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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: What party are you a registered member of? on: Today at 03:58:29 am
I'm a card-carrying member of the Liberal Party of Canada and the Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta.  Because I was born in Seattle and lived there for the first 6 years of my life, I can register to vote in Washington State, and at some point I will get around to filling out and sending in the necessary paperwork.  Washington has non-partisan voter registration, although I would certainly be a registered Democrat if it registered them on a partisan basis instead.

I'm guessing your rationale for being a Tory is that the Liberals in Alberta are very weak and/or because of their non-affiliation with the federal party?
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: How would you have voted on United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3379? on: July 21, 2014, 11:48:50 pm
NAY.
3  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Primary Election Polls / Re: MS-PPP: Huckabee with big lead. on: July 21, 2014, 10:20:18 pm
Honestly, I don't think he'll run, he seems to be happy with his Fox News TV show (which I watch) and radio show.

Also, note Santorum's low numbers - which I don't think would be raised much in a poll with no Huckabee.
4  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion / 2016 U.S. Presidential Election / Re: Is Chris Christie going to run in 2016? on: July 21, 2014, 10:03:01 pm
Yes, but I can't see him winning the nomination.
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: What party are you a registered member of? on: July 21, 2014, 08:41:44 pm
If I lived in the US, I'd be a registered Republican.
6  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1965 Referenda on: July 21, 2014, 08:40:50 pm
Bump.
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: New York City mayoral election, 1993 on: July 20, 2014, 06:04:54 pm
After some rather quick google searching, decided to go with Marlin.
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1964 Presidential Election on: July 20, 2014, 06:04:19 pm
Goldwater
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: July 20, 2014, 09:50:12 am
















Eric Harrison, upon the Coalition's victory at the 1964 election, became Australia's most successful Prime Minister in terms of electoral success, becoming the only Prime Minister to lead his party (or parties) to success four times in a row, and four times period, and all with a majority in the House of Representatives. This was partly due to a resurgent DLP, who assisted the Liberals in some close races, and the Country Party gaining more ground, although the Liberals lost votes to these parties, their worst primary vote since the House-only election of 1952. Labor went backwards by around 1% in 1964, and the combined Communist vote was also lower than in 1961, the split in the Communist vote meaning the Communists lost three seats back to Labor, while the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party won enough votes to gain a Senate seat in Victoria, Ted Hill's home state.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 1964 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (46 seats) – 14 Labor, 19 Liberal, 9 Country, 4 Communist
Victoria (33 seats) – 10 Labor, 18 Liberal, 5 Country
Queensland (18 seats) – 7 Labor, 6 Liberal, 5 Country
South Australia (11 seats) – 5 Labor, 6 Liberal
Western Australia (9 seats) – 2 Labor, 5 Liberal, 2 Country
Tasmania (5 seats) – 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Northern Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Australian Capital Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Total – 55 Liberal,  20 Country, 44 Labor, 7 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1961:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Communist
Victoria: 2 Labor, 3 Liberal
Queensland: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
Tasmania: 2 Labor, 3 Liberal
Total: 14 Liberal, 2 Country,  13 Labor, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1964:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Communist
Victoria: 1 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Democratic Labor, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist
Queensland: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
Tasmania: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Democratic Labor
Total: 12 Liberal,  2 Country, 13 Labor,  2 Democratic Labor, 1 Communist


Summary of 1964 election:

House of Representatives
Liberal – 56 (+2)
Country – 21 (+1)
Labor – 43 (nc)
Communist – 4 (-3)

Senate
1961: 14 Liberal, 2 Country,  13 Labor, 1 Communist
1964: 12 Liberal,  2 Country, 12 Labor,  2 Democratic Labor, 1 Communist, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist
Total: 26 Liberal,  4 Country, 25 Labor,  2 Democratic Labor, 2 Communist, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 54.31-45.69

Following their fourth successive loss, Arthur Calwell resigned as Labor leader, and was replaced by his deputy, Gough Whitlam from New South Wales. While Calwell had been successful in getting many DLP voters back to Labor, they still weren't quite cutting the mustard, also, after three successive losses, Calwell and the Labor Party felt it was time for a change. Entering its fourth term, the Harrison Government faced a tragedy very early on - on the 6th of Julym Kevin Conway, a Warrant Officer serving as an advisor in South Vietnam, was killed, he was the first Australian casualty of the Vietnam War. Australia's first daily national newspaper, Rupert Murdoch's News Limited's The Australian, went on sale on the 15th of July.

The situation in Vietnam would shortly go from bad to dreadful though -  on the 2nd of August, the American destroyer USS Maddox, came into conflict with three North Vietnamese torpedo boats. A battle ensured, which saw the US damage three boats, kill four North Vietnamese soldiers, and wound another six. This battle, known as the Gulf of Tonkin incident, resulted in drastic escalation in the US involvement in Vietnam, which resulted in the RAAF sending a flight of Caribou transport planes to South Vietnam, by the end of 1964, 200 Australian military personnel were in Vietnam. Away from war, the British Invasion had spread to Australia in the 1964-65 period, with the Beatles touring in June of 1964, followed by the Rolling Stones and the Kinks in January 1965.

Prince Philip oversaw the opening of the Royal Australian Mint in Canberra, on the 22nd of February, 1965. This new mint would mint all coins used in Australia, notes had been manufactured in the RBA's Note Printing Australia facility, in Melbourne's northern suburbs since 1913. Over the 1964-65 period, the Harrison Government had prepared for what was originally going to be a twin set of referenda - one that would count Aboriginals in the Census, and thus Australian citizens, removing explicit exclusionary causes in the Constitution, and one re-aligning House of Representatives numbers so that they were as close to twice the number of Senate seats. Following the Gulf of Tonkin incident, however, and the increase in military involvement in Vietnam, a conscription question was also developed, to assist the armed forces in their fight against the North Vietnamese Army.

The referenda have been set for the 19th of March, 1965

Referendum Question A (Aboriginals):
"DO YOU APPROVE the proposed law for the alteration of the Constitution entitled— 'An Act to alter the Constitution so as to omit certain words relating to the People of the Aboriginal Race in any State and so that Aboriginals are to be counted in reckoning the Population?"

Referendum Question B (Parliament):
"Do you approve the proposed law for the alteration of the Constitution entitled 'An Act to alter the Constitution so that the number of members of the House of Representatives may be increased without necessarily increasing the number of Senators'?"

Referendum Question C (Conscription):
"Do you approve the proposed law that would enable a lottery-based conscription system, to assist the armed forces during the ongoing conflict in Vietnam?"
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - 1965 Referenda on: July 20, 2014, 09:21:45 am
Eric Harrison, upon the Coalition's victory at the 1964 election, became Australia's most successful Prime Minister in terms of electoral success, becoming the only Prime Minister to lead his party (or parties) to success four times in a row, and four times period, and all with a majority in the House of Representatives. This was partly due to a resurgent DLP, who assisted the Liberals in some close races, and the Country Party gaining more ground, although the Liberals lost votes to these parties, their worst primary vote since the House-only election of 1952. Labor went backwards by around 1% in 1964, and the combined Communist vote was also lower than in 1961, the split in the Communist vote meaning the Communists lost three seats back to Labor, while the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party won enough votes to gain a Senate seat in Victoria, Ted Hill's home state.

Summary of 1964 election:

House of Representatives
Liberal – 56 (+2)
Country – 21 (+1)
Labor – 43 (nc)
Communist – 4 (-3)

Senate
1961: 14 Liberal, 2 Country,  13 Labor, 1 Communist
1964: 12 Liberal,  2 Country, 12 Labor,  2 Democratic Labor, 1 Communist, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist
Total: 26 Liberal,  4 Country, 25 Labor,  2 Democratic Labor, 2 Communist, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 54.31-45.69

Following their fourth successive loss, Arthur Calwell resigned as Labor leader, and was replaced by his deputy, Gough Whitlam from New South Wales. While Calwell had been successful in getting many DLP voters back to Labor, they still weren't quite cutting the mustard, also, after three successive losses, Calwell and the Labor Party felt it was time for a change. Entering its fourth term, the Harrison Government faced a tragedy very early on - on the 6th of Julym Kevin Conway, a Warrant Officer serving as an advisor in South Vietnam, was killed, he was the first Australian casualty of the Vietnam War. Australia's first daily national newspaper, Rupert Murdoch's News Limited's The Australian, went on sale on the 15th of July.

The situation in Vietnam would shortly go from bad to dreadful though -  on the 2nd of August, the American destroyer USS Maddox, came into conflict with three North Vietnamese torpedo boats. A battle ensured, which saw the US damage three boats, kill four North Vietnamese soldiers, and wound another six. This battle, known as the Gulf of Tonkin incident, resulted in drastic escalation in the US involvement in Vietnam, which resulted in the RAAF sending a flight of Caribou transport planes to South Vietnam, by the end of 1964, 200 Australian military personnel were in Vietnam. Away from war, the British Invasion had spread to Australia in the 1964-65 period, with the Beatles touring in June of 1964, followed by the Rolling Stones and the Kinks in January 1965.

Prince Philip oversaw the opening of the Royal Australian Mint in Canberra, on the 22nd of February, 1965. This new mint would mint all coins used in Australia, notes had been manufactured in the RBA's Note Printing Australia facility, in Melbourne's northern suburbs since 1913. Over the 1964-65 period, the Harrison Government had prepared for what was originally going to be a twin set of referenda - one that would count Aboriginals in the Census, and thus Australian citizens, removing explicit exclusionary causes in the Constitution, and one re-aligning House of Representatives numbers so that they were as close to twice the number of Senate seats. Following the Gulf of Tonkin incident, however, and the increase in military involvement in Vietnam, a conscription question was also developed, to assist the armed forces in their fight against the North Vietnamese Army.

The referenda have been set for the 19th of March, 1965.

Referendum Question A (Aboriginals):
"DO YOU APPROVE the proposed law for the alteration of the Constitution entitled— 'An Act to alter the Constitution so as to omit certain words relating to the People of the Aboriginal Race in any State and so that Aboriginals are to be counted in reckoning the Population?"

Referendum Question B (Parliament):
"Do you approve the proposed law for the alteration of the Constitution entitled 'An Act to alter the Constitution so that the number of members of the House of Representatives may be increased without necessarily increasing the number of Senators'?"

Referendum Question C (Conscription):
"Do you approve the proposed law that would enable a lottery-based conscription system, to assist the armed forces during the ongoing conflict in Vietnam?"

Voting is open for three days.

Me:
  • A - YES
  • B - NO
  • C - YES*

*On a side note, I probably would have voted NO, had I been able to foresee the remainder of the Vietnam War as it occurred IRL.
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1964 on: July 20, 2014, 05:08:35 am
Voting has now closed, thank you all for your participation.
12  Forum Community / Forum Community Election Match-ups / Re: Is the previous poster to the left/right of you? on: July 19, 2014, 07:21:24 pm
Left
13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1964 on: July 19, 2014, 11:00:31 am
Final bump before the poll closes, I'm going to be out when the polls are due to close, so the polls will close sometime in the afternoon or evening.
14  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: By-elections of the 44th Australian Parliament (2013-2016) on: July 19, 2014, 05:12:52 am
It's less ALP leaning than Redcliffe for example. What should ring serious warning bells for the LNP is that this is right next door and very similar to Campbell Newman's seat.

Talley... seriously? This was a debate about the margins.

Swing is sitting at 19% ... 19%

I thought Redcliffe was more of a swing seat than Stafford? Redcliffe was only an ALP+2.7 seat at the 2012 election, and was more solid than Stafford for the Liberal/Country Parties pre-1989.

A higher swing in Stafford than in Redcliffe is not good news for the Newman Government though.
15  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: By-elections of the 44th Australian Parliament (2013-2016) on: July 19, 2014, 04:01:00 am
It's on a 7% margin. I suspect the LNP will hold onto lose it narrowly, but regain it next year.

I disagree, Stafford is a Labor-leaning seat, and should be won with a Labor 2PP between 58-62% tonight. It was 5.7% more Labor than Queensland as a whole at the 2012 election.
16  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ask Obama on: July 19, 2014, 02:46:28 am
Did you vote for George W. Bush?
17  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Arkansas Senatorial Election, 2014 on: July 19, 2014, 01:10:46 am
Cotton
18  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ask AK on: July 18, 2014, 09:57:48 pm
How would you have voted on the 1933 Western Australia secession referendum?

Good question! Most likely Yes.
19  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ask AK on: July 18, 2014, 08:56:21 pm
Favorite Australian Senator?

Either Bob Day, Cory Bernardi or David Leyonhjelm, although there are others I'm quite fond of.

You've said in other threads that you're a Christian.  Which denomination are you affiliated with?

Church of England.
20  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ask Dick Cheney on: July 18, 2014, 08:52:47 pm
Who do you think is a better leader: Obama or Putin?
21  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Ask AK on: July 18, 2014, 08:46:41 pm
Bump
22  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Voting Booth / Re: Mideast Voting Booth: July 2014 Elections on: July 18, 2014, 08:40:20 pm
Legislative Election:
[3] Inks.LWC  
[1] Spiral
[4] Jack Enderman
[2] Cassius
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1964 on: July 18, 2014, 11:09:44 am
Bumping.
24  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Which electoral districts (CDs or equivelant) have you been to in 2014? on: July 18, 2014, 09:44:15 am
Germany
Berlin Reinickendorf
Berlin Mitte
Berlin Pankow
Berlin Charlottenburg – Wilmersdorf
Berlin Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg – Prenzlauer Berg East
Berlin-Tempelhof – Schöneber

UK
Hayes and Harlington

UAE
Dubai

Australia
Swan
Perth
Stirling
Cowan

Add Curtin to the list.

Now add Moore and Pearce as well.

New additions, all in Western Australia:
Tangney
Fremantle
Brand
Canning
Forrest
O'Connor
25  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: By-elections of the 44th Australian Parliament (2013-2016) on: July 18, 2014, 08:57:48 am
Looks like Labor should easily win it back.

One day out from the Stafford by-election, and I can't see anything else but a solid Labor win.
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