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« Reply #25 on: February 20, 2010, 10:40:40 pm »
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That's not to say that an urbanite could not serve capably as Secretary of Agriculture.  John Lindsay was a very talented individual who could have been effective in this capacity, after having immersed himself in agricultural issues, but it would be highly unusual, and may cause animosity and resentment within the agricultural community.

But I agree Lindsay is much better for Transportation, as you have made the change.

Also, do you not think that Rockefeller would have included at least one or possibly two Democrats in cabinet?  Rockefeller's public life did go back to working himself in the FDR administration as Assistant Secretary of State, not a cabinet level position, but in the administration.

Your cabinet as named is very good, especially with the change, the above is simply a discussion point.

Inspired choice George Romney at Treasury.  Smiley
« Last Edit: February 20, 2010, 10:50:44 pm by President Thomas E. Dewey »Logged




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« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2010, 12:42:58 am »
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Go Rocky!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2010, 12:54:04 pm »
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That's not to say that an urbanite could not serve capably as Secretary of Agriculture.  John Lindsay was a very talented individual who could have been effective in this capacity, after having immersed himself in agricultural issues, but it would be highly unusual, and may cause animosity and resentment within the agricultural community.

But I agree Lindsay is much better for Transportation, as you have made the change.

Also, do you not think that Rockefeller would have included at least one or possibly two Democrats in cabinet?  Rockefeller's public life did go back to working himself in the FDR administration as Assistant Secretary of State, not a cabinet level position, but in the administration.

Your cabinet as named is very good, especially with the change, the above is simply a discussion point.

Inspired choice George Romney at Treasury.  Smiley

Thanks! Smiley Well I think that Rocky choosing several Democrats in his cabinet is not out of the realm of possibility. However, I found enough Republicans that Rocky probably would have wanted in his administration that I didn't need to add a Democrat, AND I figure that he probably would have been criticized enough already by the conservative wing for choosing some of the more liberal Republicans in his cabinet (like Lindsay and Volpe), and that criticism would have been amplified had he chosen a Democrat. Not to mention that Rocky was already perceived by many as a liberal. I figured that he wanted to unify his party at least a little bit.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2010, 12:59:54 pm by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2010, 04:50:22 pm »
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Any more thoughts, comments, or suggestions? I'd love to hear them. Smiley
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« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2010, 12:13:35 am »

Keep it up.
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« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2010, 08:31:55 pm »
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The 1972 Congressional Elections

President Rockefeller managed to make inroads in the House of Representatives, winning 15 house seats. However, the Republicans lost a net of two seats in the Senate, while the Democrats made a net gain of two. In North Carolina, Democrat Jesse Helms managed to defeat both incumbent Senator B. Everett Jordan and Nick Galifianakis in the Democratic primary, and he would win a convincing victory in the general election. Also, Delaware incumbent Republican J. Caleb Boggs closely defeated Democrat Joe Biden in his bid for re-election. Secretary of Commerce John Chafee resigned his cabinet position to run for the Senate. While President Rockefeller was sad to see him go, he endorsed Chafee in his senate run and even campaigned for him a little. Chafee would be replaced by New York Senator and Rockfeller Republican Jacob Javits, who was easily confirmed by the Senate.

Republican Gains:
Rhode Island: John Chafee
New Mexico: Pete Dominicini
Virginia: William L. Scott

Democratic Gains:
Texas: John Connally
Kentucky: Walter D. Huddleston
South Dakota: James Abourezk
Iowa: Dick Clark

House: 237 D (-15), 198 R (+15)
Senate: 55 D (+1), 44 R (-1), 1 I


« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 02:21:28 pm by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2010, 04:18:01 pm »
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The Second Term of Nelson Rockefeller



While President Rockefeller was reinaugurated in a national feeling of optimism, that feeling would soon fade away, as it was clear that economic troubles were afflicting the nation, and that these economic problems would most likely increase. To deal with the increasing inflation problem, President Rockefeller and the Democratic Congress brandished a new economic plan, entitled WIN, or “Whip Inflation Now.” In addition to circulating WIN pins to encourage personal fiscal responsibility, President Rockefeller signed off on a bill that cut domestic spending, raised taxes on the rich to levels not seen since the Eisenhower years, and restarted price and wage controls. However, inflation would not desist, and unemployment continued to rise. The wage and price controls began to ruin productivity in the economy, and stagflation only increased. President Rockefeller would have liked more spending to have been cut, but infighting in Congress led to a cut of only small portion of domestic spending.


The signing of the Paris Peace Accords


Secretary Nixon greeting former POW John McCain

The United States, North Vietnam, South Vietnam, and the Provisional Revolutionary Government signed off on the Paris Peace Accords in 1973. They agreed to a cease-fire, and North and South Vietnamese forces were allowed to hold their places. Additionally, US troops would withdraw, and US POWs would be returned to home. Saigon and the Viet Cong were to negotiate, and reunification of Vietnam was to be “carried out step by step through peaceful means.” If North Vietnam was to break the treaty, the United States would respond with military force. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and Lê Ðức Thọ would be rewarded Nobel Peace Prizes, even though Thọ refused to accept it.



After an Arab coalition led by Soviet allies Egypt and Syria attacked Israel in October 1973, Rockefeller initiated an airlift of weapons to help out the Israelis. By the time the United States and the USSR agreed to a truce, Israel had made inroads in the homelands of the enemy. However, OPEC raised oil prices as a result of US support of Israel in the Yom Kippur War. OPEC also placed an embargo against the United States and the Netherlands (the Netherlands assisted Israel as well).



As a result of the bad economy and US support for Israel, gas prices reached an all time high. To ameliorate the high gas prices and gas lines, President Rockefeller signed off on a bill that lowered the maximum U.S. speed limit to 55 mph on January 2, 1974. Although Rockefeller had already signed off on a bill to cut spending, he also signed the Alternative Energy Act, which granted more funding to the EPA, raised taxes on oil companies and polluters, and gave economic incentives to companies so that they could invest and discover alternate energy sources.

Additionally, the stock market crashed from January 1973 to December 1974, as a result of the collapse of the Bretton-Woods System (President Rockefeller had taken the United States off the gold standard in 1971). After the United States went off the gold standard, foreign countries increased their currency reserves, which made the United States dollar and other currencies deflate.

On February 6, 1974, Rockefeller introduced the Comprehensive Health Insurance Act, or CHIP, which mandated employers to provide health insurance for their employees and provided a federal health plan that any American could join (as a sweetener to Democrats, the federal health plan was completely free to the very poor). While CHIP raised the ire of boll weevil Democrats and conservative Republicans, congress signed CHIP on tight margins, and President Rockefeller authorized it.


A stressed out and tired President Rockefeller at a cabinet meeting

When all was said and done, the economic problems brought the President’s approval ratings down to a measly 37% by November 1974, right before the midterm elections, possibly one of the worst times to be an unpopular president.
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« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2010, 05:20:16 pm »
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Intersting...
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« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2010, 11:15:32 am »
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Intersting...

Thanks! Smiley

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« Reply #34 on: February 27, 2010, 09:20:30 am »
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Ouch...Im hoping Rocky's old heart can take the mountain of stress of the deplorable economic situation and unstable Foriegn Policy Realm. His workload alone could have aged him considerably, and it might not take an Sexual Encounter to do the trick ITTL. Either way, if he manages to survive, Teddy should be a lock in for '76...Keep it comming
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« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2010, 10:49:38 pm »
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Any more comments, suggestions, or thoughts?
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« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2010, 10:53:38 pm »
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I admire Rocky for helping out Israel during the Yom Kippur War, even if it caused the U.S. to go into a recession as a consequence. I think that the Democrats will win in 1976--hopefully somone like Scoop Jackson, Hugh Carey, or Mo Udall wins the Democratic nomination. I'm assuming Chapaquiddick never occurs in this TL, but I still don't want to see another Kennedy in the White House. That family is way overrated.
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« Reply #37 on: March 04, 2010, 08:48:54 pm »
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Very interesting.  Wonder what Rocky will do if Vietnam and Cambodia collapse?  I always thought he would be much more aggressive.
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« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2010, 08:22:13 pm »
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Thanks for all of the comments and suggestions guys! Here's the next update

The 1974 Congressional Midterm Elections

The 1974 Congressional Midterm Elections
The bad economy had made President Rockefeller an unpopular president. Ergo, the Democrats made significant gains in Congress. Due to a campaign by President Rockefeller, who was still relatively popular among the New York populace, Senator Louis Lefkowitz, who New York governor Malcolm Wilson had appointed to fill the seat of Secretary of Commerce Jacob Javits, was able to win election in his own right. Several of the Senate elections would be close. Some close Senate elections would include Nevada, where Harry Reid would defeat Governor Paul Laxalt; Florida, where Jack Eckerd managed to defeat Richard Stone, and Kansas, where William Roy would defeat Bob Dole. In the House Elections, the Democrats would pick up 46 seats, leaving them 6 seats short of a veto proof majority.  

Democratic Pickups:
Gary Hart (D-CO)
Patrick Leahy (D-VT)
Wendell Ford (D-KY)
William Roy (D-KS)
John Glenn (D-OH)

Republican Pickups:
None

House: 283 D (-46), 198 R (+46)
Senate: 60 D (+5), 39 R (-5), 1 I

« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 02:21:50 pm by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #39 on: March 05, 2010, 09:26:55 pm »
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President Rockefeller was determined to rehabilitate his image over the next two years of his second term. The first domestic problem afflicting the nation was the Swine Flu Crisis. After the Influenza strain H1N1, which used to only harm pigs, began to affect humans, public health officials urged the President to demand mandatory vaccinations against Swine Flu. The President agreed, but due to public relations problems and delays, only 25% of the population was vaccinated. Many Americans were angered that more people died from the vaccines than did from the disease itself.

President Rockefeller happily signed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, which required all public schools to accept federal funds for special education. He would also sign the Fairness in Education Act, which took funds deemed unnecessary by the Department of Education from rich public schools and gave them to poor public schools. Education activist Jonathan Kozol would proclaim that “The Fairness in Education Act has given poor children what they deserve the most: a path to success.” Also, at the request of New York City Mayor Abe Beame, Rockefeller would give New York City a Federal bailout, since they were facing bankruptcy.

Although the United States, North Vietnam, and South Vietnam had agreed to the Paris Peace Accords, North Vietnam resumed their attack on South Vietnam. Rockefeller wanted to supply the South with weapons and military aid, but the Democratic Congress refused to allow him to do so. President Rockefeller then implemented Operation Frequent Wind, which evacuated 1,373 US citizens and 5,595 Vietnamese and third country nationals from Saigon. Many of those Vietnamese refugees would become American citizens. The Reagan Republicans disliked Rockefeller’s Vietnam policy, and Ronald Reagan would proclaim “what happened to South Vietnam represents the ultimate betrayal of a military ally, the ultimate betrayal of the South Vietnamese citizens who wish to preserve their freedom against the evils of Communism, and the ultimate betrayal of everything we stand for.” The anti-war left would criticize Governor Reagan for his remarks, since they were glad that the long war in Vietnam was over. However, Republicans were beginning to consider Ronald Reagan as a potential presidential candidate if Vice President John Tower did not run in 1976.



To help reduce Cold War Tensions, President Rockefeller would also enter the Helsinki Accords with the Soviet Union, continuing the policy of détente that Secretary Nixon and Secretary Kissinger had crafted. Also, he would again visit China and the Soviet Union.

Things were beginning to look up for President Rockefeller: his popularity was beginning to climb; the economy showed signs of recovery; and the War in Vietnam was over. While he was originally worried about how the rest of his term would play out, he once again felt optimistic about the rest of his term. Unfortunately, President Rockefeller never got to see the rest of his term, because on September 22, 1975, a woman named Sara Jane Moore shot President Rockefeller as he left a San Francisco hotel. Although doctors tried to operate on the President, he had lost too much blood, and President Rockefeller was dead. On trial, Moore would proclaim: “I am glad I succeeded, and allowed the winds of change to start. I did it to create chaos." President John Tower was quickly sworn in as President of the United States.


Sara Jane Moore


Nelson Rockefeller (July 8, 1908-September 22, 1975)

The assassination of Nelson Rockefeller was considered the greatest tragedy of the decade. The country was in great mourning and grief not seen since President John F. Kennedy’s assassination twelve years earlier. President Rockefeller’s untimely death cemented his reputation as a Progressive Hero. Years later historians would see him as one of the greatest Presidents of the United States.  


John Tower (R-TX): The 38th President of the United States
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 10:50:26 am by hantheguitarman »Logged
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« Reply #40 on: March 05, 2010, 09:31:38 pm »
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Very interesting.  Wonder what Rocky will do if Vietnam and Cambodia collapse?  I always thought he would be much more aggressive.

Thanks! Well I figured that Rocky would probably listen to Henry Kissinger's advice just as much as Ford and Nixon did, since they were friends OTL. So unfortunately, Vietnam and Cambodia meet the same fate as they did OTL (I wish they hadn't, I'm Vietnamese).
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« Reply #41 on: March 06, 2010, 09:15:33 am »
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Hmmm...I guess Rocky's old heart could have taken a slug like Ford did...The 1976 Race should be very interesting, since we know how big of a patriot Ronnie was I doubt that hell run against the Incumbent President under these circumstances, especially a fellow Conservative. If the economy has recovered enough for Tower to seem viable, I think he could win in a narrow squeeker(especially if he sweeps the South). As for the Democrats Teddy might decide to wait or IDk maybe Scoop?
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« Reply #42 on: March 06, 2010, 08:34:31 pm »
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I realized that I never mentioned Nelson Rockefeller’s Supreme Court Appointments. Without any ado, here they are.

Nelson Rockefeller Judicial Appointments:


Raymond P. Shafer
Began service on June 23, 1969


William J. Brennan Jr. (Chief Justice)
Already in the Supreme Court—Began service as Chief Justice on June 23, 1969


Wilfred Feinberg
Began service on May 14, 1970


Lewis F. Powell Jr.
Began service on December 9, 1971


John Paul Stevens
Began service on December 15, 1971

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« Reply #43 on: March 06, 2010, 08:43:43 pm »
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The Presidency of John Tower



President Tower came into office at a time of national mourning. As a result, Tower had approval ratings as high as 89%. To hold the country together, he requested that President Rockefeller’s cabinet stay with him for the rest of what was supposed to be President Rockefeller’s term. The next important thing that President Tower had to do was appoint a Vice President, since the Twenty-Fifth Amendment allowed him to do so—at the Senate’s confirmation. President Tower decided to appoint House Minority Leader Gerald Ford, whom the Democratic Senate found palatable and easily confirmed on December 13, 1975. Gerald Ford would be the first Vice President not elected.



Additionally, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court William Douglas announced his resignation. In a different move than his predecessor would have made, President Tower appointed William Rehnquist, an unabashed conservative, to the Supreme Court. Rehnquist was confirmed by the Senate by a tight vote. Rehnquist’s appointment would solidify President Tower’s popularity in the South. Associate Justice Rehnquist would begin service on December 17, 1975.



President Tower announced that he and Vice President Gerald Ford would be candidates for re-election. Although Ronald Reagan was planning to run for President in 1976, he changed his mind after President Rockefeller’s untimely assassination, and Governor Reagan endorsed the Tower/Ford ticket. Governor Reagan would, however, decide to run for the Senate in California. With no major opposition, John Tower and Gerald Ford easily won the Republican Nomination.

All in all, Tower was not afraid of the 1976 Presidential Election. The Vietnam War was over, the economy was recovering, he was fairly certain to win sympathy votes, and Tower’s approval ratings were relatively high (but had declined from the almost universal 89%). But Tower losing was not out of the realm of possibility, and whom the Democrats nominated, and how he or she campaigned, still needed to be determined.
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« Reply #44 on: March 07, 2010, 07:03:32 am »
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Awesome.

You never posted a map of the '68 Senate elections, so based on the '70 numbers (the Republicans gained 2 seats for a 55-45 majority for Democrats; therefore, they'd had a 57-43 majority before '70) and the '74 map, I've come to the conclusion that the '68 races were all exactly the same with two exceptions:

Idaho: George Hansen (R) defeats Frank Church (D)
Ohio: John Gilligan (D) defeats William Saxbe (R)

Is this right?
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« Reply #45 on: March 07, 2010, 11:10:19 am »
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Awesome.

You never posted a map of the '68 Senate elections, so based on the '70 numbers (the Republicans gained 2 seats for a 55-45 majority for Democrats; therefore, they'd had a 57-43 majority before '70) and the '74 map, I've come to the conclusion that the '68 races were all exactly the same with two exceptions:

Idaho: George Hansen (R) defeats Frank Church (D)
Ohio: John Gilligan (D) defeats William Saxbe (R)

Is this right?

I had meant for the 1968 elections to be exactly the same as OTL, so that means that I messed up the 1974 maps. What happened in 1974 in Ohio was that Saxbe lost to John Glenn (since he's not Attorney General ITTL), so it's a Democratic gain. I screwed Ohio up because when I looked up the 1974 senate races I saw that Metzenbaum was the incumbent therefore making it a Democratic hold and not a gain, but I didn't realize that Metzenbaum was only appointed because Saxbe went off to be attorney general. Sorry for all the confusion. I'll change the 1974 map now.
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« Reply #46 on: March 07, 2010, 11:11:48 am »
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Yeah I had a feeling Tower wouldn't shrink away from the Nomination that easily lol...Can't wait to see what happens on the Democratic side.
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« Reply #47 on: March 07, 2010, 12:36:10 pm »
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Awesome.

You never posted a map of the '68 Senate elections, so based on the '70 numbers (the Republicans gained 2 seats for a 55-45 majority for Democrats; therefore, they'd had a 57-43 majority before '70) and the '74 map, I've come to the conclusion that the '68 races were all exactly the same with two exceptions:

Idaho: George Hansen (R) defeats Frank Church (D)
Ohio: John Gilligan (D) defeats William Saxbe (R)

Is this right?

I had meant for the 1968 elections to be exactly the same as OTL, so that means that I messed up the 1974 maps. What happened in 1974 in Ohio was that Saxbe lost to John Glenn (since he's not Attorney General ITTL), so it's a Democratic gain. I screwed Ohio up because when I looked up the 1974 senate races I saw that Metzenbaum was the incumbent therefore making it a Democratic hold and not a gain, but I didn't realize that Metzenbaum was only appointed because Saxbe went off to be attorney general. Sorry for all the confusion. I'll change the 1974 map now.

Oh, okay. Since your going about changing errors in Senate maps, 1972 Oklahoma should be D hold, not gain Smiley

And great TL, by the way. Great TL.
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« Reply #48 on: March 07, 2010, 12:54:26 pm »
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Poor Rocky Sad

President Tower, interesting!
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« Reply #49 on: March 07, 2010, 02:22:21 pm »
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Awesome.

You never posted a map of the '68 Senate elections, so based on the '70 numbers (the Republicans gained 2 seats for a 55-45 majority for Democrats; therefore, they'd had a 57-43 majority before '70) and the '74 map, I've come to the conclusion that the '68 races were all exactly the same with two exceptions:

Idaho: George Hansen (R) defeats Frank Church (D)
Ohio: John Gilligan (D) defeats William Saxbe (R)

Is this right?

I had meant for the 1968 elections to be exactly the same as OTL, so that means that I messed up the 1974 maps. What happened in 1974 in Ohio was that Saxbe lost to John Glenn (since he's not Attorney General ITTL), so it's a Democratic gain. I screwed Ohio up because when I looked up the 1974 senate races I saw that Metzenbaum was the incumbent therefore making it a Democratic hold and not a gain, but I didn't realize that Metzenbaum was only appointed because Saxbe went off to be attorney general. Sorry for all the confusion. I'll change the 1974 map now.

Oh, okay. Since your going about changing errors in Senate maps, 1972 Oklahoma should be D hold, not gain Smiley

And great TL, by the way. Great TL.

Thanks man! Smiley Good call. Thanks for all the help and corrections!
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