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Author Topic: The Biggest Damned-Fool Mistake I Ever Made: by Dallasfan65 and hantheguitarman  (Read 23435 times)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
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« on: March 12, 2010, 01:31:28 pm »
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Cook County, Illinois: June 1952
“Mamie, there’s something I need to talk with you about.”
“Yes, darling, is there something wrong?”
“Well, yes. It’s the presidency. I’m not sure I want it.”
“But, you’ve come so far. Look at all those people who drafted you into running”
“I know, I know, but I simply don’t think that I’m cut out to be a president. I’ve no love for politicians. I got into the military to avoid them! Plus, you and I both know that I’m getting old, and what if something were to happen to me?”
“But what about the Republican nomination? Robert is too crazy to be a good president, let alone win the presidency.”
“I’ll endorse Earl Warren. I’m sure he’ll be a good conservative president.”
“Well, you do what you think is right dear. I’ll support you no matter what.”
"Oh, I knew you'd understand, Mamie!"


The 1952 Republican National Convention in Chicago was expected to be intense. Political pundits had predicted that the Republican Nomination would be a bitter battle to the death between Robert Taft (R-OH) and Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower (R-KS). However, Eisenhower would surprise everybody with an announcement:

“After much thought and deliberation, I have decided that tonight, I shall not seek, nor shall I accept your nomination for the President of the United States. While I am greatly humbled at those who supported my candidacy, I believe that I would not be able to serve the interests of the American people to the best of my ability as President of the United States. It is with great pleasure that I announce my endorsement for Governor Earl Warren! He represents the kind of political, economic, and social thinking that I believe we need in the White House. He has a national name for integrity, uprightness, and courage that, again, I believe we need in the White House.”

Earl Warren (R-CA) couldn't believe his luck. He had initially run as a favorite son, whose chances of winning the Republican nomination was slim. He had originally planned to offer his support to Eisenhower in exchange for a Supreme Court appointment. Now, however, his head was reeling. He could potentially win the nomination, and with the nomination came the very good chance that he would win the Presidency, given the unpopularity of the Democrats. Eisenhower's delegates and supporters flocked to the California Governor.

The political pundits however, were correct in stating that the convention would be bitter. Fist fights between Warren and Taft delegates would erupt. Thomas Dewey (R-NY) and Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA), who now allied themselves with Warren, urged delegates to flock to Warren. However, with the rising conservative movement, there was a sizeable amount of delegates that weren't persuaded to go to the California Governor. However, William F. Knowland, whom led a smattering of delegates (that would otherwise go to Taft) pledged his delegates to Warren in exchange for his backing in a future run for Governor.

Presidential Balloting, RNC 1952

First Ballot

Earl Warren: 676 Delegates
Robert Taft: 325 Delegates
William F. Knowland: 175 delegates
Harold Stassen: 20 Delegates
Douglas MacArthur: 10 Delegates
Thomas Dewey: 1 Delegate

Second Ballot

Earl Warren: 922 Delegates
Robert Taft: 280 Delegates
Douglas MacArthur: 4 Delegates

To appease conservatives, Warren would choose Vermont Senator Ralph E. Flanders as his vice-presidential nominee. Flanders would be nominated unanimously. While Warren had not gained Taft's endorsement yet, the Republicans were ready to send the Warren/Flanders ticket to the White House in what was sure to be an interesting election.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2010, 01:42:31 pm by Northeast Representative Han »Logged
Dallasfan65
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2010, 01:38:32 pm »

The Democratic National Convention, 1952
 

Chicago was fortunate enough to greet its second gathering a mere two weeks after the Republicans; this time, it was the Democrats. A second thing they had in common was their disorder: after an hour of waiting for the arrival of the keynote speaker, Adlai E. Stevenson, the Chairman received news that the Illinois Governor had an infected knee, and would be in the hospital. Fortunately for the Democrats, the rest of the Convention would go by as planned, though there was a sharp divide between the segregationists and those whom supported civil rights.

Presidential Balloting, DNC, 1952

First Ballot
Estes Kefauver: 515 Delegates
Richard Russell: 357 Delegates
Averell Harriman: 185 Delegates
Alben Barkley: 49 Delegates
Robert S. Kerr: 65 Delegates
William Fulbright: 22 Delegates

Second Ballot

Estes Kefauver: 580 Delegates
Richard Russell: 419 Delegates
Averell Harriman: 194 Delegates
 
Kefauver held a plurality of delegates; with Harriman's delegates, he would surely be put over the top in delegate count and establish a majority. Then, Russell's Dixiecrat delegates could either hold their nose or "shove it" according to Kefauver, in private. Kefauver contacted Truman at the convention, in private.

"Mr President, I'd like to strike a deal with you."

"What do you want, Cowfever?"
 
"It's clear that I hold the most delegates, but unless Harriman pledges his support to me we're going to have a problem on our hands, with this Russell."
 
"I don't give a damn! If it's that important, why don't you throw your lot behind Harriman yourself?"

"I was actually suggesting the opposite. Harriman backs me, and I put him on the ticket. I support civil rights, but I will be, and always have been hush-hush on the matter."

"Fine, I'll contact Harriman, but this whole conversation has left a bad taste in my mouth."

 
Third Ballot:
Estes Kefauver: 783
Richard Russell: 410
 
 
After accumulating enough delegates to clinch the nomination, Kefauver announced the selection of Averell Harriman for his Vice President. A handful of Russell's delegates insisted he be placed on the bottom of the ticket, but even Russell declined. "Don't worry boys, if the South won't have it's voice heard on the ticket then we just won't have to show up to the voting booth," he said in private.
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2010, 01:41:39 pm »
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The 1952 Presidential Election

Just like in 1948, all polling seemed to indicate that Warren would defeat Kefauver by a comfortable margin. However, not wanting to repeat the same mistake as Thomas Dewey did in taking the presidency for granted, Warren and Flanders would campaign actively for the presidency. No matter how much he tried, Kefauver could not disassociate himself with the ever unpopular President Truman. Warren would emphasize three themes throughout the entire campaign: Korea, Communism, and Corruption, and the Democrats' failures with all three of them. Although he hated Wisconsin Senator Joe McCarthy's demagoguery, Warren would stay silent on the issue of McCarthyism, due to the strong anticommunist sentiment in the nation. Warren would even publicly shake McCarthy's hand during a campaign in Wisconsin, although Warren privately said "I gotta wash my damn hands hard after that handshake." On November 4, the Republicans would reclaim the White House for the first time since 1928 on a comfortable margin. Additionally, they would retake Congress on Warren's coattails. With control of both houses of Congress and the White House, Warren had a mandate.



Earl Warren/Ralph Flanders: 54.2% PV, 365 EV
Estes Kefauver/Averell Harriman: 44.9% PV, 158 EV

Unpledged: 0.5% PV, 8 EV
« Last Edit: March 12, 2010, 01:45:09 pm by Northeast Representative Han »Logged
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2010, 04:37:01 pm »
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I like the storyline. Great start! Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2010, 05:42:38 pm »
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I like the storyline. Great start! Smiley

Thanks! Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2010, 06:28:50 pm »
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Good so far.
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2010, 06:54:05 pm »
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Thanks Roch! Smiley
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2010, 07:30:32 pm »
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Can't wait to see what President Warren does with his Supreme Court picks.
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Dallasfan65
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« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2010, 06:42:23 pm »

The First Term of Earl Warren


President: Earl Warren
Vice President: Ralph E. Flanders
State: Christian Herter
Treasury: Nelson Rockefeller
Defense: Dwight David Eisenhower
Postmaster General: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
Interior: Margaret Chase Smith
Agriculture: Frederick A. Seaton
Commerce: Warren Austin
Labor: John Bricker
HEW: Harold Stassen
Attorney General: Thomas Dewey

The First Term of Earl Warren
 
One of the number one priorities of the Warren Administration was a close to the Korean War. With the help of his Secretary of Defense Eisenhower, he signed an armistice, effective immediately, on July 15th, 1953. Still committed to preventing the spread of communism, he allied the United States with South Korea and Taiwan, vowing to "not let it spread another inch." Some on the political left criticized his interventionism, such as the installment of the "Shah" in Iran, or supplying aid to the Republic of Vietnam, but President Warren's foreign policy was widely approved by the American people.
 
On the economic front, President Warren pledged to balance the budget, and with the Republican Congress he was able to get many of his initiatives through. President Warren oversaw, and spearheaded a reduction in inflation and the national debt, though his approval ratings took a dip with a mild recession in the fall of 1953, which allowed for the Democrats to gain 25 seats in Congress and regain control of both chambers, a slight blow to the Warren Administration.
 
Earl Warren worked with both Congresses to make slight expansions to Social Security, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and other New Deal programs. Despite meeting fiery opposition from conservative members of the Republican Party, and complete indifference on the part of his own Vice President, his initiatives were passed.
 
After the Supreme Court gave it's Brown V Board of Education ruling, Earl Warren applauded the decision, and weeks later delivered an impassioned speech denouncing segregation. Earl Warren appointed blacks himself to numerous under-cabinet levels in light of the court ruling. Initially, there were some riots in the South, but the crisis simmered down a week after the decision, though many schools in the South would go to defy the Supreme Court's order.

Another roadblock to the Warren Administration was a single, but increasingly adversarial and vocal opponent - Senator Joseph McCarthy. Never being a friend of the President, he secretly pulled strings in the Wisconsin Republican Party to discourage support for Warren, trying to depress turnout on the Republican side, narrowing his margin in a state that should have went big for him. With President Warren's ambitious agenda, he did not want to pick a fight with McCarthy, but after the Senator began investigating key members of his administration, publicly and privately calling his cabinet "red to the core" Warren decided it was time to take action.

Vice President Ralph E. Flanders, an experienced member of the Senate, pulled strings and arranged for a condemnation of Senator McCarthy. He wrote a speech, delivered by Senator Thomas C. Hendrickson, denouncing the McCarthy hearings as "A bunch of hullabaloo" and went on at length to describe their misdirection in the overall fight against Communism. Most of the Senate signed on very quickly, and the censure vote had been nearly unanimous; McCarthy's only defense came from Senator Styles Bridges, whom failed to garner support for McCarthy. Thus, the Warren Administration had defeated one of its greatest enemies.

With a lively economy and the dust settling from the McCarthy censure, Brown v Board, and the 1954 Senate Elections, Earl Warren decided he would make the biggest expenditure of his political capital yet: Civil Rights legislation.

Such an ambitious agenda would be deemed impossible in most cases, where the President and Congress were of opposite parties. However, this proved to be President Warren's greatest asset, for the majority was controlled by a legendary legislator: Majority Leader, Lyndon B. Johnson. The President also had, on this issue, an ally in the Democratic whip; Senator Earle C. Clements. Despite his uneasy relationship with Senator Knowland, the minority leader, the President conferenced with him privately and assured his support, along with the whip, Leverett Saltonstall.

President Warren met with the House leadership in hopes of securing their support aswell. The meeting proved to be much more contentious than his negotiations with the Senate leadership, however.

(Rayburn) "We just can't do it! Eastland has a lock on that committee and you know it!"
 
(McCormack) "Nonsense, Sam. If we get the Republicans, and a majority of the Democrats, Eastland will have no choice, unless he wants to lose that Chairmanship."

(Rayburn) "I can the congressmen to tow the line, but it's just not that damn easy with the Senate! We have no shot at the White House without the South! I don't give a damn about that, but I know most Democrats do."

(Warren) "If you are unable to govern effectively, what is the point of being elected to a job that requires you to do so?"

(Rayburn) "I suppose you're right... This is going to be my last battle, though.
"

After nearly a month of contention, the Civil Rights Act of 1954 managed to pass both the House and the Senate, right before the Christmas recess. Warren saw his approvals skyrocket in many urban states, yet drop to a mere 30% in the South. The Civil Rights Act of 1954 ensured the voting rights of blacks, and completely outlawed segregation. It would be a long time before it's intents were enforced in the South, though.

Supreme Court Appointments
Goodwin Knight (1953)
Herbert Brownell Jr. (1954)
John Davis Lodge (1956)

1954 Senate Elections
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 07:07:29 pm by Dallasfan65 »Logged

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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2010, 08:28:12 pm »
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Wasn't Hawaii and Alaska not states at this time, so shouldn't they not be on the map?
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« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2010, 08:29:16 pm »
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Wasn't Hawaii and Alaska not states at this time, so shouldn't they not be on the map?

He's probably using the 2008 map, so they're still on it; I do that, but I edit the year to remove them if necessary.
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« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2010, 08:29:33 pm »

Wasn't Hawaii and Alaska not states at this time, so shouldn't they not be on the map?

I deleted DC from the IMG code and it still appears on the map, so I didn't bother trying to delete Alaska and Hawaii.
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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2010, 11:00:19 am »
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Interesting new timeline han..A Warren Presidency, should return Progressivisim to the GOP from long forgotten TR-Era Memory, to the parties mantra. I wonder if Vice President Flanders at age 76 will forgoe being Renominated in '56. That will give Warren a chance to pick a viable successor in maybe Nelson Rockefeller? Keep it comming.
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« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2010, 11:22:30 am »
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Supreme Court Appointments
Goodwin Knight (1953)
Herbert Brownell Jr. (1954)
John Davis Lodge (1956)

Now that is a liberal court.  Who is Chief Justice?
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« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2010, 11:24:03 am »

Supreme Court Appointments
Goodwin Knight (1953)
Herbert Brownell Jr. (1954)
John Davis Lodge (1956)

Now that is a liberal court.  Who is Chief Justice?
Goodwin Knight.
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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2010, 09:45:28 pm »
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The Democratic Nomination

On the Democratic Side the Southern Conservative Democrats were enraged at the Warren administration, and they joined forces to get Senator Richard B. Russell, a member of the Conservative Coalition, the Democratic Nomination, while the Northern Democrats did not unite around one candidate and many Northern candidates threw their names into the ring. The 1952 Democratic nominee, Estes Kefauver, did not put his name in the running, even though there were some that wanted him to run again. The Democrats who threw their names into the ring were:

Adlai E. Stevenson II (D-IL)
Richard B. Russell (D-GA)
W. Averell Harriman (D-NY)
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN)
John F. Kennedy (D-MA)
Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)

By the time of the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, on August 13-17, no candidate had enough delegates to ensure the nomination. As a result, it was clear that the nomination would most likely take several ballots, with an air of uncertainty, tension, and factionalism. Every candidate yearned for the magic number of delegates: 687 was the magic number.

Presidential Balloting, DNC, 1956


First Ballot:

Richard B. Russell: 506 Delegates
Adlai E. Stevenson II: 362 Delegates
John F. Kennedy: 206 Delegates
Lyndon B. Johnson: 103 Delegates
Hubert Humphrey: 100 Delegates
W. Averell Harriman: 98 Delegates
 
Second Ballot:
Richard B. Russell: 510 Delegates
Adlai E. Stevenson: 460 Delegates
John F. Kennedy: 216 Delegates
Lyndon B. Johnson: 193 Delegates

Third Ballot:

Richard B. Russell: 535 Delegates
Adlai E. Stevenson: 628 Delegates
John F. Kennedy: 216 Delegates

The balloting had come to an impasse. Before the next round of voting would begin, Russell privately met with Adlai Stevenson.

"Listen... I support states' rights, you support states' rights. However, me nor anyone else in the South is going to support you if you win."

"I support states' rights, you support segregation. And I only do it because you damned Southerners have our party by the balls."

 
"I'm not going to give in, so you may aswell yield the delegates to me. Then set yourself up for a run in 1960, should I lose. That old bastard Flanders won't be running."

"Fine, but all hell is going to break loose after I do so."

 
Fourth Ballot:

Richard B. Russell: 824
John F. Kennedy: 555

When it was announced the Richard Russell had won the nomination, he received both loud applause and loud boos from the audience. It became clear that Russell would not try to diversify the ticket geographically or ideologically, as he would choose J. William Fulbright, a Southern segregationist, as his Vice Presidential Nominee. In his acceptance speech, Russell would say:

"Over my time as Georgia's senator, I've seen countless politicians treat the South like a dog. I've seen countless politicians act like the South is a region to be trifled with. I've seen countless northern liberals patronize us, telling us: 'We know what's best for you, and you will do as we say. You are savages, and you must change.' They treat us like we're their slaves! But the Democratic Party has proved, through my nomination, that we will no longer accept any more abuse! And we will send a powerful message to Washington D.C. that we will not stand for the patronization of the South ANYMORE! "

While the Southern Democrats wept with joy that their voices were heard for the first time since 1948, many other Democrats were disgusted. Hubert Humphrey, Lyndon Johnson, John F. Kennedy, Averell Harriman, and all of Kennedy's delegates stormed out of the convention. Nevertheless, those who stayed were elated at the possibility of a Russell/Fulbright ticket making it to the White House.

Johnson's desertion would especially anger Southerners, who saw Johnson as one of their own. Alabama Senator John Sparkman would comment at the Convention: "Lyndon Johnson has deserted his party, he has deserted the South, and he has deserted his brothers. He has consigned himself to the likes of Abraham Lincoln, Judas, or any nasty, vile traitor. It is imperative that we show him that he can no longer masquerade as one of us. We recognize him for what he is: a blue-blooded liberal traitor. Lyndon Baines Johnson, we shall destroy you!" The vitriolic remarks had the crowd on their feet, and they shouted out "Down with Lyndon! Down with Lyndon!" over and over again. The Democrats began to look at prospective Texan Democrats to challenge Johnson for the nomination in 1960, and given the time the Democrats had to search for a Texan to challenge Johnson, it seemed likely that Senator Johnson would be toast on the day of the Texas primaries in 1960.

Despite the hatred the Democrats at the convention felt for Senator Johnson, the air of the DNC (for those who stayed) was optimistic. They believed that Earl Warren, who had interfered with Southern affairs for long enough, would be ousted out in a landslide in November. Now, the audience began to shout "Run Warren Run! Run Warren Run! Run Warren Run!" The night would end with a feeling of confidence for the Democrats that supported Russell.
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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2010, 09:52:33 pm »

The Republican Nomination:
Given the prosperity of the economy, the end of McCarthyism, and foreign policy successes such as the end of the Korean War, President Warren was in a safe position for the 1956 Presidential Election. Warren's poll numbers were very high in everywhere that wasn't the South. Warren's unpopularity in the South was sky-high, and had never recovered from the political backlash of the Civil Rights Act of 1954. It was no surprise when Earl Warren announced that he and Vice President Ralph Flanders would run for re-election. Without much fuss, President Warren and Vice President Ralph Flanders would be renominated at the 1956 Republican National Convention in San Francisco, California that took place from August 23-26. Unlike four years ago, there was no factionalism, and the bitterness that existed in the 1952 Republican National Convention dissipated. Nothing really exciting happened at the convention, except one delegate voted for a fictional "John Doe" for President and "Joe Smith" for Vice President to protest, in his own private words, "everything being so god-damn unanimous." Nevertheless, the GOP was energized and ready to do whatever it took to keep the Warren/Flanders ticket in the White House.

The General Election:

The general election would prove to be one of the nastiest election cycles in history. The animosity Warren supporters felt against Russell supporters, and vice versa, was unmatched. The partisan hatred between the two parties was so bad that fist fights would occasionally break out between Warren and Russell supporters. Warren would attack Russell as a "cold hearted bigot who was stuck to an era in history that ought to be forgotten," while Russell would attack Warren as a "bleeding heart liberal who had no respect for the traditions and customs of the United States, and who had no respect for the doctrine of states rights." Richard Russell campaigned for racial segregation, states rights, and white supremacy. Despite all the excessive partisanship that characterized this election, the advantage was clearly on President Warren's side, given the prosperous economy, domestic and foreign policy successes, and Richard Russell's radicalism. Additionally, many prominent Democrats, especially liberal Northerners, refused to endorse Russell, which effectively hampered his candidacy. Liberal Northern Democrats would either vote for Warren, or stay home. The election would also be notable, given the amount of television ads by both sides of the campaign. Television, for the first time, would be major medium by which Presidential candidates would campaign on, replacing newspapers and radio. To attract the female vote, President Warren would make heavy use of television ads aimed at housewives. On November 6, 1956, Earl Warren would win his second term in a landslide, and Russell would only carry states in the Democratic South.


Earl Warren/Ralph E. Flanders: 376 EV, 59.2% PV
Richard Russell/William Fulbright: 155 EV, 40.8% PV
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« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2010, 09:55:59 pm »
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The Second Term Of Earl Warren

Following the advice of Secretary Eisenhower, President Warren would endorse and authorize the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, This created The Interstate Highway System, which Eisenhower said would be vital for the Cold War, given the possibility of a future war. The Interstate Highway would receive heavy federal funding and would be the largest public works project in American history.

Despite his mandate to maintain his progressive policies, President Warren would face powerful opposition to his civil rights agenda. The South, who hated Warren's "meddling in their affairs," would resist President Warren at every turn. In 1957, the state of Arkansas refused to integrate their schools. Although nine black students were scheduled to attend Little Rock Central High School, the Alabama governor, Orval Faubus, protected by the Arkansas National Guard, stood outside the school door, refusing to let any black in. President Warren was outraged. "Don't they understand the role of the President?! This is insanity!" thought Warren. He was determined, however, not to let the South win. He placed the entire state of Arkansas under martial law, and suspended the Arkansas National Guard. Then, he decided to escort the nine black children to school himself, with the protection of not only the Secret Service but also Federal Troops. As he walked with them, protestors jeered, throwing tomatoes and fruit in President Warren's direction. Only the Secret Service had stopped any protest from going too far. As President Warren and the nine students walked up the steps to the school, Faubus would say, in a powerful voice "I am the Governor of Alabama, and you shall not pass." Warren would retort, "Heh. Well I'm the President of the United States. Now get out of my goddamn way." The crowd suddenly became silent. Was Faubus going to let Warren in? Faubus would simply say, "Well you're certainly not my President. I never voted for you, and neither did the crowd" to the cheers of the entire white crowd. Warren lividly said, "In the name of the Constitution of the United States, you will let us through. Now move or be moved!" As Warren said this, Federal Troops brandished their guns in front of Faubus' face. Faubus, who knew he wouldn't win that day, stepped aside, and those nine students went to school that day.

Due to the Faubus incident, President Warren placed Arkansas under martial law, and federal troops would monitor Arkansas actions all day and all night to ensure that blacks got the Constitutional freedoms that they deserved. Placing Arkansas under martial law was one of President Warren's most controversial actions, and even Secretary of Defense Dwight David Eisenhower was reported to have privately said "Endorsing Earl Warren was the biggest damned-fool mistake I ever made."

On January 5, 1957, President Warren would announce, in a message to Congress, the "Warren Doctrine." The "Warren Doctrine" would proclaim that the United States would have the right to intervene in any country threatened by international Communism. President Warren sent troops to Lebanon on July 15, 1958, with the purpose of boosting up Lebanese President's Camille Chamoun's pro Western government against threats from Syria, Egypt, and internal threats as well. The operation was largely a success, and Chamoun would resign and be replaced by Fuad Chehab, contributing to general stability and an easing of tensions.

On October 4 1957, The USSR would launch the first Earth orbiting artificial satellite: Sputnik I. This sparked the fear in many Americans that the United States was losing the Cold War. Even Warren was scared, since the United States used to consider themselves the front runner in space technology. Fears of a nuclear warhead being launched at the United States from Outer Space was horrifying. As a result, Warren took swift action. He would increase defense spending to a heavy extreme; signed the National Defense Education Act, which increased spending on education to avoid falling behind in the Cold War, and most importantly, he signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act, which created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Project Mercury. Public schools now placed a huge emphasis on math and science to avoid falling behind in the technological race. The Space Race had begun.

Finally, two new states would be admitted to the Union. Alaska, on January 3, 1959, and Hawaii, on August 21, 1959.
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« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2010, 10:00:51 pm »
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Warren is turning out to be one wonderful President! Please continue! Smiley
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« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2010, 10:02:59 pm »
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Warren is turning out to be one wonderful President! Please continue! Smiley
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« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2010, 10:06:56 pm »

1956 Senate Elections:
1958 Senate Elections:


SCOTUS Appointments

William J. Brennan, Jr. (1957)
Thomas E. Dewey (1958)
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« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2010, 10:07:58 pm »

Warren is turning out to be one wonderful President! Please continue! Smiley

Thanks guys - every comment on this TL counts, they're very encouraging. Smiley
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« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2010, 10:12:27 pm »
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Warren is turning out to be one wonderful President! Please continue! Smiley

Thanks guys - every comment on this TL counts, they're very encouraging. Smiley
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Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
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« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2010, 10:35:52 pm »
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The 1960 Presidential Election

The Republican Nomination

To nobody's surprise, Vice President Ralph Flanders announced that he would not run for President, due to his old age. President Warren used this as an opportunity to hand pick his successor. He endorsed Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Harold Stassen (R-MN) as his preferred nominee. Though initially seen as the front-runner, things would not be so easy for Stassen. Conservative Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater, who referred to the Warren Administration as a "dime store New Deal,"  announced his candidacy for the Republican Nomination just days after. Members of the once disaffected conservative movement in the Republican party, including many former Taft supporters, flocked to Goldwater in droves, and he had the most energetic primary campaigns out of all the candidates. Stassen's position as heir-apparent seemed to be jeopardized. California Governor William Knowland, who helped President Warren receive the nomination in 1952, ran as a favorite son for California, as would Postmaster General Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr, and Interior Secretary Margaret Chase Smith: a sharp divide in both the Warrenites and the GOP as a whole.

No candidate was assured of nomination walking into the 1960 Republican National Convention. With different candidates with different political ideologies, it seemed evident that balloting would take a long time, and that the mood of the convention would probably be as tense as it was in 1952, when the Warren faction and the Taft faction battled for the nomination of the Republican Party.  (Note: 1308 delegates total)

First Ballot:
Barry Goldwater: 567 Delegates
Harold Stassen: 497 Delegates
William F. Knowland: 156 Delegates
Henry Cabot Lodge: 67 Delegates
Margaret Chase Smith: 21 Delegates

Second Ballot:
Barry Goldwater: 588 Delegates
Harold Stassen: 564 Delegates
William F. Knowland: 156 Delegates

"Barry, are you sure you want to do this?"

"I can't
not do it Peggy, I can't bear to see my party being taken in this direction."

"But this could kill your political future,"

"If I bring change about in the party, it'll be worth it."

"OK dear, I'll stand by you."

Senator Goldwater gave a game change to the election when he announced that if Stassen was to win the nomination, he and his delegates would exit the convention. While Stassen had President Warren's endorsement, it was clear that Stassen would need the backing of the Goldwater wing of the party. Essentially, the GOP was in a gridlock, and if Stassen was to win the nomination, it was clear he would lose the general eleciton. At the same time, If Goldwater was to win the nomination, it was obvious that Warren, Stassen, and the progressives would not support him either. All seemed lost for the party, and it seemed like the nomination was a lose-lose situation.

Favorite-son William F. Knowland approached both of the men as a compromise candidate. After much negotiation with President Warren and Stassen, Knowland agreed to pick Postmaster Henry Cabot Lodge in exchange for Stassen's support. Both were reluctant of the deal, Stassen felt as if he should be on the bottom of the ticket and Goldwater didn't want to see "another damn Californian." In the end, both reluctantly acepted.
 
Third Ballot:
William F. Knowland: 1108 Delegates
Scattering: 200 Delegates

Harold Stassen and Barry Goldwater both endorsed William Knowland. President Warren was somewhat dismayed that Knowland was the Republican nominee, since it was painfully obvious that Knowland would be a conservative, anathema to President Warren's progressive legacy. Nevertheless, he know that Knowland supported civil rights, and that Knowland was infinitely preferable to the reactionary Arizona Senator. As a result, President Warren offered William Knowland his full endorsement in 1960.

Governor Knowland understood that he needed a moderate as his Vice Presidential Candidate in order to win the election, given the heavy discord between the conservatives and the liberals within the GOP. While he would have liked to have chosen Barry Goldwater as his Vice Presidential nominee, he knew that Goldwater was too conservative for the country as a whole. He thus chose Massachusetts Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. as part of the agreement, whose selection was widely accepted throughout the Republican Party.

Despite all the factionalism within the Republican National Convention, the Knowland/Lodge ticket and the Republicans walked out ready to duke it out with the Democratic Party.
 
1960 Republican Primary Map:

Red: Goldwater
Blue: Stassen
Green: Favorite-sons
« Last Edit: March 26, 2010, 10:37:45 pm by hantheguitarman »Logged
Dallasfan65
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« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2010, 10:40:49 pm »

The Democratic Nomination
Once again, the battle for the Democratic Nomination would be a battle between the warring factions of the Democratic Party.

Running Democrats:
Adlai E. Stevenson (D-IL)
John F. Kennedy (D-MA)
Stuart Symington (D-MO)
Hubert Humphrey (D-MN)
Orval Faubus (D-AL)

First Ballot:
Adlai E. Stevenson: 687 Delegates
Orval Faubus: 315 Delegates
John F. Kennnedy: 302 Delegates
Stuart Symington: 180 Delegates
Hubert Humphrey: 95 Delegates

 
Second Ballot:
Adlai E. Stevenson: 1064 Delegates
Orval Faubus: 315 Delegates
John F. Kennedy: 200 Delegates

Upon clinching the nomination, Stevenson gave an acceptance speech that rallied the Democratic delegates: "It's unfortunate I couldn't have given one of these speeches four years earlier. I would like to congratulate President Warren on his accomplishments in office, but there is still much to be done. It is a time for choosing - either the reactionary policies that ushered us into an economic calamity, or their inverse; policies that level inequity and help usher America into the future." Even Faubus clapped a few times. Stevenson announced his selection of John F. Kennedy for his running mate "because he represents the next generation" whom was accepted nearly unanimously, except from Faubus' delegates.
 
1960 Democratic Primary Map:

Blue: Stevenson
Red: Kennedy
Green: Faubus
Yellow: Humphrey

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