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Author Topic: US with Canadian parties  (Read 812 times)
Peter the Lefty
Peternerdman
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« on: September 16, 2012, 08:48:08 pm »
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All right, there was one that was done a while ago on this, but it's died out, do I figure I may as well start anew.  
Conservatives: Being the result of a merger between the PC's and the Reform Party, it would now represent a moderate conservative position, gaining most of its support in the Mid-West, the right-leaning parts of New England (like NH), and in places like upstate New York, subrural/rural Pennsylvania, as well as Florida, rich parts of California, Nevada, and elsewhere along those lines.  Would've once had the South as its major base (since Reform would've sprung from there), but the South would now be turning mainly to the CHP and the Libertarians.  
Liberals: Would be strong in middle and upper class urban areas and the suburbs of NYC, especially in the financial district of Manhattan, and in the greater NYC metropolitan area.  Would be big in Connecticut and New Hampshire (especially with Martin), though it would've gone to Harper in '06 and he would've kept it in '08 and 2011.  The Liberals would also do well in lots of the richer but socially liberal suburbs of Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Springfield, Illinois, and the rich parts of Los Angeles, San Diego, Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, and Houston.  Would also be well-liked in New Jersey.
NDP: Considered a far left hippie radical tree-hugging socialist party in the American context, it would be strongest in Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, almost all of NYC (at least as of 2011, if not before that), downtown Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Scranton, Delaware, D.C., Chicago, working-class Los Angeles and San Diego, most of Oregon, Washington, and in the super-liberal and working-class parts of Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio.  Would also have pockets of support among the working-class/poor black populations in much of the south, even though they'd likely be a bit put off by the party's gay-friendliness.  San Fransisco would, of course, be their most reliable stronghold, possibly even voting for them in '93.
Greens: Far more market-friendly than their RL American counterparts, they'd probably be strongest on the West Coast among the middle-class hippie types who are impervious to the fact that May is just an articulate bullsh*tter.  
Bloc South: Would be picking up votes throughout the South for separation thanks to Harper's alienation of his Southern "red meat" Reform base.  
« Last Edit: September 16, 2012, 08:55:26 pm by Peternerdman »Logged



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DC Al Fine
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« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2012, 10:00:32 am »
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The Conservatives would have won nearly every election by significant margins. What would be really interesting is how a 90's style Reform/PC/Liberal/Bloc Texas would play out.
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Peter the Lefty
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2012, 08:03:00 pm »
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All right, let's start from the beginning.  
1867:
Conservatives: 39%
Liberals: 36%
Anti-Confederatation: (Dixiecrat Southern voters) 19%

Not worth doing until 1900:
Conservatives: 48%
Liberals: 42% (Laurier wouldn't have gotten anywhere at that time being Catholic).  

1904:
Same, roughly.

1908:
Conservatives: 48%
Liberals: 45%
Labour: 3%

1911:
Conservatives: 46%
Liberals: 41%
Labour: 8%

1917:
Unionists: 56%
Laurier Liberals: 35%
Labour: 5%

1921:
Conservatives: 41%
Liberals: 34%
Progressives: 18%
Labour: 2%

1925:
Conservatives: 48%
Liberals: 43%
Progressives: 6%
Labour: 1%
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DC Al Fine
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2012, 03:31:57 pm »
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I'll take a stab at it. Here's 1926 until right before Trudeau. I assumed the Bloc Quebecois and it's predecessors don't exist.

1926:
Conservative: 48%
Liberal: 44%
Progressive: 2%
Other (Labour, UFA etc): 2%

1930:
Conservative: 50%
Liberal: 47%
Other: 3

1935:
Liberal: 42%
Conservative:33%
Social Credit: 5% (Kind of hard to make an American equivalent, but basically Dixiecrats)
CCF: 5% (Won't really amount to much in the USA)
Reconstruction:5%

1940:
Liberal: 49%
National Government: 35%
CCF: 7%
Social Credit: 6%
Independants: 3%

1945:
Liberal: 36%
PC: 32%
CCF: 12%
Social Credit: 12%
Independants: 7%
Labour Progressive: 1%

1949:
Liberal: 45%
PC: 33%
Social Credit: 11%
CCF: 10%
Independants: 1%

1953:
Liberal: 43%
PC: 35%
Social Credit: 15%
CCF: 7%
Labour Progressive: 1%

1957:
PC: 41%
Liberal: 37%
Social Credit: 16%
CCF: 6%

1958:
PC: 56%
Liberal: 30%
Social Credit: 9%
CCF: 5%

1962:
PC: 38%
Liberal: 34%
Social Credit: 18%
NDP: 10%

1963:
Liberal: 38%
PC: 34%
Social Credit: 18%
NDP: 10%

1965:
Liberal: 37%
PC: 34%
Social Credit: 14%
CCF: 11%

Party Profiles:

PC: The Progressive Conservatives are the party of middle class WASPs, with a strong base in New England. Containing a populist contingent, they also do well across the plains states. The PC's also win most of the white vote on the West Coast

Liberal:l The Liberals have a strong base around ethnic whites, hispanics and blacks. Liberals win handsome majorities across the Midwest blue collar areas, and doing well in the south. The Liberals also fair competitively in former Progressive ridings in the plains states.

Social Credit: Competitive almost exclusively in the South, Social Credit is the party of working class whites. Social Credit members are staunch social conservatives, with a populist tinge. They have a smattering of support across the plains states and parts of the Midwest.

NDP: The New Democratic Party is not nearly as popular as it's Canadian counterpart, confined to fighting the Liberals in some former Progressive areas, and winning the urban working classes in Labour towns such as Detroit. The NDP also do well amongst college students and hippies, posting solid results in college towns.
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