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Author Topic: Changing lives of George Wallace, Jim Folsom, John Patterson and U.S. history  (Read 13292 times)
Princess Kenny
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« on: July 23, 2010, 04:28:44 pm »
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I hope I'll be able to actually continue this one, with a real, multiple butterflies.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 07:29:12 pm by The Great and Awesome State of Delaware »Logged

Princess Kenny
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 04:29:25 pm »
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In the late 1961, a four-term Democratic incumbent J. Lister Hill made an stunning announcement that he will not seek reelection as the United States Senator from Alabama.


Senator J. Lister Hill

For decades Hill has been known as one of the most moderate, if not liberal, Southern Democrats, championing issues like health care, education, labor, even breaking off with his colleagues on subjects such like federal control of the offshore drilling. On the other hand he signed an infamous “Southern Manifesto” opposing Brown v. Board of Education historic landmark rule, and was giving his loyal support (although never player an important roles in) consensutive civil rights filibuster attempts.

The lack of an incumbent in the Senate race additionally raised already very hot, due to incoming key gubernatorial election (or rather Democratic gubernatorial primary), political atmosphere in Alabama.

Governor John M. Patterson was constitutionally barred from seeking an consensutive term, which was a common provision in the South back those times. Outside Alabama Patterson was known as the chief, most militant segregationist in the country, after winning difficult 1958 primary with an open backing from the Ku Klux Klan. During his four years in office, Patterson gained a nationwide infamy for restless prosecuting of the NAACP, suppressing civil rights demonstrations and defying Federal Government interventions.


Governor John M. Patterson

Yet, on the other hand Patterson, a classical segregationist out of political opportunism, beside race matters had a strong record as a progressive Democrat, having took a number of successfull social/economic initiatives, plus broughting a sound management to the state after an erratic and corrupt administration of his predecessor. Patterson was also remembered, and was using it effectively as an election tool, as mob-busting Attorney General, cleaning up an infamous mafia-controlled Pheniz City.

Unsurprisingly, Patterson, the youngest Governor in Alabama history (being just 41 year old at the time) quickly became a front-runner to succeed Hill.

The gubernatorial primary, meanwhile, featured three leading candidates.

The first was no one else than Patterson unfortunate predecessor at the gubernatorial mansion, Jim Folsom. A legendary "Big Jim", known for his erratic, sometimes outrageous, manners, Folsom was an outstanding, and a tragic, figure in the Southern history. A fierce populist, once a supporter of former Vice President Henry A. Wallace, he was the first Chief Executive below Mason-Dixon line to embrace civil rights issue. Folsom had clearly dreamed about making an historic alliance between lower-class Whites and Black population in order to fight a semi-feudal influence of the "Old Mules": wealthy Black Belt rular interest, that deliberately used race issue to turn poor whites against Blacks, while keeping both, more or less, out of any real influence.


Former Governor "Big Jim" Folsom

Folsom had already served two terms (1947-1951, 1955-1959), more than any Governor before, except of Bibb Graves. His populist ideas were as appealing to poorer White voters to allow him to win each time, despite his sympathy to the Black population, his opponents never missed an opportunity to point out. However, most of his progressive measures were blocked by the legislature. Folsom also had no fortune for a friends, which made his administration one of the most corrupt and lavish in the recent history.

The second candidate was a former Judge and Folsom protege George Wallace. He was running against Patterson in 1958 as a racial moderate, with a NAACP backing. After losing to the Attorney General, Wallace commented privately: "John Patterson outniggered me. I won’t let anyone to outnigger me again", thus switching to the same hard-die segregationist positions his rival used to win.

And the third was prominent Tuscaloosa attorney Ryan DeGraffenried, who ran an a racial moderate, doing surprisingly well in the polls.


Former Judge George C. Wallace


Attorney Ryan DeGraffenried


Alabama gubernatorial Democratic primary (May 1, 1962)

George Wallace: 33%
Jim Folsom: 25%

Ryan DeGraffenried: 23%
MacDonald Gallion: 12%
Bull Connor: 5%
J. Bruce Henderson: 1%
Wayne Jennings: 1%

Following the runoff, with DeGraffenried endorsement and his old populist tactics, Folsom, who was already thought by many as an finished loser, walking antic, came from behind and pulled a narrow runoff victory. Thus, he secured an unprecedented, third gubernatorial term in Montgomery.

Alabama gubernatorial Democratic primary runoff (June 24, 1962)

Jim Folsom: 50.2%
George Wallace: 49.8%

Alabama gubernatorial election (November 6, 1962)

Jim Folsom (D): 91%
Frank P. Walls (R): 9%

Meanwhile, Patterson cruised to an easy victory in Senatorial race.

Alabama Senatorial Democratic primary (June 1, 1962)

John M. Patterson: 62%
John G. Crommelin: 30%
Albert Boutwell: 8%

United States Senate election in Alabama (November 6, 1962)

John M. Patterson (D): 79%
James D. Martin (R): 21%
« Last Edit: June 11, 2011, 05:40:23 pm by Keystone Rick »Logged

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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2010, 04:46:21 pm »

This should be good.
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Princess Kenny
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2010, 06:28:23 pm »
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I just can’t believe this!, George Wallace screamed to his advisors just a seconds after he learned about his second gubernatorial loss. How the hell couldn’t I outnigger Jim Folsom?!

On January 3, 1963 Governor John M. Patterson took an oath before Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson to become Junior United States Senator from Alabama. Because of this outgoing Lieutenant Governor Albert B. Boutwell, who run simultaneously a quixotic campaign for Senate against his boss and a successfull bid for Birmingham Mayor, served a 11 days of the remainder of Patterson’s term as the 45th Governor of Alabama.

In the Senate Patterson immediately became aligned with a Southern Bloc, led by Senior Senators like fellow Alabaman John Sparkman, Georgia’s Richard Russell or Mississippi’s James Eastland.

On January 14 Jim Folsom was inaugurated, along with new Lieutenant Governor, an conservative Jim Allen, for the unprecedented, third gubernatorial term.

During campaigning Folsom was very cautious about segregation issue, dodging the question and focusing mostly on his old-school populist rethorics as well as his personal appeal. However, the victory had been welcomed by liberals in Alabama and other states, just as infuriated segregationists.

Reverend Martin Luther King himself was rather cautious. Either we’ve got a friend again or he finally became a part of this machine, he said to his friends.

However, despite campaign cautiously, in his inaugural address Folsom, realizing that it’s his probably last term, thus “now or never”, openly raised the issue.

I do believe we can finally find a harmony between all oppressed, working men of Alabama., he exclaimed.

Sense of these words was clear.


Governors of Alabama:

42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 20, 1947 – January 15, 1951
43rd: S. Gordon Persons (D), January 15, 1951 – January 17, 1955
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 17, 1955 – January 19, 1959
44th: John M. Patterson (D), January 19, 1959 – January 3, 1963
45th: Albert B. Boutwell (D), January 3, 1963 – January 14, 1963
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 14, 1963 –


United States Senators from Alabama (Class 3)

J. Lister Hill (D), January 11, 1938 – January 3, 1963
John M. Patterson (D), January 3, 1963 -
« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 02:55:12 pm by Alternate George Wallace »Logged

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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2010, 06:41:30 pm »
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This is really good so far. I'm excited to see what this means for the future!
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Princess Kenny
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2010, 07:24:57 pm »
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Is this all over?, George Wallace keep to ask himself all over again since a fateful June runoff.

He worked very hard to achieve the top all his life and no one could deny this, even his bitter opponents. He comes close to become Governor once, when he was fighting to continue his mentor and friend progressive dream, just to lose to the segregationist bloc.

So all right, George took the lesson and tried again, just to lose again, to no one else that his former mentor and friend, coming back from the political wilderness in a big style.

Patterson is a Senator, Jim is Governor again, and I’m out of everything. This is not gonna work again.

Populists wouldn’t forgive him and segregationist will have their new darlings soon, before he could reemerge.

Wallace carefully yet somewhat desperate considering how to make a comeback, he finally decided to run in 1966 for Attorney General, under a his old “Little Judge” theme. If this gonna work, maybe someday...


Meanwhile, Senator Patterson found himself in a rather weird situation.

Back in 1959/1960 he was the first Southern Governor to, which was a riskily move, endorse Kennedy for President and played little known, yet important role in his campaign, even if Alabama delegation firmly went for Johnson at the Convention.

A Southern Baptist quickly get well along with a Massachusetts Catholic and tried to help him as much as he could. He even come very close to committing a serious federal offense by warning Kennedy about the planned Bay of Pigs invasion, as upon President Eisenhower request (Senator served in his staff during the World War II), he leaned Alabama Air National Guard planes for the training and the use by Cuban refugees. Worrying about strenghting Nixon chances in November if invasion take place soon, he leaked these informations and prevented early landing. Also, Patterson was instrumental with convincing all lukewarm Alabama electors to loyally support the ticket.

Patterson stances against integration didn’t harmed his good terms with the President. However, his relationships with Robert Kennedy were very strained, as the two confronted during the crisis. Patterson was somehow a mix of George Smathers, another Southern segregationist out of strict opportunism, who was also a close President’s friend and ally, and RKF personal enemy.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2010, 02:47:23 am by Jefferson John C. Breckinridge Dent IV »Logged

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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2010, 08:23:58 pm »
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This is very good, although I think it would have been more interesting to see Wallace as the perennial loser. Keep it coming!
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Princess Kenny
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« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2010, 02:49:55 am »
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This is very good, although I think it would have been more interesting to see Wallace as the perennial loser. Keep it coming!

You're right, so I modified the last one.
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Princess Kenny
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« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2010, 05:32:05 am »
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Everyone are inheriting some problems. John Patterson inherited a largely incompetent and lavish administration from Folsom. Now Folsom inherited a large race problem from Patterson.

A hard-die stance Patterson presented on civil rights issue only radicalized White population feelings. Back in late 1940s/early 1950s under first Folsom administration (mostly thanks to represented populist ideas) Alabama was even considered an bastion of enlightenment and liberalism in the South, between reactionary Georgia and Mississippi. Now, after Brown rule and other Federal Government actions, that reputation was long gone.

“Big Jim” fully realizes that there is no earthly way for him to have a legislature support. 1901 Constitution is a source of all this s**t, the Governor said. It was written deliberately to frame not only niggras, but poor working Whites as well. Ole Big Mules are turning two natural friends against each other.

On the other hand, Alabama Governors always wielded a large executive powers. Patterson used it to suppress civil right demonstrations. Folsom, who during his previous two terms vetoed most of the racist measures, decided to order State Highway Patrol and National Guard, under a command of General Henry Graham, to actively protect the demonstrators and so-called “Freedom Raiders”.

Of course he risked a White Blackash so, once again, he concentrated his vocal efforts on attacking establishment, once again proving how appealing to White working masses this way.

Despite initial fears Alabama Government did not even attempted to prevent two Black students to the University of Alabama in June 1963.

With a blacklash, Folsom was not as popular as he used to be, yet he still controlled enough populist sentiments to remain in a position.

Ironically, to this fierce populist with an outrageous manners, followed an example of former distinguished Florida Governor LeRoy Collins to ensure peaceful transition.

Passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act gave Folsom an opportunity he wanted: to form a coalition between a working class Whites, urban population and African Americans. However, due to recent actions, his position was weakened.


In the mid-1963 President John F. Kennedy began to think about replacing Johnson as his running-mate in 1964. I’d like to choose some pro-civil rights Governor from the South, someone I could work with well, he said to his secretary Evelyn Lincoln. So, as of my next running-mate, it can be Terry Sanford or Jim Folsom, but surely not Lyndon again.

Kennedy had a clear plan to choose a Southerner acceptable due to pro-civil rights stance, yet still popular in his area. That ruled out his two Senate friends, segregationist like George Smathers of John Patterson.

However, the idea never fulfilled, as Kennedy was assassinated in November 1964 in Dallas, Texas, before he could even try to drop LBJ, now the President of the United States.
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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2010, 12:28:15 pm »
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This is very good stuff. Keep it coming!
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« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2010, 01:32:03 pm »
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Senator Patterson relationships with the new President Lyndon B. Johnson were really strained. LBJ knew and could hardly forgive former Alabama Governor’s his heavy involvement in JFK’s 1960 quest for the Democratic Party nomination.

Furthermore, Patterson, who was keeping a very good terms with fellow Southern Bloc members, quickly emerged as one of the most vocal opponents of President’s Civil Rights agenda, himself filibustering the, eventually passed, 1964 Act for 18 hours, gaining additional notoriety (very positive in the Deep South, while infamous in the rest of the country).

Although he was firmly supporting the President’s Great Society agenda, that couldn’t make things right between them.

On the other hand, while perceived as an die hard segregationist almost exclusively, John Patterson, assigned to the Committees on the Judiciary and Labor by Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield, was now using his experience as Attorney General to make his mark on this field.


George Wallace couldn’t wait. Patience never figures in his vocabulary. Instead of mounting a bid for an Attorney General he decided to run sooner and for something else. More specifically, a seat in the United States House of Representatives from Alabama’s 2nd district, including his home Barbour County. The district was just reinstated after two-years hiatus which guarantees no incumbency to face.
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« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2010, 03:10:24 pm »
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With a Civil Rights Act of 1964 already passed and a Voting Rights Act underway, Governor Folsom saw an opportunity to finally build a progressive coalition composing new Black voters, working class Whites, particularly from most moderate Northern region of Alabama and Urban educated population. This was however very hard task. He still was cautious to openly court African Americans, despite sympathy they had toward him, to not lose a control over poorer Whites, which could been easily provoked by his opponents against “niggras”.  

However there were a clear signs of progress. Due to his policies, much like Georgia governed by a fellow Democrat Carl E. Sanders, and Florida, were considered rather a peaceful states regarding desegregation. Of course, there were hate and accidents, yet in contrast to other areas situation was quite stable. And that wasn’t just improvement of the “Heart of Dixie” reputation abroad. Lack of flames also caused a drop of radical feelings inside.

Yet, Governor knew there’s a long way to go before he could achieve the goal.

Very popular President Johnson, meanwhile, in a wake of his almost guaranteed landslide “reelection” in November 1964, seriously considered, just like his tragically deceased predecessor, to nominate a progressive Southern Governor for Vice President. Someone who would be both acceptable to the base and due to own popularity could help in the South, where anti-Civil Rights blacklash could allow the GOP to make a gains.

Terry Sanford and Jim Folsom were his prime choices. “Big Jim” knew that of course and that was a source of a major problem to him. He always harboured some uncertain ambitions for a higher office and still was in an appropriate age to enter the national politics. Yet, on the other hand, he felt it would be very dangerous to leave the work in a middle to the term, especially to someone like Lieutenant Governor Jim Allen.

The problem was solved without him forced to decide whether to accept or not. Out of fear of Folsom now more "civic" yet still remembered manners plus drunkenness, Johnson choose Sanford and the both cruised to an easy win in November, even if few Deep South states were carried by the Republican Goldwater/Miller ticket.

But not Alabama, where President Johnson, despite some attempts, remained in the ballot and barely beat unpledged electors slot, as Governor Folsom and his allies deliberately kept Goldwater/Miller ticket out of ballot.



President Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas/Governor J. Terry Sanford of North Carolina (Democratic): 496 ev
Senator Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona/Representative William E. Miller of New York (Republican): 42 ev


On the local lever Republicans however made a gains. One in the reactivated 2nd Congressional district.

Former Judge George Wallace easily won a Democratic primary and was already happy to be back to the public life. Still, it was Alabama and primary meant tantamount to election.

Well, not this time. Losing twice gubernatorial primary was a pitiful thing, but still these were Democratic primary. Losing to a Republican in a Heart of Dixie was a real blow and a shame.


Alabama 2nd Congressional district race, 1964

William Louis Dickinson (R): 54%
George C. Wallace (D): 46%


I'm so useless
« Last Edit: July 24, 2010, 07:03:08 pm by Alternate George Wallace »Logged

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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2010, 06:04:50 pm »
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This is very interesting. I like this a lot. Keep it coming!
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« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2010, 07:01:29 pm »
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Oh, due to butterflies, except to see this guy in action too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJ36gv3AP_s

Grin

In more prominent action I mean.


Also, any more comments/suggestions/etc.?
« Last Edit: July 24, 2010, 07:05:00 pm by Alternate George Wallace »Logged

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« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2010, 08:56:10 pm »
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YESSSSSSSS

SHORTY WILL RISE!!!!!!
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« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2010, 12:33:50 am »
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This is really good, Kal! That's a really interesting scenario: "erasing" George Wallace from political life.
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« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2010, 10:47:10 am »
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All I’m doing here is a damn firefighter job, Governor Folsom complained to his friends.

And indeed, as Governor with his direct executive powers, he played this role. He was fairly successfull in preventing racial riots and counterattacks from the segregationist, including ensuring a peaceful conduct of Selma march. All that contributed to ease of a tension and bringing Alabama transition more to Florida and Georgia model, rather than Mississippi's one.

That was an undisputed accomplishment. However Folsom was not happy. Legislature was still controlled firmly by his enemies, which rules out all attempts to pass a legislations and, more notably, to revise an reactionary 1901 Alabama constitution. Without this, large masses still were out of influence and even with his rhetorical campaign that always electricized working class Whites, it still was far from a breaking point.

Constitutionally forbidden from running for reelection in 1966, Folsom had to leave an office with some satisfaction yet some bitterness at one.

The field of candidates to succeed him was wide and diverse.
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« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2010, 02:06:36 pm »
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Lieutenant Governor James Browning Allen was one of the most obvious candidates to succeed retiring Folsom, despite being his fierce opponent (as two top office holders are elected separately). A blood and flesh of the Big Mules establishment, Allen spend last four years sitting with them against “Big Jim” on virtually every issue and now was their candidate to “bring back the order”.

Allen, however, had his weak points. While a skilled, even brilliant, political operative, he was a poor campaigner, sometimes even called a dullard, who could hardly won people’s hearts, as Folsom did. His strength comes from the machine, the same machine which kept working class down.

Yet, he still had a strong backing and money.


Lieutenant Governor Jim Allen

The opposite wing was represented by an surprise 1962 race hero, Ryan DeGraffenried. After narrowly missing runoff back then, DeGraffenried didn’t seek any other office, yet was building carefully his position to run for Governor again.

A moderate, gentle attorney became a close ally to a raging Governor Folsom, whom, as we remember, he endorsed, thus destroying Wallace’s chances and could count on his activity at the campaign trail.


Ryan DeGraffenried

The third major, yet not as strong, candidate, was wealthy businessman, World War II hero who miraciously survived severe all-body burning, Charles Woods. Woods had a name recognition and a money to campaign.


Charles Woods

And of course there were a number of minor candidates. One of them was no one else than George Wallace, desperately trying to make it after three embarrassing failures.

Wallace this time haven’t even raised a segregation issue. Instead he tried to play ”middle of the road” game, barking at “clownish” Folsom, yet trying to use the same populist rhetoric against Alabama establishment.

Among other minor players there was also Ralph “Shorty” Price. Shorty, an attorney and notorious ‘Bama football team fan, who landed in a jail many times after the games, was already a legend in the state politics. If there was an election, he ran, sometimes using his old posters, just striking “Shorty for Governor” to “Shorty for Congress” or vice versa. A good-natured Price run just for fun, as he never came even close to win (except in 1952, when he became an alternate Alabama delegate to the Democratic National Convention).

Shorty was also a former roomate of fellow Barbour County native Wallace at the University and spend a lot of time to rash and make fun of him at the campaign trail.


A self-described “Budweiser and Tampa Nugget Cigars Man” Shorty Price campaigning
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« Reply #18 on: July 25, 2010, 02:52:42 pm »
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Alabama Democratic gubernatorial primary (May 3, 1966)

Ryan DeGraffenried: 32%
Jim Allen: 30%

Charles Woods: 19%
A. W. Todd: 7%
Asa Carter: 5%
Bob Gilchrist: 4%
Shorty Price: 2%
George Wallace: 1%

As excepted, in an upcoming runoff the Alabama voters will soon decide between a moderate DeGraffenried and conservative Allen.

Shorty Price was overjoyed both by finishing second-to-last (a big improvement), and defeating his former roomate, who suffered a fourth consensutive decisive lose.


After the campaign Shorty proclaimed his success and promised that after his inventable victory in 1970, he’ll cut the gubernatorial term down to two years and won’t impose a taxes on air to breathe and a right to going to the bathroom, unlike all of his opponents.

This election night was one of the worst nights in Wallace’s life, as after results came, a small yet loud group of Price supporters, led by a candidate himself, chanted outside his HQ: Shorty, Shorty, he’s our man. Wallace belongs to the garbage can.

Alabama Democratic gubernatorial primary runoff (June 1966)

Ryan DeGraffenried: 53%
Jim Allen: 47%

With a help of outgoing Governor and his own previous capital, DeGraffenried beat Big Mules candidate and then scored an easy, thus not as lopsided as usual, win in November.

Alabama gubernatorial election (November 8, 1966)

Ryan DeGraffenried (D): 62%
James D. Martin (R): 34%
Carl Robinson (I): 2%

During the same race, State House of Representatives Speaker Albert Brewer had been elected Lieutenant Governor in a low-key race.

Governors of Alabama:

42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 20, 1947 – January 15, 1951
43rd: S. Gordon Persons (D), January 15, 1951 – January 17, 1955
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 17, 1955 – January 19, 1959
44th: John M. Patterson (D), January 19, 1959 – January 3, 1963
45th: Albert B. Boutwell (D), January 3, 1963 – January 14, 1963
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 14, 1963 – January 16, 1967
46th: Ryan DeGraffenried (D), January 16, 1967 -
« Last Edit: July 25, 2010, 02:57:49 pm by Alternate George Wallace »Logged

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« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2010, 07:17:48 pm »
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After the failure of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and subsequent 1965 Voting Rights Act filibusters, Senator Patterson, as many of his colleagues, showed the lesser interest in fighting civil rights measures for now, remaining vocally opposing to them of course.

By 1965 Alabama Junior Senator gets more involved in the Judiciary and Health and Labor Committees, slowly starting to make a mark other than an infamous segregationist.

In 1967, however, which was alsopublicly noted, along with many other Southern Senators, he voted against nomination of Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court.

Patterson strongly supporter the escalation of the Vietnam War and Great Society programs, although he remained one of the LBJ personal enemies.


Senator John M. Patterson


Due to protests against the Vietnam War and riots all across the country, President Johnson seemed vulnerable before 1968 election. After almost losing New Hampshire primary to Senator Eugene McCarthy, a proud Texan decided against seeking reelection and Vice President Terry Sanford became establishment’s choice to run instead. However, his lack of position within it as well as involvement in now unpopular Johnson Administration, made him vulnerable as well.

After a wild convention fight between McCarthy, Sanford and George McGovern (a “replacement” for assassinated Robert F. Kennedy, the Vice President was convinced (not without problems) to step aside. Johnson and his machine turned to Senate Majority Whip Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota as a “compromise” candidate. Humphrey was one of Johnson Senate allies and a key man in pushing thorough Great Society agenda in Senate. He was also one of the first choices for the Vice Presidency in 1964 and held some bitterness against former Master of Senate for turning him down.

Humphrey’s choice for Vice President was a real suprise. As Johnson before, he decided to pick a pro-civil rights Southerner to at least neutralize emerging second Dixiecrat rebelion. Among the people mentioned for that role were, for example, former Florida Governor LeRoy Collins, former Georgia Governor Carl Sanders, Maryland Senator Joseph Tydings etc.

However, the new nominee asked former Governor Folsom to join him on the ticket, despite fears about the latter’s behavior in the past. Yet, the choice was fully acceptable and Folsom, already out of office, gladly accepted.

1968 United States presidential election



Senate Majority Whip Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota/Former Governor James E. Folsom of Alabama (Democratic): 280 ev
Former Vice President Richard M. Nixon of California/Governor Spiro T. Agnew of Maryland (Republican): 240 ev
Former Governor Orvall E. Faubus of Arkansas/Governor Lester Maddox of Georgia (State’s Rights Democrats): 17 ev

Humphrey and Folsom scored a very narrow win both in electoral and popular votes terms. The second Dixiecrat rebellion was neutralized partially with Folsom appeal to the Southern populists and partially by the fact they were on ballots only in Alabama and Mississippi (in the latter despite Governor DeGraffenried attempts to prevent it from happening), where Democratic nominees were not placed at all.


Hubert Horatio Humphrey (D-MN), 38th President of the United States
January 20, 1969 -


James Elisha Folsom (D-AL), 39th Vice President of the United States
January 20, 1969-


Senator Patterson, despite being invited by Faubus on the State’s Rights ticket, remained loyal, even if not very active during presidential race, to the Democratic Party. I’m not as stupid to risk my future, he said to his aide.

Renominated easily in a first round, Patterson won second term in November.

United States Senate election in Alabama, 1968

John M. Patterson (D, inc.): 65% 
Perry O. Hooper, Sr. (R): 24%
Robert P. Schwenn (Alabama National Democratic): 11%
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« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2010, 07:33:09 pm »
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I see nobody is feeling sorry for George.
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Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario)
Vazdul
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« Reply #21 on: July 25, 2010, 08:46:56 pm »
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I see nobody is feeling sorry for George.

Nope. He's getting what he deserves.

Keep it coming.
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cpeeks
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« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2010, 01:35:27 am »
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Being from alabama this is neat.
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Princess Kenny
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« Reply #23 on: July 26, 2010, 08:05:56 am »
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Upon taking the office, President Humphrey immediately started to push a several key points of his agenda. The foremost was, of course, a Vietnam question, but also there were other hot button issues, such as easing a tensions between United States and the Soviet Union, as well as confronting problems at home.


President Hubert Humphrey
 

Humphrey policies proved to be fairly successfull and near to the midterm peace talks with North Vietnam were in serious progress, there were a number of contacts between Moscow and Washington and in an inner circle there were also a first talks about opening on China.

Vice President Folsom hadn't played any role in these events. Which doesn’t mean Humphrey haven’t tried to keep him busy. The President was a man who brought a civil right issue to the Democratic plank, his second in command was the first Southern Governor to embrace the problem as well. Thus, Folsom played a key role in his own Southern Strategy (as Republicans were making more and more gains, due to voters dissatisfaction with national Democrats intergationist policies).

Still, even a close relations between the two couldn’t prepere Folsom on what come on February 3, 1971. Shorthy after a second aniversary of his inauguration, President Humphrey suffered a massive heart attack while working in the Oval Office. Taken to GW Hospital, he was soon pronounced dead.


James E. Folsom (D-AL), 38th President of the United States
February 3, 1971 –

Presidents of the United States

35th: John F. Kennedy (D-MA), January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963
36th: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX), November 22, 1963 – January 20, 1969
37th: Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), January 20, 1969 – February 3, 1971
38th: James E. Folsom (D-AL), February 3, 1971 –


Vice Presidents of the United States

37th: Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX), January 20, 1961- November 22, 1963
Vacant
38th: J. Terry Sanford (D-NC), January 20, 1965 – January 20, 1969
39th: James E. Folsom (D-AL), January 20, 1969 – February 3, 1971

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Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario)
Vazdul
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« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2010, 10:59:00 am »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.
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Seriously, it was time to change back to the real avatar.
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