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News: Atlas Hardware Upgrade complete October 13, 2013.

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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Australian mining magnate Lang Hancock on: Today at 06:48:01 pm
Like his small-government views and his support of states' rights, but not a fan of his views on Aboriginals or his support of Bjelke-Petersen. HP.
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Do you support a ban on hunting albino deer? on: Today at 06:44:32 pm
No, I do not.
3  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1876 Presidential Election on: Today at 06:44:06 pm
Tilden.
4  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: How partisan are you in your voting? on: Today at 07:27:34 am
From an Australian point of view, I normally put the Liberals first, although in the Senate, do vote below the line, and do not give the Liberal candidates the entirety of my Top 5 preferences, I give those to FF, LDP, CDP, National, Shooters & Fishers, depending on the candidates.

If Malcolm Turnbull becomes Liberal leader, I'm definitely giving a minor right-wing party my first preference.
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Better President, of these two (Bill Clinton vs. Barack Obama) on: October 21, 2014, 06:32:34 pm
Clinton (R)
6  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Opinion of South Park's anti-union propaganda on: October 21, 2014, 09:57:21 am
One shouldn't take one's political views from a television show.

I agree with this wholeheartedly. Source: When I was 14/15, my political views literally WERE "Whatever Trey Parker and Matt Stone say".
7  Forum Community / Off-topic Board / Re: Opinion of "Lincoln" (the movie) on: October 21, 2014, 09:17:16 am
Excellent movie, would highly recommend it.
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: How would you have voted in the preceding election? on: October 20, 2014, 09:48:29 pm
No.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasse_state_by-election,_2014
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1985 Referendum on: October 20, 2014, 08:00:31 pm
Voting is now closed, thank you all for your participation.
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1824 Presidential Election on: October 20, 2014, 07:04:03 pm
Adams or Jackson, went for Adams.
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Gough Whitlam on: October 20, 2014, 06:26:20 pm
HP (Australian), although I admire the way he stuck to his guns, and for serving his constituents, even after entering the Lodge.
12  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Australia General Discussion on: October 20, 2014, 06:17:09 pm
R.I.P.
13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1985 Referendum on: October 20, 2014, 06:22:32 am
Just a reminder that voting will close at 9am tomorrow morning, AWST.
14  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Replace a Sitting Senator on: October 19, 2014, 03:15:37 am
Harry Reid -> Sue Lowden or Wayne Allen Root
Mark Pryor -> Tom Cotton
Mark Udall -> Cory Gardner
Michael Bennett -> Ken Buck
Mary Landrieu -> Bill Cassidy
David Vitter -> Bobby Jindal (once he finishes his term as governor), or Buddy Roemer
Elizabeth Warren -> Scott Brown
Tammy Baldwin -> Tommy Thompson
Barbara Boxer -> Nancy Reagan (had to steal this one Sanchez Tongue)
15  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Replace a Sitting Governor on: October 19, 2014, 02:47:03 am
Dan Malloy -> Tom Foley
Terry McAuliffe -> Ken Cuccinelli
Steve Beshear -> Matt Bevin
Jay Nixon -> Matt Blunt
Pat Quinn -> Almost any IL Republican
Nathan Deal -> Andrew Hunt, John Monds or Karen Handel (Deal is my least favourite Republican governor)
16  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: Which state would Hillary win by the largest margin (in the general election)? on: October 19, 2014, 01:31:17 am
I'll go with Vermont.
17  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1792 Presidential Election on: October 18, 2014, 06:24:50 pm
Democratic-Republicans
18  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Bill Cosby on: October 18, 2014, 06:24:14 pm
All-around fantastic person. I'll go with "guilty until proven innocent" for the sexual assault allegations, since I'd really rather believe the best of him.

I agree with Vosem, I'd hate to think Bill Cosby is the American Rolf Harris or Jimmy Savile!

Also, am I the only The Cosby Show fan around here?
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1985 Referendum on: October 18, 2014, 06:17:38 pm
I don't understand the motivation for voting no...



I voted No as it would strip the ACT of its local governments.
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Bill Cosby on: October 18, 2014, 01:41:52 am
FF, especially for co-creating one of the greatest sitcoms to air on television.
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Which Presidents would you most want to go drinking with? on: October 18, 2014, 12:15:00 am
Washington, Jefferson, Coolidge and Reagan, to name four.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: October 17, 2014, 07:53:35 pm
Prime Ministers of Australia:
1. George Reid (Free Trade/Anti-Socialist) 1901-07
2. Andrew Fisher (Labour) 1907-15
3. Billy Hughes (Labor/National Labor) 1915-16
4. Joseph Cook (Commonwealth Liberal) 1916-17
3. Billy Hughes (Nationalist) 1917-19
5. Frank Tudor (Labor) 1919-22
6. Matthew Charlton (Labor) 1922-23
7. Stanley Bruce (Nationalist) 1923-28
8. James Scullin (Labor) 1928-31
9. Joseph Lyons (United Australia) 1931-39
10. Sir Earle Page (Country) 1939-39
11. Robert Menzies (United Australia) 1939-40
12. John Curtin (Labor, Wartime Unity Government) 1940-45
13. Frank Forde (Labor, Wartime Unity Government) 1945-45
14. Ben Chifley (Labor, Wartime Unity Government) 1945-45
11. Robert Menzies (United Australia) 1945-48
14. Ben Chifley (Labor) 1948-51
15. H. V. Evatt (Labor) 1951-55
16. Eric Harrison (Liberal) 1955-66
17. Harold Holt (Liberal) 1966-67
18. Gough Whitlam (Labor) 1967-76
19. Malcolm Fraser (Liberal) 1976-82
20. John Singleton (Progress) 1982-

Free Trade Party Leaders:
1. George Reid (1901-06, party became Anti-Socialist Party)

Anti-Socialist Party Leaders:
1. George Reid (1906-07)
2. Joseph Cook (1907-08, party merged with Protectionists to become Commonwealth Liberal Party)

Protectionist Party Leaders:
1. Edmund Barton (1901)
2. Alfred Deakin (1901-08, party merged with Anti-Socialists to become Commonwealth Liberal Party)

Labor Party Leaders:
1. Chris Watson (1901-06)
2. Andrew Fisher (1906-15)
3. Billy Hughes (1915-16, expelled from Labor Party)
4. Frank Tudor (1916-22, died in office)
5. Matthew Charlton (1922-27)
6. James Scullin (1927-35)
7. John Curtin (1935-45, died in office)
8. Frank Forde (1945, caretaker leader)
9. Ben Chifley (1945-51, died in office)
10. H. V. Evatt (1951-55, lost seat and resigned)
11. Arthur Calwell (1955-64)
12. Gough Whitlam (1964-76, stepped down after conceding defeat)
13. Bill Hayden (1976-82, defeated in leadership ballot)
14. Bob Hawke (1982-)

Revenue Tariff Party Leaders:
1. Alfred Deakin (1908-13)
2. George Wise (1913-14, party folded)

Commonwealth Liberal Party Leaders:
1. Joseph Cook (1908-17, party merged with National Labor to become Nationalist Party)

National Labor Party leaders:
1. Billy Hughes (1916-17, party merged with Commonwealth Liberals to become Nationalist Party)

Nationalist Party Leaders:
1. Billy Hughes (1917-22)
2. Stanley Bruce (1922-28)
3. John Latham (1928-31, party merged with Australian Alliance to become United Australia Party)
   
Country Party Leaders:
1. William McWilliams (1920-22)
2. Sir Earle Page (1922-39)
3. Archie Cameron (1939-40)
4. Arthur Fadden (1940-55, resigned)
5. Charles Adermann (1955-67, resigned)
6. John McEwen (1967-70, resigned)
7. Doug Anthony (1970-71, party absorbed DLP to become the National Country Party)

Liberal Union Leaders:
1. William Watt (1922-23, party folded, members re-joined Nationalists)

Lang Labor Leaders:
1. Jack Beasley (1931-36)
2. Jack Lang (1936-39, party became Non-Communist Labor Party)

Australian Alliance Leaders:
1. Joseph Lyons (1931, party merged with Nationalists to become United Australia Party)

United Australia Party Leaders:
1. Joseph Lyons (1931-39, died in office)
2. Robert Menzies (1939-50, party became Liberal Party)

Communist Party Leaders:
1. J.B. Miles (1932-40, party banned)
2. Paddy Troy (1949-51, stepped down)
3. Lance Sharkey (1951-61, stepped down)
4. Ron Maxwell (1961-70, stepped down)
5. Ted Hill (1970-79, stepped down)
6. Eric Aarons (1979-)

Social Credit Party Leaders:
1. Geoffrey Nichols (1933-43, party folded)

Non-Communist Labor Party Leaders:
1. Jack Lang (1939-49, party folded)

State Labor Party Leaders:
1. Jack Hughes (1940-49, party resumed its old name of the Communist Party, and Hughes stepped down from leadership)

Liberal Country Party Leaders:
1. Thomas Collins (1940-45, party re-merged with Country Party)

Liberal Party Leaders:
1. Robert Menzies (1950-55, resigned)
2. Eric Harrison (1955-66, resigned)
3. Harold Holt (1966-67, disappeared, presumed dead)
4. Paul Hasluck (1968-70, lost leadership ballot)
5. John Gorton (1970-73, lost leadership ballot)
6. Malcolm Fraser (1973-82, resigned, and party wrapped up)

Democratic Labor Party Leaders:
1. Bob Joshua (1955-61, lost seat)
2. Jack Little (1961-71, party merged with Country Party)

Marxist-Leninist Communist Party Leaders:
1. Ted Hill (1964-70, party re-merged with Communists)

Australia Party Leaders:
1. Gordon Barton (1968-74, resigned)
2. Steele Hall (1974-81, lost leadership challenge)
3. Don Chipp (1981-)

National Country Party Leaders:
1. Doug Anthony (1971-)

Progress Party Leaders:
1. John Singleton (1975-)

Natural Law Party Leaders:
1. Bob Brown (1981-)
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - 1985 Referendum on: October 17, 2014, 07:43:16 pm
The 1985 election, the first following the demise of the Liberal Party in 1982, provided a closer result between the left and the right. While the Progress and National Country Parties won a combined 48.1% of the vote between them, partly courtesy of a National Country surge, Labor, the Natural Law Party and the Communists won 40.7% of the vote between them, a significant improvement from 1982. Factoring in Australia Party preferences, this resulted in a 53.74% two-party preferred vote for the incumbent government, similar to their 1979 figure.
Summary of 1985 election:

House of Representatives*
Labor 46 (+10)
Progress 38 (nc)
National Country 27 (+8)
Australia Party 12 (-6)
Natural Law 2 (+2)
Communist 1 (-2)
Liberal 0 (-12)

* Changes are from 1982 election

Senate
1982: 11 Progress, 7 Labor, 5 National Country, 4 Australia Party, 2 Natural Law, 1 Communist
1985: 10 Progress, 7 Labor, 6 National Country, 6 Natural Law, 4 Australia Party, 1 Communist
Total: 21 Progress, 14 Labor, 11 National Country, 8 Australia Party, 8 Natural Law, 2 Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 53.74-46.26

While Labor managed to gain 10 seats in the House, and the Natural Law Party did well in the Senate, along with winning two seats in the House, these gains seemed to be from the Australia Party, although the Government's majority was reduced from 12 to 4. The Progress-NCP Government now held 65 seats out of a possible 126,  and in the Senate, the government was now one seat away from a majority, keyword being away - the Australia Party were now even more serious about not rubberstamping government bills. On one issue, namely the composition of Parliament Don Chipp stated to PM Singleton that the current amount of seats, set back in the 1940s, was no longer sufficient for Australia's population, and an expansion, which had been recommended by the AEC (Australian Electoral Commission) back in the late 1970s, was well overdue.

The first session of Parliament would be dominated by this issue, and that of granting the Australian Capital Territory self-government. A solution of expanding the Senate to 76 seats, by granting each state two extra Senators, and thus expanding the size of the House to 151 members, was eventually agreed to in October of 1985, effective for the next election. As for ACT self-government, no agreement could be made - The Progress Party opposed ACT self-government altogether, the NCP were weary of the idea, Labor, the Australia Party and the Natural Law supported it, and the Communists were against any government aside from the Commonwealth Government. Given the deadlock over the issue, it was decided to be put to a referendum. The model of self-government would be determined by the residents of the territory, should the referendum be successful, and would replace the local government system of the territory.

A referendum question has been set for the 30th of November, 1985.

"Do you support self-government for the Australian Capital Territory, similar in power to the Northern Territory government?"

Voting is open for 72 hours.

Me: NO
24  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: October 17, 2014, 07:42:54 pm
















The 1985 election, the first following the demise of the Liberal Party in 1982, provided a closer result between the left and the right. While the Progress and National Country Parties won a combined 48.1% of the vote between them, partly courtesy of a National Country surge, Labor, the Natural Law Party and the Communists won 40.7% of the vote between them, a significant improvement from 1982. Factoring in Australia Party preferences, this resulted in a 53.74% two-party preferred vote for the incumbent government, similar to their 1979 figure.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 1985 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (45 seats) 20 Labor, 14 Progress, 8 National Country, 2 Australia Party, 1 Communist
Victoria (34 seats) 14 Labor, 12 Progress, 5 National Country, 3 Australia Party
Queensland (18 seats) 12 National Country, 4 Labor, 2 Progress
South Australia (12 seats) 6 Australia Party, 5 Labor, 1 Progress
Western Australia (10 seats) 7 Progress, 1 Labor, 2 National Country
Tasmania (4 seats) 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Progress
Australian Capital Territory (2 seats) 1 Labor, 1 Australia Party
Northern Territory (1 seat) 1 Progress
Total 46 Labor, 27 National Country, 38 Progress, 12 Australia Party, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1982:
New South Wales: 1 Labor, 1 National Country, 1 Communist, 1 Progress, 1 Australia Party
Victoria: 3 Progress, 1 Labor, 1 Australia Party
Queensland: 2 National Country, 2 Progress, 1 Labor
South Australia: 2 Australia Party, 2 Labor, 1 Progress
Western Australia: 2 Progress, 2 National Country, 1 Labor
Tasmania: 2 Progress, 2 Natural Law,  1 Labor
Total: 11 Progress, 7 Labor, 5 National Country, 4 Australia Party, 2 Natural Law, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1985:
New South Wales: 1 Labor, 1 Progress, 1 National Country, 1 Communist, 1 Natural Law
Victoria: 1 Progress, 1 Labor, 1 National Country, 1 Australia Party, 1 Natural Law
Queensland: 2 National Country, 2 Progress, 1 Labor
South Australia: 2 Australia Party, 1 Labor, 1 Progress, 1 Natural Law
Western Australia: 2 Progress, 2 National Country, 1 Labor
Tasmania: 2 Progress, 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor
Australian Capital Territory: 1 Natural Law, 1 Australia Party
Northern Territory: 1 Labor, 1 Progress
Total: 10 Progress, 7 Labor, 6 National Country, 6 Natural Law, 4 Australia Party, 1 Communist

Summary of 1985 election:

House of Representatives*
Labor 46 (+10)
Progress 38 (nc)
National Country 27 (+8)
Australia Party 12 (-6)
Natural Law 2 (+2)
Communist 1 (-2)
Liberal 0 (-12)

* Changes are from 1982 election

Senate
1982: 11 Progress, 7 Labor, 5 National Country, 4 Australia Party, 2 Natural Law, 1 Communist
1985: 10 Progress, 7 Labor, 6 National Country, 6 Natural Law, 4 Australia Party, 1 Communist
Total: 21 Progress, 14 Labor, 11 National Country, 8 Australia Party, 8 Natural Law, 2 Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 53.74-46.26

While Labor managed to gain 10 seats in the House, and the Natural Law Party did well in the Senate, along with winning two seats in the House, these gains seemed to be from the Australia Party, although the Government's majority was reduced from 12 to 4. The Progress-NCP Government now held 65 seats out of a possible 126,  and in the Senate, the government was now one seat away from a majority, keyword being away - the Australia Party were now even more serious about not rubberstamping government bills. On one issue, namely the composition of Parliament Don Chipp stated to PM Singleton that the current amount of seats, set back in the 1940s, was no longer sufficient for Australia's population, and an expansion, which had been recommended by the AEC (Australian Electoral Commission) back in the late 1970s, was well overdue.

The first session of Parliament would be dominated by this issue, and that of granting the Australian Capital Territory self-government. A solution of expanding the Senate to 76 seats, by granting each state two extra Senators, and thus expanding the size of the House to 151 members, was eventually agreed to in October of 1985, effective for the next election. As for ACT self-government, no agreement could be made - The Progress Party opposed ACT self-government altogether, the NCP were weary of the idea, Labor, the Australia Party and the Natural Law supported it, and the Communists were against any government aside from the Commonwealth Government. Given the deadlock over the issue, it was decided to be put to a referendum. The model of self-government would be determined by the residents of the territory, should the referendum be successful, and would replace the local government system of the territory.
25  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1944 Primaries on: October 17, 2014, 06:28:03 pm
Taft.
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