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3026  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 11:22:22 am
Yeah, that sort of thing belongs in the suburbs, or the South.
3027  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 10:48:16 am
"Heavy industry!!!11"

Heavy industry does not belong in modern cities. It belongs elsewhere. It simply doesn't make sense to plop a 500,000-square foot factory in the middle of a city. Read Greg David's Modern New York for an idea about what I am talking about. I was reminded of it just a few days when some politicians gathered to demand (sillily) to create more "industrial jobs" Here's an example of what he talks about:

Quote
The most important differences involve exclusivity versus mixed use. IBZs [industrial business zones] are predicated on the theory that manufacturing simply can't afford market-priced real estate in New York City, and the only way to depress the cost is to outlaw other uses. Also, over time, commercial and residential tenants come to resent the noise, pollution and especially truck traffic of their industrial neighbors and lobby to drive them out.

He can come to that view because he defines manufacturing differently by emphasizing tech. It isn't clear exactly what he means—say it's 3-D printing—but most tech companies wouldn't fit the profile of most IBZ occupants today.

To be sure, Mr. Weisbrod hails the "new wave" of manufacturing and says some current industrial areas are "sacrosanct,'' which is a way of saying others aren't. His speeches seem to suggest some way will be found to protect industrial shops from soaring rents.

While there is something of a revival in making things in New York, much of the fervor for manufacturing is based on romantic illusions about the potential for the sector and especially the kinds of jobs it creates these days. Most of the jobs are "industrial,'' in warehousing and the like, and preserving those presents different problems. But if the advocates want to make a case, the time appears to be now.

http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20140601/BLOGS01/140539979/de-blasio-zones-out-on-manufacturing

I think everyone who has thought about the issue agrees with you in principle.  We need way more free market thinking and creative chaos in land use.  Basically, the difficult part is ramming through a development agenda (Getting much of NYC upzoned was one of Bloomberg's greatest achievements).  Everyone wants a piece of the action.

Ah, but see here at my school, you have an "anti-gentrification campaign". I mean, just, ugh.

Hey, I'm with you there.  I'm a white guy who lives in a historically black neighborhood, I'm at the forefront of gentrification.  I hate those self-righteous liberals who want to treat half of NYC like some type of Indian reservation for poor black people.  These notions of "gentrification=bad" would just look like sour grapes and old, bitter people griping about younger people if the issue didn't trigger the leftist "Spidey-sense" for anything that can be analogized to colonialism/racism/whites taking from browns.

It makes me so mad. These people are basically calling for the maintenance of racially segregated ghettos. How this is supposed to improve their lot, I don't know, but I mean, it's just baffling how these people think.

https://www.facebook.com/coalitionagainstgentrification
3028  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 10:16:34 am
I think everyone who has thought about the issue agrees with you in principle.  We need way more free market thinking and creative chaos in land use.  Basically, the difficult part is ramming through a development agenda (Getting much of NYC upzoned was one of Bloomberg's greatest achievements).  Everyone wants a piece of the action.

Ah, but see here at my school, you have an "anti-gentrification campaign". I mean, just, ugh.
 
I will caution you on your use of "conservative" though.  Conservative doesn't mean free market.  Conservatives generally idolize exurban cookie cutter tract homes where everyone can have tons of cars, children and cheap consumer crap.  You sound like one of the people Michelle Bachmann warned us about:

Quote
They want Americans to move to the urban core, live in tenements, [and] take light rail to their government jobs. That's their vision for America.

Well, those aren't the conservatives I hang out with. Like traininthedistance said, it's a central issue- considering I live here.

Also, the importance of this "forcefulness" is speeding up construction of transit projects- looking at cut-and-cover construction for new subways, for example.
3029  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 09:51:33 am
I support more high rises. I just think in a place like San Francisco there are a lot of places where they'd essentially be killing the patient with the cure. That might be because of the nature of the city. But in a place in Manhattan, there a places all over calling for up-building. And I feel the solution calls for a good heaping dose of conservatism- weakening "community boards", loosening union's strangleholds, rolling back rent regulations, fast-tracking approval procedures, pursuing transit projects with a Moses-esque singleness of purpose and regard (or more properly lack thereof) for "community needs", pursuing neighborhood renewal and "gentrification" with vigour, selling off and redeveloping public housing projects, using eminent domain for private developers liberally, and generally riding roughshod over naysayers.

There are a lot of places that could benefit from this rapid up-building in NYC that I can think of, the Far West Side, southern Harlem, Yorkville, Chelsea, Hunters Point, Astoria just to name a few.

Also, my problem with new development might stem from the fact that modern architecture, the pedestrian sort and not your star-chitect's work, is just awfully banal and bad. I'd have no desire to live in any building like that.
3030  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 09:29:42 am
"reasonably regulated to protect the character and quality of the neighborhoods"

Lmao. You have no ideas.

I mean, you can't go and build a 50-story tower in the middle of, say, Pacific Heights that blocks everyone's views. There needs to be an equilibrium. I'm not saying anything particularly profound here nor am I trying to persuade anyone otherwise.
3031  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / The conservative case for denser cities on: June 29, 2014, 09:19:06 am
Selfish, Selfish San Francisco

Quote
California is an earthly paradise. Yet there is something badly broken about the Golden State. At its best, California is America’s America, where the young and adventurous go for a fresh start. The trouble is that housing in much of California has become so expensive that the young and adventurous have been priced out, leaving its most beautiful stretches to wealthy insiders.

Last weekend, I had the great pleasure of visiting the Bay Area, to see friends and to attend a conference. The conference was held in a beautifully-situated resort in Marin County overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge, where a small number of low-rise buildings dotted a pristine landscape. And I thought to myself, as I often do, that it was insane that this land was not instead dotted by massive high-rises housing thousands of people. The beautiful town of Sausalito has a population of just over 7,000 within its 2¼ square miles. But would it be any less lovely if it were home to twice as many people, or 10 times as many even? Or would it be lovelier still if graceful towers full of young families sprouted on land currently devoted to, of all things, golf courses?

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2014/06/

I know a lot people here have taken exception to under-density here, myself included, but I don't know if Sausalito per se is the best place to be doing that. South of Market, though, and other places, more than merit increased density. And it's not even as if this necessitates tall towers everywhere, but just rowhouses would do the trick- I once read that a neighborhood of single-family townhouses could produce a density of 50,000 people/sq mi. We need to move towards a more efficient, graceful, and overall sustainable (in all senses of the word) way of living. And we cannot afford NIMBYs raising hackles at every corner.

The solution is fairly conservative- let the free market (reasonably regulated to protect the character and quality of neighborhoods) take control and meet demand. But a lot of people seem hell-bent on rent control as the answer, despite the fact pretty much every introductory economics class uses it as an example of the distortions of price ceilings- literally, textbook. That and wage increases which are, as the article points out, are not effective.
3032  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Moral foundations test on: June 29, 2014, 09:07:08 am
Harm and care- 4
Fairness and reciprocity- 3
Loyalty - 3.5
Authority and respect - 4.7
Purity and sanctity - 4.5
3033  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Which of these monarchies will still exist in 2050? on: June 29, 2014, 01:51:42 am
You have not a clue what you are talking about, do you? Why would Dubai take over the UAE? Why would the Thai legislature abolish the monarchy? What motivation would Malaysia have for abolishing theirs? Same with Cambodia, and so forth. Etc, etc, etc. Then again, we've seen a great many monarchies overthrown for no reason at all, much less good reasons (well, only a very small handful could be said to have been abolished for good reasons, a very very small handful).

My answer: none of the above. Okay. Maybe the Bahraini monarchy might go. But I don't see any others, except for a commonwealth realm or two (Papua New Guinea?).

The far more interesting question is which countries will restore their monarchies. This is a pretty sizable list of plausible choices:

Libya
Serbia
Montenegro
Romania
Bulgaria
Fiji
Nepal
Laos
Yemen
Georgia

The list is rather long, and it's pretty much in order of probability. I'd say God's own form of government (Tongue) has a bright future ahead of it. If it wasn't for George Bush's meddling,  in fact, Afghanistan would probably be a monarchy right now, actually. That, I cannot forgive him for. But we cannot rule out random events resulting in restoration in strange places (Egypt? Russia?) that we didn't expect.

Please explain how any of those choices other than Libya are plausible.

In Serbia, a recent poll shows that more people support a restoration than oppose it. In Montenegro, the Royal Family there has had its properties restored, it's "historic status" denoted by law, and the Crown Prince receives a salary equal to that of the president and has been appointed an official representative of the government. In Romania, the royal family enjoys widespread approval and the former King Michael I is by far the most trusted public figure in the country. In Bulgaria the former King was elected Prime Minister a few years ago, although that's mainly dissipated now.

In Fiji, even though the monarchy was overthrown in 1989, it enjoys widespread support,particularly amongst traditional leaders, and it's so strong that an attempt by the military regime to remove the queen from banknotes was met with widespread resistance. In Nepal, where the monarchy was overthrown less than a decade ago, restorationist sentiment is palpable and growing. Monarchist parties made gains in the most recent elections and the failure to achieve stability, coupled with a BJP government in India, could lead Nepal back to monarchy. In Laos, monarchy is the only real alternative to the regime at present as far as I am aware, but I don't know much about Laos. In Yemen Saleh was making boogeymen out of monarchists a few years ago, and the Georgian opposition had been commenting on a possible restoration.

Of course, I am not mentioning the more contentious and more personal possibilities of Iranian or more importantly Ethiopian restoration. Fun fact, apparently 1 out of 5 Germans, and 1 out of 3 young people there, support restoring the Hohenzollerns. Smiley
3034  Forum Community / Election and History Games / Re: Clash of Kings, an ASOIAF Game (Gameplay - 299 AL (2) - Tywin v. the World) on: June 28, 2014, 08:07:58 pm
12 glasses of wine? How is this woman still standing?
3035  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Which of these monarchies will still exist in 2050? on: June 28, 2014, 05:09:21 pm
You have not a clue what you are talking about, do you? Why would Dubai take over the UAE? Why would the Thai legislature abolish the monarchy? What motivation would Malaysia have for abolishing theirs? Same with Cambodia, and so forth. Etc, etc, etc. Then again, we've seen a great many monarchies overthrown for no reason at all, much less good reasons (well, only a very small handful could be said to have been abolished for good reasons, a very very small handful).

My answer: none of the above. Okay. Maybe the Bahraini monarchy might go. But I don't see any others, except for a commonwealth realm or two (Papua New Guinea?).

The far more interesting question is which countries will restore their monarchies. This is a pretty sizable list of plausible choices:

Libya
Serbia
Montenegro
Romania
Bulgaria
Fiji
Nepal
Laos
Yemen
Georgia

The list is rather long, and it's pretty much in order of probability. I'd say God's own form of government (Tongue) has a bright future ahead of it. If it wasn't for George Bush's meddling,  in fact, Afghanistan would probably be a monarchy right now, actually. That, I cannot forgive him for. But we cannot rule out random events resulting in restoration in strange places (Egypt? Russia?) that we didn't expect.
3036  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: FIFA 2014 World Cup - Official Discussion Thread on: June 28, 2014, 04:21:06 pm
Rodriguez a dark horse for Golden Boot?

At five goals I don't think he's a dark horse anymore.


Talking of dark horses though, Colombia to win the cup- you heard it here first.

Phil's been saying that for days. Perhaps it's not so out of left field.
3037  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Elections / Re: The Office of Former President Polnut, Boston on: June 28, 2014, 01:16:29 pm
I endorse you.
3038  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Regional Governments / Re: NE: Scott v. The Northeast on: June 28, 2014, 01:15:33 pm
Even though I support this, does Scott have standing or jurisdiction to file a lawsuit? He doesn't live in the Northeast.

For the sake of simplicity, I'm going to assume that Scott owns a stake in Columbia Records.

Never before has an assumption made me laugh out loud!
3039  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: The Let Us Have More Teachers Act (Debating) on: June 28, 2014, 12:38:50 pm
Then should we change "shall" to "should"?
3040  Questions and Answers / The Atlas / Re: Petition to Ban Meursault on: June 28, 2014, 11:45:10 am
Unlike mouthbreathers like TX Conservative Dem or the Obamanation, Meursault keeps this place interesting. He may be terrible, but he's perfectly harmless, so let him stay.
3041  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Atlasian Calendar Act (Debating) on: June 28, 2014, 11:32:13 am
I thought you liked it. Anyway, I hereby annul my statement on the usage of the Atlasian calendar. The Gregorian will be henceforth assumed.

The main idea was to accelerate gameplay, that is, to cause results of legislation to happen at a speed fast enough to elicit result reactions. I'm fine if that's not desired.
3042  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Sanity in Foreign Policy Amendment (Debating) on: June 28, 2014, 11:28:55 am
My main concern with the Act is the ban on Foreign arms part. Foreign arms sales are not only a crucial part of foreign policy, but support around 250,000 jobs. A blanket ban would result in those jobs being lost.

I mean, are we just going to inform the F-35 partners that they won't be getting any planes after all? They will demand reimbursement for the billions they've put in.

Furthermore what is section 6 of the Act? Huh
3043  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: The Let Us Have More Teachers Act (Debating) on: June 28, 2014, 11:10:38 am
Keep in mind the test does not automatically fail the bottom 25% of takers. Rather, it is designed in a way that makes it rigorous enough so that it should generally result in only 75% passing. It is not a mandate.

Thus, "increasing the rigour of the test" and "increasing the amount of people who pass it" would be contradictory barring a dramatic increase in the quality of applicants. The bill essentially calls for making the test easier, which I don't think is desirable.

As for Finland I think that's a place to look at but let's not get carried away; I remember that when Scott was governor he had a rather singular focus on "moving towards the Finnish model" that ultimately frustrated reform efforts.
3044  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Sex joke on: June 28, 2014, 10:10:42 am
Vulgar.
3045  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: Ignore the GM Act (Debating) on: June 27, 2014, 02:46:56 pm
If you don't want to use the Atlasian calendar, that is fine by me. Smiley
3046  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Bacon King Institute of Comedy on: June 26, 2014, 10:53:30 pm
A poltroon.

Such a slanderous attack on my character will not stand.  I am not the cowardly duel-dodger Einzige, I am a man who will defend his honor.  Pick your seconds and your weapons, sir, and let us see which one of us is truly the poltroon.

I, unlike the timid and weak Einzige, am no duel-dodger. I stand by my word, which is my honour. En Guard.

Who's this scoundrel that has entered my sight?
Why, since potatoes, he's Eire's greatest blight! 
He dares call me poltroon?  A dog with no bite
St. Paddy should've put this Celtic snake to flight!

Gully they call him, and gullible he is
Æthelred's prepared better comebacks than his
Foyle's the surname and foiled's his biz
His rhymes are as archaic as the dress on Queen Liz.

You lose this round Gully, but hey, it's not your fault
At least you have more courage than that coward Meursault
A worse man would've seen this challenge and gone Galt
Peace out.  I have a date with a straight-up single malt.

A post that belongs in the Goldmine, the Gallery, and the Sulphur Mine, all in one! Smiley

Bolded is particularly good! Legendary.
3047  Forum Community / Election and History Games / Re: Clash of Kings, an ASOIAF Game (Gameplay - 299 AL (2) - Tywin v. the World) on: June 26, 2014, 08:31:58 pm
I hereby proclaim Edric Storm and Mya Stone to be legitimised members of the Royal House, that of Baratheon, with the style of Prince and Princess.
3048  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: College is apparently still worth it and really great, some guys say. on: June 26, 2014, 05:35:34 pm
Well. It depends. A college degree in a STEM field or as a healthcare paraprofessional and/or a degree from a very prestigious institution will probably pay off. An arts degree from a TTT or community college? No. Not really.

Huh
3049  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Gubernatorial/Statewide Elections / Re: Governor Clooney? Star reportedly considering a run in Cali on: June 26, 2014, 05:23:56 pm
He'd be set up to run in... when, 2024? This assumes Hillary runs for reelection, or perhaps against a Republican incumbent. Otherwise he'd have to wait until 2028, and he'd be 67 then.
3050  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Atlas Fantasy Government / Re: SENATE BILL: The Let Us Have More Teachers Act (Debating) on: June 26, 2014, 05:06:13 pm
As the author of the AIT Act, I do not consider this wise. We need standards. Do you think it worthwhile to accept the bottom 25% of prospective teachers?
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