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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Hypothetical UT-04 2016 Election on: Today at 07:32:57 pm
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1816 Election (And the Shoe's on the Other Foot) on: Today at 05:12:24 am
Monroe.
3  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1960 Presidential Election on: Today at 02:13:09 am
AuH2O!
4  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Do you support the upcoming Black Friday protests by Walmart workers? on: Today at 12:45:53 am
There are no Wal-Marts where I live, but if there were, I wouldn't support the protests.
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 21, 2014, 10:39:07 am
If it got 50% of the vote it'd be safe to assume it didn't get a majority of states and therefore failed... no?

This would also be true, it could potentially get a majority in four states, and still fail by say, a large No margin in NSW and VIC.
6  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Andrew Cuomo vs Strom Thurmond on: November 21, 2014, 01:06:21 am
I'm going to have to go with Cuomo on this one.

Also, suggestions for future entries:

Andrew Cuomo vs Nick Clegg
Andrew Cuomo vs Kevin Rudd
Andrew Cuomo vs Julia Gillard
Andrew Cuomo vs Tony Abbott
Andrew Cuomo vs Winston Peters
Andrew Cuomo vs Nigel Farage
Andrew Cuomo vs Pauline Hanson
Andrew Cuomo vs Bob Katter
Andrew Cuomo vs Clive Plamer
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 21, 2014, 01:05:15 am
Voting is now closed, thank you all for your participation.

What happens to Question C?

As Question C received a 50-50 split in this poll, it will fail, as it failed to get 50%+1 of voters.
8  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 20, 2014, 09:30:17 pm
Voting is now closed, thank you all for your participation.
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: New York vs. New Orleans vs. San Francisco on: November 20, 2014, 08:09:26 pm
1. New Orleans
2. New York
3. San Francisco
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 20, 2014, 07:43:47 pm
Final bump, with a reminder that voting closes in just under two hours.
11  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: What is the marital status of your parents? on: November 20, 2014, 06:21:44 am
Divorced since I was 5.
12  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / International Elections / Re: UK parliamentary by-elections 2014 on: November 20, 2014, 04:48:43 am
Incidentally, Billericay's 90's era "maverick" MP Teresa Gorman is now a UKIP supporter. The Billericay constituency has seen some ... interesting characters in its time, so a UKIP defectee would be be par for the course.

I wonder if any ministers could fall to a surprise UKIP surge.

they've been making some interesting claims about Ed M's seat in Donny (can't remember if it's North or Central)

Eric Pickles is down the road in Brentwood, but I think that's one of the less likely seats in Essex to go mauve

IDS is in Tebbit's old seat, Chingford, where UKIP will most likely come a strong second but he's not going anywhere this time around

remembering how disastrous the LibDems decapitation strategy in 2001 was I'm not expecting anything like that, Ukip will be much better off targeting their most winnable seats regardless of who the MP is

Miliband's seat is Doncaster North, I've got family there. From what I know, UKIP may poll strongly in areas like Bentley, but I don't think they'll topple Labour there.
13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1960 Primaries on: November 20, 2014, 03:15:57 am
AuH2O!
14  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Is the Democratic Party left-wing? on: November 20, 2014, 03:07:08 am
By US standards? Yes.
By my standards? Yes for the most part, they'd be centre-left overall as a whole.
By a lot of other nations' standards? No.
15  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Andrew Cuomo vs Nickelback on: November 20, 2014, 03:05:19 am
I'm not really a fan of their work, but Nickelback, easily.
16  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 19, 2014, 07:03:59 pm
Bump.
17  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: How fast do you drive on the expressway? on: November 19, 2014, 10:30:24 am
At or below the speed limit (don't go into the fast lane except when I have to, plus I'm very rulebound.)
18  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Do You Support Repealing America's Ban on the Export of Oil and Natural Gas? on: November 19, 2014, 10:22:29 am
Yes (R/supports free trade)
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1808 Election (And Now for Something Completely Different) on: November 19, 2014, 10:19:12 am
Madison.
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Andrew Cuomo vs George W. Bush on: November 18, 2014, 08:40:21 pm
Bush.
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Barack Obama on: November 18, 2014, 05:39:08 pm
Definite HP, although those who say he's the US's worst president are deluded.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: November 17, 2014, 09:15:28 pm
The end of 1991, on Christmas Day itself, witnessed the final dissolution of the Soviet Union, and the end of communism in Eastern Europe and much of Asia, to an overwhelmingly positive response. This caused a major crisis in the Communist Party, while some members wanted to keep the Communist Party name and ideals, including current leader Eric Aarons, a majority of members supported a name change, and slight ideological change, to Socialist Alternative. Eric Aarons stepped aside when the new name came into force on the 7th of January, 1992, amd the inaugural leader of Socialist Alternative would be first term MP Colin Hesse of New South Wales, who stated "I will keep the anti-capitalist torch alive, in this post-Soviet era".

January of 1992 would witness US President George H.W. Bush    addressing the Australian Parliament, the first US President to do so, NSW Premier Nick Greiner, of the Progress Party, desiring to ban a controversial educational book on reproduction, funded by the Commonwealth Government, and on the final day of January, a withdrawal of 1 and 2 cent coins, whose value had deteriorated over the years.

Referendum questions:

Question A - Do you support changing the voting system for the House of Representatives to optional preferential voting?
Question B - Do you support abolishing the Senate?
Question C - Do you support allocating one-third of the seats in the House of Representatives, for election by proportional representation?
Question D - Do you support expanding the size of the House of Representatives to 200 members?
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - 1992 Referendum on: November 17, 2014, 09:13:21 pm
For the first time since 1973, the left won the two-party preferred vote in Australia - although Progress remained the largest party, it bled votes to both Labor and the Patriotic Front, and even the re-branded National Party, although the National Party only made modest gains votewise, and lost seats. This resulted in Progress falling below 30% for the first time, their worst result since they became Australia's major right-wing party in 1982. The Australia Party also took a hit to their vote, mainly to Labor and Natural Law. The Australia Party would only win 8 seats in the new Parliament, their worst total in the House of Representatives since first winning seats back in 1976, and the Patriotic Front were up to seven seats, following another gain in Queensland.

Summary of 1991 election:

House of Representatives
Labor 58 (+8)
Progress 35 (-4)
National Country 22 (-4)
Natural Law 17 (+4)
Australia Party 8 (-6)
Patriotic Front 7 (+1)
Communist 4 (+1)

Senate
1988: 9 Progress, 8 Natural Law, 6 Labor, 5 Australia Party, 5 National, 2 Patriotic Front, 1 Communist
1991: 10 Progress, 9 Labor, 7 Natural Law, 6 National, 5 Australia Party, 2 Patriotic Front,  1 Communist
Total: 19 Progress, 15 Natural Law, 15 Labor, 11 National, 10 Australia Party, 4 Patriotic Front, 2 Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 53.53-46.47

After their worst result since 1976, Don Chipp announced he was stepping down as the Australia Party's leader, to be replaced by Deputy Leader Janine Haines, who as a result would become the first female leader of a political party at the Commonwealth level. Labor and Natural Law now held 75 seats between them, or one short of a majority. As a result, the incumbent Labor-Natural Law-Australia Party government was reconstituted, with a total strength of 83 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats (15/ 15/ 10) in the Senate, for majorities of 15 and 4 respectively.

Once Parliament reconvened in July of 1991, electoral reform was the hot topic in the Parliament. It was agreed that a referendum would be set for sometime in 1992, but what it would contain was a whole other can of worms - the three parties forming the government had radically different ideas on reforming the voting system. Natural Law wanted to abolish the Senate alogether, and reform the House to a proportionally-elected 200-member chamber, Labor favoured the status quo, while the Australia Party favoured keeping the House at its current size, but introducing a "top-up" system, and reducing the number of electorates to 100. The negotiations for what to include in the referendum would dominate Parliamentary discussion, and it seemed at first that no easy agreement would be made.

Finally, in late August, a proposal was agreed to for the electoral reform referendum, it would consist of four questions, and aimed to cover each party's views, one way or another, on electoral reform:
  • Question 1 - Do you support changing the voting system for the House of Representatives to optional preferential voting? (Backed by Progress, although some Labor MPs are open to this)
  • Question 2 - Do you support abolishing the Senate? (Backed by Natural Law, the Patriotic Front and the Communists)
  • Question 3 - Do you support allocating one-third of the seats in the House of Representatives, for election by proportional representation? (Backed by the Australia Party)
  • Question 4 - Do you support expanding the size of the House of Representatives to 200 members? (Backed by Natural Law)

Although outrage would be inevitable, some MPs, journalists and critics calling the referendum a "dog's breakfast", PM Hawke, despite three of the questions not being favoured by his party, and a fourth only partially, stated that "this should answer the question of electoral reform more than sufficiently". It was announced the referenda would be set for February of 1992, to allow enough time for campaigning, and for voters to go into the booth with informed decisions.

With unemployment still climbing, and around 8.5% by October of 1991, the main focus would remain on how to get Australia through the recession, with the least amount of harm. Inflation remained low though, and seemed to get even lower throughout 1991. Bills to repeal the GST began to be debated, although a question of how the shortfall in revenue would be made up, at a time of recession, was asked. The government came back with new taxes on precious metals, an increase in the top tax rate to 55%, and a slight increase in tariffs. The debates would carry on throughout the remainder of 1991.

The end of 1991, on Christmas Day itself, witnessed the final dissolution of the Soviet Union, and the end of communism in Eastern Europe and much of Asia, to an overwhelmingly positive response. This caused a major crisis in the Communist Party, while some members wanted to keep the Communist Party name and ideals, including current leader Eric Aarons, a majority of members supported a name change, and slight ideological change, to Socialist Alternative. Eric Aarons stepped aside when the new name came into force on the 7th of January, 1992, amd the inaugural leader of Socialist Alternative would be first term MP Colin Hesse of New South Wales, who stated "I will keep the anti-capitalist torch alive, in this post-Soviet era".

January of 1992 would witness US President George H.W. Bush    addressing the Australian Parliament, the first US President to do so, NSW Premier Nick Greiner, of the Progress Party, desiring to ban a controversial educational book on reproduction, funded by the Commonwealth Government, and on the final day of January, a withdrawal of 1 and 2 cent coins, whose value had deteriorated over the years.

A referendum, containing four questions, has been called for the 8th of February, 1992.

Question A - Do you support changing the voting system for the House of Representatives to optional preferential voting?
Question B - Do you support abolishing the Senate?
Question C - Do you support allocating one-third of the seats in the House of Representatives, for election by proportional representation?
Question D - Do you support expanding the size of the House of Representatives to 200 members?

Voting is open for 72 hours as usual.

Me: YES, NO, NO and NO.
24  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: November 17, 2014, 09:06:05 pm
















For the first time since 1973, the left won the two-party preferred vote in Australia - although Progress remained the largest party, it bled votes to both Labor and the Patriotic Front, and even the re-branded National Party, although the National Party only made modest gains votewise, and lost seats. This resulted in Progress falling below 30% for the first time, their worst result since they became Australia's major right-wing party in 1982. The Australia Party also took a hit to their vote, mainly to Labor and Natural Law. The Australia Party would only win 8 seats in the new Parliament, their worst total in the House of Representatives since first winning seats back in 1976, and the Patriotic Front were up to seven seats, following another gain in Queensland.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 1991 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (52 seats) 22 Labor, 12 Progress, 7 National, 7 Natural Law, 4 Communist
Victoria (40 seats) 18 Labor, 11 Progress, 5 Natural Law, 4 National, 2 Australia Party,
Queensland (26 seats) 11 National, 7 Labor, 6 Patriotic Front, 2 Progress
South Australia (13 seats) 5 Australia Party, 5 Labor, 2 Progress, 1 Natural Law
Western Australia (13 seats) 8 Progress, 4 Labor, 1 Patriotic Front
Tasmania (4 seats) 3 Natural Law, 1 Labor
Australian Capital Territory (2 seats) 1 Natural Law, 1 Australia Party
Northern Territory (1 seat) 1 Labor
Total 58 Labor, 35 Progress, 22 National Country, 17 Natural Law, 8 Australia Party, 7 Patriotic Front, 4 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1988:
New South Wales: 1 Labor, 1 National Country, 1 Communist, 1 Progress, 1 Australia Party, 1 Natural Law
Victoria: 2 Progress, 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Australia Party
Queensland: 2 National Country, 1 Progress, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law, 1 Patriotic Front
South Australia: 2 Australia Party, 1 Labor, 1 Progress, 1 Natural Law, 1 National Country
Western Australia: 2 Progress, 1 National Country, 1 Labor, 1 Natural Law, 1 Patriotic Front
Tasmania: 2 Progress, 2 Natural Law, 1 Labor, 1 Australia Party
Total: 9 Progress, 8 Natural Law, 6 Labor, 5 Australia Party, 5 National Country, 2 Patriotic Front, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1991:
New South Wales: 1 Labor, 1 Progress, 1 National, 1 Communist, 1 Natural Law, 1 Australia Party
Victoria: 2 Progress, 1 Labor, 1 National, 1 Australia Party, 1 Natural Law
Queensland: 2 National, 2 Labor , 1 Progress, 1 Patriotic Front
South Australia: 2 Australia Party, 1 Labor, 1 Progress, 1 Natural Law, 1 National
Western Australia: 2 Progress, 2 Labor, 1 National, 1 Patriotic Front
Tasmania: 2 Natural Law, 2 Progress, 2 Labor
Australian Capital Territory: 1 Natural Law, 1 Australia Party
Northern Territory: 1 Natural Law, 1 Progress
Total: 10 Progress, 7 Labor, 6 National Country, 6 Natural Law, 4 Australia Party, 1 Communist


Summary of 1991 election:

House of Representatives
Labor 58 (+8)
Progress 35 (-4)
National Country 22 (-4)
Natural Law 17 (+4)
Australia Party 8 (-6)
Patriotic Front 7 (+1)
Communist 4 (+1)

Senate
1988: 9 Progress, 8 Natural Law, 6 Labor, 5 Australia Party, 5 National, 2 Patriotic Front, 1 Communist
1991: 10 Progress, 9 Labor, 7 Natural Law, 6 National, 5 Australia Party, 2 Patriotic Front,  1 Communist
Total: 19 Progress, 15 Natural Law, 15 Labor, 11 National, 10 Australia Party, 4 Patriotic Front, 2 Communist

Two-party preferred vote: 53.53-46.47

After their worst result since 1976, Don Chipp announced he was stepping down as the Australia Party's leader, to be replaced by Deputy Leader Janine Haines, who as a result would become the first female leader of a political party at the Commonwealth level. Labor and Natural Law now held 75 seats between them, or one short of a majority. As a result, the incumbent Labor-Natural Law-Australia Party government was reconstituted, with a total strength of 83 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats (15/ 15/ 10) in the Senate, for majorities of 15 and 4 respectively.

Once Parliament reconvened in July of 1991, electoral reform was the hot topic in the Parliament. It was agreed that a referendum would be set for sometime in 1992, but what it would contain was a whole other can of worms - the three parties forming the government had radically different ideas on reforming the voting system. Natural Law wanted to abolish the Senate alogether, and reform the House to a proportionally-elected 200-member chamber, Labor favoured the status quo, while the Australia Party favoured keeping the House at its current size, but introducing a "top-up" system, and reducing the number of electorates to 100. The negotiations for what to include in the referendum would dominate Parliamentary discussion, and it seemed at first that no easy agreement would be made.

Finally, in late August, a proposal was agreed to for the electoral reform referendum, it would consist of four questions, and aimed to cover each party's views, one way or another, on electoral reform:
  • Question 1 - Do you support changing the voting system for the House of Representatives to optional preferential voting? (Backed by Progress, although some Labor MPs are open to this)
  • Question 2 - Do you support abolishing the Senate? (Backed by Natural Law, the Patriotic Front and the Communists)
  • Question 3 - Do you support allocating one-third of the seats in the House of Representatives, for election by proportional representation? (Backed by the Australia Party)
  • Question 4 - Do you support expanding the size of the House of Representatives to 200 members? (Backed by Natural Law)

Although outrage would be inevitable, some MPs, journalists and critics calling the referendum a "dog's breakfast", PM Hawke, despite three of the questions not being favoured by his party, and a fourth only partially, stated that "this should answer the question of electoral reform more than sufficiently". It was announced the referenda would be set for February of 1992, to allow enough time for campaigning, and for voters to go into the booth with informed decisions.

With unemployment still climbing, and around 8.5% by October of 1991, the main focus would remain on how to get Australia through the recession, with the least amount of harm. Inflation remained low though, and seemed to get even lower throughout 1991. Bills to repeal the GST began to be debated, although a question of how the shortfall in revenue would be made up, at a time of recession, was asked. The government came back with new taxes on precious metals, an increase in the top tax rate to 55%, and a slight increase in tariffs. The debates would carry on throughout the remainder of 1991.
25  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: How would YOU vote in a Reid vs. Sandoval Senate Race? on: November 17, 2014, 02:17:55 am
Sandoval, no doubt about it.
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