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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 2008 on: Today at 08:58:38 am
Bump, with a reminder that voting closes at 11.30pm tomorrow night AWST, or in around 25.5 hours.
2  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: Today at 04:56:20 am
Dear God. Luke Foley has a swing AGAINST him in Auburn!

He is such an unappealing person tbh. And plus they Labor totally ignored demographics by parachuting him in.
He's won the seat at least. Will be interesting to see if he stays on. Personally, I wouldn't, but who else is there?

A small swing, but still a swing to the Liberals. Maybe Auburn's demographics are changing? Maybe, as Talleyrand said, the people of Auburb like the leader "parachuted" in?

I'm still wondering what happened in East Hills - was the smear campaign THAT effective?

Queanbeyan isn't in yet... hold your horses on Monaro.

Very true, and there's already a 1% swing to Labor there.
Apparently. Should be overturned IMO.

Also piss off with this mandate sh**t.

By that comment, do you mean my new signature picture?

Hmm - looks like Queanbeyan is not turning out as strong...

I'm surprised about that - you'd think given the demographics that it would have greatly assisted Whan's comeback. Still got a lot of votes to count though.
3  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: Today at 04:38:41 am
Dear God. Luke Foley has a swing AGAINST him in Auburn!

He is such an unappealing person tbh. And plus they Labor totally ignored demographics by parachuting him in.
He's won the seat at least. Will be interesting to see if he stays on. Personally, I wouldn't, but who else is there?

A small swing, but still a swing to the Liberals. Maybe Auburn's demographics are changing? Maybe, as Talleyrand said, the people of Auburn like the leader "parachuted" in?

I'm still wondering what happened in East Hills - was the smear campaign THAT effective?

Queanbeyan isn't in yet... hold your horses on Monaro.

Very true, and there's already a 1% swing to Labor there.
4  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: Today at 04:01:22 am
After Victoria and Queensland this is just so... boring and disappointing...

Not for me it isn't! Tongue

East Hills is holding up very well at the moment, as is Oatley.
5  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: Today at 03:25:42 am
Still very early in the night though.  On another note, the two booths reporting in Blue Mountains have swung strongly to Labor.
6  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: Today at 03:22:53 am
Looks like Labor is picking up The Entrance, and Lismore is too close to call.
7  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: New South Wales State Election, 2015 on: March 27, 2015, 11:08:12 am
My predictions:

Albury - Easy Liberal hold.
Auburn - Easy Labor hold, particularly with Opposition Leader Luke Foley as candidate.
Ballina - Traditionally a safe National seat at the state level, this will likely go down to the wire... Every election has that one upset, and I think Green preferences will give this to Labor.
Balmain - Labor have a fair chance of winning this back, although Parker is the incumbent. This, combined with this bit of Sydney being very Green-friendly, is the basis of my decision to list Balmain as a likely Green hold.
Bankstown - Easy Labor hold.
Barwon - Easy National hold, unless Rohan Boehm puts up a strong challenge.
Bathurst - Likely National hold, although given the way Bathurst swung in 2011, expect a large swing back to Labor.
Baulkham Hills - Easy Liberal hold.
Bega - Liberal hold.
Blacktown - Easy Labor hold.
Blue Mountains - Blue Mountains' bellwether record looks set to come to an end.
Cabramatta - Labor hold, with a much larger margin.
Camden - Liberal hold, particularly given the loss of the Campbelltown area.
Campbelltown - Likely Labor gain, even with the very Liberal-friendly redistribution.
Canterbury - Easy Labor hold.
Castle Hill - Easy Liberal hold.
Cessnock - Easy Labor hold, particularly after the vote-splitting of 2011 that denied the Nationals victory.
Charlestown - Labor shouldn't have much trouble holding this part of Newcastle, after gaining it at a by-election.
Clarence - National hold, although expect a large swing back to Labor.
Coffs Harbour - Easy National hold.
Coogee - This will be close, given Paul Pearce's return. Going for a narrow Liberal hold.
Cootamundra - Easy National hold.
Cronulla - Liberal hold.
Davidson - Easy Liberal hold, and Labor to retake 2nd place.
Drummoyne - Likely Liberal hold, given the reports of Labor running dead, and the demographic change here.
Dubbo - National hold, unless Col Hamilton does really well (as far as I know, he doesn’t have too much of a profile).
East Hills - Easy Labor gain.
Epping - Easy Liberal hold.
Fairfield - Labor hold, particularly with Joe Tripodi no longer an issue.
Gosford - As the only Central Coast MP not to fall victim to the ICAC, Holstein has a decent chance of holding. Going for a narrow Liberal hold.
Goulburn - Liberal hold, even with former Senator Ursula Stephens as the Labor candidate.
Granville - Labor gain, another surprise Liberal win in 2011.
Hawkesbury - Easy Liberal hold.
Heathcote - Likely Liberal hold, given the redistribution. In my opinion, Heathcote, in its current configuration, won’t go back to Labor until next time they win government.
Heffron - Easy Labor hold, and the Liberals to remain in second.
Holsworthy - Possible Liberal hold, considering the major redistribution here.
Hornsby - Easy Liberal hold, particularly without Nick Berman in the race.
Keira - Labor hold.
Kiama - The redistribution has made this more Liberal-friendly, and will be another one to watch on election night. I'll go for a narrow Liberal hold.
Kogarah - Labor hold, particularly with the Labor-friendly redistribution.
Ku-ring-gai - Easy Liberal hold, even with former Premier O'Farrell's retirement.
Lake Macquarie - Greg Piper will easily win again, and Labor will come second.
Lakemba - Easy Labor hold.
Lane Cove - Easy Liberal hold, with Labor retaking second place.
Lismore - National hold, unless Labor do REALLY well.
Liverpool - Easy Labor hold.
Londonderry - Likely Labor gain, given the scandals involving Bassett, him attempting to flee for Hawkesbury, and the major redistribution.
Macquarie Fields - Labor will easily win this notionally Liberal seat back. On another note, Pat Farmer did not represent this area - the territory comprising Macquarie Fields in both its recent incarnations, has been part of Werriwa, not Macarthur.
Maitland - Robyn Parker's retirement should easily see Maitland go back to Labor.
Manly - Premier Baird will be returned easily.
Maroubra - Labor hold.
Miranda - The Liberals will win this back, given Collier’s second retirement, and the strengthening of the seat at the redistribution.
Monaro - A traditionally marginal seat, Steve Whan should easily win this back for Labor. When Whan retires though, this will be one to watch.
Mount Druitt - Easy Labor hold.
Mulgoa - Will likely stay with the Baird Government.
Murray - Easy National hold.
Myall Lakes - Easy National hold.
Newcastle - In an alternate universe where Tim Owen had not lied to the ICAC, and thus no by-election would have occurred, the Liberals would have struggled to hold this. Labor will easily hold after their 2014 by-election pickup.
Newtown - Tough to call, I think Labor will win this new seat though, given their local campaign here.
North Shore - Easy Liberal hold.
Northern Tablelands - Easy National hold, particularly with no strong independent this time around.
Oatley - May not be as vulnerable as the low margin suggests - this covers the better Liberal areas on the northern bank of the Georges River, and would have been Liberal held on federal figures in both 2010 and 2013. I'll go for a quasi-upset Liberal hold here.
Orange - Easy National hold.
Oxley - Easy National hold.
Parramatta - Made better in the redistribution, this one will probably narrowly stay Liberal.
Penrith - Jackie Kelly contesting as an independent, and directing preferences to Labor, makes this key seat even more interesting... Should be a Liberal hold though.
Pittwater - Another very safe Liberal seat where Labor will likely retake second place in 2015.
Port Macquarie - Easy National hold, particularly with the absence of Peter Besseling.
Port Stephens - Possible Liberal hold, given what happened with Baumann.
Prospect - Labor gain, particularly with the redistribution making the seat more favourable to Labor.
Riverstone - The demographics in Riverstone have obviously changed, it was held by Labor with a 7.2% margin at the 1988 Liberal/National landslide, and by 7.5% in 1991. I’ll go for a possible-likely Liberal hold here, but I expect a large swing to Labor.
Rockdale - Labor gain, considering this was another of the high-tide Liberal wins of 2011.
Ryde - Likely Liberal hold, unless Labor gain a swing large enough to topple the inflated margin here.
Seven Hills - This new seat, with two distinct ends, is another one to watch. Possible Liberal win, if Labor win this, expect them to be winning most of the other nail-biter seats
Shellharbour - Easy Labor hold.
South Coast - Liberal hold.
Strathfield - Historically a Liberal seat, this could stay with the Liberals, while seats further up the pendulum fall to Labor. With the redistribution making Strathfield 2% better for Liberals, along with Jodi McKay being parachuted in from Newcastle, I'm going for a narrow Labor gain here.
Summer Hill - The Greens will likely come second here in 2015, although Labor should hold.
Swansea - Even without the corruption allegations against sitting member Gerry Edwards, this would have been monumentally difficult for the Liberals to hold, and Labor will easily Swansea back.
Sydney - Greenwich will win his first general election. As for second place, hard to call – could be Labor or the Liberals.
Tamworth - National hold, barring Peter Draper doing well enough after four years to get back in.
Terrigal - Liberal hold, even with the Hartcher factor here.
The Entrance - Hard to call, although Spence's scandal has made this already key seat even more crucial to watch. As Frankston in last year's Victorian election and Dobell in the last federal election both demonstrated, once a corrupt MP is removed from the equation, voting habits generally return to normal. I think we'll see a narrow Labor gain here.
Tweed - Likely National hold, barring an extremely large swing to Labor.
Upper Hunter - National hold.
Vaucluse - Easy Liberal hold.
Wagga Wagga - Easy Liberal hold, particularly with no strong independent.
Wakehurst - Easy Liberal hold, with Labor resuming 2nd place.
Wallsend - Easy Labor hold.
Willoughby - Easy Liberal hold.
Wollondilly - As with Camden, Liberal hold, particularly given the loss of the Campbelltown suburbs.
Wollongong - Safe for Labor in theory, although if Arthur Rorris holds most of Gordon Bradbery's 2011 vote, and picks up a few Liberal votes, this could become interesting... I'll class this as a Labor hold though.
Wyong - Darren Webber's tenure has ensured a Labor gain here, even with the redistribution being friendly to the Liberals.

TOTALS:
Liberal - 38
National - 16
Labor - 36
Greens - 1
Independent - 2
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1896 Election (The Hearse at Monticello) on: March 26, 2015, 09:14:37 pm
Cleveland!
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: March 26, 2015, 10:15:11 am
A referendum was called for the 30th of June, 2007:

"Do you support the proposed changes to the federal Marriage Act, namely removing the reference to one man and one woman?"



The first of July, 2007 would be forever revered by progressives around Australia - the marriage amendment passed by a margin of 2 to 1, now recognising gay marriages. A sizeable number of Tory voters voted Yes in the referendum, causing discomfort for some of the party. The carbon and mining taxes also came into effect the same day, and the government was set to introduce the paid parental leave legislation shortly. PM Crean and Deputy PM Nettle in particular were very pleased with their achievements to date, but stated that there was much more to be done. Former National MP Bob Katter announced the creation of a new national political party on the 11th of July, 2007, namely called Rural Voice. Katter described the new party, which was inspired by the WA state party of the same name, as "The only real choice for rural Australians - Labor, the Tories, Natural Law, Patriotic Front, the Democrats, they don't care!"

APEC, or the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, hosted its annual meeting in Sydney, in September of 2007, with PM Crean representing Australia. Later in the same month, Canadian PM Stephen Harper became the first Canadian PM to address the Australian Parliament. Despite the massive differences between the Prime Ministers and their respective governments, Crean and Harper got along relatively well, although Harper did not get along as well with Deputy PM Nettle, Nettle branding Harper as an “extremist”.

The end of 2007, with the Australian economy doing fairly well, amidst struggles from the industries hit by the carbon and mining taxes, saw PM Crean attend the UN’s Climate Chance Conference, held in Bali. Crean explained the massive implementation of environmentally friendly natures in Australia, and how carbon dioxide emissions have already begun to reduce in Australia, according to studies undertaken by prominent universities and thinktanks alike. Crean also encouraged fellow nations, particularly fellow Commonwealth nations, to follow Australia’s lead.

2008 began with police using capsicum spray at a tennis match in Melbourne, to control the despicable behaviour of some of the spectators, Melbourne’s Port Phillip Bay began to be dredged, amidst much controversy, and extreme heat and rain alike were witnessed around the country. On the economic scale though, the global financial crisis, which began to brew around 2006, unleashed its payload in 2008. At the start of 2008, unemployment was starting to climb back up, hitting 4% in the middle of the year, after remaining in the 3-3.5% for the 2003-08 period, under both the Costello and Crean governments.

Citing “low sales, plus increasing costs of production”, the Mitsubishi Australia plant in suburban Adelaide closed its doors in March of 2008. Opposition Leader Joe Hockey hit out at the government, stating that “Courtesy of your eco-taxes, you’ve managed to force out one of our main car manufacturers! How much longer until Holden and Ford are pushed out?” PM Crean came back with “They were declining prior to the carbon dioxide tax, and last time I checked, the people are moving to more environmentally friendly cars”. This made for a memorable Question Time, and entrenched the Conservatives’ opposition to the carbon and mining taxes, although Hockey stated that “the first step is reforming the tax”, on the carbon tax.

A territorial election in the Northern Territory, held in August, saw the NT Conservatives elected with a majority of 3. Meanwhile in Western Australia, an early election called by then Premier Alan Carpenter, resulted in Conservative Colin Barnett winning a massive landslide, only requiring Rural Voice in the Legislative Council (state equivalent of the Senate). Carpenter almost his seat in the election, and NSW Premier Morris Iemma was replaced by Nathan Rees, after Iemma lost caucus support. Although Australia was holding up better than a lot of other economies, amidst the backdrop of the US electing Barack Obama as President, the future did not look as good for Australia, leading up to the election.
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - 2008 on: March 26, 2015, 10:08:15 am
The first of July, 2007 would be forever revered by progressives around Australia - the marriage amendment passed by a margin of 2 to 1, now recognising gay marriages. A sizeable number of Tory voters voted Yes in the referendum, causing discomfort for some of the party. The carbon and mining taxes also came into effect the same day, and the government was set to introduce the paid parental leave legislation shortly. PM Crean and Deputy PM Nettle in particular were very pleased with their achievements to date, but stated that there was much more to be done. Former National MP Bob Katter announced the creation of a new national political party on the 11th of July, 2007, namely called Rural Voice. Katter described the new party, which was inspired by the WA state party of the same name, as "The only real choice for rural Australians - Labor, the Tories, Natural Law, Patriotic Front, the Democrats, they don't care!"

APEC, or the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, hosted its annual meeting in Sydney, in September of 2007, with PM Crean representing Australia. Later in the same month, Canadian PM Stephen Harper became the first Canadian PM to address the Australian Parliament. Despite the massive differences between the Prime Ministers and their respective governments, Crean and Harper got along relatively well, although Harper did not get along as well with Deputy PM Nettle, Nettle branding Harper as an “extremist”.

The end of 2007, with the Australian economy doing fairly well, amidst struggles from the industries hit by the carbon and mining taxes, saw PM Crean attend the UN’s Climate Chance Conference, held in Bali. Crean explained the massive implementation of environmentally friendly natures in Australia, and how carbon dioxide emissions have already begun to reduce in Australia, according to studies undertaken by prominent universities and thinktanks alike. Crean also encouraged fellow nations, particularly fellow Commonwealth nations, to follow Australia’s lead.

2008 began with police using capsicum spray at a tennis match in Melbourne, to control the despicable behaviour of some of the spectators, Melbourne’s Port Phillip Bay began to be dredged, amidst much controversy, and extreme heat and rain alike were witnessed around the country. On the economic scale though, the global financial crisis, which began to brew around 2006, unleashed its payload in 2008. At the start of 2008, unemployment was starting to climb back up, hitting 4% in the middle of the year, after remaining in the 3-3.5% for the 2003-08 period, under both the Costello and Crean governments.

Citing “low sales, plus increasing costs of production”, the Mitsubishi Australia plant in suburban Adelaide closed its doors in March of 2008. Opposition Leader Joe Hockey hit out at the government, stating that “Courtesy of your eco-taxes, you’ve managed to force out one of our main car manufacturers! How much longer until Holden and Ford are pushed out?” PM Crean came back with “They were declining prior to the carbon dioxide tax, and last time I checked, the people are moving to more environmentally friendly cars”. This made for a memorable Question Time, and entrenched the Conservatives’ opposition to the carbon and mining taxes, although Hockey stated that “the first step is reforming the tax”, on the carbon tax.

A territorial election in the Northern Territory, held in August, saw the NT Conservatives elected with a majority of 3. Meanwhile in Western Australia, an early election called by then Premier Alan Carpenter, resulted in Conservative Colin Barnett winning a massive landslide, only requiring Rural Voice in the Legislative Council (state equivalent of the Senate). Carpenter almost his seat in the election, and NSW Premier Morris Iemma was replaced by Nathan Rees, after Iemma lost caucus support. Although Australia was holding up better than a lot of other economies, amidst the backdrop of the US electing Barack Obama as President, the future did not look as good for Australia, leading up to the election.

An election has been called for the 6th of December, 2008, continuing the trend of shortening, as much as possible, the gap between House and Senate terms.

Party platforms at this election:

Labor Party – Prime Minister Simon Crean and Labor are running on their record in government, namely legalization of gay marriage, and the environmental reforms. Labor are promising, for a second term, introducing stimulus packages to deal with the recently-emerged global financial crisis, standardizing the school curriculum to a nationwide standard, more funding for health services, and Labor’s slogan for the 2008 election is “Moving Forward”.

Natural Law Party – Deputy Prime Minister Kerry Nettle and the Natural Law Party are campaigning on being the driving force behind the marriage and environmental reforms, and are continuing to push for a repeal of the 1979 states’ rights amendment to the Constitution, a complete end to logging, funding for wind-powered energy, and increased animal rights. Natural Law's 2008 slogan is "Let’s Continue to Clean Up the Country".

Conservative Party – Opposition Leader Joe Hockey and the Conservatives are running on a mass reduction in the petrol tax, abolition of the mining tax, an opposition to stimulus, stating that “a Market-based recovery is the best method in testing times”, pointing to how the Fraser government implemented market-based methods to the after-effects of the 1970s recession. The Conservatives are also proposing reforms  and major cuts to the carbon dioxide tax, support for a second Sydney airport in rural Western Sydney, and ensuring states retain their rights. The Conservatives’ 2008 slogan is “A Brighter Tomorrow”.

Australian Democrats – Natasha Stott Despoja and the Democrats are running on a centrist platform, arguing they are the only “middle-ground option in an extremist climate”. The Democrats’ 2008 platform includes a call for a slight reduction in the new environmental taxes, further upgrades to the Internet network of the nation, and a study into domestic violence. The Democrats' 2008 slogan is "Never Cave To Pressure".

Patriotic Front – Pauline Hanson and the Patriotic Front, are running on the same old platform, with more of an emphasis on Islamic terrorism. Hanson is also calling for repealing the marriage amendment legalizing gay marriage, and repealing the carbon and mining taxes, while increasing corporate tax. The Patriotic Front's 2008 slogan is "Telling It Like It Is".

Family First – Steve Fielding and Family First are once again committed to a 100% pro-life platform, elimination of the petrol tax, and the ending of the mining and carbon taxes. While Fielding has stated that he fully respect’s the electorate’s decision regarding gay marriage, he stated that “I will continue to promote the traditional family unit, for as long as I can keep up the Good Lord’s work!” Family First's 2008 slogan is "Children Are Our Future".

Anticapitalist Alliance – Lee Rhiannon and the Anticapitalist Alliance are running on increasing the carbon and mining taxes, to 95%, a complete ban on recreational fishing, shutting down all coal-fired power stations, restricting families to having one child, and the general hard-left platform of years gone by. The Anticapitalist Alliance’s 2008 slogan is “Start The Revolution".

Rural Voice – Bob Katter and Rural Voice are running on an anti-mining, carbon and petrol tax platform, while raising income tax on high earners and lowering the GST, along with stimulus for rural areas. Katter is also advocating on no more privatizations, re-introduction and raising of some tariffs, and removing “green tape” on rural industries and activities, namely logging, mining, shooting and fishing. Rural Voice’s inaugural slogan is “Rebuild Australia”.

Voting is open for 72 hours as per usual.

Me: Tory again.
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Who would you rather have as president? on: March 23, 2015, 05:05:40 am
Cruz
12  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Favorite Country A-Z (final round) on: March 20, 2015, 06:52:46 pm
13  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Voting Booth / Re: Mideast Voting Booth: Reintroducing the Efficient Referenda Amendment on: March 19, 2015, 08:07:23 pm
NAY
14  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 2007 Referendum on: March 19, 2015, 08:06:41 pm
Did not see this before, great this is back!

YES, obviously

Well, voting just closed, and you won't have to wait long for the next election! I'll make sure the 2008 election is up within a week, hopefully less! Smiley
15  General Politics / International General Discussion / Re: Australia General Discussion on: March 19, 2015, 07:38:50 pm
R.I.P. Malcolm Fraser, and I'm also very shocked - this article states he had a brief illness.
16  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Favorite Country M-Z (round 3) on: March 19, 2015, 06:34:16 pm
MURICA!!!
17  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Which Country's Liberal Democratic Party Is Preferable on: March 19, 2015, 06:32:26 pm
Japan's.
18  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 2007 Referendum on: March 19, 2015, 09:31:57 am
Final bump, with a reminder that voting closes at 9am tomorrow morning AWST.
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Favorite Country A-L (round 3) on: March 19, 2015, 02:59:31 am
Canada (fellow Commonwealth citizen)
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 2007 Referendum on: March 18, 2015, 04:20:10 pm
Bump.
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Favorite Country U-Z on: March 18, 2015, 01:45:34 am
USA! USA! USA!
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1996 Presidential Election on: March 17, 2015, 08:11:40 am
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of the Walker Tariff on: March 17, 2015, 12:25:55 am
Freedom (was a step in the right direction)
24  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Who would you rather be governed by??? (a tough one) on: March 16, 2015, 09:27:34 pm
Atlas members, although I'd vote for the likes of John Walsh or John Bunnell out of reality TV stars.
25  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: March 16, 2015, 08:04:30 pm
A referendum held in July of 2006, in Toowoomba, Queensland, on recycled sewerage water, would garner national attention, and a nationwide debate over recycled water emerged. The referendum was defeated by a margin of 38-62, although some councils would soon pass similar legislation, and they were backed by politicians from all across the spectrum. No political party would make attempts for a nationwide referendum on the matter, as a general consensus, spearheaded by Tory leader Mark Vaile, was that this was for communities to decide. The framework for the upcoming gay marriage referendum was released in August of 2006, it would alter the Marriage Act accordingly from "one man, one woman" to "two people", however, it would not force religious organisations to recognise or conduct gay marriages, letting them decide for themselves, as added by the Tories Family First. The referendum was due to be held on the 30th of June, 2007.

Amidst two tragic celebrity deaths in one week, namely Steve Irwin of TV's The Crocodile Hunter fame, and racecar driver Peter Brock in September 2006, the remainder of the year was fairly quiet politically, Labor won the Victorian state election, despite a decent swing to the Tories, and Mark Vaile announced his retirement as Tory leader on the 4th of December, 2006, citing that "it was time for someone else to oversee the rebuilding of the Conservatives". The leadership election saw Joe Hockey prevail over Bronwyn Bishop, Warren Truss, Dennis Jensen and Kevin Andrews.

2007 began somewhat dismally, with 500 rioters turning on police in the holiday town of Rye, Victoria, and youth attending an illegal drag race in southeastern Melbourne turning on police and trashing the vicinity. In the second Australia Day following the Cronulla riots, PM Crean stated that "We cannot, as a nation, sink to the abyss displayed on that dreadful day in 2005. We are a proud nation, but also a diverse and caring nation." A mini-scandal emerged in March of 2007, when it was revealed that Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd had met with former WA Premier, the disgraceful Brian Burke. Not long afterwards, Attorney-General Kelvin Thomson was caught in hot water over writing a character reference for a Melbourne gangland figure, Tony Mokbel six years prior. A number of disasters, natural and man-made alike, claimed the lives of 14 Australians in March of 2007. Amidst this bleak backdrop, the NSW Government, led by Premier Morris Iemma, was reduced to a three-seat majority at the state election.

A report on child abuse, domestic violence and drug/alcohol abuse in indigenous communities was released on the 21st of June. PM Crean announced that there would be no intervention into remote Aboriginal communities, citing that type of measure as racist, rather assisting to build community councils, in accordance with the Constitution, and devolving decision making power to the peoples of the land. Guantanamo Bay detainee David Hicks also arrived home the previous month, and served the remainder of his sentence at a prison in Adelaide.   
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