Opinion of Harry Truman

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k-onmmunist:
Actually, I remember hearing that Japan was trying to get negotiations when they dropped the bomb.

Senator Libertas:
Quote from: JSojourner on December 22, 2009, 06:16:04 pm

Quote from: Northeast Representative ZombieLibertas on December 22, 2009, 06:02:15 pm

Quote from: JSojourner on December 22, 2009, 06:01:02 pm

Again, there were three choices.  Maybe four.

1.  Use the bomb.
2.  Invade with massive US forces and probably another half million non-US allied soldiers as follow-on forces.  Casualties for all belligerents and civillians would like be between one and two million.  About two thirds of those would be Japanese civillians.
3.  Blockade the islands and starve the Japanese into submission.  They would die by the millions and American citizens at home would demand an end to both the starvation and the deployment of forces.
4.  Declare victory and leave the theater, allowing Japan to rearm.  And reinforce its armies in China.  This would leave the British, Australians and Chinese holding the bag.  And it would be an open invitation to the Soviet Union to do what the U.S. could or would not do -- finish it.  A Soviet-occupied Japan would certainly have been interesting.

So which alternative do you prefer?  I sincerely respect your rejection of false choices.  I detest false choices.  But I can't think of any other realistic option, giving the nature of Japanese militarism at the time.




5. Accept Japanese surrender


I said realistic.  Japan was never going to surrender. 


Uh yeah, they openly tried to surrender. Their only condition was that they be allowed to keep their emperor. And it was the emperor himself who was most sympathetic to surrendering.

But the arrogant asshole who led the U.S., i.e. Harry Truman, refused anything less than totally unconditional surrender.

Bleeding heart conservative, HTMLdon:
Quote from: Radical-Socialist on December 22, 2009, 06:17:22 pm

Actually, I remember hearing that Japan was trying to get negotiations when they dropped the bomb.


Japanese response to the Potsdam Conference resolution:

"I consider the Joint Proclamation a rehash of the Declaration at the Cairo Conference. As for the Government, it does not attach any important value to it at all. The only thing to do is just kill it with silence (mokusatsu). We will do nothing but press on to the bitter end to bring about a successful completion of the war." - Prime Minister Suzuki, courtesy of Wikipedia. 

This was the statement from the government on July 27, the bomb was dropped on August 6 and the Japanese government's position had not changed in the intervening period.

Even after the bomb was dropped, the Cabinet met on August 9 and still a majority of cabinet members would not recommend a surrender.

Senator Libertas:
Quote from: Bleeding heart conservative, HTMLdon on December 22, 2009, 06:32:05 pm

Quote from: Radical-Socialist on December 22, 2009, 06:17:22 pm

Actually, I remember hearing that Japan was trying to get negotiations when they dropped the bomb.


Japanese response to the Potsdam Conference resolution:

"I consider the Joint Proclamation a rehash of the Declaration at the Cairo Conference. As for the Government, it does not attach any important value to it at all. The only thing to do is just kill it with silence (mokusatsu). We will do nothing but press on to the bitter end to bring about a successful completion of the war." - Prime Minister Suzuki, courtesy of Wikipedia.  

This was the statement from the government on July 27, the bomb was dropped on August 6 and the Japanese government's position had not changed in the intervening period.

Even after the bomb was dropped, the Cabinet met on August 9 and still a majority of cabinet members would not recommend a surrender.


Potsdam was after the Japanese had offered their surrender.

k-onmmunist:
Quote from: Northeast Representative ZombieLibertas on December 22, 2009, 06:33:23 pm

Quote from: Bleeding heart conservative, HTMLdon on December 22, 2009, 06:32:05 pm

Quote from: Radical-Socialist on December 22, 2009, 06:17:22 pm

Actually, I remember hearing that Japan was trying to get negotiations when they dropped the bomb.


Japanese response to the Potsdam Conference resolution:

"I consider the Joint Proclamation a rehash of the Declaration at the Cairo Conference. As for the Government, it does not attach any important value to it at all. The only thing to do is just kill it with silence (mokusatsu). We will do nothing but press on to the bitter end to bring about a successful completion of the war." - Prime Minister Suzuki, courtesy of Wikipedia.  

This was the statement from the government on July 27, the bomb was dropped on August 6 and the Japanese government's position had not changed in the intervening period.

Even after the bomb was dropped, the Cabinet met on August 9 and still a majority of cabinet members would not recommend a surrender.


Potsdam was after the Japanese had offered their surrender.


Also,

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/aug/06/secondworldwar.warcrimes

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