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1  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: September 09, 2014, 10:33:41 pm
In the fall of 1837 Prime Minister Andrew Jackson steps down.  He will still serve in Parliament (at least until the next election).  Martin Van Buren will become the new Prime Minister.  Richard M. Johnson will become Deputy Prime Minister.

Jackson gives his farewell address:  "Americans I want to thank you for giving me the chance to govern over the past few years.  I feel that I must step down as Prime Minister at this point.  We've done a lot.  Thanks again and God Bless the UPA."

Van Buren gives inaugural speech: "Americans, let's go forward and continue the progress of the Jackson government.   We need to have a bigger majority to get more things done.  We've seen a Governor General who wants to take sides and not allow certain bills to be signed.   Thanks and God Bless the UPA."

The election will take place on February 5, 1838.   Martin Van Buren vs. John Sergeant.
2  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: July 25, 2014, 07:28:48 pm
In the House of Commons the Democrats feel they can get Webster impeached.  They need 2/3 vote.

Vote to impeach Webster:
89 ayes
87 nays

Therefore Governor General won't be impeached.  2 Democrats voted with the Whigs against impeachment.

Jackson says he would like an early election.  However, the way the Democrats look now, they could lose a majority of seats in both Houses.
3  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: July 25, 2014, 07:19:26 pm
Parliamentary Investigation:

PM Jackson: We come here today to fight against Governor General Webster.

Opp Leader John Sergeant: I would like the opportunity to ask the Prime Minister and Governor General questions.

Jackson: Governor General Webster, did you think that it was right to put a dent in the governments bill passage?

Webster: I've said over and over again that I felt the bill was wrong.  I think what you're doing Prime Minister is a political move.

Jackson: No Mr. Governor General it wasn't a political move.  I felt that the bill should've been signed into law.

John Calhoun (one of the Democrats on committee): I believe that Mr. Jackson's going to go down as the worst, if not one of the worst Prime Ministers ever.  I'll help the Whigs on their vote to make the impeachment fail.

Theodore Frelinghuysen: I don't think that we need to investigate this as much as the Democrats think.  One thing I will say is, Jackson knew what he was getting into when he and other Democrat voted for Webster along with total Whig support.  He should've known better.  Thank you.


Jackson: When I supported Webster for Governor General I didn't think that he'd be as partisan as he was.   I feel that over the next coming days we need vote of impeachment.

Wait and see what happens.

4  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: July 03, 2014, 02:00:29 pm
Over the next few months there's bickering between Prime Minister Andrew Jackson and Governor General Daniel Webster.  Even Lord Opposition Leader John Q. Adams says "This is the worst government I've seen in a long time.  Next year let's win a majority in both Houses."  John Sergeant (Opposition Leader in the Commons) says "Let's hope we have a good majority and can show the Democrats they were wrong when it comes to what people want."

Jackson calls Webster "the worst Governor General in the history of the UPA."  Webster slams back "I sign what I feel is right and I veto what I think is wrong.  Prime Minister Jackson doesn't know what he's talking about."

Jackson proposes impeaching Webster.  "I feel that this Governor General should be impeached.  When a vote comes before the Commons we will sure vote to make sure Webster's out of office."

The vote to impeach Webster is scheduled for early May.  He feels that he can convince some Whigs to impeach Webster.

On May 5th, 1837 Jackson addresses Parliament "My fellow Americans, I feel that we need to impeach the Governor General.  He's taken sides on certain issues especially the Indian a Removal Act.  I wish that Opposition Leader John Sergeant would join me in the impeachment process."  As of right now there's a potential of 90-95 voting in favor of impeachment. However Jackson needs 118 votes.

Three Democrats, three Whigs and one Anti-Mason are set to ask Governor General Webster questions.  Jackson will be one of the Democrats and Sergeant will be one of the Whigs.

Former Deputy PM John Calhoun wants to see Jackson go down here.  He could help Jackson lose total confidence.

Current Deputy PM Martin Van Buren says "I believe what the a Prime Minister is doing is the right thing."

In the next election the Whigs look to win big.
5  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: June 30, 2014, 09:51:42 pm
In late January 1837 Michigan becomes the 26th Province.

New Composition:
House of Commons: 91 Democrats, 84 Whigs, 1 Anti-Mason
House of Lords: 30 Democrats, 21 Whigs, 1 Anti-Mason

Toward the middle of 1837 the economy starts to collapse.  The Democrats look to lose some seats in the next general election (set for 1838).
6  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: June 29, 2014, 11:22:00 pm
In October 1836 Sam Houston becomes the first President of Texas.  Prime Minister Andrew Jackson congratulates him.  "I want to wish Mr. Houston great luck during his Presidency."

In early 1837 Prime Minister Jackson states he will step down in the fall.  At that time Martin Van Buren would become Prime Minister.
7  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: June 16, 2014, 10:35:39 pm
By the summer of 1836 Arkansas becomes a Province.

House of Commons:
89 Democrats, 83 Whigs, 2 Anti-Masons

House of Lords:
28 Democrats, 21 Whigs, 1 Anti-Mason

Prime Minister Jackson is glad he has a few more Democrats in the Commons and Lords.  Also, at this point, Jackson says he may step down in early 1837.  If he did, Martin Van Buren would become Prime Minister. Wait and see what happens.
8  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: May 26, 2014, 10:55:44 pm
At the next election there will be 170 seats in the House of Commons.  This will mean in order to have a majority government you'll need 86 seats.  Also, at this time, Arkansas Territory is applying to become a Province.  If they do they will have 5 seats in the Commons and 2 in the Lords.
9  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: May 26, 2014, 10:35:25 pm
Also, at this point, Texas was close to a revolution with Mexico.  Prime Minister Jackson says "We will help the Texans fight their war against Mexico."  Governor General Daniel Webster states "I will give my assent to the Jackson government if they decide to intervene."

On April 18th Lord Melbourne becomes the UK's new Prime Minister.  Jackson and Van Buren send their congratulations to Melbourne.

In July 1835 the Catholic Apostolic Church is formed in UK.  Also around this time the Michigan Territory and the Province of Ohio are fighting over who will have Toledo.

Texas officially declares war on Mexico on October 2nd.   Jackson asks Parliament to pass legislation giving help to Texas.   The House of Commons passes the Military Aid Act of 1835 105-62.  The House of Lords passes it 32-16.

10  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: May 21, 2014, 09:49:15 pm
In early January Jackson tries to get enough votes in the Commons and Lords.  However in the end the override vote in the Commons is 97-70.  It never makes it to the Lords for a override try.  This was a terrible day for the Jackson government.

On January 30, 1835 Prime Minister Andrew Jackson is almost assassinated.  Richard Lawrence is the attempt murderer.  He is set to go to trial in April.

Over the next few weeks it is speculated that former Governor General, William H. Harrison, may run as a Whig in the next general election.
11  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: May 17, 2014, 01:06:41 pm
After separate meetings with Prime Minister Andrew Jackson and Opposition Leader John Sergeant, Governor General Daniel Webster decides to VETO the bill.

Sergeant praises Websters action.  "I knew Webster was on the right side of history".  However PM Jackson says "I had hoped he would've signed this but he didn't."   Jackson decides to see if he can override Webster's veto in the Commons and the Lords.  He needs 112 votes in the Commons and 32 votes in the Lords to override Webster's veto.
12  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: May 11, 2014, 10:09:50 pm
At this point Governor General Daniel Webster decides to consult with Opposition Leader John Sergeant after meeting with Prime Minister Andrew Jackson.   Webster says he wants to hear both arguments then officially decide.   Sergeant says "I hope to convince Webster to veto this."


The next day the meeting takes place.   Sergeant tells Webster "You must remember that when you were in the Lords you opposed this law.   You were a big opponent of it.   So it would be terrible to see you sign this into law."

Even MP Davy Crockett wants Webster to veto this.   "I will lose my confidence in Webster if he signs this into law."
13  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: April 23, 2014, 11:39:12 pm
Governor General Daniel Webster and Prime Minister Andrew Jackson meet to discuss Webster's possible veto.  Jackson says "The bill got a good amount of votes in the Commons as well as the Lords."  "I'd really like you to consider signing this bill Governor General Webster."  Webster says "I'll consider it.  However, I may lose my Whig support if I do sign this bill."

Wait and see what happens.
14  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: April 23, 2014, 11:33:35 pm
This is a fantastic timeline! I especially enjoy the very detailed legislative events and superb research behind them!

Thanks!  I appreciate that.
15  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: April 21, 2014, 09:18:57 pm
The Massachusetts state legislature elects former PM John Quincy Adams as a member of the Lords.  He will also, most likely be named Lord Oppostion Leader in the coming days.

Jackson congratulates Adams on his win.  He says "Mr. Adams is a great and strong man.  He fights for what he believes in."

In the House of Commons, Jackson tries to get votes to support the Indian Removal Act.  In the end the vote in the Commons 95-72.  Then it moves onto the Lords, with a vote of 29-19.  With the votes here, Jackson hopes he can show Webster that the bill has a good majority support and that he doesn't have to veto it.
16  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: April 04, 2014, 09:29:05 pm
In the House of Commons, Prime Minister Andrew Jackson proposes the Indian Removal Act again.  This time he hopes it can pass the Commons and Lords.  However, Governor General, Daniel Webster may veto it.  In that case Jackson will need 2/3rds of each House to override the veto.
17  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: March 30, 2014, 10:18:35 pm
House of Lords new composition:
26 Democrats, 20 Whigs, 1 Anti-Mason, 1 vacant seat

The state legislature of Massachusetts will soon vote to replace Governor General Elect Daniel Webster to fill his former seat.

On March 4, 1834 Daniel Webster takes office as the UPA's new Governor General.   He says "I plan to work well with Prime Minister Jackson.  Him and I have had our differences in the past but I believe we will come to agreements on a majority of things."

Jackson is a little worried about legislation over the next 4 years (unless there's another election called, that's when the new one will take place) since Webster is a Whig.  However, as Governor General, Webster can't take sides now.
18  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: March 22, 2014, 07:49:59 pm
In early January 1834the House of Commons meets to select the next Governor General of the UPA.

Governor General Election:
Daniel Webster, 110 votes
John Floyd, 57 votes

Daniel Webster (Opposition Leader in the Lords) will resign his seat and take office as Governor General on March 4, 1834.

Prime Minister Jackson says "I want to congratulate Lord Opposition Leader, Daniel Webster, on his win today in the House of Commons to become the next Governor General of the United Provinces of America."
19  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: March 19, 2014, 08:11:51 pm
House of Lords Vote:
26 ayes
22 nays

On October 5, 1833 Governor General Harrison, hesitant at first, signs it into law.

Also at this point Jackson decides to try to let the Opposition have a vote on the Second Bank of the U.P. Act. It fails in the Commons by a vote of 89-78.
20  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: No on 22 on: March 19, 2014, 01:37:23 pm
Very good TL.
21  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Past Election What-ifs (US) / Re: JFK Jr vs George W. Bush 2000? on: March 08, 2014, 01:17:39 pm
No experience whatsoever, he'd be more likely to run for the Senate in 2000, while Hillary runs in Illinois, a more interesting match up would be JFK Jr. vs. McCain 2008.

That's true.  I see your point.
22  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Past Election What-ifs (US) / JFK Jr vs George W. Bush 2000? on: March 08, 2014, 01:12:54 pm
What if JFK Jr had lived and was the Democratic nominee for President in 2000?  How would the race have gone?
23  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: February 16, 2014, 01:49:21 pm
House of Commons Tariff Vote:
87 ayes
80 nays

Prime Minister Jackson praises the vote. He says "Thank the Lord it passed the Commons.  Now it should safely pass the Lords."
24  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: January 29, 2014, 09:40:15 pm
In early November the Democrats bring forward the New Tariff Act.  It would repeal the tariff passed under the Clay government.  Jackson feels all Democrats will support this.  He needs every Democrat, except one, for it to pass the Commons.  He feels it will safely pass the Lords, so once it passes the test of the Commons it will most likely become law.

Opposition Leader, John Sergeant, says "Now is the time to stop this from passing.  I plan to meet with Democrats who are uncertain of supporting it.  Hopefully I can convince some to not support it."

Wait and see what the vote is.
25  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: American Parliament 1783-present! on: January 18, 2014, 11:19:40 pm
Prime Minister Jackson proposes legislation that would repeal the tariff created under the Clay government.  He feels in both Houses he can see it passed.  He'd like to see it passed before the end of the year.

"It's time we end this horrible tariff that former Prime Minister Clay forced on us all." said Jackson.

Leader of the Opposition, John Sergeant, says "We can't let this law be repealed.  It will be wrong for the government to do this.  I, as most Whigs, will do all I can do to make sure it fails.  Thank you."
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