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Smid
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« on: July 12, 2010, 07:49:03 pm »
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I picked up a research paper the other day that someone had prepared, listing state electorates in Victoria by various demographic data. This information is also easily available on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website (www.abs.gov.au), but in her research paper, she's neatly collated the information and ranked it by percent, saving me lots of time. Having found this research paper, I thought I'd start converting it into maps. As such, although the maps are mine, the work done in preparing the initial information was somebody else's and I can't take credit for it. The ABS website also has the ability to do some very handy mapping: http://www.abs.gov.au/CDATAOnline - it's fairly self-explanatory, but if anyone wants to play with it and needs a hand, feel free to PM me. Important to note - the smallest area for which demographic information is displayed is a Census Collection District (CCD), which is roughly 150-250 households (some in growth areas may contain more households, but they'll be split into smaller districts for the next Census). These maps and tables can actually be broken down to that level (including, for example, all CCDs in a particular electorate, which is very helpful).

I'd post a link to the research paper, but I'm pretty sure that it's on an intranet and you wouldn't be able to download it. Anyway, I'll do the Victorian maps, and start uploading them, and I may move on to doing South Australian and NSW maps after that (I have electoral maps for those states, but haven't completed electoral maps for other states).

When I name electorates, I'll also reference the Region they're in to make them easier to find. Here is a map of the Districts, all coloured by Region.



Larger versions of the maps are available in the Gallery (obviously in the Demographic Maps section).

Here is the VEC's maps section. Some of them are large files, and too big to upload into the gallery, but they'll be helpful if you're looking for some of the electorates. I'd recommend using/downloading/printing the 2006 map, possibly the one "with margins" which isn't shaded nicely or anything, but at least gives an indication of where the marginal seats are...

http://www.vec.vic.gov.au/publications/publications-maps.html#1

The map is also the one I used to create my template (initially from a scanned PDF), so that probably makes it even more helpful in identifying electorates on my maps.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 11:04:31 pm by Smid »Logged
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« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2010, 08:19:37 pm »
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Here is the first one - Proportion of people living in the electorate who were born outside of Australia.



The two seats which are above 50% are Derrimut (Western Metropolitan) and Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan). Clayton has the most people born overseas (52.6%) with Derrimut just behind (50.9%). The Victorian Average is 23.8%.

There are many people living in the Clayton electorate who were born in Vietnam. Derrimut includes about half of the suburb of Sunshine, which also has many Vietnamese-born Australians (continuing through to the electorate of Footscray, just to the East). There may be a large number of Greek- or Italian-born Australians living in the western part of Derrimut, I think.

Clayton borders on Oakleigh, and there are a large number of Greek-born Australians in Oakleigh, so there may be some cross-over there.

EDIT: Just realised - also a university campus in Clayton, so there will also likely be international students living in the area.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2010, 10:18:32 pm by Smid »Logged
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« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2010, 08:50:09 pm »
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Here's the second one - Proportion of people living in the electorate, born overseas and arriving in Australia on or after 1 January 2001.



The darkly shaded electorate in the centre of the metropolitan map is the electorate of Melbourne (Northern Metropolitan). At the date of the Census, 19.0% of people in the electorate were recent arrivals. I suspect this would be higher due to the number of international students living in the area and possibly also because of tourists and other short-stay visitors staying in hotels in downtown Melbourne.

The Victorian Average is 4.0%.
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« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2010, 09:31:17 pm »
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Map 3 - Proportion of people living in the electorate who were born in either the UK or Ireland.



Frankston (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Mornington (Eastern Victoria) are the two strongest electorates. These two combined are pretty much the same as the federal electorate of Dunkley. Frankston (10.1%) is slightly behind Mornington (11.8%). Backtracking a couple of maps, Frankston had a total of 22.6% born overseas and Mornington a total of 20.4% born overseas, so almost half of Frankston foreign-born residents are from the UK and Ireland and over half of foreign-born residents in Mornington are from the UK and Ireland.

The Victorian Average is 4.4%.
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2010, 10:14:54 pm »
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Map 4 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who were born in Southern and Eastern Europe. The map includes the definition of Southern and Eastern Europe, so I won't bother typing it out again here.



The top three electorates are Kororoit (Western Metropolitan), Derrimut (Western Metropolitan) and Thomastown (Northern Metropolitan). Kororoit is the upside-down 'L' shaped electorate on the western edge of the metropolitan map, Derrimut (as discussed in map 1) is adjacent to it to the east. Thomastown is in the north, just below the very large metropolitan electorate (Yan Yean).

Although Kororoit (17.2%) and Derrimut (17.3%) have a large number of people born in Southern and Eastern Europe, Thomastown (27.7%) has far more. The Victorian Average is 5.9%.
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« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2010, 11:11:50 pm »
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Map 5 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who were born in Africa.



The top three electorates are Lyndhurst (Southeastern Metropolitan), Caulfield (Southern Metropolitan) and Dandenong (Southeastern Metropolitan).

Lyndhurst is the electorate to the south of Dandenong. Lyndhurst (3.6%) and Dandenong (4.8%) weren't overly surprising to me, as a large number of Sudanese immigrants have settled there, however I was a little surprised by Caulfield (3.9%). Caulfield has a very large Jewish population - according to Wikipedia, one of the highest concentrations of Jewish people outside of Israel. I do have a few friends, however, who are South African Jews, so perhaps this could explain the larger number of African-born Australians in Caulfield.

The Victorian Average is 1.3%.
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« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2010, 12:00:58 am »
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Map 6 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who were born in the Middle East.



The top four electorates are all adjacent to one another in the northwestern part of Melbourne. They are Pascoe Vale (Western Metropolitan), Thomastown (Northern Metropolitan), Yuroke (Western Metropolitan) and Broadmeadows (Northern Metropolitan).

Pascoe Vale (4.3%) is the southernmost of the four electorates, with a rough east-west orientation. Thomastown (5.7%) is the easternmost of the four electorates, and as shown in Map 4, has a high proportion of people born in southern and eastern Europe. In total, Thomastown has 46.5% of its population born overseas, and combining this 5.7% with the 27.7% of the population born in southern and eastern Europe, only 13.1% of Thomastown's population was born both overseas and outside of these regions. Yuroke (6.0%) is the westernmost of the four electorates, with a rough north-south orientation. Melbourne's airport at Tullamarine is located at the southern end of Yuroke. Broadmeadows (17.4%) by far contains the highest proportion of people born in the Middle East.

The Victorian State Average is 1.1%.
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« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2010, 12:48:22 am »
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Map 7 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who were born in Northeast Asia.



Several electorates have a high proportion of people born in Northeast Asia, including: Forest Hill (Eastern Metropolitan), Oakleigh (Southern Metropolitan), Kew (Southern Metropolitan), Bulleen (Southern Metropolitan), Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan), Melbourne (Northern Metropolitan), Box Hill (Eastern Metropolitan), Mount Waverley (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Doncaster (Eastern Metropolitan).

The Victorian State Average is 1.9%, but these electorates are substantially higher: Forest Hill (5.8%), Oakleigh (6.0%), Kew (6.4%), Bulleen (7.4%), Clayton (7.4%), Melbourne (8.9%), Box Hill (9.2%), Mount Waverley (9.4%) and Doncaster (10.4%).

While Melbourne, Clayton and Oakleigh are possibly international university students, the other electorates are more affluent.
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2010, 01:29:01 am »
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Map 8 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who were born in Southeast Asia.



There are eight electorates with a proportion of people born in Southeast Asia of over 7%. These eight electorates are Richmond (Northern Metropolitan), Mulgrave (Southeastern Metropolitan), Kororoit (Western Metropolitan), Melbourne (Northern Metropolitan), Footscray (Western Metropolitan), Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan), Lyndhurst (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Derrimut (Western Metropolitan).

I'm not sure what to make of Melbourne (12.8%) - it may be international students, but I'm not sure. In the early 1980s, many Vietnamese refugees settled in Richmond, Footscray, Sunshine and the Clayton area. This would be reflected by the electorates of Richmond - just to the east of the electorate of Melbourne, and the easternmost electorate of the five running east-west in the middle of the metropolitan map (7.6%), Footscray - just to the west of the electorate of Melbourne (13.9%), Derrimut - just to the west of Footscray (19.8%) and Clayton (15.0%), Lyndhurst (17.5%) and Mulgrave (9.4%) in the Southeastern part of the city. Kororoit (12.5%) is very Catholic (and as we know from earlier, has many people born in Southern and Eastern Europe), and I think there may be a fairly large number of people born in the Philippines living there, but I don't know for certain, it's very close to Derrimut and Footscray, after all. The Victorian State Average is 3.4%.

I used to work in Sunshine and there are many very good quality Vietnamese restaurants (one of them, we were the only non-Asian people eating in them). That was right on the electoral boundary of Derrimut and Footscray. Richmond also has a large number of Vietnamese restaurants, but it's now quite a trendy area and the food there costs twice as much as it does in Sunshine.
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2010, 02:01:59 am »
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Map 9 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who speak a language other than English at home.



There are six electorates where over half the population speaks a language other than English at home. These six are Lyndhurst (Southeastern Metropolitan), Kororoit (Western Metropolitan), Broadmeadows (Northern Metropolitan), Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan), Derrimut (Western Metropolitan) and Thomastown (Northern Metropolitan).

Derrimut (63.4%) and Thomastown (64.9%) are both over 60%. Lyndhurst (51.0%), Kororoit (53.1%), Broadmeadows (54.8%) and Clayton (56%) are all over 50%. The Victorian State Average is 20.4%.
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« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2010, 03:16:18 am »
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Will there also be income/occupation stuff?
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« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2010, 06:16:32 pm »
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Will there also be income/occupation stuff?

Yep! There's:
Population (including total population - since electorates are based on enrolled voters, population density, people who changed address in the preceding 5 years, people in various aged groups, median age and people who need assistance),

Ethnicity (mostly done, although there is also indigenous Australians and people not fluent in English), Religion (Christian/Catholic/Buddhist/Muslim/No Religion - although I think I'll log onto the ABS website and look up Jewish and Greek Orthodox, too),

Education (including people currently attending school, private school, tertiary education, people whose highest level of education is Year 10 or below, internet connection, broadband connection, tertiary qualifications and trade qualifications),

Labour Force (Employed/Unemployed, Youth Unemployment, Labour Force, Women in the Labour Force, Agriculture/Forestry/Fishing, Manufacturing, Managers & Professionals, Technicians & Trades, Unpaid Voluntary Work),

Dwellings (Fully owned, being purchased, rented, median loan repayments, median rent, flat/unit/apartment dwellings, residing in non-private dwellings),

Income (Families with a weekly income below $650, families with a weekly income above $2,000, Median weekly family income),

Families (couples with dependent children, couples with no children, lone parent families with dependent children, lone person households, unpaid childcare),

Transport (people using public transport to travel to work, people whose sole method of travel to work is by bicycle, dwellings with two or more motor vehicles).

It'll take a while to get through it all, but I'll get there. Feel free to suggest priorities.
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« Reply #12 on: July 13, 2010, 06:52:18 pm »
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These are good.  I'm looking forward to the NSW maps.  BTW, are you doing Canberra maps?
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« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2010, 08:06:30 pm »
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These are good.  I'm looking forward to the NSW maps.  BTW, are you doing Canberra maps?

Cheers! The NSW ones will be a little while off... I know all the Victorian electorates by name and can identify them on the map, so that greatly reduces the time it takes me to map the results. NSW will take much longer to do, but I'll eventually get around to them. I don't have any blank maps yet for Canberra/ACT, but I hope to eventually get around to that, although I think I'll focus on finishing Qld and WA state maps first, and possibly a federal map (problem is, there's a redistribution after pretty much every election, so it takes quite a long time to do the map and it only works for one election...).
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« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2010, 08:56:32 pm »
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Map 10 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who identify as being indigenous Australians.



This one is pretty much the inverse of all the earlier ones - lower percentages in metropolitan Melbourne, with higher percentages in rural and regional areas. The Melbourne electorate with the highest proportion of indigenous Australians was Preston (Northern Metropolitan). There are only three electorates with an indigenous population of more than 2% of the total population, and all are rural areas - Gippsland East (Eastern Victoria), Mildura (Northern Victoria) and Shepparton (Northern Victoria).

Preston (1.1%), Gippsland East (2.4%), Mildura (3.2%) and Shepparton (3.3%) are all well over the Victorian average of 0.6%.
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« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2010, 11:00:15 pm »
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Map 11 - Population Density



Utterly unsurprising - lots of people live close to the city and fewer live in the country... who woulda thunked it? Also, since electorates are supposedly roughly equal in terms of enrolment, one should expect that the smaller electorates have higher population density. Some areas with a large number of immigrants (not yet citizens) or families with children under the age of 18 (not yet old enough to vote) may have a higher population density than the electorate boundary would suggest, but I'm not seeing anything surprising. Narre Warren South (Southeastern Metropolitan, with the bit that juts out to the east - indeed, probably the easternmost point of Southeastern Metro) is probably the electorate to take the most from... it's suburbia that is growing and contains plenty of new young families. Population growth since the redistribution means that it is the electorate most over-quota in the state (if I remember correctly... if it's not the top, it's certainly in the top three). This statistic is replicated here, in that it is a slightly larger electorate with a higher population densitiy than other electorates of a similar size. Also, as it contains mostly young families, there are probably a larger number of children living in the electorate - included in population counts, but not in enrolments.

The electorates with the highest population densities are all closest to the CBD (although not the electorate containing the CBD - obviously the large number of commercial properties/highrises downtown decrease it): Oakleigh (Southern Metropolitan), Albert Park (Southern Metropolitan), Hawthorn (Southern Metropolitan), Caulfield (Southern Metropolitan), Brunswick (Northern Metropolitan), Richmond (Northern Metropolitan) and Prahran (Southern Metropolitan).

Oakleigh (2,910.0) and Caulfield (3,655.6) have a fairly large number of blocks of flats of twenty or so units, many built in the 1960s, I would suspect. I live in one such building. I don't know about Hawthorn (3,073.4), although I suspect it is much the same, although with the apartments being more modern. Albert Park (2,979.0) has experienced much gentrification and demographic change over the past 15-20 years or so. Rail yards on the south bank of the Yarra River, opposite the CBD (and contained in the electorate of Albert Park), now have been replaced by Crown Casino and Eureka Towers - for a while the tallest residential highrise in the world. There has also been much development along the bayside waterfront. If Narre Warren South is the most over-populated electorate, I think Albert Park is the second.

Brunswick (3,795.9) and Richmond (3,976.1) have also experienced demographic change over the past decade or so, with more trendy apartments being built. Brunswick is to the north of the city and many students live there, while Richmond is just to the east of the city. There also are several Ministry of Housing Towers in both Brunswick and Richmond.

Prahran (4,596.7) is the most dense electorate in Victoria, and well above the Victorian average of 21.4 people per square kilometre. It would be even more dense, but it contains the Botanic Gardens, Fawkner Park and other large open areas. There are several Ministry of Housing Towers in Prahran, a couple of them by Chapel Street and I think another couple in Windsor towards the southern end of the electorate. Consequently, Prahran is a diverse and polarised electorate, ranging from the Tower Blocks to expensive waterfront properties. The primary vote for the Liberal Party at the last election ranged from less than a third in Windsor (under a quarter in some St Kilda booths), through to over two-thirds in Toorak. The Greens outpolled the Liberals in the St Kilda booths. Those results were also reflected in the Two Party Preferred, where the Liberals received almost three-quarters of the vote in Toorak, but just a quarter of the vote in Redan Central and a third of the vote in St Kilda and Windsor.
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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2010, 11:46:29 pm »
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Map 12 - Proportion of the population aged 0-4 years



The research paper I've been using notes: "The highest proportions are found in outer metropolitan growth corridor electorates which attract young families to their affordable housing estates. The lowest proportions are located in inner metropolitan Melbourne seats, and a belt of well established central, eastern and south-eastern suburbs electorates."

The highest proportion is in Narre Warren South (Southeastern Metropolitan), where there were 7,468 children aged 0-4 years at the time of the 2006 Census.

The next three top seats are Keilor (Western Metropolitan), Cranbourne (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Altona (Western Metropolitan).

While the Victorian average is 6.2%, these seats have many more young children: Altona (8.1%), Cranbourne (8.1%), Keilor (8.2%) and Narre Warren South (9.2%).
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« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2010, 12:43:49 am »
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Map 13 - Proportion of the population aged 5-14 years



Similarly to the map of 0-4 year olds, this 5-14 year olds are concentrated in the outer suburbs, where young families are residing.

Especially high electorates include Ferntree Gully (Eastern Metropolitan), Cranbourne (Southeastern Metropolitan), Yan Yean (Northern Metropolitan), Gembrook (Eastern Victoria), Keilor (Western Metropolitan), Yuroke (Western Metropolitan), Macedon (Northern Victoria), Narre Warren North (Southeastern Metropolitan), Broadmeadows (Northern Metropolitan) and Narre Warren South (Southeastern Metropolitan).

Ferntree Gully (16.0%) is the north-south oriented electorate in the southeastern corner of Eastern Metropolitan. It is the most marginal seat in the Victorian Parliament (held the title for most marginal seat in Australia until Fran Bailey hung on in McEwan), being won by the Liberal Party by just 27 votes, or 0.04%. Cranbourne (16.0%) is the east-west oriented electorate in the southeastern corner of Southeastern Metropolitan, directly to the south of Lyndhurst and Narre Warren South.

Yan Yean (16.3%) is the largest electorate in metropolitan Melbourne, stretching across the north of the city. Gembrook (16.4%) stretches from the outer suburban estates on the eastern edge of town, out to smaller townships and borders on Ferntree Gully, Narre Warren North and Narre Warren South, and also on Bass to the south. Belgrave, known for it's alternative lifestyle, is divided between Gembrook and Monbulk.

Keilor (16.5%) is growing in population with many new housing estates in the Watergardens area. Adjacent to it is Yuroke (16.6%) to the northeast and Macedon (16.6%) to the north. Roughly half of Macedon lives in the town of Sunbury, which is in the corner of the electorate, between Keilor and Yuroke, so in many ways, Sunbury could be considered to be a part of Melbourne. Five minutes' drive from Sunbury into Yuroke is the airport, and Sunbury and the airport are both in the municipality of Hume. Sunbury is connected to Melbourne by a regional rail service, which continues up to Bendigo (the electrification of the St Albans/Sydenham line is at Watergardens rail station in Keilor), however the Government has announced that electrification to Sunbury will occur. Consequently, Sunbury has more in common with electorates of Western and Northern Metropolitan, than it does with the remainder of the Macedon electorate and the rest of the Northern Victoria Region, so I would suspect that the next redistribution will move it back into a Metropolitan Region (aided by massive population growth on the western outskirts of Melbourne, requiring significant changes to boundaries in the area).

Narre Warren North (16.6%) is directly to the north of Narre Warren South, but to the south of Ferntree Gully. Broadmeadows (16.6%) is to the south-west of Yan Yean, and south and east of Yuroke.

Narre Warren South (18.1%) is again the highest, and is therefore most susceptible to the much-documented (on the Election 2012 Board) Age Wave.

The Victorian Average is 13.1%.
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« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2010, 01:19:10 am »
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Map 14 - Proportion of the population aged 15-24 years



Somewhat unsurprisingly, the electorates with the most youth in them are generally electorates with educational facilities. Melbourne (Northern Metropolitan) which contains Melbourne University stands out as having the greatest concentration, although Bundoora (Northern Metropolitan) which contains Deakin University and Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan) which contains Monash University, also stand out. I'm not sure about Hawthorn (Southern Metropolitan) and Scoresby (Eastern Metropolitan), although I suspect that Scoresby is because much of the electorate was a new estate at about the time people with children aged 15-24 years were looking to buy a house.

I was a little surprised by the strength of Bendigo East (Northern Victoria), although it may stand out more than otherwise because of the comparably low levels of young people in neighbouring electorates. Burwood (Southern Metropolitan), Melton (Western Victoria), Mill Park (Northern Metropolitan), Narre Warren North (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Eltham (Eastern Metropolitan) all contain a higher proportion of young people, but are not as obvious.

The Victorian average is 13.7%, however those electorates all had a higher proportion. Eltham (15.6%), Bundoora (15.7%), Scoresby (16.4%), Hawthorn (17.2%) and Clayton (19.4) all have a large number of young people living in them, however Melbourne (29.7%) has far more than any other electorate in the state.
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« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2010, 02:13:19 am »
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Map 15 - Proportion of the population aged 25-64 years



Almost all electorates have over half their population in the 25-64 year age bracket, with a few notable exceptions. Nepean (Eastern Victoria), Broadmeadows (Northern Metropolitan), Ballarat West (Western Victoria), Swan Hill (Northern Victoria) and Mount Waverley (Southeastern Metropolitan) all have fewer than 50% of the population aged between 25 and 64 years.

Nepean (47.7%) is a seachange electorate on the southern side of Port Philip Bay. This electorate will become more obvious in the next map, especially as it has been towards the lower end of the last three maps, and was the lowest of both this map and the last map.

Broadmeadows (48.9%) has a very high number of children, and was near the top of the brackets of both the 0-4 age group and the 5-14 age group. I suspect that later maps showing single parent families may have Broadmeadows towards the upper end of the list (cheated, flicked ahead and found that it has the third highest proportion of single-parent families). Keep an eye on Broadmeadows, it is going to show up at one end or the other of most of the charts coming up, including lowest % of high income families, highest % of low income families, lowest median income, highest unemployment rate, lowest % of managers and professionals, one of the highest % of people employed in manufacturing, lowest % of tertiary qualifications, lowest % by employment ratio, second highest youth unemployment rate, lowest participation rate, lowest level of women in the workforce... anyway, you get the picture.

Ballarat West (49.0%) puzzles me a little - it's been sort of in the middle of the maps showing children, and was only three-quarters or so up the list of young people. There's a university there, so I was surprised at how low it was on that one, but regardless, it's not that high up. I might have speculated that it was a bit of a tree-change electorate, but it's less than three-quarters up the next map... I'm just going to have to put it down to "don't know what's going on here."

Swan Hill (49.4%) is a rural electorate. I'm not entirely certain the reason for it, although it comes second (after Nepean) on the next map. By not entirely certain of the reason - I mean, I'm not sure if it's a tree-change electorate, where people are settling after retirement (probably along the banks of the Murray), or whether it's because many of the younger people have moved away... probably a bit of both, I'd suspect.

Mount Waverley (49.8%) also puzzles me. It comes third on the next map (after Nepean and Swan Hill), but I hadn't thought of it as a particularly aged electorate. I think there may be a few retirement homes and aged care facilities there, but I didn't think there were enough of them to warrant such a high number. It's the southern end of Melbourne's so-called 'Bible belt' but I always thought it was more young evangelical families, rather than retirees. I also thought it wealthy enough that older people living there could afford to move interstate or to the coast or country upon retirement. Perhaps it contains a large number of recently retired people who may be doing the whole 'grey nomad' Winnebago type thing who marked their "place of usual address" on the Census form as being in this electorate. I guess it's a slightly older electorate than Scoresby, in that the people who bought in Scoresby are probably just a few years younger than the people who bought in Mount Waverley, and therefore if Scoresby contained a high proportion of youth as a result, perhaps Mount Waverley has just hit the empty nest stage.

At the other end of the Spectrum Northcote (Northern Metropolitan), Brunswick (Northern Metropolitan), Prahran (Southern Metropolitan), Richmond (Northern Metropolitan) and Albert Park (Southern Metropolitan) all ring the Melbourne CBD to the north, east and south and probably contain a fairly high number of young professionals and young professional couples. Their youth decreases the percentage of children in those electorates, although the concentration of students in the Melbourne CBD reduces its proportion of people in this age bracket.

While the Victorian average is 53.4%, these electorates are all closer to the 60% mark or higher: Northcote (59.2%), Brunswick (59.4%), Prahran (65.1%), Richmond (66.4%) and Albert Park (67.6%).
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« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2010, 03:31:35 am »
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Seeing as Shepparton is a constituency based on a middling town... that's a little odd.
Map 10 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who identify as being indigenous Australians.


I was a little surprised by the strength of Bendigo East (Northern Victoria)
This would make perfect sense if there was some kind of university (agricultural college, whatever) in Bendigo... apparently not, though. Huh
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« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2010, 05:03:19 am »
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Seeing as Shepparton is a constituency based on a middling town... that's a little odd.
Map 10 - Proportion of People living in Victorian State Electorates, who identify as being indigenous Australians.

It's a rural town, though, and does take in a bit of farming communities around it, so Shepparton's strength didn't surprise me so much. Unlike the US and Canada, we don't have Native Reserves, so frequently indigenous Australians live in rural towns and on (eg. cattle) properties.

I was a little surprised by the strength of Bendigo East (Northern Victoria)
This would make perfect sense if there was some kind of university (agricultural college, whatever) in Bendigo... apparently not, though. Huh

That's what I would have thought, but I'm not really sure... Googling "Bendigo East" and as I'm typing it's suggesting swimming club, bowling club, baseball and secondary college... but no universities. Unless that secondary college is huge, I'm not quite sure what is attracting young people to the area.
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Lewis Trondheim
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« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2010, 05:17:40 am »
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Maybe there's an army installation in the constituency? It does take in quite a few rural areas along with half of Bendigo after all.
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I may conceivably reconsider.

Knowing me it's more likely than not.
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« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2010, 05:34:28 am »
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Map 16 - Proportion of the Population aged 65 Years and Over



A few things to note... the first that really popped out to my is that ring of middle suburbs of metropolitan Melbourne - any further out and you have young families buying homes and any further in and you have the young professionals and young couples buying in the inner suburbs. The ring, however, is cut on the southeastern side by a string of five electorates with a lower level of people aged 65 years and older. These five electorates are Malvern (Southern Metropolitan), Oakleigh (Southern Metropolitan), Clayton (Southeastern Metropolitan), Mulgrave (Southeastern Metropolitan) and Dandenong (Southeastern Metropolitan). These five electorates all run along the Pakenham/Cranbourne railway line (technically, it cuts through the edge of Caulfield, too, but it doesn't penetrate that electorate very deeply), and there is a university in the middle (Monash, in Clayton).

The electorates with the most people aged 65 years and older were:

Nepean (Eastern Victoria), Swan Hill (Northern Victoria), Mount Waverley (Southeastern Metropolitan), Gippsland East (Eastern Victoria), Benalla (Northern Victoria) and Bellarine (Western Victoria).

I've already mentioned that Mount Waverley (19.8%) puzzles me a little. Swan Hill (20.0%), Gippsland East (19.5%) and Benalla (19.2%) are all rural electorates. I'm not sure if any of these electorates are affected more by an influx of "tree change" retirees, or whether they are more affected by young people moving to the city, or whether it's a combination of both. Of these, Gippsland East could be a combination of both tree change retirees and sea change retirees, because it is both rural and has a coastline. I guess I could take a closer look at some point at the actual breakdown of that electorate and see where most of the 65+ age group live within the electorate. I would be almost certain that Bellarine (19.1%) and Nepean (27.7%) are sea change electorates, most affected by an influx of retirees moving to the coast. These two seats are on opposing peninsulas at the mouth of Port Philip Bay.

Given the massive boom in young families moving into new housing estates in Narre Warren South, it is unsurprising that it has the least proportion of people aged over 65 years (5.3%). The Victorian average is 13.7%.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 10:24:13 pm by Smid »Logged
Smid
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« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2010, 05:37:30 am »
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Maybe there's an army installation in the constituency? It does take in quite a few rural areas along with half of Bendigo after all.

Now that's a thought! Puckapunyal is up that way somewhere, although I though it was in Seymour... however that would be the nearest major town, perhaps? I'll look into that...
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