside of pathos. Just something to consider.

You are absolutely right. They do not want to have anything to do with me, I do not want to have anything to do with them, so, in fact, we have a perfect coincidence of wants - no trouble whatsoever between me and proper Israeli nationalists. It is those inbetween that we all have a problem with.

In that case I, as a proud member of the in-between vote to kick you all off the communal boat. Problem solved.

Perfect. And we shall just acknowledge that instead of one Jewish people there are a few dozens. That is exactly what I want.

There are, in fact, many dozens of subdivisions of Jewish people, no one group more Jewish than any other, but that does not mean "Jewish" as a category is any less legitimate.



It takes an astonishing amount of doublethink to oppose Zionism but support human rights.


It takes a complete ignorance of both the notions of Zionism and of human rights to think there is anything whatsoever conceptually realting the two.

Supporting human rights is incompatible with opposing the notion of people getting a homeland in which they are free from ispravniks, prejudice, and dictatorship, and supporting that these things be torn down.


This is the most horrible thing you've said so far. By what right do you tell someone they forfeit their ethnic identity by living somewhere, or consign a people to the status of an eternal minority? It's a shame "Israeli" isn't a race, because if it was I would know what to call your beliefs.

Let me be clear. I do not care how anybody else defines Jewishness. I have my own definition of it. In Israel, Arabs are the Jews and the Jews are the ispravniks. That is all.

Why would you ever support a party like Hadash then? In the last Knesset, 25% of its delegation were ispravniks.
63  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 01:11:36 am
Our friend Vosem here would object to saying that some Communists long ago were not vurdalacs, by pointing out that what matters is the actual, implemented Communism.

Not only is that not what I think, I've spoken to the contrary in this very thread:

There is a difference, morally, between being a communist in 1915 (when the ideology was completely untested) or even 1950 (when it's results were still not widely known) and being a communist in 2015, when what results from the adoption of the ideology is common knowledge around the world.

...

Einstein, whatever his ideas were, has nothing to do with actual implementation of the Zionist idea. May be, somewhere in another universe, there would exist a non-ispravnik state of Israel. But we only have one empirically observed implementation to consider.

You can start looking for one by reading the present State of Israel's Wikipedia article.
64  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 01:09:01 am


On the contrary -- the history of the United States begins as one of religious minorities fleeing persecution (and ispravniks) to set up their own state elsewhere where they can govern themselves.

They did not need a nation-state - still less, a theocracy, to do that.

It's the other way around -- firstly, they tried to make do without a nation-state, and what ended up happening is the ispravniks followed them across the ocean. Only once they finally established one, in the American Revolution, did they free themselves.



In that quote, I meant the Israeli ones who are part of the party "Hadash", but it doesn't particularly matter; it could apply to any country I can think of with a prominent Communist party off the top of my head.

I see no evidence they would be any worse than any random collection of people pulled of the street.

I see no evidence in Israeli elections that the median person pulled off the street would have an ideology so horrible.



Then refrain from supporting ispravnik parties (the way you define them), which are Balad, Hadash, and the UAL at the one end, and Shas, UTJ, and Yahad at the other.
 

Whose beards have they cut?

They are minority parties -- they have not yet managed to cut many beards. It is that they shout, and loudly, for oppression.

Actually, I will be a lot more in sympathy with, say, UTJ than with Likud.  Yes, they are medeival religious fanatics - but they never pretended to be anything else. But, then, they are what Jews were all these centuries of persecution. They want to maintain that lifestyle our ancestors died for - it is their choice. Of course, I would object to them imposing their lifestyle on me (or anybody else). But I have no problem supporting their desire to live their way. In particular, I find it horrifying that in Israel it is considered somehow "modern" or "progressive" to try to force these guys to serve in the army. As a proud draft dodger myself, I really find that attrocious. And attrociously anti-Jewish.

Of course, you understand that UTJ does try to impose their lifestyle on those around them through small battles over lifestyle (by trying to regulate where people sit in buses, or what it is women can wear outside).


How is that relevant? Israel isn't Lebanon or Syria.


This is the most horrible thing you have said so far.

The average Israeli, be they Arab or Jewish, has the fantastic opportunity of living out his life not worrying that rival militias will kill him, or that he will need to protect his family from them. This is not the case in some of Israel's neighbors. You seemed to be implying that it was also not the case in the State of Israel.


You won't catch me defending Meretz (which, unlike Hadash's token historical leftovers, is an actual bicommunal party, though still largely majority Jewish) too often, but it is precisely Meretz's Zionism and acknowledgement of human rights that make it a democratic party acceptable in a democratic society.



What does Zionism have to do with human rights (except in the breach, of course)?

It takes an astonishing amount of doublethink to oppose Zionism but support human rights.


The point of the post (which I don't think you missed) is that, because of community solidarity in minority communities, bicommunalism the way you define it can be virtually impossible to achieve, and leave you in the unenviable position of supporting very extremist parties because of it. The Republican Party is not a threat to Jews and blacks, even though they largely support its opponents. While there is a lot more bad blood in Israel, Likud is not much of a threat to Israeli Arabs either (who are, in fact, exempt from the draft -- it's probably more of a threat to your typical Israeli Jew).



Being a Jew means being a minority. When they became a majority, they stopped being Jews.

This is the most horrible thing you've said so far. By what right do you tell someone they forfeit their ethnic identity by living somewhere, or consign a people to the status of an eternal minority? It's a shame "Israeli" isn't a race, because if it was I would know what to call your beliefs.
65  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 12:39:39 am
Ah -- a fantastic example of an actual ispravnik, of the sort Zionists have been striving -- thankfully, largely successfully -- to liberate Jews from since Herzl first put pen to paper.


While Gen. Dragunsky was, obviously, a lot braver in battle than in peace,

This is true -- General Dragunsky, too, was not without redeeming qualities.

whose beard has he cut, exactly?

The Jews who were not allowed to leave the Soviet Union for a friendlier sky (as in Israel or the United States), or, like Natan Sharansky, were imprisoned for their Zionism. By endorsing such things, he gave them the veneer of acceptability.

Back on topic, this happened:
http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/1.645114
Marzel should be sitting in jail right now.

Agreed (though it doesn't, for me, make Zoabi a more sympathetic figure).


Do you really think the Communists would refrain from cutting beards, or govern more justly than these "ispravniks"?



Which communists? You seem to ignore a very crucial distinction here.

In that quote, I meant the Israeli ones who are part of the party "Hadash", but it doesn't particularly matter; it could apply to any country I can think of with a prominent Communist party off the top of my head.
66  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 04, 2015, 12:15:30 am
1. In my idiolect I use ispravnik to mean "the guy who cuts Jewish beards". I admit, I do not even pretend to use it in a historic context. Try to abstract from the "historic context" and you will, hopefully, figure out what I mean.

Do you really think the Communists would refrain from cutting beards, or govern more justly than these "ispravniks"?

2. As you can, probably, figure out, I have a problem considering any Zionist party "bicommunal".

I figured it out, but this is a ridiculous position, since without Zionism your "bicommunalism" would not even be possible.

3. The reason, of course, is, that, while I share with most of my Jewish brethren the fascination with Jewish history, I disagree on the lessons we are supposed to have learnt from it. Whereas I get from history the distaste to the figure of the ispravnik, Zionists merely objected to the ispravnik not being Jewish. I find that objection to be inadequate.

On the contrary -- it is Zionism that has freed Jews around the world from the figure of the ispravnik, in Russia, across Europe, and in North Africa, by permitting them a place to go when the depredations become too much.

3a. Well, clearly, a party that these days, at the present level of diversity of US population, is represented in Congress almost exclusively by White Christians (a token Jew and a token black notwhithstanding) can hardly be perceived as non-communal.

The point of the post (which I don't think you missed) is that, because of community solidarity in minority communities, bicommunalism the way you define it can be virtually impossible to achieve, and leave you in the unenviable position of supporting very extremist parties because of it. The Republican Party is not a threat to Jews and blacks, even though they largely support its opponents. While there is a lot more bad blood in Israel, Likud is not much of a threat to Israeli Arabs either (who are, in fact, exempt from the draft -- it's probably more of a threat to your typical Israeli Jew).

4. Well, I guess, it is hard for me to be more explicit on why one could want to join Hadash (or to stay as far away from Israel as possible, in order to avoid joining Hadash, as is my case). To make it very plain: I do not like the ispravnik parties.

Then refrain from supporting ispravnik parties (the way you define them), which are Balad, Hadash, and the UAL at the one end, and Shas, UTJ, and Yahad at the other.

More generally: I dislike nation states.

What party do you suppport in Mexico that denies Mexico being a state established for Mexicans?

5. Meretz is a Zionist party.

You won't catch me defending Meretz (which, unlike Hadash's token historical leftovers, is an actual bicommunal party, though still largely majority Jewish) too often, but it is precisely Meretz's Zionism and acknowledgement of human rights that make it a democratic party acceptable in a democratic society.

I guess, I have been clear, havenīt I?

You have certainly been repetitive, but you've been as clear as mud.

What else is a national homeland good for, if not to get your own ispravnik?

How are you going to avoid ispravniks without having a national homeland?

Then again, I am related by marriage to this gentleman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Dragunsky

Canīt say I am proud of this either Smiley

Ah -- a fantastic example of an actual ispravnik, of the sort Zionists have been striving -- thankfully, largely successfully -- to liberate Jews from since Herzl first put pen to paper.

And, in any case, shouldnīt we care not only about not being killed, but also about not killing?

How is that relevant? Israel isn't Lebanon or Syria.

There are other ways of achieving that. As, for instance, the United States has strived to.

On the contrary -- the history of the United States begins as one of religious minorities fleeing persecution (and ispravniks) to set up their own state elsewhere where they can govern themselves.
67  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: MD-Senate - Sources: Mikulski expected to retire on: March 03, 2015, 11:05:29 pm

Probably leaving the path open for Pelosi to be succeeded by Xavier Becerra as soon as Hoyer retires, since Clyburn doesn't look likely to go for it.

So, why would Van Hollen do this? Is it that his House career looks like a dead end? Pure boredom, like with Markey? Or ambitions for an office that is easier to aspire to from the Senate than the House?

Unless you're speaker or minority/majority leader, being a senator is always an upgrade to being a congressman.

Van Hollen has devoted his life, since 2003, to Democratic congressional leadership, and it is very likely that when Pelosi and Hoyer step aside either him or Xavier Becerra, of California, will become Speaker. I'm inclined to think he has more power in the House than the Senate, but he might be anticipating it being removed. My tweet was oblique future presidential speculation.

There is, I realized the other day, another way for O'Malley to stay relevant after 2016 if his presidential run doesn't get him notoriety or an appointment: Maryland only has a consecutive gubernatorial term limit, so he could be the candidate against Hogan in 2018.
68  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: How do you sleep at night? on: March 03, 2015, 10:59:11 pm
I typically fall asleep and wake up on my back. While I don't know, having never seen myself sleep, I have it from my family that I am an extremely motionless sleeper -- which makes sense, since I always get up at the same place and in the same position as when I went to bed.
69  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Israel General Election Thread: March 17 2015 on: March 03, 2015, 10:41:42 pm


Into a bind of having some sort of weird discriminatory attitudes towards Israeli Jews, where you don't believe their state has a right to defense or the necessary high level of morality to hold national elections?


Nothing discriminatory. Part of my Jewish self-identification is that I do not like ispravniks of any origin. Unfortunately, all other Israeli parties have been parties of ispravniks. And I identify with the Jews. Which, in Israeli context, means Arabs.

You're using ispravnik in a sense totally divorced from its historical context, the way the radical left likes to use "fascist" and the American right likes to use "socialist" -- meaning nothing more than "political grouping I don't like". You continue to give no actual reason for not liking them.

Condensing the discussion a bit, the problem is that, in Israeli context, even I would have been forced to join the Communist party - though, of course, ideologically I am as staunch an anti-communist as it gets. Unfortunately, at this point this is the only non-communal party - there are simply no other options available.

This is rather ridiculous; Hadash, Meretz, and Avoda are all clearly bicommunal parties, and if you include Druze as a minority you quickly grow to include all the non-religious parties. But more to the point, it's a common thing worldwide for national minorities to vote en masse for their own parties, or for one of the main option to the exclusion of others; does the presence of the SSW in Southern Schleswig make all the other parties non-communal? Are Republicans non-communal because 95% of blacks vote Democratic?

  But that, of course, means, that you cannot make too many conclusions about an individual from his or her membership in the Communist party - there may be many good reasons to be there.

The floor is yours -- please tell us what they are.

Now, of course, M. Liberman has forced the Communists to join a communal joint list, killing the last available alternative. But, at the very least, they still do have some separate identity (thank you, Mr. Khenin and Mr. Burg).

Eh, I don't think they've had as much as Meretz. Could be wrong though.
70  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Hot or not: Lily Allen on: March 03, 2015, 05:29:42 pm
hot (normal)
71  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: Canadian federal election - 2015 on: March 03, 2015, 05:25:30 pm
B.Jenny Kwan, 48, M.L.A Vancouver-Mount Pleasant 1996- and critic Community Living B.C, former Vancouver City Councillor 1993-1996, Community Legal Advocate/former Actress, B.A-Criminology

I did not realize Kwan is so young. Because of the 2001 wipeout, isn't she the longest-serving New Democrat in the BC legislature?
72  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: ME-02: Emily Cain (D) running again on: March 03, 2015, 05:20:20 pm
Fantastic news!
73  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: WI-Sen: Feingold statement on stepping down from State Dept. on: March 03, 2015, 05:17:15 pm
Why didn't he run in 2012? (And on a related note, why didn't Rudy Boschwitz run in 1994?)
74  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Lief Reservoir of Simple Truths and Smart One-Liners on: March 02, 2015, 11:03:16 pm
Issues wise, the country IIRC leans more towards the Democrats POV than the Republican POV.

I wasn't taking this account, since people don't generally vote on issues. If you do, then I suppose overall it would be just about even.
75  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: MD-Senate - Sources: Mikulski expected to retire on: March 02, 2015, 09:40:39 pm

Probably leaving the path open for Pelosi to be succeeded by Xavier Becerra as soon as Hoyer retires, since Clyburn doesn't look likely to go for it.

So, why would Van Hollen do this? Is it that his House career looks like a dead end? Pure boredom, like with Markey? Or ambitions for an office that is easier to aspire to from the Senate than the House?
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