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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Best President in US History? on: May 28, 2015, 11:34:08 am
Washington, with Jefferson a close second.
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Your position on the traditional continuum. on: May 25, 2015, 05:43:05 am
Right.
3  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Pro-Lifers Only: Why are you against Abortion? on: May 24, 2015, 06:13:43 am
For both moral and religious reasons. You are literally taking a life!
4  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Voting Booth / Re: Mideast Voting Booth: May 2015 Elections on: May 24, 2015, 12:31:17 am
Governor:
Botley (DR)/Write in: JCL (Fed)

Assembly:
1. Write-in: JCL
2. Shua
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Pro-choice Hawk or Pro-life Dove? on: May 23, 2015, 10:55:44 pm
Pro-life dove.
6  General Politics / Political Debate / Re: How would you have sentenced Timothy McVeigh? on: May 21, 2015, 11:21:52 am
Death, no doubt whatsoever.
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Best Senators of the Past 50 Years: Arkansas on: May 21, 2015, 05:29:34 am
Anyone voting for Cotton is too far gone to save.

Looks like I can't be saved Tongue
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Is the Tea Party an eco-terrorist organization? on: May 21, 2015, 04:14:19 am
No, neither as eco-terrorists nor economic-terrorists.
9  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International What-ifs / Re: How Would You Have Voted? Your State's gubernatorial election's on: May 20, 2015, 04:17:28 am
We don't directly elect our Premiers here in Australia, so I'll do which of the leaders I like the most for each election.

1890: John Forrest (Ministerialist)
1894: John Forrest (Ministerialist)
1897: John Forrest (Ministerialist)

1901: George Throsell (Unaligned Non-Labor)
1904: Walter James (Unaligned Non-Labor)
1905: Cornthwaite "Hector" Rason (Unaligned Non-Labor)
1908: Newton Moore (Unaligned Non-Labor)
1911: Frank Wilson (Unaligned Non-Labor)

1914: Frank Wilson (Liberal)[/color]
1917: Henry Lefroy (Nationalist)
1921: James Mitchell (Nationalist)
1924: James Mitchell (Nationalist)
1927: James Mitchell (Nationalist)
1930: James Mitchell (Nationalist)
1933: James Mitchell (Nationalist)
1936: Norbert Keenan (Nationalist)
1939: Robert Ross McDonald (Nationalist)
1943: Robert Ross McDonald (Nationalist)

1947: Ross McLarty (Liberal)
1950: Ross McLarty (Liberal)
1953: Ross McLarty (Liberal)
1956: Ross McLarty (Liberal)
1959: David Brand (Liberal)
1962: David Brand (Liberal)
1965: David Brand (Liberal)
1968: David Brand (Liberal)
1971: David Brand (Liberal)
1974: Charles Court (Liberal)
1977: Charles Court (Liberal)
1980: Charles Court (Liberal)

1983: Hendy Cowan (National)
1986: Hendy Cowan (National)
1989: Hendy Cowan (National)

1993: Richard Court (Liberal)
1996: Richard Court (Liberal)
2001: Richard Court (Liberal)
2005: Matt Birney (Liberal)
2008: Colin Barnett (Liberal)
2013: Colin Barnett (Liberal)
10  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International What-ifs / Re: US With British Parties on: May 20, 2015, 03:16:06 am
How would Asian American groups vote in a UK party scenario?

Would Chinese, Koreans and Indian Hindus vote Tory as the "entrepreneurial party"?  How about Filipinos?

White Catholics I assume vote largely Labour though perhaps they'd go Tory in a big swing.

Hey,

Sorry for the major delay, but yes, a significant number of Americans of Asian ancestry would generally vote Tory, although Labor would win a majority of these voters in a 1997-style landslide, and some would prefer the Lib Dems.

To break things down a bit more:

Filipinos - Tory, 1997-style landslides aside.
Vietnamese - Tory, although a significant portion of younger voters would prefer the Lib Dems or Labor.
Koreans - Tory-leaning swing voters.
Chinese - Generally Labour, although a significant number would have gone to the Lib Dems in 2005 and 2010. Would have also supported the Tories and Liberals more in the past, prior to Labor's shift to the right.
Indian Hindus - Another swing voting bloc.

As for Catholics, they would generally vote Labour (particularly in northern states, which is why the Tories didn't win the likes of WI or PA in 2010 in this scenario), although could vote Tory with the right candidate and/or circumstances, as you said.

Will post the 2015 results in the next post.
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Epilogue on: May 20, 2015, 02:07:05 am
Thanks Anton, this has been a spectacular series.

No problem, glad you've enjoyed it! Smiley
12  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Would the death penalty be justified for Hitler? on: May 18, 2015, 11:08:37 pm
Yes, definitely.
13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: How would you have voted for TARP (by party)? on: May 18, 2015, 11:07:33 pm
Nay (R)
14  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Epilogue on: May 18, 2015, 08:57:17 pm
Prime Ministers of Australia:


1. George Reid (1845-1918, Free Trade/Anti-Socialist) – 1901-07


2. Andrew Fisher (1862-1928, Labour) – 1907-15


3. Billy Hughes (1862-1952, Labor/National Labor) – 1915-16


4. Joseph Cook (1860-1947, Commonwealth Liberal) – 1916-17


3. Billy Hughes (1862-1952, Nationalist) – 1917-19


5. Frank Tudor (1866-1922, Labor) – 1919-22


6. Matthew Charlton (1866-1948, Labor) – 1922-23


7. Stanley Bruce (1883-1967, Nationalist) – 1923-28


8. James Scullin (1876-1953, Labor) – 1928-31


9. Joseph Lyons (1879-1939, United Australia) – 1931-39


10. Sir Earle Page (1880-1961, Country) – 1939-39


11. Robert Menzies (1894-1978, United Australia) – 1939-40


12. John Curtin (1885-1945, Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1940-45


13. Frank Forde (1890-1983, Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1945-45


14. Ben Chifley (Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1945-45


11. Robert Menzies (1894-1978, United Australia) – 1945-48


14. Ben Chifley (1885-1951, Labor) – 1948-51


15. H. V. Evatt (1894-1965, Labor) – 1951-55


16. Eric Harrison (1892-1974, Liberal) – 1955-66


17. Harold Holt (1908-67, Liberal) – 1966-67


18. Gough Whitlam (1916-2014, Labor) – 1967-76


19. Malcolm Fraser (1930-2015, Liberal) – 1976-82


20. John Singleton (1941-, Progress) – 1982-86


21. Peter Reith (1950-, Progress) – 1986-88


22. Bob Hawke (1929-, Labor) – 1988-92


23. Paul Keating (1944-, Labor) – 1992-94


24. Alexander Downer (1951-, Progress, Unity Government) – 1994-97


25. Bob Brown (1944-, Natural Law) – 1997-99


26. Peter Costello (1957-, Conservative) – 1999-2005


27. Simon Crean (1949-, Labor) – 2005-08


28. Joe Hockey (1965-, Conservative) – 2008-15


29. Julie Bishop (1956-, Conservative) – 2015-

Presidents of Australia:

1.   Paul Keating (1999-2008)


2. Malcolm Turnbull (2008-)
15  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - Epilogue on: May 18, 2015, 08:56:56 pm
Despite opinion polls and early returns showing a third term for the Hockey Government, election night 2014 proved to be quite different to the predictions - The Tories lost their vote lead to Natural Law, and finished on a mere 72 seats, a massive drop from the 106 Tories elected in 2011. Natural Law won 68 seats, an increase of 36 from 2011, Labor picked up two seats, Family First and Rural Voice made gains of three and seven respectively, while the hard-left Anticapitalist Alliance picked up a seat, and the centrist Democrats bombed to just one seat, leader Natasha Stott Despoja resigning as leader and MP not long afterwards. Kevin Rudd and Clive Palmer's respective new parties, Justice and Freedom, won singular seats each, and while both parties won Senators, aside from their leaders, they failed to make headway in the House.

Summary of 2014 election:

House of Representatives
Conservative – 72 (-34)
Natural Law – 68 (+36)
Labor – 28 (+2)
Rural Voice – 13 (+7)
Family First – 11 (+3)
Anticapitalist Alliance – 5 (+1)
Justice – 1 (+1)
Freedom – 1 (+1)
Democrats – 1 (-17)

Senate
2011: 12 Conservative, 8 Natural Law, 5 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Family First, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance
2014: 11 Natural Law, 9 Conservative, 5 Labor, 5 Rural Voice, 4 Family First, 2 Justice, 2 Freedom, 1 Democrats
Total: 21 Conservative, 19 Natural Law, 9 Labor, 8 Family First, 7 Rural Voice, 6 Democrats, 2 Anticapitalist Alliance, 2 Justice, 2 Freedom

Two-party preferred vote: 52.03-47.97

The first deadlocked Parliament since 1994 saw the Tories, Family First and Rural Voice hold a combined 96 seats, the same number as Natural Law and Labor. These figures increased to 97 a side, assuming Clive Palmer supported a Tory-led government, and Kevin Rudd a Natural Law-led government. With 101 seats required for a majority, and only the Anticapitalist Alliance able to provide either side a majority, which they would not, for obvious reasons, it seemed a minority government was the only way to avoid a second election. Going from the Senate results, the Tories, Rural Voice, Family First and the Freedom Party held a combined 38 seats, while Natural Law, Labor, the Democrats (if they were to support a Hanson-Young govermment) and Justice held a combined 36 seats, neither of which was a majority.

After negotiations went beyond the Christmas-New Year period, it was decided that the incumbent Government would continue in minority, given their upper hand in the Senate, and that some of the Anticapitalist Alliance MPs and Senators had poor attendance records, making a majority in Parliament just that little bit easier. Joe Hockey, however, would not lead this government - the Freedom Party stated that the election was a rejection of the Prime Minister, and they would not support the government in the Senate unless they changed leader. A snap leadership spill resulted in Julie Bishop elected the new Tory leader, and thus the 29th Prime Minister of Australia. Julia Gillard resigned as Labor leader, to be replaced by deputy leader Anthony Albanese. Hanson-Young also resigned as Natural Law leader, replaced by Scott Ludlam. A by-election in Natasha Stott Despoja’s old seat of Hawker, in South Australia, saw the Tories gain the seat, narrowly fending off a strong Natural Law challenge, boosting the government’s numbers in the House to 98.

Queensland’s Tory government led by Campbell Newman faced an election in early 2015, Newman lost his seat, and the Justice and Freedom parties shared the balance of power with Natural Law and Rural Voice. Eventually, a Tory-Rural Voice-Freedom government was cobbled together, although opinion of the state government and Freedom Party alike sank, following reports of federal Freedom MP and party leader Clive Palmer not attending parliamentary sittings. New South Wales’ Tory government had an easier re-election, despite several members caught out by the ICAC during the term. The centenary of the ANZACs landing at Gallipoli was commemorated on the 25th of April, 2015, to record turnouts at Dawn Services nationwide.

Dominating the Australian media in early 2015, however, was the execution of Bali Nine ringleaders Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran and preluding lead-up to the execution. Despite pleas from PM Julie Bishop, opposition leader Scott Ludlam, and most MPs and Senators, along with a significant portion of the Australian public, the executions went ahead on the 29th of April, 2015. A minority of Australians boycotted Bali, a popular tourist island in Indonesia, following the incident, and foreign aid to Indonesia was cut, which Indonesia agreed to. Domestically, budget time was looming, and given the shaky Parliament, would be very turbulent. How would it go? Only time would tell…

A note from AK:

Thank you all once again for participating in this election series . I couldn’t have done it without you all, you’ve all contributed greatly. It’s been a great deal of fun, and sometimes a bit tricky, but I’ve definitely enjoyed it all the way through. And now, a list of all the Prime Ministers in this series!
16  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 08:56:13 pm
Party Leaders
Free Trade Party Leaders:
1. George Reid (1901-06, party became Anti-Socialist Party)

Anti-Socialist Party Leaders:
1. George Reid (1906-07)
2. Joseph Cook (1907-08, party merged with Protectionists to become Commonwealth Liberal Party)

Protectionist Party Leaders:
1. Edmund Barton (1901)
2. Alfred Deakin (1901-08, party merged with Anti-Socialists to become Commonwealth Liberal Party)

Labor Party Leaders:
1. Chris Watson (1901-06)
2. Andrew Fisher (1906-15)
3. Billy Hughes (1915-16, expelled from Labor Party)
4. Frank Tudor (1916-22, died in office)
5. Matthew Charlton (1922-27)
6. James Scullin (1927-35)
7. John Curtin (1935-45, died in office)
8. Frank Forde (1945, caretaker leader)
9. Ben Chifley (1945-51, died in office)
10. H. V. Evatt (1951-55, lost seat and resigned)
11. Arthur Calwell (1955-64)
12. Gough Whitlam (1964-76, stepped down after conceding defeat)
13. Bill Hayden (1976-82, defeated in leadership ballot)
14. Bob Hawke (1982-92, lost leadership ballot)
15. Paul Keating (1992-97, resigned, appointed President in 1999)
16. Kim Beazley (1997-2002, resigned)
17. Mark Latham (2002-05, resigned)
18. Simon Crean (2005-08, resigned)
19. Kevin Rudd (2008-12, lost leadership ballot, subsequently started his own party)
20. Julia Gillard (2012-15, resigned)
21. Anthony Albanese (2015-)

Revenue Tariff Party Leaders:
1. Alfred Deakin (1908-13)
2. George Wise (1913-14, party folded)

Commonwealth Liberal Party Leaders:
1. Joseph Cook (1908-17, party merged with National Labor to become Nationalist Party)

National Labor Party leaders:
1. Billy Hughes (1916-17, party merged with Commonwealth Liberals to become Nationalist Party)

Nationalist Party Leaders:
1. Billy Hughes (1917-22)
2. Stanley Bruce (1922-28)
3. John Latham (1928-31, party merged with Australian Alliance to become United Australia Party)
   
Country Party Leaders:
1. William McWilliams (1920-22)
2. Sir Earle Page (1922-39)
3. Archie Cameron (1939-40)
4. Arthur Fadden (1940-55, resigned)
5. Charles Adermann (1955-67, resigned)
6. John McEwen (1967-70, resigned)
7. Doug Anthony (1970-71, party absorbed DLP to become the National Country Party)

Liberal Union Leaders:
1. William Watt (1922-23, party folded, members re-joined Nationalists)

Lang Labor Leaders:
1. Jack Beasley (1931-36)
2. Jack Lang (1936-39, party became Non-Communist Labor Party)

Australian Alliance Leaders:
1. Joseph Lyons (1931, party merged with Nationalists to become United Australia Party)

United Australia Party Leaders:
1. Joseph Lyons (1931-39, died in office)
2. Robert Menzies (1939-50, party became Liberal Party)

Communist Party Leaders:
1. J.B. Miles (1932-40, party banned)
2. Paddy Troy (1949-51, stepped down)
3. Lance Sharkey (1951-61, stepped down)
4. Ron Maxwell (1961-70, stepped down)
5. Ted Hill (1970-79, stepped down)
6. Eric Aarons (1979-92, party became Socialist Alternative)

Social Credit Party Leaders:
1. Geoffrey Nichols (1933-43, party folded)

Non-Communist Labor Party Leaders:
1. Jack Lang (1939-49, party folded)

State Labor Party Leaders:
1. Jack Hughes (1940-49, party resumed its old name of the Communist Party, and Hughes stepped down from leadership)

Liberal Country Party Leaders:
1. Thomas Collins (1940-45, party re-merged with Country Party)

Liberal Party Leaders:
1. Robert Menzies (1950-55, resigned)
2. Eric Harrison (1955-66, resigned)
3. Harold Holt (1966-67, disappeared, presumed dead)
4. Paul Hasluck (1968-70, lost leadership ballot)
5. John Gorton (1970-73, lost leadership ballot)
6. Malcolm Fraser (1973-82, resigned, and party wrapped up)

Democratic Labor Party Leaders:
1. Bob Joshua (1955-61, lost seat)
2. Jack Little (1961-71, party merged with Country Party)

Marxist-Leninist Communist Party Leaders:
1. Ted Hill (1964-70, party re-merged with Communists)

Australia Party/Democrats Leaders:
1. Gordon Barton (1968-74, resigned)
2. Steele Hall (1974-81, lost leadership challenge)
3. Don Chipp (1981-91, resigned)
4. Janine Haines (1991-97, renamed the party Australian Democrats in 1992, resigned)
5. Meg Lees (1997-2005, lost seat and resigned)
6. Natasha Stott Despoja (2005-14, resigned)
7.

National Country/National Party Leaders:
1. Doug Anthony (1971-86, stepped down)
2. Ian Sinclair (1986-94, party renamed National Party in 1990)
3. Tim Fischer (1994-99, party merged with Progress Party)

Progress Party Leaders:
1. John Singleton (1975-86, stepped down)
2. Peter Reith (1986-88, lost leadership ballot)
3. John Hewson (1988-92, lost leadership ballot)
4. Alexander Downer (1992-99, resigned, party merged with National Party)

Natural Law Party Leaders:
1. Bob Brown (1981-99, resigned)
2. Kerry Nettle (1999-2008, resigned)
3. Sarah Hanson-Young (2008-15, resigned)
4. Scott Ludlam (2015-)

Patriotic Front Leaders:
1. Joh Bjelke-Petersen (1986-89, forced out after Fitzgerald Enquiry)
2. Graeme Campbell (1989-96, resigned)
3. Pauline Hanson (1996-2008, resigned after losing seat)
4. Rosa Lee Long (2008-10, folded party and became an independent)

Socialist Alternative/Anticapitalist Alliance Leaders:
1. Colin Hesse (1992-99, party incorporated some Natural Law members and renamed itself)
2. Lee Rhiannon (1999-)

Conservative Party Leaders:
1. Peter Costello (1999-2005, resigned)
2. Mark Vaile (2005-06, resigned)
3. Joe Hockey (2006-15, forced out of office)
4. Julie Bishop (2015-)

Family First Party Leaders:
1. Steve Fielding (2003-13, stepped down)
2. Bob Day (2013-)

Rural Voice
1. Bob Katter (2007-)

Justice Party
1.   Kevin Rudd (2012-)

Freedom Party
1. Clive Palmer (2013-)
17  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 08:55:47 pm
Prime Ministers of Australia:


1. George Reid (1845-1918, Free Trade/Anti-Socialist) – 1901-07


2. Andrew Fisher (1862-1928, Labour) – 1907-15


3. Billy Hughes (1862-1952, Labor/National Labor) – 1915-16


4. Joseph Cook (1860-1947, Commonwealth Liberal) – 1916-17


3. Billy Hughes (1862-1952, Nationalist) – 1917-19


5. Frank Tudor (1866-1922, Labor) – 1919-22


6. Matthew Charlton (1866-1948, Labor) – 1922-23


7. Stanley Bruce (1883-1967, Nationalist) – 1923-28


8. James Scullin (1876-1953, Labor) – 1928-31


9. Joseph Lyons (1879-1939, United Australia) – 1931-39


10. Sir Earle Page (1880-1961, Country) – 1939-39


11. Robert Menzies (1894-1978, United Australia) – 1939-40


12. John Curtin (1885-1945, Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1940-45


13. Frank Forde (1890-1983, Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1945-45


14. Ben Chifley (Labor, Wartime Unity Government) – 1945-45


11. Robert Menzies (1894-1978, United Australia) – 1945-48


14. Ben Chifley (1885-1951, Labor) – 1948-51


15. H. V. Evatt (1894-1965, Labor) – 1951-55


16. Eric Harrison (1892-1974, Liberal) – 1955-66


17. Harold Holt (1908-67, Liberal) – 1966-67


18. Gough Whitlam (1916-2014, Labor) – 1967-76


19. Malcolm Fraser (1930-2015, Liberal) – 1976-82


20. John Singleton (1941-, Progress) – 1982-86


21. Peter Reith (1950-, Progress) – 1986-88


22. Bob Hawke (1929-, Labor) – 1988-92


23. Paul Keating (1944-, Labor) – 1992-94


24. Alexander Downer (1951-, Progress, Unity Government) – 1994-97


25. Bob Brown (1944-, Natural Law) – 1997-99


26. Peter Costello (1957-, Conservative) – 1999-2005


27. Simon Crean (1949-, Labor) – 2005-08


28. Joe Hockey (1965-, Conservative) – 2008-15


29. Julie Bishop (1956-, Conservative) – 2015-

Presidents of Australia:

1.   Paul Keating (1999-2008)


2. Malcolm Turnbull (2008-)
18  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 08:32:13 pm
After negotiations went beyond the Christmas-New Year period, it was decided that the incumbent Government would continue in minority, given their upper hand in the Senate, and that some of the Anticapitalist Alliance MPs and Senators had poor attendance records, making a majority in Parliament just that little bit easier. Joe Hockey, however, would not lead this government - the Freedom Party stated that the election was a rejection of the Prime Minister, and they would not support the government in the Senate unless they changed leader. A snap leadership spill resulted in Julie Bishop elected the new Tory leader, and thus the 29th Prime Minister of Australia. Julia Gillard resigned as Labor leader, to be replaced by deputy leader Anthony Albanese. Hanson-Young also resigned as Natural Law leader, replaced by Scott Ludlam. A by-election in Natasha Stott Despoja’s old seat of Hawker, in South Australia, saw the Tories gain the seat, narrowly fending off a strong Natural Law challenge, boosting the government’s numbers in the House to 98.

Queensland’s Tory government led by Campbell Newman faced an election in early 2015, Newman lost his seat, and the Justice and Freedom parties shared the balance of power with Natural Law and Rural Voice. Eventually, a Tory-Rural Voice-Freedom government was cobbled together, although opinion of the state government and Freedom Party alike sank, following reports of federal Freedom MP and party leader Clive Palmer not attending parliamentary sittings. New South Wales’ Tory government had an easier re-election, despite several members caught out by the ICAC during the term. The centenary of the ANZACs landing at Gallipoli was commemorated on the 25th of April, 2015, to record turnouts at Dawn Services nationwide.

Dominating the Australian media in early 2015, however, was the execution of Bali Nine ringleaders Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran and preluding lead-up to the execution. Despite pleas from PM Julie Bishop, opposition leader Scott Ludlam, and most MPs and Senators, along with a significant portion of the Australian public, the executions went ahead on the 29th of April, 2015. A minority of Australians boycotted Bali, a popular tourist island in Indonesia, following the incident, and foreign aid to Indonesia was cut, which Indonesia agreed to. Domestically, budget time was looming, and given the shaky Parliament, would be very turbulent. How would it go? Only time would tell…

A note from AK:

Thank you all once again for participating in this election series . I couldn’t have done it without you all, you’ve all contributed greatly. It’s been a great deal of fun, and sometimes a bit tricky, but I’ve definitely enjoyed it all the way through. And now, a list of all the Prime Ministers in this series!
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 08:31:07 pm
















All 2PP swings from the 1945 election onwards:


Despite opinion polls and early returns showing a third term for the Hockey Government, election night 2014 proved to be quite different to the predictions - The Tories lost their vote lead to Natural Law, and finished on a mere 72 seats, a massive drop from the 106 Tories elected in 2011. Natural Law won 68 seats, an increase of 36 from 2011, Labor picked up two seats, Family First and Rural Voice made gains of three and seven respectively, while the hard-left Anticapitalist Alliance picked up a seat, and the centrist Democrats bombed to just one seat, leader Natasha Stott Despoja resigning as leader and MP not long afterwards. Kevin Rudd and Clive Palmer's respective new parties, Justice and Freedom, won singular seats each, and while both parties won Senators, aside from their leaders, they failed to make headway in the House.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 2014 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (68 seats) – 24 Conservative, 19 Natural Law, 14 Labor, 5 Anticapitalist Alliance, 3 Family First, 3 Rural Voice
Victoria (52 seats) – 19 Conservative, 19 Natural Law, 9 Labor, 5 Family First
Queensland (35 seats) – 13 Conservative, 9 Natural Law, 7 Rural Voice, 3 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Justice, 1 Freedom
Western Australia (18 seats) – 9 Conservative, 5 Natural Law,  2 Labor, 2 Rural Voice
South Australia (17 seats) –  7 Natural Law, 6 Conservative, 2Family First, 1 Democrats, 1 Rural Voice
Tasmania (5 seats) – 5 Natural Law
Australian Capital Territory (3 seats) – 3 Natural Law
Northern Territory (2 seats) –1 Conservative, 1 Natural Law
Total –72 Conservative, 68 Natural Law, 28 Labor, 1 Democrats, 11 Family First, 13 Rural Voice, 5 Anticapitalist Alliance , 1 Justice, 1 Freedom

Here's the Senate summary from 2011:
New South Wales: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance, 1 Family First
Victoria: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
Queensland: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor , 1 Rural Voice, 1 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
South Australia: 2 Democrats, 2 Conservative,1 Family First, 1 Natural Law
Western Australia: 2 Conservative, 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Rural Voice
Tasmania: 2 Natural Law, 2 Conservative, 1 Democrats, 1 Family First
Total: 12 Conservative, 8 Natural Law, 5 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Family First, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance

Here's the Senate summary from 2014:
New South Wales: 1 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Rural Voice, 1 Natural Law, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance
Victoria: 2 Conservative, 2 Natural Law, 1 Family First, 1 Labor
Queensland: 1 Rural Voice, 1 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law, 1 Justice, 1 Freedom
South Australia: 2 Natural Law 1 Conservative, 1 Democrats, 1 Family First, 1 Rural Voice
Western Australia: 2 Conservative, 1 Rural Voice, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Natural Law
Tasmania: 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Conservative, 1 Rural Voice, 1 Freedom
Australian Capital Territory: 1 Natural Law, 1 Justice
Northern Territory: 1 Conservative, 1 Natural Law
Total: 11 Natural Law, 9 Conservative, 5 Labor, 5 Rural Voice, 4 Family First, 2 Justice, 2 Freedom, 1 Democrats

Summary of 2014 election:

House of Representatives
Conservative – 72 (-34)
Natural Law – 68 (+36)
Labor – 28 (+2)
Rural Voice – 13 (+7)
Family First – 11 (+3)
Anticapitalist Alliance – 5 (+1)
Justice – 1 (+1)
Freedom – 1 (+1)
Democrats – 1 (-17)

Senate
2011: 12 Conservative, 8 Natural Law, 5 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Family First, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance
2014: 11 Natural Law, 9 Conservative, 5 Labor, 5 Rural Voice, 4 Family First, 2 Justice, 2 Freedom, 1 Democrats
Total: 21 Conservative, 19 Natural Law, 9 Labor, 8 Family First, 7 Rural Voice, 6 Democrats, 2 Anticapitalist Alliance, 2 Justice, 2 Freedom

Two-party preferred vote: 52.03-47.97

The first deadlocked Parliament since 1994 saw the Tories, Family First and Rural Voice hold a combined 96 seats, the same number as Natural Law and Labor. These figures increased to 97 a side, assuming Clive Palmer supported a Tory-led government, and Kevin Rudd a Natural Law-led government. With 101 seats required for a majority, and only the Anticapitalist Alliance able to provide either side a majority, which they would not, for obvious reasons, it seemed a minority government was the only way to avoid a second election. Going from the Senate results, the Tories, Rural Voice, Family First and the Freedom Party held a combined 38 seats, while Natural Law, Labor, the Democrats (if they were to support a Hanson-Young govermment) and Justice held a combined 36 seats, neither of which was a majority.
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 07:38:07 pm
The 2012 budget would see major overhauls to the health system – a $6 co-payment for doctors’ visits on the national public health system, Medibank, although this was blocked by Rural Voice in the Senate. Tightening of welfare payments went ahead, as did deregulation of university fees, and a rise in the GST rate to 12.5%. All the left parties, plus the Democrats, generally opposed the measures, although some Democrats supported the GST hike. Some on the right, particularly libertarian Tory MP David Leyonhjelm, conservative Tory Alex Hawke, and Family First Deputy Leader Bob Day, felt the reforms were insufficient. Following the budget, on the 1st of June, 2012, Alex Hawke defected from the Conservatives to Family First, citing that Family First suited his “blend of Christianity and conservatism” better than the Tories did.

The Tory government in the Northern Territory was re-elected with an increased majority in August, around the time the Commonwealth government revealed mandatory national service for 18-24 year olds not in higher education, an apprenticeship or employment, which despite a number of Tory MPs voting against it, including Leyonhjelm and fellow libertarian John Humphreys, passed both houses, and was effective from the 1st of July 2013. An initially peaceful protest from radical Muslims, against an anti-Islamic movie and the US Government, turned sour, and six police, along with 19 protesters, were injured. Both PM Hockey and Opposition Leader Gillard condemned the violence, and both of them, along with Australian Muslim leaders, sent a message to say no to this radical violence and divisiveness.

Construction of Sydney’s second airport commenced in November of 2012, with a projected completion date of 2020, and 60,000 jobs to be added in the area by 2030. Early 2013 witnessed dismal events for the nation and the Conservative Party alike – a series of natural disasters, namely floods and fires, ravaged much of eastern Australia, although not on the scale of the 2009 Black Saturday fires, or 2011 floods. Tory premier Ted Baillieu, while holding a majority in the state Parliament, was under fire for his chief of staff accusing the government of having hamstrung the operations of a new anti-corruption programme, all caught on tape. Baillieu resigned after losing caucus support, Denis Napthine succeeded him as Premier of Victoria.

Industrial relations was a cornerstone of the 2013 legislative agenda, and the Hockey Government wasted no time in reforming industrial relations, namely by abolishing unfair dismissal laws for small businesses, more restrictions of unions and striking, and putting an emphasis on the individual. Labor, Justice, Natural Law and the Anticapitalist Alliance all staunchly opposed the bill, while all but one Democrat also opposed the bill, one Democrat Senator defected to the Conservatives. An interest rate cut was also announced at this time, amidst a background of 3% unemployment. Clive Palmer, a long time Conservative (and before 1999, the National and National Country Parties), announced the formation of a new political party, the Freedom Party, on the 20th of April 2013. Palmer’s reasoning for starting his own party was his own disappointment in the Conservative government, particularly on lobbyists, transparency, and taxes, as Palmer put it.

2013 continued to remain relatively uneventful and trouble-free for the Hockey Government, although there was no shortage of events occurring around the nation –analogue television was finally turned off in November, Bob Day became Family First leader after Steve Fielding resigned, and a brawl between rival outlaw motorcycle clubs erupted in Brisbane in September, which saw Premier Campbell Newman and his government introduce legislation that would aim to clamp down on criminal gangs, which the Western Australian government soon adopted. This was endorsed by the Hockey Government, who proudly reiterated their stance on law and order and states’ rights alike. Car manufacturer Holden would prove to be another shake-up for the government – Australia’s arm of General Motors, sales had been declining for a significant time, and it was crunch time for Holden – to continue to make cars, or to fold production? With thousands of jobs in Adelaide on the line, the motoring giant announced it would carry on, although this announcement in itself caused concern across the political spectrum.

2014 saw the introduction of “one-punch” laws across many states, in a response to an increase in “sucker-punch” or “king-hit” attacks, primarily in entertainment and “red-light” districts in Australian cities. Legislation increasing penalties for family violence was also introduced around the 2013/14 period by all states, and the SA Conservatives narrowly won government in March on the back of a campaign centred around Holden’s future, and increased penalties for family, street and gang violence alike. The Tasmanian Conservatives also won government, with a large majority, on the back of a economy-opening, tough-on-crime campaign. New South Wales Premier Barry O’Farrell would abruptly resign in April of 2014, over failing to declare a bottle of wine to the Independent Commission Against Corruption, and thus giving misleading evidence. He was replaced by Mike Baird, who would witness several MPs caught out by the ICAC.

Police raids against the emerging threat of ISIS were carried out in September of 2014, on would-be terrorists who were allegedly going to carry out public executions in Australia. Fifteen people were charged in both Sydney and Melbourne, and Parliamentary security was increased the following day. Hockey made an announcement that diplomatic support would be provided to Iraq, Australia’s troops would be used to defend the nation at home, in these testing times. A crackdown on students living overseas, and evading their university debts, was also announced in September.

Australia hosted the G-20 Summit in November 2014, with PM Hockey addressing Australia to the G20 leaders. The primary topic was the economy, and Hockey demonstrated how his government and their market-based reforms led Australia through the global financial crisis of the late 2000s and beyond. Not all was good for the Conservatives, however – despite a surplus budget, a looming election in Victoria showed the parties neck and neck, and given the election was held a week before the federal poll, the Hockey Government got a tad nervous. In the end, the Napthine Government in Victoria won re-election, with not much of a change from 2010, although the redistribution assisted the Government, and they lost two seats.

House of Representatives at dissolution of Parliament:
Conservative – 105 (-1)
Natural Law – 31 (-1)
Labor – 23 (-3)
Democrats – 18 (nc)
Family First – 9 (+1)
Rural Voice – 6 (nc)
Anticapitalist Alliance – 4 (nc)
Justice – 3 (+3)
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: May 18, 2015, 07:35:49 pm


















Australians seemed to embrace conservatism significantly in the 2011 election, as not only was the Hockey Government returned for a second term, but a referendum calling for a complete repeal of the carbon tax narrowly passed. While Australia voted to legalise gay marriage by a 66.6-33.3 margin just four years prior, the nation seemed to be economically back on the right, during the aftermath of the global financial crisis. New Zealand's Prime Minister, and close personal and ideological ally of PM Hockey, John Key, would vote in favour of a similar measure to Australia regarding gay marriage in 2012. Key's government had also recently won a second term itself. With the remaining ex-Patriotic Front (which dissolved as a party in 2010) turned independent Senator, Rosa Lee Long, losing her Senate seat to Rural Voice, the Anticapitalist Alliance and Family First gaining ground, and Labor plunging, it seemed Australia was on a stable path politically for the next few years.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 2011 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (68 seats) – 35 Conservative, 13 Labor, 10 Natural Law, 4 Democrats, 4 Anticapitalist Alliance, 2 Family First
Victoria (52 seats) – 27 Conservative, 8 Natural Law, 7 Labor, 6 Democrats, 4 Family First
Queensland (35 seats) – 20 Conservative, 5 Labor, 5 Rural Voice, 5 Natural Law
Western Australia (18 seats) – 14 Conservative, 2 Natural Law,  1 Labor, 1 Rural Voice
South Australia (17 seats) – 7 Democrats,  6 Conservative, 2 Natural Law, 2Family First
Tasmania (5 seats) – 3 Conservative, 2 Natural Law
Australian Capital Territory (3 seats) – 2 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
Northern Territory (2 seats) –1 Conservative, 1 Natural Law
Total –106 Conservative, 32 Natural Law, 26 Labor, 18 Democrats, 8 Family First, 6 Rural Voice, 4 Anticapitalist Alliance

Here's the Senate summary from 2008:
New South Wales: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Rural Voice, 1 Natural Law
Victoria: 2 Conservative, 1Family First, 1 Democrats, 1 Natural Law, 1 Labor
Queensland: 2 Conservative, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law
South Australia:, 2 Conservative, 2 Democrats, 1 Family First, 1 Natural Law
Western Australia: 2 Conservative, 1 Rural Voice, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Democrats
Tasmania: 2 Natural Law, 2 Democrats, 2 Conservative
Total: 12 Conservative, 6 Natural Law, 6 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Rural Voice, 4 Family First

Here's the Senate summary from 2011:
New South Wales: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance, 1 Family First
Victoria: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor, 1 Family First, 1 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
Queensland: 2 Conservative, 1 Labor , 1 Rural Voice, 1 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
South Australia: 2 Democrats, 2 Conservative,1 Family First, 1 Natural Law
Western Australia: 2 Conservative, 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Rural Voice
Tasmania: 2 Natural Law, 2 Conservative, 1 Democrats, 1 Family First
Australian Capital Territory: 1 Natural Law, 1 Democrats
Northern Territory: 1 Conservative, 1 Natural Law
Total: 13 Conservative, 10 Natural Law, 6 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Family First, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance

Summary of 2011 election:

House of Representatives
Conservative – 106 (+2)
Natural Law – 32 (+10)
Labor – 26 (-23)
Democrats – 18 (+7)
Family First – 8 (+3)
Rural Voice – 6 (-1)
Anticapitalist Alliance – 4 (+2)

Senate
2008: 12 Conservative, 6 Natural Law, 6 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Rural Voice, 4 Family First
2011: 13 Conservative, 10 Natural Law, 6 Democrats, 4 Labor, 4 Family First, 2 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance
Total: 25 Conservative, 16 Natural Law, 12 Democrats, 8 Labor, 8 Family First, 6 Rural Voice, 1 Anticapitalist Alliance

Two-party preferred vote: 54.28-45.72

Kevin Rudd, whose "Working families" and presidential-style campaign was a massive failure, vowed to stay on as Labor leader. This was met with immediate hostility from most of the Labor caucus, and Rudd was promptly rolled by Julia Gillard, who chose Anthony Albanese as her deputy leader, in the first caucus meeting after the Christmas/New Year period, on the 13th of January, 2012. Rudd would quit the Labor party not long afterwards, and sit as an independent. The returned government, on the other hand, now had a conservative majority in the Senate - something which the right-wing of Australia last held in the 1960s. The Tories, Family First and Rural Voice held 39 seats between them in the new Senate, meaning negotiation with the Democrats was no longer required, although given the different bases and platforms of the three parties, negotiation would remain key in the Senate. Sarah Hanson-Young was re-elected Natural Law leader easily, and became Opposition Leader.

The first bill in the second term of the Hockey Government, abolition of the petrol tax, passed very easily in both houses. New, tough penalties for crimes involving illicit substances and deprivation of life, namely dealing drugs, murder and manslaughter, were also announced, criminals who committed these crimes now faced life imprisonment, with no parole until halfway through their sentence. Other crimes, such as home invasions, were left up to the states to set punishments. These measures also cleared both houses of Parliament quickly, amidst opposition from Natural Law and the Democrats in particular.

Australia’s love affair with conservatism continued into 2012, when Queensland elected a Conservative government, led by Campbell Newman, in an enormous landslide. The landslide was so large, Labor only narrowly remained ahead of Rural Voice in the seat count, and thus clung onto Opposition status. Kevin Rudd, former Labor leader, turned independent, announced the formation of a new party on the 22nd of April, 2012, called the Justice Party. Rudd stated that “Labor, while better than the incumbent government, is no longer the true party of working families in Australia. The Social Democrats will continue the fight for the justice of Australian working families, effective immediately!” Most MPs and Senators dismissed Rudd for playing politics, although he was joined in the new party by 3 Labor MPs, and a Natural Law MP.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1968 General Election - Austrian Election Series on: May 16, 2015, 09:32:56 am
LKP.
23  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International What-ifs / Re: WI: Tony Blair vs. David Cameron vs. Nick Clegg in 2010? on: May 15, 2015, 09:53:03 am
Tory.
24  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1964 General Election - Austrian Election Series on: May 12, 2015, 07:34:59 pm
I'm sorry for not offering any possibilities myself and now start nitpicking, but National Party might be a bit problematic this early on in regards to the NS-dictatorship and a question on whether Austria is indeed a nation on its own.

Anyway, thank you for your ideas, here are three possible suggestions, if I could again ask you, which would you prefer?

ÖNVP - Österreichische Nationale Volkspartei - Austrian National People's Party
DPÖ - Demokratische Partei Österreichs - Democratic Party of Austria
LKP - Liberalkonservative Partei - Liberal-Conservative Party

Liberal-Conservative Party sounds good to me!
25  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1964 General Election - Austrian Election Series on: May 12, 2015, 02:53:19 am
VdU/WB.

I also support a merger, as for a name, I also support National Party.
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