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1  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Do you eat ... on: Today at 11:09:02 am
Option 2.

Things like canned goods and dry grains are built to last well beyond the printed expiration date, though I'll generally try to use them within a month or two anyway, just because.

Anything that needs to be refrigerated (dairy, eggs, etc.) gets used beforehand or it gets thrown out. Better to be cautious on that stuff.
2  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Your favorite hard liquor on: Today at 10:56:59 am
I'm a thoroughgoing wine drinker, so hard liquor is tough because all I taste is alcohol, fire (or in gin's case, polish), etc. Having said that, it would probably be vodka. There are things that can be done with vodka (White Russians are like spiked milkshakes Smiley) to make it palatable and now they have reduced alcohol (reduced calorie) flavored vodkas, and they are good to sip on ice.

I've tried all the stuff on that list except Tequila, and I don't really like any of it. Jameson Irish whiskey wasn't bad, though. But I wouldn't sit and drink it or mix it.

Scotch and gin I simply cannot do. Too nasty. I have a relative who loves gin, and I had her make me a gin martini one time at a holiday gathering. I took one sip of it and gave it back to her. She drank it.

Worth noting that there's a pretty wide variety in flavors of scotch; some stuff is really peaty/smoky (Johnnie Walker, or the Islay single malts), whereas stuff from, say, Speyside is going to be a lot more delicate, with more of a honey flavor rather than a smoke flavor.  So it's worth trying a couple different varieties before writing the whole category off.  I mean, I like the smoky stuff but it's kind of an acquired taste.

Though I guess if hard liquor isn't your thing in general then maybe not.  De gustibus non est disputandum, etc.

To that end, it's kind of fun to get a whiskey flight to taste the subtle differences.  There's a really cool West Village bar that does a bunch of scotch whiskey flights.  I think it's called Highlands.  One of my favorite NYC whiskey destinations along with Beast of Bourbon in my hood.

I love the idea of whisk(e)y flights, but they're too expensive for me 99% of the time.  Maybe I should get one for my birthday or something.

Beer flights are pretty cool and more doable, budget-wise.  I'd rather have four 4oz glasses of different beers rather than one monolithic pint, even if I have to spend an extra buck or two.
3  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: What kind of phone do you have? on: Today at 10:31:34 am
Dumb phone.
4  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Rank the parties w/ national legislative representation: Australia on: Today at 10:29:58 am
1. Labor
2. Greens
3. Palmer United
4. Liberal Democratic
5. Katter's Australian
6. Liberal
7. National
8. Democratic Labour
9. Motoring Enthusiast
10. Family First
5  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Opinion of IceSpear on: September 01, 2014, 09:35:32 pm
6  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Your favorite hard liquor on: September 01, 2014, 08:29:11 pm
I'm a thoroughgoing wine drinker, so hard liquor is tough because all I taste is alcohol, fire (or in gin's case, polish), etc. Having said that, it would probably be vodka. There are things that can be done with vodka (White Russians are like spiked milkshakes Smiley) to make it palatable and now they have reduced alcohol (reduced calorie) flavored vodkas, and they are good to sip on ice.

I've tried all the stuff on that list except Tequila, and I don't really like any of it. Jameson Irish whiskey wasn't bad, though. But I wouldn't sit and drink it or mix it.

Scotch and gin I simply cannot do. Too nasty. I have a relative who loves gin, and I had her make me a gin martini one time at a holiday gathering. I took one sip of it and gave it back to her. She drank it.

Worth noting that there's a pretty wide variety in flavors of scotch; some stuff is really peaty/smoky (Johnnie Walker, or the Islay single malts), whereas stuff from, say, Speyside is going to be a lot more delicate, with more of a honey flavor rather than a smoke flavor.  So it's worth trying a couple different varieties before writing the whole category off.  I mean, I like the smoky stuff but it's kind of an acquired taste.

Though I guess if hard liquor isn't your thing in general then maybe not.  De gustibus non est disputandum, etc.
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Rank the parties w/ national legislative representation: Greece on: August 31, 2014, 11:03:12 pm
1. DIMAR
2. SYRIZA
3. PASOK
4. New Democracy
5. KKE
6. Independent Greeks
7. Nazis
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Rank the parties w/ national legislative representation: Netherlands on: August 31, 2014, 10:58:05 pm
1. Democrats 66
2. GroenLinks
3. Labour Party
4. Socialist Party
5. People's Party for Freedom and Democracy
6. Christian Democratic Appeal
7. ChristianUnion
8. Party for the Animals
9. 50PLUS
10. Party for Freedom
11. Reformed Political Party
9  General Politics / U.S. General Discussion / Re: Which U.S. President do you most closely identify with? on: August 31, 2014, 07:37:03 pm
I have giant soft spots for John Quincy Adams and Jimmy Carter.  This is not to say that they're the best presidents, more that they're the most underrated.
10  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Good Post Gallery II on: August 31, 2014, 06:56:29 pm
I think it's a mistake to disregard the fact that land has a carrying capacity. Technological innovations can stretch it out, but at the end of the day, access to those technologies is not equal and fair, and in some places the increase of people outpaces the spread of technology. Yes, the issue often fixes itself (people die), but that doesn't do much for local quality of life.

So I'd summarize my opinion like this: Looking at the Earth from space, I wouldn't say that overpopulation is, on average, a massive problem. Looking at it in specific places, it really is.

I mean, look—death rates have dropped in the developing world with the spread of Western medicine. Infant mortality is down. Life expectancy is up. The trouble is, cultural disparities have prevented birth rates from similarly dipping. One example is that parents still hold onto the idea that they need to make more babies so that the kids can go out and earn extra money for the family. Couples have many babies as a sort of insurance policy... they expect some of the children to die. What's happening now though is that they actually aren't dying, so we end up with all these families living in arid places with piss-poor access to decent farmland and too many mouths to feed. Here, overpopulation is a problem because access to vital resources sucks and too many people are competing for the same stuff. How can you honestly say that's not a problem? It would be okay in a place with wealth, access to food and water, and good infrastructure, but not everywhere has that.

So yeah, the developing world would be better off with less people. This is where I think empowering women would really make a difference. Let's actually educate women so that having eight kids is no longer necessary or common. Let's make sure the caretakers of the family—the "mothers of the nation"—actually know a bit about family planning.

Anyway, I've gone off topic, but I think expecting the problem to solve itself or waiting on "the inevitable spread of technology" misses the mark. There are unique factors that make overpopulation a problem in certain places, and we shouldn't approach the issue as if the silver bullet is "we need more food!"

11  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Should people with disabilities who are unable to attain orgasm, be allowed to.. on: August 31, 2014, 12:58:07 pm
I feel like it says something very revealing about Atlas that most of the No votes are from Dems.
12  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Is overpopulation and the human breeding the root of all evil on the planet ? on: August 31, 2014, 12:53:55 pm
What Nix said. It's not the "root of all evil", duh, but just going "lol malthus" is not actually an answer, and certainly not any sort of answer that is conscious of basic science.

And of population history prior to the agricultural breakthroughs of recent centuries...

Yeah.  We've managed to massively up our planet's carrying capacity through better farming techniques and stuff like petroleum-based fertilizer... but that doesn't mean we've negated the concept of carrying capacity, not any more than the Wright Brothers repealed the laws of gravity.

And of course those petro fertilizers won't last forever.

And, even if they did, there's the danger of desertification, sea level rise, aquifer depletion, etc. clawing back many of our gains even in the absence of an energy crunch...
13  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Is overpopulation and the human breeding the root of all evil on the planet ? on: August 31, 2014, 01:15:36 am
What Nix said. It's not the "root of all evil", duh, but just going "lol malthus" is not actually an answer, and certainly not any sort of answer that is conscious of basic science.
14  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Update for Everyone II - Less Boring, More Whoring on: August 29, 2014, 03:45:40 pm
Visiting Philly for the weekend.  Good to be here again.

oh god my friends are talking constantly about ingress now maybe i spoke too soon
15  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Tik's Focus on Christmas (Music) Thread on: August 29, 2014, 03:20:40 pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8qE6WQmNus
16  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Update for Everyone II - Less Boring, More Whoring on: August 28, 2014, 09:54:18 pm
Visiting Philly for the weekend.  Good to be here again.
17  General Politics / Political Geography & Demographics / Re: Weighted Voting For Congress on: August 28, 2014, 09:51:59 pm
Edit: Left Portsmouth out of Tidewater in Plan 3, Winchester city out of Southern Virginia Plan 2 and 3.

I think the first of your three Virginias is clearly the best- it seems to me like Richmond and Tidewater probably ought to stay together.

I generally approve of your compromise PA as well; perhaps a few rural counties (such as Clearfield, Elk, and the like) could also be shifted from the West to the Northeast to lower deviations if necessary.
18  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Re: What would you spend $42 000 from your piggy-bank on? on: August 28, 2014, 11:46:00 am
I lovingly crafted two posts that were completely deleted from this thread by the guy who moved it to this forum that he isn't even a moderated of. What kind of bs is that? Makes me want to not even bother.

They were deleted because they responded directly to the troll whose posts were infracted and deleted and your posts as a result were not salvageable.  On the other hand, the posts that ignored the troll's post and only replied to the question in the title he gave his thread were interesting enough that rather than nuke the whole thread, I saved them and moved the resulting abbreviated topic to FC.

Tik's post was a treasure.  You ought to be ashamed of yourself.
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of coal mining on: August 27, 2014, 11:13:16 pm

Obviously we're going in the right direction as coal sucks for a lot of reasons (as does every single one of our energy options), but we also still really really need it, at least for a couple of more decades.  In the mean time we should acquire it and use it in the most reasonable and efficient and clean way possible.  I don't understand how something that provides us nearly 40% of our electricity can be a HA unless you also think electricity is a horrible thing...but that would be stupid.

Wow, I didn't know wood still had the sort of share that would actually show up on a chart like this.  

Also, where would garbage incinerators go?  Renewables (even though that would be kind of a misnomer)?  Or, hm, perhaps "wood" really means "biomass" and includes incinerators as well.  Not that it's a super-common way to get energy in the US, so doubt that would be the whole explanation even if true.

If you look at the EIA's breakdown of "other renewables" (in various charts on its web site), it includes categories called "landfill gas", "biogenic municipal solid waste", and "other waste biomass".  I would guess that the systems you have in mind are somehow covered in these three. All are much smaller sources than wood and wood-derived fuels.

"Wood" here (nowadays - not for the historic parts of the above chart) mainly means wood waste from the forestry industry used for electricity generation. In areas with sawmills or pulp and paper mills, there are often nearby power plants that burn waste products like pellets or liquid byproducts of the paper-making process.

Aha, thank you.  I sort of vaguely knew that byproducts of paper production were used in a number of other capacities- though I had vanilla flavoring in mind rather than power generation- but that's a surprisingly large percentage of the grid, even if it's not actually large.

Makes sense re: landfill gas and incineration.  I was wondering if landfill gas was actually part of "natural gas" (since it's basically the same molecule- methane- that we're either finding in shale or collecting from being burped out by anaerobic bacteria), but I guess it does make more sense, big-picture, to have it in renewables.
20  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: The Simple Truths Silver Mine on: August 27, 2014, 02:54:16 pm
This new 538 is really made of fail. And I say this as one of Nate's earliest fans.
Are you only saying that because it doesn't show Democrats to have an advantage?

I think he's saying that because the new 538 has still not launched their official model of the 2014 midterm elections - yet they still have time to run articles about the statistical accuracy of tarot readers and the effects of binge-watching the Simpsons on the human brain.

Election forecasting and predictions is what made Mr. Silver famous--whether or not he realizes it, that is what his appeal is built upon. Instead, he's traveling the country to find America's Best Burrito.

Maybe that's what he actually wants to do though?

Also keep in mind that Silver was pretty well-known for his fantasy baseball work well before he jumped into elections- a jump that, by his own admission, was more because the competing work was so shoddy and easy-to-best rather than because of any passion for electoral politics per se.
21  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: Government social program for low income families regarding automobiles on: August 27, 2014, 02:19:56 pm
The money would be better invested in the development of affordable public transportation.

Obviously.

...

What about people who live in rural areas?

Let the public transit crowd listen to the sound of their own echo. They do not wish to be inconvenienced by considering the lives of people who do not live in densely populated areas.

Heavens forfend we inconvenience the exurban crowd by considering the lives of people who do live in densely populated areas.  Or, hell, even so much as acknowledge the concept of externalities.

CrabCake's suggestion of subsidized ride-sharing for those in truly rural areas is a good one.  As for the suburbs, many of them can and should be retrofitted to become transit-friendly, and let ride-share be a bridge to that if necessary.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of coal mining on: August 27, 2014, 01:30:36 am

Obviously we're going in the right direction as coal sucks for a lot of reasons (as does every single one of our energy options), but we also still really really need it, at least for a couple of more decades.  In the mean time we should acquire it and use it in the most reasonable and efficient and clean way possible.  I don't understand how something that provides us nearly 40% of our electricity can be a HA unless you also think electricity is a horrible thing...but that would be stupid.

Wow, I didn't know wood still had the sort of share that would actually show up on a chart like this. 

Also, where would garbage incinerators go?  Renewables (even though that would be kind of a misnomer)?  Or, hm, perhaps "wood" really means "biomass" and includes incinerators as well.  Not that it's a super-common way to get energy in the US, so doubt that would be the whole explanation even if true.
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of coal mining on: August 26, 2014, 10:48:54 pm
Sibboleth makes some good points about coal's deep historical importance, and I don't want to knock that... but whaling was once pretty crucial to the economy and quality-of-life of "developed" nations, too.  And we know what happened there.  These days, knowing what we now know about the environmental and social devastation that coal leaves in its wake (both acute and chronic), and knowing what we know about how to produce clean(er) energy in so many other ways (gas, solar, wind, nukes, hydro, etc.)...

Well, I think it's high time that coal join the Pequod & co. in the history books.
24  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Is this post racially insensitive? on: August 26, 2014, 01:35:25 pm
Inner City in the sense of urban geography does not refer to the city centre but to a ring - the classical shape, though less common than it used to be - of deprived neighbourhoods around the city centre. It replaced (and is arguably a euphemism for) the older term 'slum'. There isn't really an English term for deprived suburb, but there is a French one and we might as well use it: banlieue.
And that's why I said near the urban core. Most American big city downtowns (as we call them, not sure if that term is used in the UK) are perfectly safe and, in addition to hosting the traditional officespace, are full of trendy, supercool types living in expensive lofts next to wine bars and small plate restaurants. Even in Memphis, the least supercool city in America. Outside of stray homeless people, of course poors don't live downtown. They often work there in restaurant kitchens and hotels though.

You have Graceland and Beale Street; you're far more supercool than, say, Fresno or Jacksonville.

As for the OP's question... Gustaf has the right of it. 
25  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Which European political party is the preceding poster best suited for? on: August 26, 2014, 01:26:23 pm
Greece's KKE.
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