Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 29, 2014, 08:02:43 pm
HomePredMockPollEVCalcAFEWIKIHelpLogin Register
News: Don't forget to get your 2013 Gubernatorial Endorsements and Predictions in!

+  Atlas Forum
|-+  Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion
| |-+  Election What-ifs?
| | |-+  International What-ifs (Moderators: Bacon King, Dallasfan65)
| | | |-+  Canada: What if the Progressives displaced the Liberals? (Or the Tories!)
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print
Author Topic: Canada: What if the Progressives displaced the Liberals? (Or the Tories!)  (Read 5687 times)
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« on: September 04, 2009, 02:48:21 am »
Ignore

Edit - As seen below, it actually makes more sense due to factors of history to have the Progressives replace the Tories (not the Liberals) and in stead have the Liberals move to the right, creating an Australian-like situation in Canada.

I'm surprised no one posted this yet.

Background. In the United Kingdom, and many other European nations, during the period from 1900 to 1930, Social Democratic and pro-Labour parties replaced many big and small L Liberal parties as the main opposition tot the various type of Conservative parties out there. In Canada this did not happen because, in short, the Liberal Party of Canada was able to absorb many of the Progressive Party's MP's, policies, and voters, moving it to the left of other "Liberal Parties" and keeping it cemented as Canada's largest Left of Centre party. In 1933 nearly the entire Progressive delegation in Parliament (IE it's MPs) and nearly all its MLAs defected to the new CCF party, which later became the NDP. Due to the fact that most of these MPs were from rural Alberta, most were not re-elected to represent the CCF.

Change:
The change would be that in the 1921 election, the Progressives managed a wider victory. I will post a table in my second post (directly below this one) about this. Regardless, the new, larger Progressive caucus decides not to work with the Liberals but to oppose them as the official opposition.

Result:
This is where I need help. What would have happened? I see one of two paths:
A - The Progressives keep a steady vote while the Conservative Party raises, and the Liberals get squeezed out.
B - The Conservatives never recover. They are replaced on the right by Social Credit out west, and remain a very small party existing only in certain provinces.

Theories:
Pierre Trudeau started out in the CCF/NDP and only switched to the Liberals just before getting elected. As the story goes, a high-placed Liberal saw how skilled he was and asked him "How would you like to be Prime Minister" and secured him a riding. My theory is that Trudeau hence would have been a Progressive and not a Liberal if said party was in a position to win.

Thoughts:
The story would progress easier if it were the Conservatives who had died off. Many of the "Tory" leaders from 1930-2003 were 'red' Tories, and could well have fit into a right-shifted Liberal Party with ease. Also, the Conservatives remaining off the stage would have allowed for Social Credit to remain a force. Remember, Preston Manning ran for Social Credit decades before he founded Reform. The CCF changed its name to the NDP, so there is no reason why Social Credit could not change its name to Reform, etc.



I'd like to turn this into one of those "Stories" that are in the american what-if forums. Id like to see what Canada would look like today if this had happened.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 04:40:18 am by nickjbor »Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2009, 04:38:45 am »
Ignore




1921 election:

First, I note the fracture of the vote. The Progressive Party was, in short, a coalition between various United Farmer and Labour groups. Some candidates still ran for the Labour Party despite this. In order for this timeline to work, we will assume all ran under the Progressive banner.

There are many ridings that did not run a Progressive candidate. This makes it difficult yet also easy to change history. BC in particular did not have many Progressives (or Labour etc) running. I therefore have upped those ridings with said candidates to help them win. There are cases where the progressive candidate got, for example, 39 votes, compared to the winners 10,493. Clearly this is not a riding that's going to switch, but where the difference is within a few thousand, I've switched the riding over.


Ridings that switched.
BC: Kootney Easy. New Westminster. Nanimo. Vancouver South.
AB: Progressives already won every seat in the province.
SK: Regina
MB: Winnipeg North (Won by a "Socialist", who then went on to sit with the Progressives
Hop, Skip, and a Jump.
NB: Kent See interesting note below
NS: Inverness. Cape Breton South and Richmond (two MPs)
PEI: none (no ridings close enough)
YK: none (no progressive candidate)


Note on Kent: In 1997, the NDP won the riding of Kent-Westmorland. This win was on the strength of the candidate within Westmorland county. Kent, as a whole, has never, never, voted anything but Liberal (federally OR provincially), and is the only place in Canada I can find that's done that. I am truly shocked to find that in 1921 the Progressives took over 40% of the vote here, and could have won with a little boost from alternate history.

Now down to the "Big 2" provinces.
QC: Yamaska only riding in the province that the Progressives even got close to
ON: Bruce North. Essex South. Oxford North. Carlton. Durham. Elgin East. Elgin West. Fort William and Rainy River. Grey North. Hamilton East. Hamilton West. Hastings East. Lambton West. Lincoln. Northumberland. Oxford South. Parry Sound. Peel. Prince Edward. Simcoe South. Toronto East. Wentworth. -- Also, the Independent elected for Victoria later switched to the Progressives. We are assuming he did so now.


I'm surprised how many close ridings there were in Ontario where the Tories just edged out the Progressives. I think this clearly shows that we cannot kill the Liberals. We must kill the Tories. Anyways, here's the alternate history results table:



Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2009, 05:32:35 am »
Ignore

The Liberal government would last until 1923 due to limited Progressive and Tory support.

The election was a huge morale killer for the Tories. Many of their left-wing members left for the Progressives and never looked back.

Provincial politics also changed as a result. The government of Ontario lead by the United Farmers, officially re branded themselves as the Ontario Progressives and united with Labour members. The United Farmers of Alberta, also in government did the same. A Progressive majority government was further elected in Manitoba in 1922.

The 1923 Ontario provincial election proved a disaster for the Conservatives. Attempting a comeback, they failed miserably, and lost seats from the previous election.
Pro - 55
Lib - 34
Con - 22
The Progressives, despite some unpopularity, were able to cobble together a Minority government.


The 1923 Quebec provincial election also saw the Conservatives falter, but not by as much.

Lib - 64
Pro - 12
Con - 9


The 1923 Prince Edward Island provincial election saw the first Progressives elected to the provincial legislature. Only here were the Conservatives able to hold on to some degree.

Lib - 15
Con - 14
Pro - 1


The 1923 federal election saw a rebound in Liberal fortunes as the expense of the Conservative Party. Anti-Progressive voters gathered behind the Liberals, and despite gaining votes, the Progressives lost seats. It was the Conservatives, however, who were decimated, falling below the 12 seats required for party status.

Lib - 128 - 43%
Pro - 97 - 36%
Con - 10 - 17%

The election granted the Liberals a comfortable Majority, but also killed the hope of the Conservative Party. One of their seats came from the remote north. All 9 of their remaining seats came from one province, Ontario. Supporters of the party continues to branch off; more left wing supporters joined the Progressives, joined by increasing number of left-wing Liberals, while right-wing Conservatives either stayed with the party or joined the Liberals to help stop the Progressive tide.

Provincial elections continued the tide of Progressive-from-Conservative votes.

Prince Edward Island was the first to go, due to the small majority gained there in the last election. Islanders were not yet ready to trust the Progressives, but had given up on the Conservatives. The 1924 election saw the following results:

Lib - 26
Pro - 3
Con - 1


British Columbia went to the polls in 1924 as well. Under the name the "Provincial Party" and in an electoral coalition with Labour, the BC Progressives were able to burst on to the scene, displacing the Conservatives as the #2 party.

Lib - 25
Pro - 17
Con - 6


In Early 1925 the Ontario government fell apart, and an election was held that saw the Progressives gain a large majority. The Conservatives, however, were able to make a strong stand, and displaced the Liberals, giving some hope to Tories nationwide.

Pro - 74
Con - 23
Lib - 15


Mid 1925 saw Nova Scotia elect a new assembly.  Demands for change were strong, but the Progressives were not fully trusted. the result was was one that would give Tories even more hope.

Con - 20
Pro - 19
Lib - 4

The result of this election was a coalition between the Conservatives and the Liberals, that remained stable for years.


Late in 1925, Saskatchewan went to the polls. The Liberals continued to hold on to government here.

Lib - 50
Pro - 10
Con - 3


1926 saw an election in Alberta. The Progressives won re-election easily. Their government continued to be very popular.

Pro - 54
Lib - 8


Prior to the federal election in 1927, Quebec went to the polls. The result was painful for all but the Liberals.

Lib - 79
Pro - 4
Con - 2


The 1927 Federal Election saw a minor bounce for the Conservatives in terms of seats. They increased their seat count in Ontario, and they were able to pick up a few ridings in Nova Scotia, and even one in Quebec, however their nation-wide popular vote continued to drop

Lib - 126 - 45%
Pro - 91 - 37%
Con - 28 - 16%
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Hatman
EarlAW
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20528
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -4.97, S: -6.00


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2009, 11:55:24 am »
Ignore

Really cool idea. I look forward to more!
Logged

http://canadianelectionatlas.blogspot.com

Follow me on Twitter @EarlWashburn
PASOK Leader Hashemite
Hashemite
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 31334
South Africa



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2009, 03:32:41 pm »
Ignore

The Progressive Party in Quebec would be quite interesting, but in those years it's hard to see them emerging as the same type of party as they did in the rest of Canada (aka, a rural protest party). They might, instead, emerge as something similar to Paul Gouin's ALN and gain the support of the left-wing of the Liberal Party... but where would Maurice Duplessis, the otl leader of the PCQ go? Would he be a Liberal, meaning that the Liberals provincially become a French nationalist Christian right party? Who would the West Island Anglos end up supporting both federally and provincially?

Real interesting issue for sure, and I look forward to your answers.

And I approve of any scenario in which the Conservatives die Smiley
Logged

Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2009, 05:41:17 am »
Ignore

Rather than continue to post each province as part of the main story, I've decided to post them in a single list, and I will note which elections require a "story" and elaborate on those.

(Translation - these elections are not important and I want to get them "out of the way")

Alberta 1930
Pro - 49
Lib - 11

Alberta 1935
SC - 56
Lib - 5
Pro - 2

Alberta 1940
SC - 36
Lib - 20
Pro - 1

Alberta 1944
SC - 51
Lib - 7
Pro - 2

Alberta 1948
SC - 51
Lib - 4
Pro - 2

Alberta 1952
SC - 52
Lib - 5
Pro - 2

Alberta 1955
SC - 37
Lib - 22
Pro - 2



BC 1928
Lib - 21
Con - 15
Pro - 12

(The Conservatives and Progressives formed a pro-rural coalition government, which fell apart after the Depression hit)

BC 1930
Lib - 34
Pro - 10
Con - 3

BC 1934
Lib - 35
Pro - 12

BC 1937
Lib - 31
Pro - 17

BC 1941
Lib - 33
Pro - 15

BC 1945
Lib - 37
Pro - 15

BC 1949
Lib - 39
Pro - 11

BC 1952
SC - 19
Pro - 18
Lib - 11

BC 1953
SC - 28
Pro - 14
Lib - 6

BC 1956
SC - 39
Pro - 10
Lib - 3



Sask 1929
Lib - 28
Pro - 25
Con - 10

(Progressives and Conservatives formed a government, which was quickly co-opted by the Conservative agenda. It fell apart during the Depression.)

Sask 1932
Lib - 50
Pro - 5

Sask 1935
Lib - 41
Pro - 9

Sask 1938
Lib - 39
Pro - 12
SC - 2

Sask 1944
Pro - 47 (Lead by Tommy Douglas)
Lib - 5

Sask 1948
Pro - 41
Lib - 19
SC - 2

Sask 1952
Pro - 42
Lib - 11

Sask 1956
Pro - 36
Lib - 14
SC - 3


Manitoba 1927
Pro - 33
Lib - 15
Con - 7

Manitoba 1932
Pro - 43
Lib - 10
Con - 2

Manitoba 1936
Pro - 30
Lib - 16
SC - 9

Manitoba 1941
Pro - 30
Lib - 15
SC - 10

Manitoba 1945
Pro - 29
Lib - 15
SC - 11

Manitoba 1949
Pro - 31
SC - 14
Lib - 12

Manitoba 1953
Pro - 35
SC - 12
Lib - 10


Nova Scotia 1928
Con - 24
Lib - 10
Pro - 8

(At it's demise in 1933, this would be the last Conservative government in Canadian history)

Nova Scotia 1933
Lib - 22
Pro - 8

Nova Scotia 1937
Lib - 25
Pro - 5

Nova Scotia 1941
Lib - 22
Pro - 5
SC - 3

Nova Scotia 1945
Lib - 28
SC - 2

Nova Scotia 1949
Lib - 27
Pro - 8
SC - 2

Nova Scotia 1953
Lib - 22
Pro - 13
SC - 2

Nova Scotia 1956
Lib - 20
Pro - 18
SC - 5

(The Liberals remained in office in coalition with Social Credit. This Minority government would go on to be a crucial turning point for allowing Social Credit to be perceived as a national party.)


PEI 1931
Lib - 15
Pro - 15

(The two parties agreed to work together under a Liberal administration. The Liberals were successfully able to play the unpopularity of the depression off on the policies demanded by the Progressives)

PEI 1935
Lib - 30

PEI 1939
Lib - 27
Pro - 3

PEI 1943
Lib - 20
Pro - 10

PEI 1947
Lib - 24
Pro - 6

PEI 1951
Lib - 24
Pro - 6

PEI 1955
Lib - 27
Pro - 3


New Brunswick 1925 (accidentally left off earlier)
Lib - 23
Con - 13
Pro - 12

(Conservative lead coalition with the Progressives. Pro-rural)

New Brunswick 1930
Con - 17
Pro - 16
Lib - 15

(Conservative lead coalition with the Progressives, fell apart quickly)

New Brunswick 1932
Lib - 30
Pro - 13
Con - 5

New Brunswick 1937
Lib - 29
Pro - 19

New Brunswick 1942
Lib - 36
Pro - 12

New Brunswick 1947
Lib - 47
Pro - 5

New Brunswick 1952
Lib - 29
Pro - 23

(Despite a higher popular vote, the Progressives lost due to concentration of the vote in the english regions of the province)

New Brunswick 1956
Lib - 26
Pro - 24

(Despite a higher popular vote, the Progressives lost due to concentration of the vote in the english regions of the province. The Progressives would actively seek out a francophone to lead them into the next election. They eventually settled on Louis Robichaud.)


Ontario 1929
Pro - 92
Lib - 11
Con - 9

Ontario 1934
Lib - 69
Pro - 17
Con - 3

Ontario 1937
Lib - 66
Pro - 24

Ontario 1943
Lib - 38
Pro - 36
Con - 16

Ontario 1945
Lib - 66
Pro - 16
Con - 8

Ontario 1948
Lib - 53
Pro - 23
Con - 14

Ontario 1951
Lib - 79
Pro - 8
SC - 2
Con - 1

Ontario 1955
Lib - 84
Pro - 11
SC - 3


Quebec and the Feds are saved for later Wink Premier lists to come out soon. I've decided to make 1957 as a "turning point" year, hence the story will advance to that point shortly (within a day or so) and then I will stop and take a look back at what I've written so far.

As I get into the future, things become more and more open to chance. Hence after 1957 I will open the floor to suggestions, and by the time we get to 2009, I might be running on suggestions alone! I have a few ideas though to get me though to that point that I think are solid; regardless, we'll see where this goes.
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2009, 06:56:45 am »
Ignore

Premiers of Ontario
Ernest Dury (PRO) 1919-1925
Harry Nixon (PRO) 1925-1934
Mitchell Hepburn (Lib) 1934-1942
George Conant (Lib) 1942-1943
George A Drew (Lib) 1943-1948
Mitchell Hepburn (Lib) 1948-1949 (Interim)
Leslie Frost (Lib) 1949-present (1957)

The Hepburn government and federal King government did not get along well. Hepburn, while remaining leader of the party, stepped aside as Premier and allowed Conant to take over. Liberals demanded a leadership election in which George A Drew was elected. Drew, a former Tory, had chosen to run for the Liberals and not the Tories upon entering provincial politics, despite holing a Conservative membership while mayor of Guelph. Drew was defeated in his riding by William Temple from the Progressives, and opted to resign as Premier, and run federally, becoming a key cabinet minister in the government of Louis St. Laurent. Drew was followed by Leslie Frost, a powerful figure in Ontario politics for years to come. Frost was premier when Ontario's highway 401 was constructed, as well as Toronto's Subway.



British Columbia
John Oliver (Lib) 1918-1927
John MacLean (Lib) 1927-1928
Simon Fraser Tolmie (Con) 1928-1930
Duff Pattullo (Lib) 1930-1941
John Hart (Lib) 1941-1947
Byron Johnson (Lib) 1947-1952
W.A.C. Bennett (SC) 1952-present



Alberta
Herbert Greenfield (Pro) 1921-1925
John Edward Brownlee (Pro) 1925-1934
Richard Reid (Pro) 1934-1935
William Aberhart (SC) 1935-1943
Ernest Manning (SC) 1943-present



Saskatchewan
William M. Martin (Lib) 1916-1922
Charles A. Dunning (Lib) 1922-1926
James G. Gardiner (Lib) 1926-1929
James T.M. Anderson (Pro/Con) 1929-1932
James G. Gardiner (Lib) 1932-1935
William John Patterson (Lib) 1935-1944
Tommy Douglas (Pro) 1944-present

The Anderson government was elected with support of the Progressives and Conservatives. Anderson, a former Conservative, was chosen as Premier as he was seen as the one Progressive who Conservatives could get behind. Anderson quickly became very right-wing in government, and some Progressives refused to support the government. Anderson ran as Conservative leader in the 1932 election, and lost all seats, while anti-government Progressives managed to retain just a handful of seats.



Manitoba
Tobias C Norris (Lib) 1920-1922
John Bracken (Pro) 1922-1943
Stuart S. Garson (Pro) 1943-1948
Douglas L. Campbell (Pro) 1948-present



New Brunswick
Walter E Foster (Lib) 1917-1923
Peter J. Veniot (Lib) 1923-1925
John Baxter (Con) 1923-1931
Charles D Richards (Con) 1931-1932
Allison A Dysart (Lib) 1932-1940
John B McNair (Lib) 1940-1952
Hugh John Flemming (Lib) 1952-present




Nova Scotia
George H Murray (Lib) 1896-1923
Ernest H Armstrong (Lib) 1923-1925
Edgar N Rhodes (Con) 1925-1930
Gordon S Harrington (Con) 1930-1933
Angus L Macdonald (Lib) 1933-1940
Alexander S MacMillan (Lib) 1940-1945
Angus L Macdonald (Lib) 1945-1954
Harold Connolly (Lib) 1954
Henry D Hicks (Lib) 1954-1956
Robert Stanfield (Lib) 1956-present

The election of Hicks over Connolly (who was also serving as interim leader at the time) was due to anti-catholic feeling. Hicks was unable to unite the party, and initially refused to sit in coalition with Social Credit. His MLA's revolted against him, and chose to sit with Social Credit with Stanfield as Premier.




Prince Edward Island
John Howatt Bell (Lib) 1919-1925
Albert C Saunders (Lib) 1925-1930
Walter M Lea (Lib) 1930-1936
Thane A Campbell (Lib) 1936-1943
J Walter Jones (Lib) 1943-1953
Walter R Shaw (Lib) 1953-present


Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2009, 06:59:00 am »
Ignore

Newfoundland joined confederation in 1949

Newfoundland 1949
Lib - 22
Pro - 5
Ind - 1

Newfoundland 1952
Lib - 24
Pro - 4

Newfoundland 1956
Lib - 32
Pro - 4


Newfoundland has had only one premier.
Joseph Smallwood (Lib) 1949-present
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
PASOK Leader Hashemite
Hashemite
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 31334
South Africa



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2009, 07:00:22 am »
Ignore

I personally recommend you do a real 'narrative' timeline like most timelines on this board are... Stats are nice, but it's always nicer if there's a narrative that tells us the story, if you catch my drift.
Logged

Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2009, 09:25:21 am »
Ignore

I personally recommend you do a real 'narrative' timeline like most timelines on this board are... Stats are nice, but it's always nicer if there's a narrative that tells us the story, if you catch my drift.
The fun starts in 1957. Pictures, graphics, more tables, a compelling story. Until then, sadly, its quite boring. Two more posts (one to get Quebec out of the way, and another for federal elections) and then the fun starts tonight.
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2009, 09:51:41 am »
Ignore

Quebec 1931
Lib - 79
Pro- 6
Con - 5

Not much going on at this time, except that Liberal dominance continues. But that's all about to change when a break-away faction from the Liberals causes everything to go amiss.


Quebec 1935
Lib - 46
ALN - 26
Con - 10
Pro - 8

A group of left-wing Liberals broke off from the Liberal party. Demanding change, they united with the Conservatives and the Progressives to form the Union Nationale. With the support of not only the ALN and Conservatives but the Progressives as well, they scored an overwhelming victory in the next election.


Quebec 1936
UN - 86
Lib - 4

Within a year of the election, however, over a dozen members had broken off from the UN due to the increasingly right-wing policies of it's leader, Maurice Duplessis. These Progressives were able to take hold of the agenda and marginalize the Liberals.


Quebec 1939
Pro - 42
Lib - 29
UN- 15


The Liberals, eager to return to power, and the Progressives, eager to form their first government, signed a pact and formed a coalition government with Progressive policies, and a Liberal premier.


Quebec 1944
UN - 48
Lib/Pro - 39
Bloc - 4

The anti-war Bloc Populaire was able to win 4 seats this election. The Liberal-Progressive alliance was pushed into the opposition. The alliance fell apart prior to the next election


Quebec 1948
UN - 82
Pro - 8
Lib - 1

Increasing numbers of Liberals joined the provincial Progressive party, while remaining in support of the federal Liberals. The Provincial Progressives for their part were not anxious in the slightest to tie themselves to the federal Progressive movement. The Federal Progressive party had a very difficult time breaking into Quebec, as those who supported Progressive policies, were adverse to the leaders of the Progressive movement who were by in large western Canadians, and protestants.


Quebec 1952
UN - 68
Pro - 22
Lib - 2

The policy of keeping the provincial and federal Progressives separate would prove to be a successful idea.


Quebec 1956
UN - 72
Pro- 20
Lib - 1





The list of Premiers of Quebec is as follows.

Lomer Gouin (Lib) 1905-1920
Louis-Alexandre Taschereau (Lib) 1920-1936
Adelard Godbout (Lib) 1936
Maurice Duplessis (UN) 1936-1939
Adelard Godbout (Lib) 1936-1944
Maurice Duplessis (UN) 1944-present
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2009, 10:49:24 am »
Ignore

I wanted to clarify, just "why" I'm "rushing" to get to 1957. In short, what we think of as right and left were different back in the 20's and 30's. Its only when we get to the 60's that our perception of right and left match the political reality of the time. The story before 1957 would not only be boring, but would be much like real Canadian politics was at the time - about two parties that really were just not all that different.


The 1931 federal election would see quite a few changes. The campaign was bitter and hard fought, but many Canadians just grew tired of the Liberal government and its failures to deal with the depression.

The Progressives were able to make a strong stand, arguing for strong government involvement to cure Canada's problems. Lead by Ernest Dury in Ontario, JS Woodsworth in Manitoba, and HH Stevens in BC the Progressives were finally able to achieve victory.



Unfortunately for the Progressives, the battle had just begun. Without a true single national leader, the Caucus had to chose who would be Prime Minister. Dury was a popular early choice amongst some, but he ruled himself out early on. The race came down to Woodsworth, the radical, and Stevens, the moderate. Caucus was split nearly down the middle, and there was some talk that the leadership issue could divide the party and wreck the government. Dury, however, still commanded a lot of respect from Ontario Progressives, the largest delegation in the new government. Dury lent his support to Woodsworth, and so JS Woodsworth became the first openly Socialist Prime Minister in the history of Canada.

Woodsworth's government was met with immediate resistance. Not only did the courts attempt to outlaw many of his social spending packages, but the Liberal Senate blocked bill after bill. Woodsworth was unwilling to appoint Senators to an "undemocratic institution" such as the Senate, and attempted a stand off with the upper house on a number of issues. With some arm twisting, part of the social reforms package was passed, while other more conterversial measures were scrapped. By mid 1932, Woodsworth found his position untenable, and offered his resignation. While Caucus at first attempted to fight it, Dury himself had grown weary of the infighting, and supported Stevens to become the next Prime Minister.

Stevens' term was met with less skepticism from the Liberals, and his government was generally productive. The Liberals did, however, ensure that the Progressives were not able to "get away" with "too much". The damage from all the infighting, however, had been done, and the Progressives were harmed in the polls. Stevens, like Woodsworth, was loath to appoint Senators. He did, however, appoint Progressives to the senate. In early 1935, realizing an election was around the corner, Stevens quickly packed the remaining senate seats with very young Progressives. The move brought criticism from political circles and even from the Progressive Party itself, however these few Progressive Senators would end up playing an important role in the future of the country.

The elections that followed all had the same storyline. Starting in the 1935 election, a new party appeared on the scene. Social Credit. Fueled by the local party in Alberta, they became the beacon for right-wing interests that the Conservative Party had failed to be. The Conservatives, for their part, made one last stand, taking 9 seats all in Ontario, but gaining a full 1/5th of the nationwide popular vote.

Canada 1935
Lib - 176 - 44%
Pro - 43 - 30%
SC - 17 - 4%
Con - 9 - 20%

The Conservative Party started its final decline after this election. Many local Conservative clubs from across the country joined the new Social Credit movement. While none of them helped elect any new Social Credit members, they did increase it's popular vote sharply.

Canada 1940
Lib - 182 - 51%
Pro - 43 - 30%
SC - 15 - 8%
Con - 5 - 10%


The 1945 election saw the Progressives break into Quebec in the first meaningful way. They were able to score two dozen seats in the province, as well as hold their own outside the province. Social Credit meanwhile was able to pick up a handful of seats from all 4 western provinces, and even a half dozen members from Ontario. The only Conservative to win re-election was Gordon Graydon. He would lose his next attempt to hold his riding federally, and switch to provincial politics. He would die in 1953 as the last Conservative ever elected in Canada.

Canada 1945
Lib - 127 - 41%
Pro - 77 - 28%
SC - 33 - 16%
Con - 1 - 4%
Bloc - 1 - 3%
Ind - 6



Canada 1949
Lib - 192 - 50%
Pro - 46 - 30%
SC - 24 - 13%

The elections of 1949 and 1953 were considered 'standard' by most Canadians. The Liberals were re-elected with yet another majority. The Progressives yet again were by far the second most popular party, but failed to gain many seats. Social Credit yet again won seats, almost exclusively from Western Canada, with a smattering of wins each election from Ontario. Canadians had begun to settle into the idea that this is how federal politics in this country would be.

Canada 1953
Lib - 172 - 50%
Pro - 66 - 31%
SC - 27 - 14%


It was not until 1957 that an event happened that would rock politics and the country. Two men stormed on to the scene that would tear the existing political system apart. The Liberal Party itself, would cease to exist by the year's end.
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Hatman
EarlAW
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20528
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -4.97, S: -6.00


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2009, 10:57:49 am »
Ignore

dun dun dun!
Logged

http://canadianelectionatlas.blogspot.com

Follow me on Twitter @EarlWashburn
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2009, 01:16:50 am »
Ignore

1956 was like most other years in Canadian Politics. Boring. That changed, however, in the summer during the “Pipeline debate”. The Liberal government of Louis St. Laurent (Uncle Louis) decided a pipeline was needed connecting the oil and gas fields of Alberta to central Canada. The government decided on an all-Canadian route, the trade off would be that the American company that built the pipeline would need government loans.  The Progressives, backed up by Social Credit, decided to filibuster the bill. The Progressives wanted the entire pipeline to be built by a crown corporation, while Social Credit wanted western Canadian business interests to own it, not the Americans.

The Opposition knew that June 6th was the deadline for passing the bill. The Liberals, in order to avoid a fight, forced closure (IE a vote to beat a filibuster) to force a vote at every stage. The move was widely unpopular with Canadians, who viewed it as an undemocratic over-reaction to an issue they really did not care about. On June 5th, house speaker Rene Beaudoin allowed the opposition to debate a procedural matter. At the end of the day, he decided the debate would continue the next day, a move that would have effectively filibustered the bill. The government, outraged at the action, pressured Beaudoin into reversing his decision.  The next day, Beaudoin declared that everything after 2:15pm the day before was “an error”, causing the usually passive Progressive leader MJ Coldwell to rush to the speaker’s stand, and begin yelling at the speaker while shaking his fist. Social Credit walked out of the house altogether.

The result of the move was a deep unpopularity with the Liberal government. Beyond this, many within the Liberal party itself were outraged at these moves. Agriculture minister, J.G. Diefenbaker, a former Conservative, and Mike Pearson, External Affairs minister, in particular were outraged. The two men then orchestrated what amounted to a coup d’etat of the government. Throughout January 1957, the two men attempted to recruit caucus and cabinet support to remove St. Laurent from power.  The power struggle came to a head on January 23rd 1957. All 169 Liberal MP’s were in Ottawa. A rare and unexpected thing in the middle of a winter blizzard while Parliament is out of session; They were there to fight for their party. Three meetings occurred simultaneously that lasted through the night. One meeting with St. Laurent and his right-hand man, C.D. Howe; another with Pearson and Diefenbaker, and another with Liberal MP’s who were determined to defuse the situation. Reports are that as much alcohol was consumed throughout the night by all three meetings, as would be consumed for the rest of 1957 combined.

Diefenbaker and Pearson debated many legal challenges while St. Laurent and Howe tried to block them all. A giant chess game took place over the 16 hour meeting, with emissaries from all three meetings meeting with emissaries from the remainder. Many options were debated, including spinning off a new Conservative Party, a takeover of Social Credit, even gathering enough support to ask Coldwell to take government. What became clear as the dawn broke was that St. Laurent was done for. A proposal was sent between meetings to have Howe take over as Prime Minister, but this was rejected. Finally, at a quarter past noon on January 24th, after an exchange of notes, a mass movement from the Diefenbaker-Pearson meeting room to the “Neutral” meeting room took place. After 30 minutes of discussion, over 100 Liberal MP’s from this meeting knocked on the door of the meeting with St. Laurent and Howe, and demanded a leadership election for that spring, one in which neither St. Laurent nor Howe would run. Failure to accept this demand would result in a Vote of Non Confidence in the government, an election, and a likely Progressive government, forcing St. Laurent to resign one way or another. Seeing no other option, St. Laurent and Howe wisely accepted.

The coming leadership election started with a crowded field, but one by one, candidates withdrew to either support Pearson, who wanted to continue with a centrist and moderate government, or Diefenbaker, who wanted to move the party sharply to the right. Diefenbaker was able to gain many former Conservatives as supporters by committing that if elected, he would rename the party the Liberal-Conservatives. Pearson, outraged by the move (something which was discussed and rejected on a few months prior in the January meetings) responded that he and other “True Grits” would never allow the Liberal Party to be hijacked by former Conservatives. The comments only served to polarize the leadership election, and many Pearson supporters threatened  to vote to rename the party the True Grits should a motion allowing the leader to re-name the party pass at the convention. The debate split the party wide open, with Liberal MP’s, and supporters from across the country declaring themselves either “True Grits” or “Liberal-Conservatives”. The split affected even families and was very damaging to many of the more politically involved people in the country. As delegates gathered on April 28 1957 for the leadership convention, there was open talk that should their candidate of choice lose, they would split from the party. The Liberal Executive, in an effort to stop the division ordered that no signs or other supporter paraphernalia would be allowed to be shown at the convention, leading to confusion as to which candidate had the greater support. They also restricted voting on ballot measures to the single name-change rule, something which was supported by nearly all delegates regardless. Most of the convention was focused on the past with many speeches from former King cabinet ministers, who used their time to attack the Progressives.

When the results of the balloting was announced, it left many delegates in shock. Hundreds of them stormed out without a word, including their leader. Newspapers, clamoring for comment only got one, from the campaign manager of the losing candidate, who said that Canadians can expect “A New Political Party” and that the Liberal Party, as it was; the Liberal Party that Canadians had come to know “was dead”. The first act of the new Leader was to change the name of the party as proposed. He ignored those delegates who walked out and his opponent. With a very muted celebration, he declared that he would seek an immediate election, and set the date for June 10th 1957.

So just what were the results of the leadership convention? Well they are right below this post Wink (I wanted to take some time to make a pretty graphic)
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2009, 01:34:34 am »
Ignore



Pearson took most of the Quebec delegation with him when he walked out, as well as a majority of the delegates from Manitoba, and a sizable minority from Ontario
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Hatman
EarlAW
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20528
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -4.97, S: -6.00


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2009, 02:55:42 am »
Ignore

Ahh, the Pearson-Diefenbaker rivalry lives on.
Logged

http://canadianelectionatlas.blogspot.com

Follow me on Twitter @EarlWashburn
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2009, 05:16:46 am »
Ignore

The 1957 election would become the single most bitter campaign in Canadian history. Diefenbaker, and his Liberal-Conservatives, were subject to attacks from all sides. The Progressives, referring to the party only as the Liberals, accused them as being "old and tired in government". Social Credit, using the Liberal-Conservative name, accused the party of being not truly Conservative. While Pearson's "True Grits" would refer to the party as the "Tories". Diefenbaker, never one to back down from a challenge, wore the "Tory" label with pride, but made clear that he and the party are different entities. The three opposition parties largely ignored one another and focused all of their attacks at the government. Some newspapers even had somewhat biased reporting, referring to the party often as "Tories" on the belief that it would harm their electoral chances. Diefenbaker would manage to pull a minority government out of the election, the smallest minority in Canadian history; smaller even than the infamous 1921 minority. The Progressives, while being only a few points behind in popular vote, only managed slightly more than a dozen seats beyond their nearest competitor. Social Credit, meanwhile, was able to use the split in the vote to record their best result ever, while Pearson and his True Grits did not achieve the unanimity he sought, when most old Liberals remained with the party and Diefenbaker, only in Quebec, Manitoba, and Northern Ontario did the True Grits elect members, although they did outpoll the Progressives in Prince Edward Island.

Quote
1957: Liberal-Conservative (John Diefenbaker) 93 vs. Progressive (M.J. Coldwell) 90 vs. Social Credit (Solon Low) 53 vs. True Grit (Lester Pearson) 29.

Needless to say, the government was anything but stable. Pearson, due to his personal problems with Diefenbaker, utterly refused to work with the Liberal-Conservatives. Pearson even proposed a coalition government with the Progressives, an idea that was rejected by Coldwell. Diefenbaker would rule on an issue by issue basis using either Social Credit or the Progressives for support. Diefenbaker appeared magnanimous when he used all 12 senate vacancies to appoint Progressives to the Senate. The Progressive Party had fallen to 5 senators, the minimum needed for party status in the upper chamber. Diefenbaker used this and the idea of the unelected senate as political fuel. An infamous picture of Diefenbaker shaking hands with the Progressive Senators would haunt the Progressive Party, as Diefenbaker would use it to appear 'bigger' than politics. Diefenbaker committed to major senate reform as a policy item.

Of course there were other reasons for making the appointments. Many of the Progressives appointed were from Western Canada, and many were MP's. Diefenbaker used the appointments to weaken the Progressive electoral base by getting rid of some of their more popular members. The appointments also pushed the "True Grits" to third place in the Senate, after 13 Liberal Senators decided not to follow Diefenbaker.

Canadians welcomed the change that Diefenbaker brought to government, and when the Liberal-Conservatives fell on a budget bill Diefenbaker was able to take his message straight to the people, without Pearson, Social Credit, or the Progressives being able to set the agenda. The result was nothing short of spectacular.

Quote
1958: Liberal-Conservative (John Diefenbaker) 208 vs. Progressive (M.J. Coldwell) 48 vs. True Grit (Lester Pearson) 8 vs. Social Credit (Solon Low) 1.

Diefenbaker won the single largest majority government in Canadian history. Taking over 50% of the vote in each and every province, he decimated his opponents. The Progressives were able to hold on with a respectable caucus. Pearson was humiliated, winning only one seat in English Canada (his own) and losing all but 7 of his colleagues in Quebec. Many of his supporters had either chosen to return to the Liberal-Conservative, or to vote Progressive. Social Credit, however, took the hardest blow. The party lost every single seat they held with the exception of one, that of George Nowlan in Nova Scotia. The western-based party was now represented in parliament by an Atlantic Canadian. While some wished for Nowlan to become leader, he refused, saying that he was there to work for the people and to work for the party, not the other way around. Nowlan offered his unconditional support for leader Solon Low. Low, however, would soon resign, and be replaced by BC's Phil Gaglardi as federal Social Credit leader. Nowlan did not even enter the contest, and the convention acclaimed Gaglardi as leader in 1959.

The biggest change, however, was saved for the Liberal-Conservatives. Of the 208 MP's, only 91 were MPs in 1956. Most of the new members were significantly more right-wing than traditional Liberals with at least half holding a membership in the now defunct Conservative Party at some point in the past.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2010, 09:59:12 pm by Teddy (DSoFE) »Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2009, 05:46:38 am »
Ignore

Manitoba would be the first province to go to the polls after the radical shift in politics. The provincial Liberal-Conservative party, lead by Duff Roblin, felt they could use the shift in politics to score a government. The Progressives, meanwhile, were demoralized in government. A "True Grit" party determined to run in the election to spoil the chances of the Liberal-Conservatives. The election provided a minority government
L-C - 26
Pro - 12
TG - 11
SC - 8

Roblin was able to win government and call an election within a year, whereupon he strengthened his gains into a Majority.
L-C - 36
SC - 10
Pro - 6
TG - 5

Social Credit was able to use the division in the centre-left vote to score the official opposition.

The 1959 Newfoundland election was uneventful.
L-C 31
Pro - 3
TG - 2

The 1959 Alberta election was a blow out for Social Credit
SC - 62
L-C - 2
Pro - 1

In Prince Edward Island, the True Grits and Liberal-Conservatives were able to reach a deal; The provincial Liberal-Conservative party would open itself up to more frequent challenges, and the new party constitution greatly limited the power of the party leader. The objective was to allow both parties to, in effect, run as one.
L-C - 22
Pro - 8

In Ontario, an election was also held in 1959.
L-C - 71
Pro - 22
SC - 3
TG - 2


1960 saw elections in Saskatchewan
Pro - 37
L-C - 17

BC
SC - 32
Pro - 16
L-C - 4

Nova Scotia
L-C 26
Pro - 15
SC - 2

In New Brunswick, the Progressives, under leader Louis Robichaud, were able to win their first provincial government.
Pro - 31
L-C - 21

Quebec also saw a seismic change. The Progressives were able to win their first government here, sparking off something that would later become known as the "Quiet Revolution"
Pro - 51
UN - 43
TG - 1


Federally, there was little electoral news to note. Social Credit became immersed in a debate about renewal, with much talk that a new party was needed to replace Social Credit. "New Party" clubs sprang up across the country, and in 1960 they were given a giant boost when Fred Stenson of the New Party won a by-election in Peterborough. The party would later decide that in the next election, candidates would be allowed to (if they wished) use a name for SoCreds in the 1940's in conjunction with the official name, creating the "Social Credit - New Democracy Party", or SC-NDP.


In 1962, a series of provincial elections were held.

In Quebec, the Progressives won a second majority
Pro - 63
UN - 31
L-C - 1

Newfoundland
L-C - 34
Pro - 8

Prince Edward Island
L-C - 25
Pro - 5

Manitoba
L-C - 36
SC - 13
Pro - 8

A federal election also occurred in 1962, but due to changes to the political scene in the interim, this election would play out much different than the last...
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2009, 06:31:16 am »
Ignore

I really dont like how these provincial elections bog everything down. Hence I will do again what I did previously, and just list them, noting what needs to be noted.

For example, that Social Credit uses the term "New Democracy Party" or NDP. This jump is to 1988


Manitoba:
1966
L-C - 31
NDP - 14
Pro - 12

1969
Pro - 28
L-C - 22
NDP - 8

1970
Pro - 31
L-C - 21
NDP - 5

1975
L-C - 33
Pro - 23
NDP - 1

1977
L-C - 33
Pro - 23
NDP - 1

1981
Pro - 34
L-C - 23

1986
Pro - 30
L-C - 26
NDP - 1

Douglas L. Campbell (Pro) 1948-1958
Duff Roblin (L-C) 1958-1967
Sterling Lyon (L-C) 1967-1969
Edward Schreyer (Pro) 1969-1977
Sterling Lyon (L-C) 1977-1981
Howard Pawley (Pro) 1981-1988
Gary Filmon (L-C) 1988-present





New Brunswick:
1963
Pro - 32
L-C - 20

1967
Pro - 32
L-C - 26

1970
L-C - 32
Pro - 26

1974
L-C - 33
Pro - 25

1978
L-C - 30
Pro - 28

1982
L-C - 39
Pro - 18
NDP - 1

1987
Pro - 58

Hugh Flemming (L-C) 1952-1960
Louis Robichaud (Pro) 1960-1970
Richard Hatfield (L-C) 1970-1987
Frank McKenna (Pro) 1987-present




Prince Edward Island:
1966
L-C - 30
Pro - 2

1970
L-C - 27
Pro - 5

1974
L-C - 26
Pro - 6

1978
L-C - 20
Pro - 12

1982
L-C - 30
Pro - 2

1986
L-C - 21
Pro- 11

Alex Matheson (L-C) 1953-1959
Walter R Shaw (L-C) 1959-1966
Alex B Campbell (L-C) 1966-1978
Angus MacLean (L-C) 1978-1981
James Lee (L-C) 1981-1986
Joe Ghiz (L-C) 1986-present




Newfoundland:
1966
L-C - 39
Pro - 3

1971
Pro - 21
L-C - 20
Lab - 1

Joey Smallwood would try to hold on to government with the support of the Labrador party. He failed.

1972
Pro - 33
L-C - 9

This would be the first Progressive government in Newfoundland

1975
Pro - 30
L-C - 16
Lib - 5

Smallwood attempted a comeback as "Liberal" party leader. He failed again.

1979
Pro - 33
L-C - 19

1982
Pro - 44
L-C - 8

1985
Pro - 36
L-C - 15
NDP - 1


Joey Smallwood (L-C) 1949-1972
Frank D Moores (Pro) 1972-1979
Edward Roberts (Pro) 1979-present






Nova Scotia:

1963
L-C - 41
Pro - 3

1967
L-C - 40
Pro - 5
NDP - 1

1970
Pro - 21
L-C - 20
NDP - 5

The Progressives win their first minority in the province.

1973
Pro - 20
L-C - 18
NDP - 8

1975
Pro - 22
L-C - 21
NDP - 3

1978
L-C 31
Pro - 17
NDP - 4

1981
L-C - 37
Pro - 13
NDP - 2

1984
L-C - 42
Pro - 7
NDP - 3

1988
L-C - 28
Pro - 21
NDP - 3

Robert Stanfield (L-C) 1956-1967
George Smith (L-C) 1967-1970
Gerald A Regan (Pro) 1970-1978
John Buchanan (L-C) 1978-present



Saskatchewan:
1964
L-C - 32
Pro - 25
NDP - 1

1967
L-C - 35
Pro - 24

1971
Pro - 54
L-C - 15

1975
Pro - 39
L-C - 15
NDP - 7

1978
Pro - 44
NDP - 17

1982
NDP - 55
Pro - 8

1986
NDP - 38
Pro - 25
L-C - 1

Tommy Douglas (Pro) 1944-1961
Woodrow Lloyd (Pro) 1961-1964
W. Ross Thatcher (L-C) 1964-1971
Allen Blakeney (Pro) 1971-1982
Grant Devine (NDP) 1982-present






Alberta
1963
NDP - 60
Pro - 2
L-C - 1

1967
NDP - 55
L-C - 7
Pro - 3

1971
NDP - 38
L-C - 37 (Lead by Harry Strom)
Pro - 1

1975
NDP - 69
L-C - 4
Pro - 1

1979
NDP - 74
Pro - 4
L-C - 1

1982
NDP - 75
Pro - 2
L-C - 2

1986
NDP - 61
L-C - 16
Pro - 6

Ernest Manning (NDP) 1943-1968
Peter Lougheed (NDP) 1968-1985
Don Gerry (NDP) 1985-present




British Columbia
1963
NDP - 33
Pro - 14
L-C - 5

1966
NDP - 33
Pro - 16
L-C - 6

1969
NDP - 38
Pro - 12
L-C - 5

1972
Pro - 38
NDP - 10
L-C - 7

First Progressive Government in the province

1975
NDP - 35
Pro - 18
L-C - 2

1979
NDP - 31
Pro - 26

1983
NDP - 35
Pro - 22

1986
NDP - 47
Pro - 22

W.A.C. Bennett (NDP) 1952-1972
Dave Barrett (Pro) 1972-1975
Bill Bennett (NDP) 1975-1986
Bill Vander Zalm (NDP) 1986-present





Ontario:
1963
L-C - 77
Pro - 24
NDP - 7

1967
L-C - 69
Pro - 28
NDP - 20

1971
L-C - 78
Pro - 20
NDP - 19

1975
L-C - 64
NDP - 31
Pro - 30

1980
L-C - 70
Pro - 34
NDP - 21

1985
Pro - 52
L-C - 48
NDP - 25

1987
Pro - 95
NDP - 19
L-C - 16

Leslie Frost (L-C) 1949-1961
John Robarts (L-C) 1961-1971
Bill Davis (L-C) 1971-1985
Larry Grossman (L-C) 1985
Bob Rae (Pro) 1985-present






Quebec:
1966
UN - 56
Pro - 50
L-C - 2

1970
to come...


Maurice Duplessis (UN) 1944-1959
Paul Sauve (UN) 1959-1960
Antonio Barrette (UN) 1960
Jean Lesage (Pro) 1960-1966
Daniel Johnson Sr. (UN) 1966-1968
Jean-Jaques Bertrand (UN) 1960-1970
to come...


« Last Edit: September 06, 2009, 07:15:53 am by nickjbor »Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2009, 07:18:16 am »
Ignore

So in review...
We have a Progressive party of Canada, or PC. They are the left-wing party, left of the Liberals. The NDP meanwhile is radically right-wing.

Go figure Cheesy
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Hatman
EarlAW
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20528
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -4.97, S: -6.00


View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: September 06, 2009, 09:54:34 am »
Ignore

lol. I love how you copied actual history withj the NDP winning in Peterborough first. All I can do is lol at seeing NDP next to Grant Devine or Ernest Manning.
Logged

http://canadianelectionatlas.blogspot.com

Follow me on Twitter @EarlWashburn
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: September 06, 2009, 10:26:58 am »
Ignore

lol. I love how you copied actual history withj the NDP winning in Peterborough first. All I can do is lol at seeing NDP next to Grant Devine or Ernest Manning.
More than you think is 'made up as I go'. I really dont know who will turn out to be the Prime Minister in 2009. Social Credit, the name itself, would get old very fast indeed without people truly proposing Social Credit theory, and arguably if the party were bigger, it would have eventually changed its name. The "New Party" movement seemed quite apt to apply here. It was only really due to the fact that they had run as "New Democracy" in 1940 that I could use "NDP", which of course I did with great delight Cheesy
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: September 08, 2009, 04:28:10 am »
Ignore

TO COME...

Events during the Diefenbaker Government
A Split in Social Credit? Perhaps not?
Liberal-Conservative Leadership Convention 1967
Progressive Party Leadership Convention 1968
The October Crisis in Quebec (1970) and the results
NDP Leadership election of 1976
1976 Liberal-Conservative Leadership
1979 Progressive Leadership
1982 Liberal-Conservative Leadership
1988 NDP Leadership Convention
Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Teddy (IDS Legislator)
nickjbor
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8345
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -1.42, S: -1.91

View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2009, 02:59:59 am »
Ignore

I've decided to bring most provinces up to 2009.




Manitoba

1988
L-C - 25
Ref - 20
Pro - 12

The Reform Party - The NDP under a new name - finished second. Leader Felix Holtmann became embroiled in controversy, during this time the Liberal Conservative government was split between moderates lead by party leader Gary Filmon, and more conservative elements lead by Vic Toews. Toews and a number of conservatives left the party to join Reform, whereupon Toews was elected leader replacing the ousted Holtmann. Filmon, rather than face a larger Reform opposition caucus in the legislature, called for immediate elections. Due to the party's fracture, the Liberal-Conservatives would drop to last place.

1990
Ref - 30
Pro - 20
L-C - 7

1995
Ref - 31
Pro - 23
L-C - 3

1999
Pro - 31
Ref - 24
L-C - 1

2003
Pro - 35
Ref - 20
L-C - 2

2008
Pro - 36
Ref - 19
L-C - 2

Premiers
Gary Filmon (L-C) 1988-1990
Vic Toews (Ref) 1990-1999
Gary Doer (Pro) 1999-present





New Brunswick
1991
Pro - 46
Ref - 8
L-C - 4

1995
Pro - 48
Ref - 6
L-C - 1

1999
Ref - 44
Pro - 10
L-C - 1

2003
Ref - 28
Pro - 26
L-C - 1

2006
Pro - 29
Ref - 26

Frank McKenna (Pro) 1987-1997
Ray Frenette (Pro) 1997-1998
Camille Thériault (Pro) 1998-1999
Bernard Lord (Ref) 1999-2005
Jeannot Volpe (Ref) 2005-2006
Shawn Graham (Pro) 2006-present





Prince Edward Island
1989
L-C - 30
Pro - 2

1993
L-C - 30
Pro - 1

After this election, the Liberal Conservatives became arrogant in power. Facing a growing deficit situation, the government made many very unpopular cuts. Expecting there was no way they could lose an election, they rejected public opinion polls and used heavy scare tactics against the Progressives. This failed and in 1996, the Progressives won a majority government, their first in the province, ending 77 years of unbroken Liberal-Conservative rule.

1996
Pro - 19
L-C - 9

2000
Pro - 26
L-C - 1

2003
Pro - 23
L-C - 4

2007
Pro - 23
L-C - 4


Joe Ghiz (L-C) 1986-1995
Pat Binns (L-C) 1995-1996
Herb Dickinson (Pro) 1996-present





Newfoundland
1989
L-C - 31
Pro - 21

1993
L-C - 35
Pro - 16
Ref - 1

1996
L-C - 37
Pro - 9
Ref - 1

1999
L-C - 32
Pro - 14
Ref - 2

2003
Pro - 34
L-C - 12
Ref - 2

2007
Pro - 43
L-C - 3
Ref - 1


Edward Roberts (Pro) 1979-1989
Tom Rideout (L-C) 1989-1995
Loyola Sullivan (L-C) 1995-2003
Jack Harris (Pro) 2003-present





Nova Scotia
1993
Pro - 40
L-C - 9
Ref - 3

1988
Pro - 30
L-C - 14
Ref - 8

1999
Pro - 30
L-C - 11
Ref - 11

2003
Pro - 27
L-C - 15
Ref - 10

2006
Pro - 27
L-C - 20
Ref - 5

2009
Pro - 31
L-C - 11
Ref - 10



John Buchanan (L-C) 1978-1990
Roger Bacon (L-C) 1990-1991
Donald W Cameron (L-C) 1991-1993
Alexa McDonough (Pro) 1993-2003
Darrel Dexter (Pro) 2003-present






Saskatchewan

1991
Pro - 55
Ref - 10
L-C - 1

1995
Pro - 42
Ref - 11
L-C - 5

1999
Pro - 29
Ref - 25
L-C - 4

3 of the 4 L-C members joined the Progressives

2003
Pro - 30
Ref - 28

2007
Ref - 36
Pro - 22


Grant Devine (Ref) 1982-1991
Roy Romanow (Pro) 1991-2001
Lorne Calvert (Pro) 2001-2007
Brad Wall (Ref) 2007-present






Alberta
1989
Ref - 59
L-C - 16
Pro - 8

1993
L-C - 51
Ref - 32

1997
Ref - 43
L-C - 38
Pro - 2

2001
Ref - 64
L-C - 17
Pro - 2

2004
Ref - 62
L-C - 16
Pro - 5

2008
Ref - 72
L-C - 9
Pro - 2


Don Getty (Ref) 1985-1992
Ralph Klien (Ref) 1992-1993
Laurence Decore (L-C) 1993-1997
Preston Manning (Ref) 1997-present







British Columbia
1991
Pro - 51
Ref - 17
L-C - 7

1996
Pro - 39
Ref - 33
L-C - 2

2001
Ref - 77
Pro - 2

2005
Ref - 46
Pro - 33

2009
Ref - 49
Pro - 36


Bill Vander Zalm (Ref) 1986-1991
Rita Johnston (Ref) 1991
Mike Harcourt (Pro) 1991-1996
Glen Clark (Pro) 1996-1999
Art Miller (Pro) 1999-2000
Ujjal Dosanjh (Pro) 2000-2001
Gordon Campbell (Ref) 2001-present










Ontario
1990
Pro - 74
L-C - 36
Ref - 20

1995
to come...

Bob Rae (Pro) 1985-present







Yukon
1978
L-C - 11
Ref - 2
Pro - 1
Ind - 2

1982
L-C - 11
Pro - 6

1985
Pro - 8
L-C - 6
Ref - 2

1989
Pro - 9
L-C - 7

1992
L-C - 7
Pro - 6
Ref - 1
Ind - 3

1996
Pro - 11
L-C - 3
Ref - 3

2000
Ref - 10
Pro - 6
L-C - 1

2002
L-C - 12
Pro - 5
Ref - 1

2006
L-C - 10
Ref - 5
Pro - 3


Chris Pearson (L-C) 1978-1985
Willard Phelps (L-C) 1985
Tony Penikett (Pro) 1985-1992
John Ostashek (L-C) 1992-1996
Piers McDonald (Pro) 1996-2000
Pat Duncan (Ref) 2000-2002
Dennis Fentie (L-C) 2002-present
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 03:24:37 am by nickjbor »Logged

TEDDY - ARKANSAS - IDS - Liberal Whip



Note to self: use brain more.
Hatman
EarlAW
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 20528
Canada


Political Matrix
E: -4.97, S: -6.00


View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2009, 06:26:58 pm »
Ignore

I've decided to bring most provinces up to 2009.

Vic Toews (Ref) 1990-1999

...


Herb Dickinson (Pro) 1996-present


lol


Quote
Jack Harris (Pro) 2003-present

Nice! What's Danny Williams doing in this timeline?


Quote
Alexa McDonough (Pro) 1993-2003

Woot!

Quote
Preston Manning (Ref) 1997-present

Hahaha. I guess he just loves that word refooooooorm too much.



Quote
Bill Vander Zalm (Ref) 1986-1991
Rita Johnston (Ref) 1991
Mike Harcourt (Pro) 1991-1996
Glen Clark (Pro) 1996-1999
Art Miller (Pro) 1999-2000
Ujjal Dosanjh (Pro) 2000-2001
Gordon Campbell (Ref) 2001-present

Some things never change








Quote
Ontario
1990
Pro - 74
L-C - 36
Ref - 20

1995
to come...

Bob Rae (Pro) 1985-present


NO! This is the best part!



Logged

http://canadianelectionatlas.blogspot.com

Follow me on Twitter @EarlWashburn
Pages: [1] 2 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Logout

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines