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News: Atlas Hardware Upgrade complete October 13, 2013.

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1  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1948 Presidential Election on: Today at 04:41:30 am
Dewey or write-in Taft, voted Dewey in the poll.
2  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1932 Presidential Election on: August 22, 2014, 10:28:33 pm
Mister we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again...
3  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Which of These Individuals Sounds More Appealing? on: August 22, 2014, 04:03:59 am
While I'm not fond of Professor X's xenophobia and anti-Catholicism, he's better than Mr. Y on balance.
4  Atlas Fantasy Elections / Voting Booth / Re: August 2014 Federal Election - At-Large Senate on: August 22, 2014, 12:03:19 am

AT-LARGE SENATE


[  ] Alfred F. Jones of Rhode Island
Labor Party



[  ] Bacon King of Oceania
National Front to Restore Democracy



[4] Clarence of Florida
Federalist Party



[2] Deus naturae of New York
Democratic-Republican Party



[  ] Dr Cynic of Pennsylvania
Labor Party



[  ] GAworth of South Dakota
P.E.A.C.E. Party



[1] JohannesCalvinusLibertas (JCL) of Indiana
Federalist Party



[3] LuminevonReuental of Utah
Federalist Party



[  ] Mechaman of Indiana
Bad Party



[  ] Poirot of New York
Independent



[  ] Polnut of Massachusetts
The People's Party



[  ] Write-in:______________________________
-__________________



[  ] None of the above
5  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Hypothetical 2016 US Presidential Election on: August 21, 2014, 07:29:25 pm
Johnson or Perkins, depending on the state I lived in.
6  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1974 Referenda on: August 21, 2014, 07:26:45 pm
Voting has closed, thank you all once again.
7  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1974 Referenda on: August 20, 2014, 06:18:49 am
Bumping, with a reminder that voting closes at 10.30pm tomorrow night AWST.
8  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion / Congressional Elections / Re: Who will win in Oregon? on: August 20, 2014, 02:13:39 am
9  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Opinion of Jay Nixon on: August 19, 2014, 09:04:47 pm
10  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1997 UK General Election on: August 19, 2014, 08:49:19 am
Referendum Party or Tory, depending on what constituency I was in. Voted Referendum in the poll.
11  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1888 Presidential Election on: August 19, 2014, 08:32:10 am
Cleveland easily.
12  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: When did you first hear of.... on: August 18, 2014, 08:56:19 pm
David Cameron: 2008, around the time I became a McCain supporter.

Ed Miliband: 2010, around the time of the UK election.

Tony Blair: Early 2000s.

Gordon Brown: 2007, when he became Prime Minister.

Ken Livingstone: 2008

Nick Clegg: 2010, I remember the "Cleggmania" of the polls in the lead up to the 2010 UK election.

Boris Johnson: 2008

Kevin Rudd: 2007, in the run-up to the election. The politically naive AK, who thought John Howard should go because "he was in for too long" (mind you, he should have retired in '06 with hindsight, but that's from a different angle) was a massive Rudd fanboy at the time.

John Howard: Around 1999.

Julia Gillard: 2009

Tony Abbott: 2009, not long before he became Liberal leader.

Stephen Harper: 2008/2009

Justin Trudeau: 2012/13

Francois Hollande: 2012, when he won election as French President.

Nicolas Sarkozy: 2009 I think

Angela Merkel: 2009/10

Vladimir Putin: 2012
13  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: If all 50 states went to war, which one would win? on: August 18, 2014, 07:50:14 pm
I'd go with Texas.
14  General Politics / Individual Politics / AK's Australian Election Series - 1974 Referenda on: August 18, 2014, 09:36:03 am
In the House of Representatives, the 1973 election was very similar to the 1970 election, with no change in the territories or Western Australia, and Labor losing only one seat each in South Australia and Victoria. The now-reunited Communist Party's vote share remained stagnant, which meant it was a drop of over 6%, given the loss of the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party. Now down to only one seat in the House of Representatives, the Communists still managed to elect a Senator from New South Wales, narrowly beating the Australia Party candidate. The National Country Party, a result of the Country Party absorbing the DLP, did better in Queensland and Western Australia compared to the old parties' 1970 totals, particularly in the Senate, although made little headway into metropolitan areas in Australia, particularly the old DLP stronghold of Victoria.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 1973 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (46 seats) – 31 Labor, 7 Liberal, 7 National Country, 1 Communist
Victoria (33 seats) – 16 Labor, 12 Liberal, 5 National Country
Queensland (18 seats) – 10 Labor, 4 Liberal, 4 National Country
South Australia (12 seats) – 7 Labor, 5 Liberal
Western Australia (9 seats) – 6 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 National Country
Tasmania (4 seats) – 4 Labor
Northern Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Australian Capital Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Total – 77 Labor, 28 Liberal, 17 National Country, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1970:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 1 Communist, 1 Australia Party
Victoria: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist
Queensland: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 National Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 National Country
Tasmania: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Democratic Labor
Total: 13 Labor, 11 Liberal,  2 Country,  1 Democratic Labor, 1 Communist, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist, 1 Australia Party

Here's the Senate summary from 1973:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Communist
Victoria: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Australia Party
Queensland: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 National Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 National Country
Tasmania: 3 Labor, 2    Liberal
Total: 14 Labor, 10 Liberal, 4 National Country, 1 Australia Party, 1 Communist

Summary of 1973 election:

House of Representatives
Labor – 76 (-1)
Liberal – 29 (+1)
National Country – 18 (+1)*
Communist – 1 (-1)
* - Change is from 1970 Country figure.

Senate
1970: 13 Labor, 11 Liberal,  3 National Country 2 Communist, 1 Australia Party
1973: 14 Labor, 10 Liberal, 4 National Country, 1 Australia Party, 1 Communist
Total: 27 Labor, 21 Liberal,  7 National Country, 3 Communist, 2 Australia Party

Two-party preferred vote: 55.69-44.31

Having lost its Senate majority, with the Communists and Australia Party jointly holding the balance of power, the Whitlam Government entered its third term by introducing a bill that would give the territories Senate representation, each territory would have two Senators, elected at each House of Representatives election. This easily passed both houses, and was effective for the next election, due in 1976. In the wake of the 1973 election, in which the Liberals were led by moderate John Gorton, a leadership spill occurred, on the back of Gorton's moderate campaign not achieving a lot. The leadership ballot was between Gorton, and fellow Victorian Malcolm Fraser, the latter from the conservative wing of the party. Fraser proved successful in the leadership ballot, and Gorton resigned to the backbench shortly afterwards. Doug Anthony remained leader of the National Country Party.

The Snowy River Scheme, having been under construction for almost a quarter of a century, was finally completed in 1973. While this infrastructural milestone benefited southeastern Australia to a great degree, the Australian economy, which went through significant growth in the 1950s and 1960s, aside from a recession in the early 1960s, was beginning to show signs of slowing down and indeed, regression. Inflation, which had reached around 6.5% at the start of 1972, before dipping to below 5% a year later, was about to skyrocket to 12% by the start of 1974. This was partially caused by the world economy, by the oil crisis that broke out in October of 1973, by the UK's entry in what was then the EEC, and lowered foreign investment in, and economic productivity out of Australia.

In late 1973, around the commencement of the oil crisis, a commission was created to devise the best method for recognising Aboriginal land rights in the Northern Territory. One year later, landmark legislation was introduced into Parliament, allowing a claim of land title, on the criterion that claimants provide enough evidence of traditional association. After passing the House of Representatives easily, the legislation went to the Senate, where although the Communists opposed the bill, on the basis that no-one should own land, the bill passed easily, and became law early in 1975. Along with Labor, the Australia Party, and most Liberal and Country Senators, voted in favour of the bill.

A referendum, proposed in early 1974, would, if validated, enable those in the ACT and NT alike to vote in future referenda. At this point in time, only those in the states could vote in referenda. The votes from the territories would be incorporated into the national total, and only three states would need to vote Yes to have a referendum passed, along with a majority of the national vote. Another two referendum questions, which would ensure Senate elections, both regular half-Senate elections and double dissolutions, were held at the same time as House of Representatives elections, and allow the federal government to give grants to local governments, were also put onto the table.

The referenda have been set for the 9th of March, 1974.

Question A (Altering the Constitution)
“Do you approve of the proposed changes that would allow residents of the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory to vote in referenda, and to change the requirement for passing from four states plus a national majority, to three states plus a national majority?”

Question B (Elections)
“Do you approve of amending electoral law to ensure Senate elections are held in conjunction with House of Representatives elections?”

Question C (Local Government Grants)
“Do you approve of a proposed law that would enable the Commonwealth Government to provide monetary grants to local governments?”

Voting is open for 72 hours as per usual.

Me: YES, NO and NO.
15  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - Master Thread on: August 18, 2014, 09:35:11 am
















In the House of Representatives, the 1973 election was very similar to the 1970 election, with no change in the territories or Western Australia, and Labor losing only one seat each in South Australia and Victoria. The now-reunited Communist Party's vote share remained stagnant, which meant it was a drop of over 6%, given the loss of the Marxist-Leninist Communist Party. Now down to only one seat in the House of Representatives, the Communists still managed to elect a Senator from New South Wales, narrowly beating the Australia Party candidate. The National Country Party, a result of the Country Party absorbing the DLP, did better in Queensland and Western Australia compared to the old parties' 1970 totals, particularly in the Senate, although made little headway into metropolitan areas in Australia, particularly the old DLP stronghold of Victoria.

In terms of seats, here's a summary of each state's results from the 1973 election in the House of Representatives:
New South Wales (46 seats) – 31 Labor, 7 Liberal, 7 National Country, 1 Communist
Victoria (33 seats) – 16 Labor, 12 Liberal, 5 National Country
Queensland (18 seats) – 10 Labor, 4 Liberal, 4 National Country
South Australia (12 seats) – 7 Labor, 5 Liberal
Western Australia (9 seats) – 6 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 Country
Tasmania (4 seats) – 4 Labor
Northern Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Australian Capital Territory (1 seat) – 1 Labor
Total – 77 Labor, 28 Liberal, 17 Country, 1 Communist

Here's the Senate summary from 1970:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 1 Communist, 1 Australia Party
Victoria: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Marxist-Leninist Communist
Queensland: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Country
Tasmania: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Democratic Labor
Total: 13 Labor, 11 Liberal,  3 National Country 2 Communist, 1 Australia Party

Here's the Senate summary from 1973:
New South Wales: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Communist
Victoria: 2 Labor, 2 Liberal, 1 Australia Party
Queensland: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 National Country
South Australia: 3 Labor, 2 Liberal
Western Australia: 2 Labor, 1 Liberal, 2 National Country
Tasmania: 3 Labor, 2    Liberal
Total: 14 Labor, 10 Liberal, 4 National Country, 1 Australia Party, 1 Communist

Summary of 1973 election:

House of Representatives
Labor – 76 (-1)
Liberal – 29 (+1)
National Country – 18 (+1)*
Communist – 1 (-1)
* - Change is from 1970 Country figure.

Senate
1970: 13 Labor, 11 Liberal,  3 National Country 2 Communist, 1 Australia Party
1973: 14 Labor, 10 Liberal, 4 National Country, 1 Australia Party, 1 Communist
Total: 27 Labor, 21 Liberal,  7 National Country, 3 Communist, 2 Australia Party

Two-party preferred vote: 55.69-44.31

Having lost is Senate majority, the Communists and Australia Party jointly holding the balance of power, the Whitlam Government entered its third term by introducing a bill that would give the territories Senate representation, each territory would have two Senators, elected at each House of Representatives election. This easily passed both houses, and was effective for the next election, due in 1976. In the wake of the 1973 election, in which the Liberals were led by moderate John Gorton, a leadership spill occurred, on the back of Gorton's moderate campaign not achieving a lot. The leadership ballot was between Gorton, and fellow Victorian Malcolm Fraser, the latter from the conservative wing of the party. Fraser proved successful in the leadership ballot, and Gorton resigned to the backbench shortly afterwards. Doug Anthony remained leader of the National Country Party.

The Snowy River Scheme, having been under construction for almost a quarter of a century, was finally completed in 1973. While this infrastructural milestone benefited southeastern Australia to a great degree, the Australian economy, which went through significant growth in the 1950s and 1960s, aside from a recession in the early 1960s, was beginning to show signs of slowing down and indeed, regression. Inflation, which had reached around 6.5% at the start of 1972, before dipping to below 5% a year later, was about to skyrocket to 12% by the start of 1974. This was partially caused by the world economy, by the oil crisis that broke out in October of 1973, by the UK's entry in what was then the EEC, and lowered foreign investment in, and economic productivity out of Australia.

In late 1973, around the commencement of the oil crisis, a commission was created to devise the best method for recognising Aboriginal land rights in the Northern Territory. One year later, landmark legislation was introduced into Parliament, allowing a claim of land title, on the criterion that claimants provide enough evidence of traditional association. After passing the House of Representatives easily, the legislation went to the Senate, where although the Communists opposed the bill, on the basis that no-one should own land, the bill passed easily, and became law early in 1975. Along with Labor, the Australia Party, and most Liberal and Country Senators, voted in favour of the bill.

A referendum, proposed in early 1974, would, if validated, enable those in the ACT and NT alike to vote in future referenda. At this point in time, only those in the states could vote in referenda. The votes from the territories would be incorporated into the national total, and only three states would need to vote Yes to have a referendum passed, along with a majority of the national vote. Another two referendum questions, which would ensure Senate elections, both regular half-Senate elections and double dissolutions, were held at the same time as House of Representatives elections, and allow the federal government to give grants to local governments, were also put onto the table.

Referenda questions:

Question A (Altering the Constitution)
“Do you approve of the proposed changes that would allow residents of the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory to vote in referenda, and to change the requirement for passing from four states plus a national majority, to three states plus a national majority?”

Question B (Elections)
“Do you approve of amending electoral law to ensure Senate elections are held in conjunction with House of Representatives elections?”

Question C (Local Government Grants)
“Do you approve of a proposed law that would enable the Commonwealth Government to provide monetary grants to local governments?”
16  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: What avatar color and state would best fit the preceding poster? on: August 18, 2014, 04:14:16 am

17  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: 1912 Presidential Election on: August 17, 2014, 11:06:25 pm
I'll go with Taft.
18  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: PM Series: Question 12 on: August 17, 2014, 07:12:25 pm
Neutral/not a critical issue (firm believer in the watershed and ratings/certificates, but not in filtering the Internet)
19  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: China vs. India on: August 16, 2014, 06:52:04 pm
India.
20  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: Best President without Military Service? (2) on: August 16, 2014, 06:51:17 pm
Cleveland, although Coolidge and the Adams' are also up there.
21  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: When did you first hear of.... on: August 15, 2014, 11:03:47 pm
Barack Obama: Early 2008 from my dad, indeed, I was an Obama supporter during this period /shock.

Hillary Clinton: 2008, possibly before.

Joe Biden: Middle of 2008, whenever he was picked as Obama's running mate.

George W. Bush: September of 2001, when my 5th grade class and I were learning about 9/11. Up until then, I thought Clinton was still President. Was a massive Bush fanboy when I was 13 too.

Dick Cheney: Not sure, I would have been around 12 or 13 (2003/2004)?

Mitt Romney: 2011, when the primary debates were getting underway for the 2012 primaries. Disliked him from the word go.

John McCain: Mid-2008, became a McCain supporter around September that year.

Rudy Giuliani: Not until 2010 at the earliest.

Ron Paul: Early 2009, through the Internet.

Sarah Palin: July or August of 2008.

Michelle Bachmann: Around 2010, like ChairmanSanchez, thought she was the new Palin.

Newt Gingrich: 2011 I think, same reason as Mitt Romney.

Rick Santorum: Same as Gingrich.
22  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1973 on: August 15, 2014, 11:08:58 am
Voting is now closed, thank you all again for your participation.
23  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: AK's Australian Election Series - 1973 on: August 14, 2014, 11:10:15 pm
Final bump before the poll closes in just under 12 hours.
24  General Politics / Individual Politics / Re: PM Series: Question 11 on: August 14, 2014, 06:15:32 pm
Usually Disagree
25  Forum Community / Forum Community / Re: Atlas Sexual Morality Poll on: August 14, 2014, 10:41:05 am
Disagree with all except #4, and #2 to an extent (serious relationships are very different to non-serious relationships).
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