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May 05, 2016, 01:46:21 am
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1  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Update for Everyone IV - Hungover on: May 03, 2016, 10:49:39 pm
just at a whole family size bag of ruffles

fml lol

Hate when that happens.
2  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Write the previous poster's presidential campaign slogan on: May 03, 2016, 09:55:09 am
down with cis
3  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 02, 2016, 09:36:41 pm
Really enjoying this TL. Great update!

Thanks! I appreciate the comment.
4  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 02, 2016, 09:34:04 pm
An Ode to Richard Nixon
Joan Hoff, May 1994


On April 22nd, 1994, Richard M. Nixon, 37th President of the United States of America, passed away from cerebral edema caused by a blood clot. While former President Dole, one of his proteges and perhaps his most popular successor, declared that the latter half of the 20th Century will be remembered as the "Age of Nixon", the late President has received little examination since leaving office. Despite his activity in Republican presidential politics and as a diplomat, actual discussion of the Nixon legacy and what his presidency was has been remained buried. This is in all likelihood due to having been sandwiched between John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson on one side, and Robert F. Kennedy and Bob Dole on the other. While he serves as a transitional president between the last liberal triumphs of the New Deal Era and the final liberal failures and conservative resurgence, many have accepted that he was merely a failed executive who got his comeuppance and retreated into the shadows.

However, an examination of the four years Nixon spent at the head of the world's most powerful country say a lot about both him and the nation. The pedestrian assumptions about the Nixon presidency were that he was a conservative out of his time, booted from office for failure to end the Vietnam War. What remains far from discussion is the litany of liberal legislation pushed for and signed by Nixon, as well as the numerous steps taken by his administration toward de-escalating both Vietnam and the Cold War. Moreover, had Nixon responded to conservative pressures on school desegregation, he might have won the day, as conservative vote-splitting in the South arguably cost him Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky. With Bobby Kennedy having taken the credit for a number of liberal initiatives pushed for by the Nixon administration, the Republican President's liberal legacy has been overshadowed.

Nevertheless, it was the second Kennedy administration that began the deregulatory spiral we are now in. In a world where Democratic politicians compete to unveil new plans for "entitlement reform" and for the money of Wall Street donors, one wonders what might the state of American liberalism be had Robert F. Kennedy not tainted its name in the 1970's. While the 38th President held a solid environmental record, he had little concern for regulation of the finance industry and records show that, had 1976 not been an election year, he would have been inclined to attach a hefty price tag onto the federal government's decision to bail out New York City. He replaced a "conservative" that had supported not only the EPA and detente, but the legalization of abortion, the ERA, the expansion of food stamps, the end of the draft, affirmative action, and a guaranteed minimum income.

After Nixon came a parade of the right; not only the first "New Democrat" Kennedy, but the conservative Southerner Brewer, herald of the right Dole, and so on. Holton, ironically, seems to be the last of the type of Republicans of the Nixon era--progressive, pragmatic, and principled. The current crew of apparent neo-confederates and business interests obsessed with gutting the welfare state that make up the current Republican Party looks no better. Had Richard Nixon been re-elected, it is interesting to speculate as to how the parties might have changed. A second-term Nixon, bereft of as intense pressure from his right-flank, might have come out in full support for the Equal Rights Amendment, have ended Vietnam just on time, and have successfully passed universal healthcare, twenty years before the current battle being waged. There is little doubt that the power of Goldwater's faction would have been greatly reduced, and the reactionary surge of 1980 staved off. Liberal projects supported by the second Kennedy administration would likely still have been pursued, and perhaps with more vigor--a man such as Nixon not afraid of appearing "too far left". The moderation of Nixon's Republicans in the nineteen-seventies might have been followed by a full-blooded liberal resurgence under a more fitting champion than Bobby Kennedy in the 1980's. Now, in 1994, a moderate Republican party, likely led by Lowell Weicker, John Anderson, or H. John Heinz--all of whom came to prominence around the acme of Nixon's type of Republicanism--might be in charge.
5  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Drinking habits by party affiliation on: May 02, 2016, 04:07:44 pm
Flawed methodology.

I think you put a higher value on cultural conservatism, whereas I (for example) think it's less relevant than one's political conservatism (i.e., a Bible readin' White Southern male who loves God and country and lives a traditional lifestyle but strongly supports unions, redistributing income and regulating the free market has no business calling someone like me a RINO or liberal of any kind).  Using your (presumed) framework, I think there'd be a correlation, I do admit.

EDIT: Heavy drinker (R)

I do agree that finding a correlation would be hard in the context of this forum, as we're missing wide swaths of the population, and people have reasons beyond "traditionalism" and Christian morality to not drink. Like I said in the other thread, one could just as easily see drunks as reactionaries--imagine your college leftist bitching about drunk "fratboys" or athletes that, when drunk, objectivize women, act tribally ("far too primitive for this ultra-sophisticated male feminist!"), yaddah yaddah yaddah. I feel like one might want to point out that these characters, while left-wing, might be... "illiberal" to certain extents. Think about how Antonio is not only "conservative" about drinking, but also would be suspicious of both contemporary ("liberal") and traditional gender norms--opposed to prostitution for feminist, as opposed to, say, religious reasons, and so on. Which is why a simple conservative-liberal dichotomy has limited use.

Also, see the poster right above me.
6  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: #NeverTrump (for GE) might have their candidate on: May 02, 2016, 03:30:03 pm
Also, is this guy even 35?

Can't find any indicator to say he is!
7  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Drinking habits by party affiliation on: May 02, 2016, 03:20:27 pm
Flawed methodology.

I think you put a higher value on cultural conservatism, whereas I (for example) think it's less relevant than one's political conservatism (i.e., a Bible readin' White Southern male who loves God and country and lives a traditional lifestyle but strongly supports unions, redistributing income and regulating the free market has no business calling someone like me a RINO or liberal of any kind).  Using your (presumed) framework, I think there'd be a correlation, I do admit.

EDIT: Heavy drinker (R)

Didn't bother to read your post. "Flawed methodology" in the sense that being drunk once shouldn't be that strong of an indicator. Even effing Antonio's been drunk once. If the survey responses were tailor to a range of drinking, more information could be gleaned from this. There are a total of only six options; secondly, if the respondent had been drunk once, it puts them in a camp with people who might be drunk three nights a week. How much information are you going to get from that? The options are zero and greater-than-or-equal-to one. Even though doing an actually methodologically rigorous poll might be impossible on this forum in this format, there was still at least a better way to do this.

Yikes, guess I'll return the favor.

Jesus man, pay attention to the edit. Your post addressed my worldview and not my comment on "flawed methodology". As such, I responded in order. I wanted to be upfront, though, rather than underhanded. I type semi-stream of consciousness.
8  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Drinking habits by party affiliation on: May 02, 2016, 03:10:09 pm
Flawed methodology.

I think you put a higher value on cultural conservatism, whereas I (for example) think it's less relevant than one's political conservatism (i.e., a Bible readin' White Southern male who loves God and country and lives a traditional lifestyle but strongly supports unions, redistributing income and regulating the free market has no business calling someone like me a RINO or liberal of any kind).  Using your (presumed) framework, I think there'd be a correlation, I do admit.

EDIT: Heavy drinker (R)

Didn't bother to read your post. "Flawed methodology" in the sense that being drunk once shouldn't be that strong of an indicator. Even effing Antonio's been drunk once. If the survey responses were tailor to a range of drinking, more information could be gleaned from this. There are a total of only six options; secondly, if the respondent had been drunk once, it puts them in a camp with people who might be drunk three nights a week. How much information are you going to get from that? The options are zero and greater-than-or-equal-to one. Even though doing an actually methodologically rigorous poll might be impossible on this forum in this format, there was still at least a better way to do this.

EDIT: Read your post. You're correct in your assumption, I guess. The "Bible thumper" might not be part of any Heritage foundation "conservative movement", but they will certainly be an impediment to progress. The essence of liberalism, as I understand it, was the triumph of individualism over tradition and, to an extent, community. In modern times, you can see this as advocated through attempts at universal, global norms being institutionalized through the United Nations as well as forum leftists guffawing at "muh aribtrary lines on a map". But I digress. Of course you're a "liberal Republican" in the sense that you're probably tolerant and perceive society in a relatively atomized fashion--individual over community, etc. (Didn't mean that in a hostile way, for the record)
9  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 02, 2016, 02:52:35 pm
The Neoliberal Consensus - The 1996 United States Presidential Election

Pete Wilson might, in another world, have been well-situated to win back the White House for the GOP. The moderate Governor of one of the most populous states in the union--and a swing state--that could brag fiscal responsibility and a commitment to tough-on-crime policies. Nevertheless, he had failed to secure a majority of the primary vote and had won the nomination only with significant concessions to those to his right. Meanwhile, the very people he would need as his base were in the process of rebellion.

Patrick J. Buchanan might have been the "heir apparent" to the Republican nomination in 1996. He nevertheless had grown tired of working within the Republican party. Following a wide fundraising and polling lead by the entrance of Pete Wilson, Buchanan had formally withdrawn from any Republican nominating contest and chosen to pursue instead the U.S. Taxpayer's Party nomination. With Wilson's nomination, the former speechwriter was beginning to attract a following equivalent to his 1992 run. In standing as a significant third choice between two neoliberal candidates, the Old Right conservative had begun to attract some support from the left, as well, including activists Lenora Fulani and Brian Moore. For voters looking for a candidate opposed to free trade and foreign intervention who would defend homeschooling and religious groups, Buchanan's brand was gaining significant ground.

The death knell, however, for the Wilson campaign was the attempt to "shore up" the party's deficit hawks while appealing to moderates by proposing "agrireform". In a campaign plank authored by former Nevada State Senator and veteran of the D'Israeli campaigns Areus Ho'kee, the candidate denounced the "billions pumped towards agribusiness, creating market distortions and comprising some of the real corporate welfare that our government is guilty of." The move backfired in the West, where Wilson should have been strong, with Democrats running ads featuring images of devastated family farms, while pundits discussed the "severe price surges" that would happen under the Wilson plan.

While the Republican vote appeared to be splitting and surrogates were savaging the Republican ticket, President Hart worked to appear above-the-fray. It would be the work of Vice President Wilder to rally record African-American turnout against "the candidate of entitlement-slashing and three-strikes laws" in states like Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, and Florida. Meanwhile, ads would be run across the fruited plain portraying Wilson as "wishy-washy" on abortion and a host of other social issues from "independent" political action committees. Of great effect were Lamar Alexander's own quotes about Wilson's record made during the primary campaign.

With Vice President Wilder focused on the South and the inner-cities, Hart concentrated on an area he was far more familiar with. Hoping to achieve sweeping victory, special emphasis was placed on the traditionally Republican Interior West as well as the electoral vote-rich West Coast. Appearing in campaign commercials and speaking engagements framed by mountains, fields, and the Pacific Ocean, the Democratic incumbent made a serious play for the area.

Above: Despite the President's cosmopolitan political orientation, Gary Hart adopted a rugged persona to help seize his home region in his ambitious bid for a landslide re-election.

With Hart having crafted in image as a centrist progressive in contrast to the "heartless" Wilson and the "small" Buchanan, the President and the Democrats made easy work of their opponents.


President Gary Warren Hart (Democrat-Colorado)/Vice President Lawrence Douglas Wilder (Democrat-Virginia) 384 electoral votes, 49.1% of the popular vote
Governor Peter Barton Wilson (Republican-California)/Former Secretary of Health & Human Services Andrew Lamar Alexander, Jr. (Republican-Tennessee) 154 electoral votes, 43.5% of the popular vote
Former White House Communications Director Patrick Joseph Buchanan (Taxpayer's-Virginia)/Economic Pat Choate (Taxpayer's-Oklahoma) 0 electoral votes, 7.3% of the popular vote
Others: 1.0% of the popular vote
10  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Drinking habits by party affiliation on: May 02, 2016, 01:31:23 pm
Flawed methodology.
11  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Update for Everyone IV - Hungover on: May 02, 2016, 01:30:53 pm
Semester GPA: 3.95
Cumulative GPA: 3.62

Five A's and an A-.
12  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 02, 2016, 11:43:09 am
1994 United States Senate Elections
Despite Tsongas' popularity, the Democrats were over-inflated and 1994 was not well-situated for them. If not for key gains against vulnerable incumbents, they might have lost control of the chamber.

Democrats: 51 (-2)
Republicans: 50 (+2)

Notable Races
Alabama: In a special election for Jefferson Dent's old seat, Governor Jim Folsom, Jr. was elected.
Connecticut: Senator Lowell Weicker was elected with the endorsement of the Democratic state party. His rival in state politics, Joe Lieberman, would be re-elected Governor with significant cross-over votes from Republicans. Many contemplated that he might switch parties with Weicker's decision to join the Democrats. Shortly after voting, Weicker would officially join the Democrats in order to solidify the party and gain favor for committee appointments.
Maine: First Lady of Maine Olympia Snowe is elected to the Senate as a moderate and protectionist. Her political career had taken a hit in 1978 with her primary loss to Thaddeus O'Connor. Nevertheless, she had soldiered on, returning to the state legislature and serving as the State's Attorney General and an active and popular First Lady to Governor
13  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 02, 2016, 10:49:13 am
1992 United States Senate Elections

Democrats: 53 (-1)
Republicans: 46 (+1)
Independents: 1

Notable Races:
Alabama: Senator Jefferson Dent wins Re-Election. Selected for Secretary of State shortly thereafter, he would be replaced by a token Democrat from 1993 until a 1994 special election.
Alaska: Easily beating Mike Gravel, Congressman Don Young (R) ascended to the Senate.
Colorado: With Senator Hart opting not to run for re-election, Ben Nighthorse Campbell was elected following a tough primary with former Governor Dick Lamm and Congresswoman Patricia Schroeder.
Indiana: Senator Dan Quayle, a prominent social conservative in the Senate, is easily re-elected.
North Carolina: Former First Lady of the United States Elizabeth "Liddy" Dole, who had resigned from her position in the Holton cabinet in 1991, was easily elected over the Democratic incumbent.
North Dakota: Deficit hawk Kent Conrad (D) is easily re-elected.
Oregon: Following allegations of sexual misconduct and assault, liberal Republican Bob Packwood was ousted by the fiscally moderate Les Aucoin (D).
Wisconsin: Liberal Russ Feingold (D) is elected to replace a Republican.
14  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Age That You First Got Drunk on: May 02, 2016, 07:49:42 am
Okay, it seems we have around 36% of liars. There isn't that much Mormons here.

Is there something wrong with living a very conservative lifestyle even if we're not Morman in your book?

I bet there's literally zero correlation between one's political affiliation and how much he or she drinks.

In theory, it seems pretty obvious. Holy rollers terrified of the devil's juice and associated sexual libertinism combined with self-hating liberals horrified by becoming one of those reactionary woman-beaters if they touch booze. Who are there more of?
15  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 01, 2016, 09:40:47 pm
Interview with Governor Christian Mattingly, MPR, March 16th, 1996

Reporter Slob: We're here with Governor Christian Mattingly, the day before St. Patrick's and with less than half a week to go before Michigan's March 19th Republican primary. Governor?
Mattingly: First off, thanks, I'm glad to be here. In case I don't run into you tomorrow, happy St. Patrick's Day.
RS: Thanks, and the same to you. Do you have any plans for the day?
Mattingly: Probably a run, 9:00 AM mass, then it's off to Corktown.
RS: You haven't developed a reputation as being particularly athletic or health-obsessed.
Mattingly: Well, I don't do marathons, but after I quit smoking, I found it useful to acquire a second vice.
RS: When, exactly, did you quit?
Mattingly: I would've quit sooner, but I put a lot of pressure on myself for much of the past decade. Probably when I got back from Washington DC. They don't talk about it a lot, but that town is lousy with alcoholism and all other forms of... abuse. Coming back from that city was quite the breath of fresh air.
RS: Talking about DC brings us 'round to what a lot of people are wondering-
Mattingly: Oh, really?
RS: Yes, with three days to go before the primary, this is the second contested Republican primary in a row with you as Governor where you've refused to publicly endorse. In fact, during your, admittedly short, political life, there's very little close to a record of your presidential votes.
Mattingly: *Smirk, Scoff* Well, I have to admit, it's partly out of self-interest. I'm very hesitant about voting in elections where I'm not on the ballot.
RS: *Smirk*
Mattingly: In all seriousness, though, I don't feel the urge to interject myself into contentious debates. The voters that do their research, or that have seen how I've campaigned in 1990 and '94, they know my values. That said, I still like to keep my votes private. We've all had votes we've regretted, and I just have distaste for saying to others "Vote my way!" when it's probably very likely that something awful comes out about any of these candidates at any time. I'll vote the way I decide to vote, but that isn't a command to the state's Republicans--I don't own their votes and I'm not asking for them.
RS: You said that the voters know your values... What are they?
Mattingly: It's, uh, it's pretty simple. I oppose the legalization of abortion that happened nationwide in the 1970's; I stand against the free trade deals brokered by both parties over the past twenty years; I favor a strong military and benefits for our veterans; I'm nevertheless cautious about using our military in situations that might be less-than-winnable; I stand by cops and firefighters and workers and business owners.
RS: By the sound of it, it seems like you'd favor a populist campaign. Did you vote for Buchanan four years ago?
Mattingly: *Smirk* No comment.
RS: Well, if you won't answer that, would you be willing to talk about what you think the best option is for the Republican party's future?
Mattingly: Of course! I think the years since the New Deal have been demonstrative of the direction that wins us elections. Eisenhower and Dole ran national campaigns and championed a Republicanism--a conservatism, even--that was for the common man. I mean, there were labor endorsements in both their re-election campaigns. They were also smart enough to reject nonsense that involved the diffusion of our national industrial base to other countries. Republicans, ranging from the liberal Prescott Bush to the conservative Barry Goldwater were smart enough to oppose Democratic free trade proposals in the 1960's. Where we have lost, especially most recently, is where we betrayed our commitment to the nation-state, and to our nation's middle class, in favor of wonky, new age ideas that eroded our national interest. Lin Holton, he's a great American, sure, but beyond MBA interns and Georgetown theorists, he didn't have a natural constituency.
RS: So, you want to focus on blue collar workers?
Mattingly: Absolutely. And it's nowhere near an original strategy.
RS: Do you think your policies as Governor reflect this?
Mattingly: I've had to buck both conservative and liberal orthodoxy to get things done in Lansing. But the reason I can actually talk to you, right now, about going to Corktown for St. Patrick's, is because of steps my administration has taken. They called us barbaric for defending lives and property through "vicious" gang squad tactics. And they called us bleeding hearts for investing in our inner city education and employment systems. There are a lot of pundits that like to talk about focusing on the "white working class"; I've tried to shift focus to the working class in general.
RS: But what about outside of just Detroit?
Mattingly: My administration has promoted programs to support Michigan's farmers, Michigan's infrastructure, and Michigan's businesses. Blanchard began putting us in the right direction, and since my election, we as a state have been leading the nation in a number of categories.
RS: How does this relate to your social policies?
Mattingly: From a philosophical standpoint, if we want a government that defends the rights of all, and not just a few, this applies to the unborn as much as the poor and the marginalized. If we're talking about it as a political direction, well, some things you take a stance on regardless of whether they win you votes. Nevertheless, I do believe the party needs to reintroduce a right-to-life plank to stand not only with those unborn that die every year, but also the millions of faithful. To vocally distance the party, as some would hope to do, from the anti-abortion movement would be political suicide. The types who are adamant about abortion rights have already found their party, and the nomination of a pro-choice Republican isn't going to provide any long-term, stable advantage. I apply the same logic when it comes to the drug-obsessees and people seeking to redefine marriage.
RS: Well, thank you for your time, Governor Mattingly. It looks like this segment has its limits.
Mattingly: *Smiles* Anytime. Remember to vote on Tuesday and don't forget to celebrate this weekend!
16  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 01, 2016, 07:48:16 pm
The 1996 Democratic Primaries

Despite President Hart's general popularity, there were a number of discontents in the Democratic camp. Those less-than-enthusiastic over "leftism-gone-Hollywood" or "Democrats as the business party" ran a litany of candidates at the state-level. This largely consisted of write-in campaigns or the recruitment of down-and-out or non-politicians. The name of consumer activist Ralph Nader--who eventually officially announced in mid-February after months of being pestered--was put on a number of state caucus and primary ballots. In Minnesota, Eugene McCarthy was the anti-establishment standard bearer, and in more conservative states, non-partisan businessman Ross Perot experienced a groundswell of support, and in the South, some attempted to nominate Jefferson Dent.


President Gary Warren Hart of Colorado
Others: Ross Perot (ID, MT, ND, OH, OK); Jefferson Dent (AL); Ralph Nader (ME); Eugene McCarthy (MN); Bernard "Bernie" Sanders (VT)

Despite activist victories in low-turnout primaries and caucuses, President Hart and Vice President Wilder were renominated without incident. Jefferson Dent rolled his eyes as he was forced to hand over delegates to the incumbent for a candidacy he had far from consented to.

Tricky Dicky Screwdriver - The 1996 Republican Primaries

The Republican primaries were a far less unifying. The Republican party's right wing would long attribute the following events to a drawn-out conspiracy by business and establishment party members. With Republicans looking to bump-off President Hart and render him another failed Democratic President--the rejections of Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy in recent decades had tasted far too sweet--a number of candidates chose to enter the fray. From the left-wing of the Republican Senate caucus and a 1988 contender hailed H. John Heinz III. Despite a pro-choice and liberal voting record, Heinz struck a moderate tone, highlighting his role in drafting economic legislation of the 1980's and casting himself as the sensible, middle-of-the-road candidate, attempting to draw parallels between himself and Eisenhower, Nixon, and Dole. He also claimed a populist mantle, emphasizing President Hart's "sheer abandonment of a national industrial policy." He was endorsed by business magnate H. Ross Perot. Nevertheless, Heinz was not alone in the "rebranded moderates" field. California Governor Pete Wilson, a pro-choice business Republican, would emphasize not only his fiscal reforms of the Golden State, but his strident opposition to illegal immigration.

With Patrick J. Buchanan having quit the Republican party to launch a second third-party campaign, the populist right still within the party would need a new champion. Former Democrat Tim Penny, a fiscal conservative, anti-globalist, and tough-on-crime pro-lifer, would be that champion. Having opted to change parties in response to his party's embrace of social liberalism and free trade, Penny had shortly thereafter decided to seek a promotion: The Presidency. Lamar Alexander, who had served as Governor of Tennessee from 1975 to 1983, and as Linwood Holton's HHS Secretary following Liddy Dole's resignation, would also launch a populist campaign based on "getting money out of politics" and opposition to "D.C. liberalism". Other candidates included publisher Steve Forbes and his flat tax plan and Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana.

Candidates who opted to sit out the election included Governor Jeb Bush of Florida, former Secretary of Defense Cheney, and former National Security Adviser Kirkpatrick--in general, those associated with Holton were choosing to step aside for the duration of the election; Governor Christian Mattingly, Senator David MacKenzie, Businessman Ross Perot, and former Congressman Ron Paul.

Where the "conspiracy" claims emerged as in the run-up to New Hampshire. With Wilson scoring relatively highly in West Coast and New England polls, East Coast and DC funding quickly changed streams, being united behind the California Governor. Easily winning Hawaii against Heinz and Alaska against Forbes and Penny, Wilson had the moderate momentum, writing off Iowa to score an easy victory in New Hampshire. Meanwhile, the Iowa Caucuses had become a far different animal, saturated with conservative activists and the "Jesus crowd". In such an environment, Penny used his next-door advantage and voting record to narrowly eek out victory against Alexander and Quayle. Despite taking fifth in New Hampshire, he placed second in South Carolina, solidifying his presence in the race. Meanwhile, Alexander, the candidate of Dixie, would take the Palmetto State, effectively creating a three-way race between Wilson, Penny, and Alexander. Quayle, who had attempted to paint himself as the conservative candidate, and Forbes, who had failed to cobble together an effective anti-tax coalition, were pushed out. They endorsed Alexander and Wilson, respectively. Meanwhile, Heinz' second-place finish in New Hampshire came to very little, and he dropped out without endorsement.

To many, it was "beyond absurd" that Wilson was among the three finalists for the nomination. This was effectively ignoring the fact of Lin Holton's primary victories in 1988 and 1992. Wilson's significant fundraising advantage pushed him well beyond New Hampshire, as he overpowered his rivals in the North-East and the West Coast. As well, his campaign executed competent victories in Florida and Illinois, giving him the national coalition that Alexander and Penny--splitting the conservative vote--lacked. What was most notable was Wilson's surge to the right, as he showcased an "impressive" anti-illegal immigration record. Critics mocked the moderate's choice of a "strongman" image. He also was more than proud to tote out California's economic record, and cited the approval of conservative institutions including the Heritage Foundation. Despite Wilson's lead in primary delegates and the popular vote, both Penny and Alexander opted to stay in throughout the primaries, denying Wilson a majority prior tot he convention. 

Demographically, things broke along fairly regional lines, with the tightest races held in the Upper South and industrial Mid-West. Wilson was denied crucial majorities in New England and North-Eastern States thanks to Penny's support from blue collar and "South Boston" voters. In states that were once solidly liberal votes in Republican primary contests such as Rhode Island and Massachusetts, Penny took second place thanks to Democratic converts--the "Ed King/John Silber" voter. Regional boundaries were often drastic, with different candidates in a three-way race taking majorities in neighboring states. Penny took the Interior West and Mid-West, Wilson the North-East, South-West, and Pacific, and Alexander in the South.


Blue - Governor Peter B. "Pete" Wilson of California
Green - Former Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander of Tennessee
Red - Congressman Timothy "Tim" Penny of Minnesota

Going into the convention, the Wilson team was working overtime. Their candidate had captured nearly every large state, minus Texas. With that state's delegation, Wilson would have been the nominee. Identifying Alexander as the more pliable of the candidates--Penny was "A Mid-West nutjob, addled by subsidized corn and evangelical Christianity"; Alexander had governed a state and worked in the three most recent Republican administrations--Team Wilson was prepared to offer him anything. Alexander, seeking not to abandon his conservative base, insisted that a right-to-life plank be re-introduced to the Republican platform (it had quietly disappeared in 1988 and 1992) and, naturally, that he be named Vice President. Seeing it as preferable to a Penny-Alexander alliance--"a party taken over by unelectable holy-rollers and coal miners"--Wilson's advisers urged him to take the offer.

Above: The nomination of Governor Pete Wilson by the Republicans would be met with more than mere opposition. While, in the aftermath of Roe v. Wade, at least one Presidential nominee, Linwood Holton, had been nominated, he had the legitimacy of being an incumbent Vice President nad had been more than willing to "play ball", at least in 1988. Wilson's first "rapprochement" with the Republicans' right was in the run-up to the convention. The fact that his gubernatorial record and multiple statewide campaigns had helped him acquire more than enough of a public record on abortion and other issues proved more than some could handle. His choice of Lamar Alexander for Vice President gave him the nomination, but not the spiritual support of the party. While primary opponent Tim Penny opted not to walk out of the convention, he had little incentive not to help Wilson's adversaries in the general election

Mere days before the convention, Wilson and Alexander announced their decision. Seeing Wilson nominated on the first ballot, Tim Penny opted to make the "politic" choice of not walking out of the convention. Nevertheless, there was nothing to be gained by seeing a pro-choice rival win. Patrick J. Buchanan received an important call.
17  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Election What-ifs? / Re: Unfortunate Son on: May 01, 2016, 05:59:55 pm
Imperial Liberalism

President Hart, a seasoned political operator, was more than aware that one of the greatest threats to Democrats in the general election was the perception of weakness, both against crime domestically, and against foes abroad. The President, determined not to meet the fates of “squishy” Garrett or his own overly-intellectual Secretary of State Dent, made sure, in the runup to the 1996 election, to emphasize his own credentials on national security and crime-fighting. Incidents in Waco, Texas and Ruby Ridge, Idaho, despite their formal statuses as operational disasters, were used to form a narrative of a tough President who took on “right-wing militants”. Similarly, Hart was sure to put a resolute public relations spin on actions taken in Eastern Europe by NATO and US operations against “Islamic terrorists” in the Middle East.

Nevertheless, while suburbanites and upscale voters felt secure with Hart in the driver’s seat, those on the marginal ends of society were left to feel more and more prosecuted. Both black communities, feeling under assault by municipal law enforcement, and far-right whites that were uncomfortable with a large, liberal federal government telling them what guns to buy and how to educate their children, were hostile to the political establishment. New standards for homeschooling--that, to some, effectively criminalized it--would form an important bullet in right-wing talking points.
18  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: 2016 PAPOY Creepfest on: May 01, 2016, 10:03:56 am
I've been thinking about doing this, though I'm still not sure. I have issues with taking good selfies (and taking selfies in general, since I personally think taking too much is being too self-important) since I'm not very photogenic. I found a decent one but I'm not looking directly into the camera and I'm in my bathroom Tongue

But there really isn't much of a point unless one of you wants to see me.

dooooo it! Personally, I always wonder what you guys look like.

I make up faces. As of now, ElectionsGuy has posted a fake picture, while Cathcon edited his.

'Twas to cover my name, which was clearly printed in that space.
19  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: GOP’s Stop-Trump fever breaks on: April 30, 2016, 11:43:39 pm
This is where there is a difference between the establishment and the conservative movement.  The establishment might be willing to cut their losses, lose in 2016, but keep Congress, and win in 2020.  But, both that and the mere idea of Trump being the GOP nominee is unacceptable to the conservative movement.

What, pray tell, is the "conservative movement"? (especially as a monolithic entity)
20  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Do you have Asperger's or Autism? on: April 30, 2016, 11:19:03 pm
Never been diagnosed with a darn thing--to my knowledge. Still, taking abnormal psych makes ya wonder...
21  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Update for Everyone IV - Hungover on: April 29, 2016, 10:03:50 pm
Effed up week. Got asked to hook up Friday night--it didn't pan out (should've seen that as an omen for the week to come), went to an interview for a low-paying water parks job on Sunday, got turned down for the internship I wanted Monday (how can an $11/hour security analysis internship tell a third-year senior with a 3.55 and multiple security jobs and related activities he needs more "experience"!?), scheduled two interviews for the upcoming Monday/Tuesday for other low-paying parks jobs, went to a job fair to find out how unemployable I am, got sick the week of finals, and am hoping to officially sort out my personal life by the end of this weekend, but it all depends on her schedule, my health, and the weather. With the summer starting soon, I'd like to have my personal and professional crap in order as soon as possible. Also might have a chance to work at a kayaking place. One more final tomorrow morning and I can barely think, let alone study this crap.
22  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The SteveMcQueen Theatre of Absurdity, Ignorance, and Bad Posts V on: April 29, 2016, 09:57:25 pm
Had a bs incident at work today, this TRUMP supporting lady who comes in quite frequently (she is the chair of my city's Trump office) decked in Trump swag told me to move her from a seat I sat her because she felt the Muslim family I sat next to her was "going to bomb the restaurant" and she felt uncomfortable, so I politely told her "we don't serve bigotry here, there is a wing place down the street you can take it to instead" so she gets up goes to my boss and complains about me and he then tells her to "get the  out of my restaurant"

She starts yelling something about "squinty eyed" people and "terrorist loving liberals" and then my boss tells me she always causes incidents but he doesn't ban her because it would be too much of a hassle.

While obviously absurd, ignorant, and bad, did you mean for this for the Update for Everyone thread? (Also its own contender for the Theatre, but that's beside the point)
23  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Have you ever submitted a BS assignment because you knew you'd pass the class? on: April 29, 2016, 09:53:00 pm
I aim to maximize my GPA for employment and grad school reasons, so I try to get as close to an A as I can, multiplied by six.

I try to as well, but once I literally rage quit an assignment after spending a month on it and not going anywhere with it, and this was this semester.

I mean, I often give up on papers before they're "perfect" in my--or my professors' eyes--and there are always assignment produced below the optimal level of quality, but I try to do it within a certain margin of "likely to produce an acceptable result".

Yeah, I try to put a lot of effort into my assignments and got 100's or 90's on all of them, but this one I just didn't understand AT ALL and tried to get tutoring help for it and even then it wasn't processing so after spending 2 WEEKS just trying to understand it and applying it to the other 2 WEEKS of working on it, I just suck f[inks] it and turned it into my professor's dropbox and got a 35 on it and got an 89.4% in the class.

You're computers, right? I have a friend who takes programming classes to sub for her CIS electives--effing rough; if ya don't get it, you're kinna effed.
24  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Should public nudity and public sex be legal? on: April 29, 2016, 09:25:57 pm
[b]Liberty trumps want and comfort.[/b] The law should not be constructed to appease the people on a "moral" front, for that would be an affront to secularism. On this principle, I will never yield.

Lol. Shall our governments also function entirely independent of culture, or, y'know, popular will?
25  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Have you ever submitted a BS assignment because you knew you'd pass the class? on: April 29, 2016, 09:14:23 pm
I aim to maximize my GPA for employment and grad school reasons, so I try to get as close to an A as I can, multiplied by six.

I try to as well, but once I literally rage quit an assignment after spending a month on it and not going anywhere with it, and this was this semester.

I mean, I often give up on papers before they're "perfect" in my--or my professors' eyes--and there are always assignment produced below the optimal level of quality, but I try to do it within a certain margin of "likely to produce an acceptable result".
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