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51  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 07:14:10 pm
Do we know whether Wisconsin updated their VTD's during the 2000's?

Clearly they add new wards as annexations happen, but I haven't seen anything that shows a change in the existing wards during the decade.

They would have updated wards in 2001 or 2002.

But the Census Bureau only uses VTD's for the Census. Moreover, the meaning of VTD's is up to each state, including whether they are delineated at all. The district court opinion says that the Wisconsin legislature deviated from past practice by redistricting prior to re-warding. But if they had re-warded after the census, then there would not have been any use of the VTD's. And with block data available there is no real reason to use VTD's.

OK I found some stuff:

Legislative Technology Services Bureau - Data Library

What does DRA use?  Where is Waukesha "36"? On the southwest corner or on the west side?
52  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Describe your state legislative district/districts on: March 19, 2017, 04:48:37 pm
Minnesota Senate districts are simply split in half, which each half being a House district, and labeled the Senate District number and then A or B.

There are currently five Senate districts based around Minneapolis, two in the northern part, three in the south. I'm in district 62, which is also the most Democratic in the state. It's the middle district in south Minneapolis. It basically runs from the edge of downtown down the I-35W corridor to 50th street. The I-35W corridor includes almost all the largely minority neighborhoods in South Minneapolis, and is a pretty diverse area in general. Even the whites are, ranging from some rather affluent ones at the southern edge to the more working class ones around where I live, much like southeast Minneapolis this area is known as the more affordable part unlike the southwest. The resulting culture is an area that has very little in terms of any serious Republican demographics and no precinct has even a notable Republican minority. Contrary to what you might think, this is not the "hipster area" as they are mostly in 61, but does include the classic quirky urban stores, art galleries, etc. Also the smallest district in the state geographically, and thus also the most dense in population. Think a coalition of minorities, working class white liberals, some affluent liberals, and a bit of the young and hipster crew, basically a little bit of everyone. It even includes a predominately Native American housing project! Currently has a black incumbent, his predecessor held the seat for over 30 years, just to show how rigid politics are.

62A is the northern part of it, between roughly Lake Street and downtown. It's the smaller of the two geographically and the most dense in the state, although slightly less Democratic by a point or two than B, probably attestable to B's higher black population. Basically what I said above but moreso, and less affluent, since just about all reasonably affluent areas in 62B, although the residential housing in general is your much smaller homes with no driveways and still backalleys, etc. Also no lakes, a rarity in Minnesota. Also has a lesbian incumbent who was first elected in 1980. Incidentally the only other lesbian in the Minnesota legislature represents 62B.

African American or Somali?  I thought the black areas in Minneapolis were in the northwest, pushing outward toward the Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn Center? Or is everything on that side of the river considered south?
53  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 04:43:00 pm
Standard deviation of relative deviation = 2.68%.

27 of 99 districts absolute relative less than 1%
51 of 99 less than 2%
72 of 99 less than 3%
84 of 99 less than 4%
94 of 99 less than 5%
5 of 99 greater than 5%
54  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 11:25:05 am
Do we know whether Wisconsin updated their VTD's during the 2000's?
55  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 03:04:30 am
Neenah city



Oshkosh ciity

56  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 19, 2017, 02:26:02 am
Also, the court has not issued an opinion on the House districts. The senate districts has been settled.
57  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 19, 2017, 02:24:11 am
BTW, the Legislative Council redistricting website  now has the election results for 2016. Clinton carried TX-23 by 3.5%. The court tends to prefer exogenous results. Over the three elections, 2012-2016, the Democratic candidate for Congress has received more votes in total.

There are also shapefiles in case someone is interested in looking at what the plaintiffs proposed for their eight "compact" districts.
58  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 02:11:27 am
Green Bay city.

59  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 19, 2017, 02:08:32 am
Do you need lists of 2008 wards for my splits for comparison?

I hope to put in a spreadsheet.

I had started gathering the data for 2004 to 2010 but got side tracked trying to normalize the results. Different cities and towns would change their election arrangements over time. I should only have to worry about wards for the cities that are split.
60  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 18, 2017, 08:15:57 pm
I figured out how to make my ward maps conform to the 2010 census city limits. I used the following procedure:

(1) Isolate VTD's associated with a city. In Wisconsin, VTD's include the city name in the VTD name.

(2) Clip the VTD's to the city limits. This removes territory that was outside the city limits, but inside a city-associated VTD. This might be territory that was de-annexed or simply reflect non-conformance between wards and VTD's.

(3) Take the union of the territory inside the city limits and the clipped VTD's. This adds territory that was inside the city, but outside the VTD's associated with the city. This was either territory annexed into the  city, or non-conformance between VTD's and ward boundaries.

(4) Convert multipart features into single parts. A part is an area within a continuous boundary. A feature may have multiple parts. For example, Step 3 added the portion of a city outside the clipped VTD's as a multipart feature that reflected dozens of annexations that are physically disjoint. A few VTD's were also multipart. For example, the area to the east of the city (site of a landfill) is part of Ward 11.

(5) Merge parts into VTD's. This extends the VTD's which we have census data for to include annexed territories. A somewhat similar process was used to adjust the population associated with VTD's.

The final map matches the city limits at the time of the 2010 census, and the total population of the VTD's matches the population of the city. They might not match ward boundaries or populations.

Wisconsin tends to have large boards of supervisors. For example,  Eau Claire County has 29 supervisors elected by district (about 3400 persons per district). Districts may originally conform to city boundaries at the start of the decade, but annexations might be into a town in another district. Thus additional wards are created during the decade. A "ward" is essentially a voting precinct. City council and county supervisor districts are aggregates of wards.

Eau Claire City

61  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Ancestry.com DNA samples used to trace American migration history on: March 18, 2017, 10:31:47 am
One interesting pattern is that WV is not part of the South, but shares more with PA and OH.

I assume that the size of the circles indicates the strength of the relationship. So we are looking at something similar to maps of religion affiliation, where a "dominant" group is only  a weak pluralistic. If the Appalachian and Lower Midwest group and Upland South groups were combined, there might be a stronger showing further west.

We tend to forget how difficult it was to migrate by wagon, horseback, and foot. It is hard to take a wagon over a mountain.

The Appalachian and Lower Midwest group came down the Valley of Virginia and through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky and then on into Indiana and Illinois, and then Missouri.

Virginia kept West Virginia when Kentucky was detached in hopes of developing its own route to the west. New York had the advantage of an easier path for its Erie Canal. Pennsylvania eventually developed its combined canal and rail system, but by the time it was completed it was possible to build a railroad. Virginia did not have a significant port, and the national government was not inclined to develop its own route up the Potomac.

At the time of its secession, West Virginia was dominated by the counties along the Ohio and the north. In 1880, the most populous counties were Ohio River: Marshall, Mason, Ohio, and Wood; North: Harrison and Preston; and south central: Kanawha.

By the time the coal industry developed it was possible to migrate by train, and the demand for workers was more than could be accommodated by farmers from the immediate area. At the time of separation, West Virginia had about 35% of the population of Virginia. This peaked in 1930 and 1940 at about 70%, and like Maine and Massachusetts, there would be at least a fantasy of the child surpassing the parent in population. West Virginia is now down to 23%, about the same as 1840.

It is interesting that Wisconsin and Iowa are largely blank. Perhaps the German population was more diverse, than the Scandinavian population??? In Texas at least, German migration tended to be part of specific migration schemes, so that for example, counties in the Hill Country tend to have distinct religious beliefs.

A question  about the Finns in UP and the Iron Range, are they primarily Suomi (as opposed to Swedish speakers)? If someone migrated from Aland or the west coast, would they just move to Minneapolis, Rockford, New York City, or Worcester and become Swedish?
62  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Ancestry.com DNA samples used to trace American migration history on: March 18, 2017, 09:38:39 am
I came across this article, and I thought people might find this interesting.  (It includes maps.)

https://www.wired.com/2017/02/770000-tubes-spit-help-map-americas-great-migrations/

Ancestry is one of the three major companies doing DNA testing, and they've collected DNA from 770,000 customers.  One of their services is to link up people sharing unbroken strands of DNA.  (Generally speaking, these are people related within about 8 generations, give or take.)

Anyhow, they did statistical analysis of their data, and they were able to cluster people into groups, and they mapped the groups.

Or at least, I think this is what they did; I didn't read that closely.

Anyhow, pretty maps.


Original paper
63  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 16, 2017, 06:54:13 am
Those three compact CDs would seem to suffer from the same section 2 violation cited in the decision.

Quote
To the extent the desire for Nueces County to anchor a district did play a small role, that desire must yield to the requirements of the VRA, especially where, as here, Hispanic voters compose more than 50% of the County’s CVAP

Quote
Plaintiffs have amply demonstrated that Nueces County Hispanics have a § 2 right that has not been remedied in Plan C185, but could be remedied without the loss of a § 2 remedy for others

Quote
Plaintiffs have shown that seven compact majority-HCVAP districts could and should be drawn there that would substantially address the § 2 rights of Hispanic voters in South/West Texas, including Nueces County. Defendants’ decision to place Nueces County Hispanic voters in an Anglo district had the effect and was intended to dilute their opportunity to elect their candidate of choice.

Your proposed districts are not compact.

The opinion discusses the attempt by the plaintiffs to demonstrate that 8 compact majority HCVAP districts could be drawn in South/West Texas and found that they had not because they had problems similar to yours.

How about this:

Nueces, San Patricio, Aransas, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron (come down Padre Island and then jump into Brownsville)

Remainder of Cameron and most of Hidalgo.

Remainder of Hidalgo, Starr, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Brooks, Duval, Webb, McMullen, Dimmit, LaSalle, Live Oak, and Frio.

Leave TX-23 in its current format coming into Bexar County.

Leave TX-20 in Bexar County.

Then Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, Bee, Goliad, DeWitt, Victoria, Calhoun, Refugio.

That hinges on whether the current TX-23 can withstand a challenge. I'm skeptical.

The current TX-23 has a 60% HCVAP.

But the court said that an HCVAP-majority doesn't matter if the district doesn't provide an opportunity to elect. The C185 version was 58.5% HCVAP.

Quote
First, the Court rejects Defendants’ bright-line rule that any HCVAP-majority district is by definition a Latino opportunity district. Although some courts have applied such a rule and held that § 2 challenges may not be raised to a majority-minority district, that appears to be a minority view.  In fact, Justice Kennedy recognized that a majority-HCVAP district may still lack “real electoral opportunity.”
On what basis do claim that the current TX-23 lacks "real electoral opportunity"?

Instead of shifting Dimmit, LaSalle, and Frio, leave TX-23 totally unchanged, and make it:

Hidalgo (remnant), Starr, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Brooks, Webb, Duval, McMullen, Live Oak, and Atascosa (which I left out of my previous map).

Move the remaining portion of TX-27 to TX-10, and move the Travis portion of TX-10 into TX-25.
64  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 15, 2017, 01:44:37 pm
Those three compact CDs would seem to suffer from the same section 2 violation cited in the decision.

Quote
To the extent the desire for Nueces County to anchor a district did play a small role, that desire must yield to the requirements of the VRA, especially where, as here, Hispanic voters compose more than 50% of the County’s CVAP

Quote
Plaintiffs have amply demonstrated that Nueces County Hispanics have a § 2 right that has not been remedied in Plan C185, but could be remedied without the loss of a § 2 remedy for others

Quote
Plaintiffs have shown that seven compact majority-HCVAP districts could and should be drawn there that would substantially address the § 2 rights of Hispanic voters in South/West Texas, including Nueces County. Defendants’ decision to place Nueces County Hispanic voters in an Anglo district had the effect and was intended to dilute their opportunity to elect their candidate of choice.

Your proposed districts are not compact.

The opinion discusses the attempt by the plaintiffs to demonstrate that 8 compact majority HCVAP districts could be drawn in South/West Texas and found that they had not because they had problems similar to yours.

How about this:

Nueces, San Patricio, Aransas, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron (come down Padre Island and then jump into Brownsville)

Remainder of Cameron and most of Hidalgo.

Remainder of Hidalgo, Starr, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Brooks, Duval, Webb, McMullen, Dimmit, LaSalle, Live Oak, and Frio.

Leave TX-23 in its current format coming into Bexar County.

Leave TX-20 in Bexar County.

Then Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, Bee, Goliad, DeWitt, Victoria, Calhoun, Refugio.

That hinges on whether the current TX-23 can withstand a challenge. I'm skeptical.

The current TX-23 has a 60% HCVAP.
65  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 15, 2017, 01:38:59 pm
Is this court to achieve its mandate in effect requiring that performing minority districts be created that join non contiguous minority zones that are far away from each other?  I assume the problem with TX-23 is that an adjacent Hispanic CD in Bexar is deemed excessively packed. Is that correct?
The decision is confusing in that it is written in the present tense, when it actually refers to districts that have never been used. The current TX-23 has a HCVAP of over 60%.
66  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 14, 2017, 02:57:59 pm
Muon2, which cities, etc. did you divide, and in to how many pieces?

My splits are:

Milwaukee 14
Waukesha 2
Racine 2
Kenosha 2
Jamesville 2
Madison 4
Oshkosh 2
Green Bay 2
Eau Claire 2

Neenah 2
New Berlin 2

I recall that you divided

West Allis and Oak Creek, and divided Madison into 5 parts. were there others?

West Allis is no longer chopped. I kept the smallest district large enough that the range is less that 10%.

Here's my AD chop list for cities:

Kenosha
Racine
Janesville
Oak Creek
Milwaukee 11 chops (there are 12 ADs all or partially in Milwaukee, one partial AD has two fragments linked by West Milwaukee.
Waukesha
Madison 4 chops (5 ADs, 2 with two fragments each)
Oshkosh
Green Bay
Eau Claire

The SD chop list for cities is
Milwaukee 4 chops
Madison 1 chop (includes 1 fragment isolated by Monona)

I am starting to compile the results for statewide elections from 2004-2010. Generally, the results will be by City-Town-Village (CTV).

I then add a column for district number. Using SUMIF(), I can total population and election results by district.

But split cities have multiple districts. For those, I create a separate sheet with values for each ward. I can then compute values for CTV district parts.

On the main sheet there will be rows for each CTV part (e.g. I will have 14 rows for Milwaukee, you would use 12). Actually I will have 15, I will keep one row for the whole city.

For Neenah and New Berlin, you can specify the district for the entire city, while I would do the same for Oak Creek.
67  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 14, 2017, 02:38:16 pm
So after reading the court order, it seems they decided:

1. There needs to be 7 HCVAP majority districts in south/west Texas

2.  They don't consider the current TX-23 to be a performing district for hispanics and it needs to be made performing

3.  Nueces county must be put into a HCVAP majority district.  

4.  CD-35 must be removed from Travis county....? To make it more compact?  (Not sure on this, I guess they're saying a second HCVAP district in Bexar county alone?).   TX-21 would be the obvious target to fill in what's left empty in Travis.   

So those changes would pretty much force 2 districts entirely within Bexar, 1 district most likely entirely within Travis, TX-23 be made more hispanic (and dem),  and TX-34 would take in Nueces, resulting in big changes to TX-27.

Did I get this right..?
No. The court was evaluating the districts drawn in 2011. In 2012, the court drew remedial districts, which were used in 2012. The Texas legislature adopted the districts in 2013, and they have been used in 2014 and 2016.

The court ruled that districts that have never been used are unconstitutional.

This doesn't make a lot of sense though, the current map still has the violations they talk about in the ruling (except maybe the TX-23 one, that's debatable).   How can they rule the other map is unconstitutional and the current one isn't, when they both do the same thing?

Has anyone challenged the current maps?


68  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 14, 2017, 02:35:08 pm
Those three compact CDs would seem to suffer from the same section 2 violation cited in the decision.

Quote
To the extent the desire for Nueces County to anchor a district did play a small role, that desire must yield to the requirements of the VRA, especially where, as here, Hispanic voters compose more than 50% of the County’s CVAP

Quote
Plaintiffs have amply demonstrated that Nueces County Hispanics have a § 2 right that has not been remedied in Plan C185, but could be remedied without the loss of a § 2 remedy for others

Quote
Plaintiffs have shown that seven compact majority-HCVAP districts could and should be drawn there that would substantially address the § 2 rights of Hispanic voters in South/West Texas, including Nueces County. Defendants’ decision to place Nueces County Hispanic voters in an Anglo district had the effect and was intended to dilute their opportunity to elect their candidate of choice.

Your proposed districts are not compact.

The opinion discusses the attempt by the plaintiffs to demonstrate that 8 compact majority HCVAP districts could be drawn in South/West Texas and found that they had not because they had problems similar to yours.

How about this:

Nueces, San Patricio, Aransas, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron (come down Padre Island and then jump into Brownsville)

Remainder of Cameron and most of Hidalgo.

Remainder of Hidalgo, Starr, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Brooks, Duval, Webb, McMullen, Dimmit, LaSalle, Live Oak, and Frio.

Leave TX-23 in its current format coming into Bexar County.

Leave TX-20 in Bexar County.

Then Bexar, Wilson, Karnes, Bee, Goliad, DeWitt, Victoria, Calhoun, Refugio.
69  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 14, 2017, 08:18:54 am
I drew up some maps that left two CDs in Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Zapata, then tried to construct the best whole county SSRV district that contained all of Nueces. The CD has the following counties: Willacy, Kenedy, Kleberg, Jim Wells, Nueces, San Patricio, Aransas, Calhoun, Refugio, Bee, Goliad, Victoria, and DeWitt. From DRA is is 53.2% HVAP, 47.1% SSRV, and went 55.6% for McCain. Swapping Karnes and Wilson for Willacy, Kenedy, and Kleberg moves it to 50.3% HVAP, 44.2% SSRV and 57.5% McCain.

Nueces has voted Pub for the last three presidential elections as have all the counties north of it in the strips on my map. It is impossible to create a compact Latino opportunity district with Nueces without including either population from the Rio Grande counties or San Antonio. So if the court has found that Nueces has a section 2 claim, it can only be reasonably satisfied by linking it with counties in the Rio Grande valley.
Where did the two Lower Rio Grande districts go to?

BTW, conventional treatment would place Cameron, Hidalgo, Willacy, and Starr in the Lower Rio Grande. The counties to the north are oriented towards Corpus Christi. Hebronville and Falfurrias are in the far northern ends of Jim Hogg and Brooks counties. They were created from Hidalgo and Starr counties because the population was so remote. And even now, Hidalgo has an awful lot of empty space in the northern part of the county.

While it would be better to include Kleberg and Jim Wells with Nueces, this can not be done, because the LRGV doesn't have enough population for two districts, let alone three.

You didn't answer my question about the SSVR for the two parts of Nueces County in your map.

It appears that you placed an area with a higher Anglo population with Cameron, and an area with higher Hispanic population with Hidalgo in  order to keep the Hispanic percentage up as you headed further north.


I didn't save that file, so I'd have to reconstruct it. I did split Corpus in a way to keep both CDs with SSRV majorities and have them both vote Dem, though I'm not sure if that would hold in 2016. That requires analysis beyond DRA, which I haven't had time for yet. Edit - I reconstructed it and the red part of Nueces is 53.4% SSRV and the Yellow part is 46.6% SSRV, These can be shifted to better balance the two CDs.

I gave numbers for two versions of a Corpus district since keeping Willacy with Cameron made it worse for a Latino opportunity district. In both versions the McAllen CD connected to Atascosa. The counties south and west of Nueces (minus Webb) are 21K short of two districts. Remove Jim Wells and add McMullen, Live Oak, Atascosa, and LaSalle and the population is just 2K over 2 CDs.
Take the 21K from Nueces.

That gives you:

Cameron, Willacy, Kenedy, Kleberg, Nueces (21), and Hidalgo (Huh) to balance.

Hidalgo (remainder), Starr, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Brooks, Duval, and Jim Wells.

Nueces (remainder), San Patricio, Aransas, Refugio, Calhoun, Victoria, Goliad, Bee, Live Oak, McMullen, Atascosa, Wilson, Karnes, and DeWitt.

Three compact districts.
70  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: District Court, Splitting 2-1, Finds Texas Congressional Districts Violate VRA on: March 14, 2017, 12:10:25 am
I drew up some maps that left two CDs in Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Zapata, then tried to construct the best whole county SSRV district that contained all of Nueces. The CD has the following counties: Willacy, Kenedy, Kleberg, Jim Wells, Nueces, San Patricio, Aransas, Calhoun, Refugio, Bee, Goliad, Victoria, and DeWitt. From DRA is is 53.2% HVAP, 47.1% SSRV, and went 55.6% for McCain. Swapping Karnes and Wilson for Willacy, Kenedy, and Kleberg moves it to 50.3% HVAP, 44.2% SSRV and 57.5% McCain.

Nueces has voted Pub for the last three presidential elections as have all the counties north of it in the strips on my map. It is impossible to create a compact Latino opportunity district with Nueces without including either population from the Rio Grande counties or San Antonio. So if the court has found that Nueces has a section 2 claim, it can only be reasonably satisfied by linking it with counties in the Rio Grande valley.
Where did the two Lower Rio Grande districts go to?

BTW, conventional treatment would place Cameron, Hidalgo, Willacy, and Starr in the Lower Rio Grande. The counties to the north are oriented towards Corpus Christi. Hebronville and Falfurrias are in the far northern ends of Jim Hogg and Brooks counties. They were created from Hidalgo and Starr counties because the population was so remote. And even now, Hidalgo has an awful lot of empty space in the northern part of the county.

While it would be better to include Kleberg and Jim Wells with Nueces, this can not be done, because the LRGV doesn't have enough population for two districts, let alone three.

You didn't answer my question about the SSVR for the two parts of Nueces County in your map.

It appears that you placed an area with a higher Anglo population with Cameron, and an area with higher Hispanic population with Hidalgo in  order to keep the Hispanic percentage up as you headed further north.
71  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 13, 2017, 08:32:19 pm
I've started reading through the District Court decision.

It makes a claim that in 2012, the Republicans won 60 assembly districts with 48.6% of the vote.

But in 23 districts there was no Republican candidate, while there was no Democratic candidate in only 4 districts.

In 2014, Republicans won 63 assembly assembly seats with 52% of the vote.

There were 23 districts with no Republican candidate, three new. Three districts that were uncontested in 2012, were contested in 2014.

29 districts had no Democratic candidate, 26 of which had a Democratic candidate in 2012.

Statewide assembly voting totals are a bogus metric.

72  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 13, 2017, 06:49:27 pm
Muon2, which cities, etc. did you divide, and in to how many pieces?

My splits are:

Milwaukee 14
Waukesha 2
Racine 2
Kenosha 2
Janesville 2
Madison 4
Oshkosh 2
Green Bay 2
Eau Claire 2

Neenah 2
New Berlin 2

I recall that you divided

West Allis and Oak Creek, and divided Madison into 5 parts. were there others?
73  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Foreign stock population in US cities, 1890 on: March 13, 2017, 02:06:52 pm
The Twin Cities:

Minneapolis

Scandinavian  50,107  30.5% (27,988 Swedes, 19,693 Norwegians and 2,426 Danes)
German  19,068  11.6%
Irish  14,857  9%
Canadian  12,724  7.7% (9,726 English Canadian, 2,998 French Canadian)
British  10,632  6.5% (6,760 English, 3,129 Scots and 743 Welsh)

St. Paul

German  34,375  25.8%
Scandinavian  24,603  18.5% (16,574 Swedes, 5,814 Norwegians and 2,215 Danes)
Irish  18,483  13.9%
British  8,829  6.6% (6,064 English, 2,541 Scots and 224 Welsh)
Canadian  7,902  5.9% (9,726 English Canadian, 2,226 French Canadian)


When looking at the old census data, I was struck by how distinctive the Twin Cities were, with Germans and Irish dominant in St. Paul, and Scandinavians in Minneapolis.

You will find similar differentiation at the county level, with Germans more prevalent in the earlier settled counties in the south. I think there are a couple of outlier counties as well.
74  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 13, 2017, 02:02:10 pm
Wisconsin has 72 counties.

The 26 largest counties have one or more whole districts. All 26 counties have the maximum number of whole districts possible.

The next 23 counties (total of 49) have the largest share of their district. This includes all counties down to Vilas with an equivalent of 0.373 districts. Despite being divided, Dunn*, Vernon, and Monroe form the largest component of a district.

I think this represents a good faith effort to avoid unnecessary division of counties.

*This assumes a finer division of Eau Claire city  would be done.
75  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Wisconsin Legislative Redistricting on: March 13, 2017, 11:00:24 am
This includes division of Eau Claire.

Eau Claire 1.719, Barron 0.799, Dunn 0.763, Trempealeau 0.502, Buffalo 0.237, and Pepin 0.130, have a population equivalent to 4.149 districts and will be divided into four districts.

Dunn will be split, with a bit less than 1/3 attached to Barron, and the remainder attached to Eau Claire. One district will be entirely in Eau Claire, with its surplus divided between two districts.

The city of Eau Claire has a population equivalent to 1.112 districts, so that the district wholly in the county will consist of  most of the city, with a small area trimmed off and placed in a district with the surrounding towns.



Dunn detail.



Eau Claire detail.



About half the population of Dunn is in the Menomonie city area. That area along with the remainder of the southern portion of the county will form a district with a portion of Eau Claire county. The northern part of Dunn will be attached to Barron.

The extreme southeastern tip of Eau Claire was chopped, leaving the bulk of the city as one district. The last ward removed, Ward 18, is fairly populous and leaves the districts somewhat unbalanced population. Other, smaller wards could be removed, but would make the district more irregular. In reality, Ward 18 would likely be divided. But for electoral results purposes it is better to keep it whole.

93. Eau Claire: Eau Claire city (wards 1-15, 17, 19-23, 25-32, 34-38) 1.022. Note Eau Claire does not have a ward 16 or 24.

94. Barron: (all) 0.799; and Dunn: Boyceville village, Colfax town, Colfax village, Downing village, Grant town, Hay River town, Knapp village, Lucas town, New Haven town, Otter Creek town, Ridgeland village, Sand Creek town, Sheridan town, Sherman town, Stanton town, Tainter town, Tiffany town, Wheeler village, and Wilson town 0.240. 1.039

95. Dunn: Dunn town, Eau Galle town, Elk Mound town, Elk Mound village, Menomonie city, Menomonie town, Peru town, Red Cedar town, Rock Creek town, Spring Brook town, and Weston town 0.523; and Eau Claire: Altoona city, Brunswick town, Drammen town, Eau Claire city (wards 18, 33, 39), Pleasant Valley town, Seymour town, Union town, and Washington town 0.530. 1.053.

96. Buffalo (all) 0.237; Eau Claire: Augusta city, Bridge Creek town, Clear Creek town, Fairchild town, Fairchild village, Fall Creek village, Lincoln town, Ludington town, Otter Creek town, and Wilson town 0.186; Pepin (all) 0.130; and Trempealeau (all) 0.502. 1.036.
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