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| | |-+  Changing lives of George Wallace, Jim Folsom, John Patterson and U.S. history
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Author Topic: Changing lives of George Wallace, Jim Folsom, John Patterson and U.S. history  (Read 14860 times)
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« Reply #25 on: July 26, 2010, 03:08:40 pm »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.

Funny thing is that Folsom due to his 1962 loss and, thus, withdrawing from public life is remembered mostly as a 1940s/1950s man, despite being in quite "presidential" age later (he was born the same year LBJ was, and was just 3 years senior to Humphrey).
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« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2010, 04:01:22 pm »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.

Funny thing is that Folsom due to his 1962 loss and, thus, withdrawing from public life is remembered mostly as a 1940s/1950s man, despite being in quite "presidential" age later (he was born the same year LBJ was, and was just 3 years senior to Humphrey).
3

Folsom actually didnt reply retire from public life, he ran for governor in every election untill 1982 but never got many votes after he appeared drunk during that debate with wallace. I know his gradson and he told me that the family swears to this day that the wallace people drugged him. He was picked up that night in cullman and was driven to montgomery about a two plus hour drive, and they caimed that he had 2 or 3 drinks on the way down, but by the time he got on stage he was incoherent, and they say the wallace people drugged on the drive down.
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« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2010, 04:28:21 pm »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.

Funny thing is that Folsom due to his 1962 loss and, thus, withdrawing from public life is remembered mostly as a 1940s/1950s man, despite being in quite "presidential" age later (he was born the same year LBJ was, and was just 3 years senior to Humphrey).
3

Folsom actually didnt reply retire from public life, he ran for governor in every election untill 1982 but never got many votes after he appeared drunk during that debate with wallace. I know his gradson and he told me that the family swears to this day that the wallace people drugged him. He was picked up that night in cullman and was driven to montgomery about a two plus hour drive, and they caimed that he had 2 or 3 drinks on the way down, but by the time he got on stage he was incoherent, and they say the wallace people drugged on the drive down.

Hm, that's interesting. I've of course read election results with Folsom receiving votes in primaries as late as 1980s, but with many sourced saying about withdrawal, I thought it was rather write-ins,

And yes, I've heard about the accident and belief Wallace people were behind this thing.
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« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2010, 09:17:00 pm »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.

Funny thing is that Folsom due to his 1962 loss and, thus, withdrawing from public life is remembered mostly as a 1940s/1950s man, despite being in quite "presidential" age later (he was born the same year LBJ was, and was just 3 years senior to Humphrey).
3

Folsom actually didnt reply retire from public life, he ran for governor in every election untill 1982 but never got many votes after he appeared drunk during that debate with wallace. I know his gradson and he told me that the family swears to this day that the wallace people drugged him. He was picked up that night in cullman and was driven to montgomery about a two plus hour drive, and they caimed that he had 2 or 3 drinks on the way down, but by the time he got on stage he was incoherent, and they say the wallace people drugged on the drive down.

Wouldn't surprise me...
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« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2010, 07:32:31 pm »
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Writer's block.
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« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2010, 07:43:17 pm »
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Nice twist! I can't wait to see what Folsom does as President.

Funny thing is that Folsom due to his 1962 loss and, thus, withdrawing from public life is remembered mostly as a 1940s/1950s man, despite being in quite "presidential" age later (he was born the same year LBJ was, and was just 3 years senior to Humphrey).
3

Folsom actually didnt reply retire from public life, he ran for governor in every election untill 1982 but never got many votes after he appeared drunk during that debate with wallace. I know his gradson and he told me that the family swears to this day that the wallace people drugged him. He was picked up that night in cullman and was driven to montgomery about a two plus hour drive, and they caimed that he had 2 or 3 drinks on the way down, but by the time he got on stage he was incoherent, and they say the wallace people drugged on the drive down.

Hm, that's interesting. I've of course read election results with Folsom receiving votes in primaries as late as 1980s, but with many sourced saying about withdrawal, I thought it was rather write-ins,

And yes, I've heard about the accident and belief Wallace people were behind this thing.

No he was actually on the ballot, and I know alot of people across the nation hate Wallace but he did do alot of good here. The 2 year college system and vocationa schools was started by wallace as well as the free text book act of 1964, and he really wasnt a racist he was an opportunist and this kinda shows it :
 When a supporter asked why he started using racist messages, Wallace replied, "You know, I tried to talk about good roads and good schools and all these things that have been part of my career, and nobody listened. And then I began talking about niggers, and they stomped the floor."
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« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2010, 11:50:54 pm »
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Being known as the “Alabama Most Notorious Loser” was bad already, and life wasn’t more kind for George Wallace. After losing his wife Lurleen, who died on cancer in 1968, which was combined with all previous failures, he developed a heavy drinking habits. In early 1970, the year of the first gubernatorial election he haven’t participated since 1958, he made a rare and definitively not pleaseant headline after getting arrested for violating a “dry laws” of the Cullman County, he was then visiting.


Meanwhile, Governor Ryan DeGraffenried was more fortunate than his predecessor in legislative works, most notably establishing a constitutional reforms convention, which was a first step to revise an archaic Alabama’s 1901 Constitution.

Among other accomplishment of DeGraffenried’s in office were establishing, by an executive order, a first ethic code for a state’s employees and passing a large funds for an education. 

Continuing Folsom policies, adding his non-confrontational style and abilities to work across the lines, of race relations, was also successfull, with more Blacks appointed to the offices and tensions declining. The Governor also tried to find a middle-to-road path on forced school integration, fearing that may cause another segregationist blacklash. 

Relations with his Lieutenant Governor, a moderate Albert Brewer, were complicated, as both supports each others in areas of transition, constitutional reforms and investments. Brewer however clashed badly with the Governor over his reluctance to enforce 1907 Alabama Obscenity Law.
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« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2010, 12:43:23 am »
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What is Wallace doing for a profession aside from drinking? It would be cool to perhaps see him eventually turn his ways around, become a born-again Christian, and maybe become something non-political (maybe a singer? Grin).

Keep it coming, Kal! Cheesy
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« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2010, 12:51:16 am »
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What is Wallace doing for a profession aside from drinking? It would be cool to perhaps see him eventually turn his ways around, become a born-again Christian, and maybe become something non-political (maybe a singer? Grin).

Keep it coming, Kal! Cheesy

Thanks for this question, Han. Next entry should give a response Grin
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« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2010, 01:14:52 am »
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After his 1958 primary loss, George Wallace’s income came mostly from his law office in Montgomery. When he was still a promising politician, he never had any troubles with finding a lients, esspecially when a cases he was offered were about fighting a civil right movement in courts.

Thus, former Judge was able to make both good money and raise his profile among segregationists before next electoral try.

However, after another failure in 1962, and, even more, in 1964, with a fading possibilities, his law practice was declining as well. Wallace was forced to spend a lot of his money during his wife, Lurleen, ilness and soon started to face a poverty.

Depressed after losing both his career and a spouse, with not prospering office and developing a heavy drinking, Wallace stopped to care, believing, his life already ended. He was just like watching what was happening to him like he was watching a movie.

On a summer July night in 1971 Alabama Most Notorious Loser was driving from Montgomery to Clayton City while being, naturally, heavily intoxinated.

Later, Wallace couldn’t recall the moment when his car landed in a lake. He haven’t remembered how he managed, with his limited senses, to get out of the sinking machine. His next memory was him lying on the empty beach and slowly regaining conciosnues.

After a good hour, former gubernatorial and a congressional candidate realized, that he was about to drown and couldn’t find any other explanation for his survival, than a God’s will.

Yes, George Corley Wallace, orginally of Clio, Barbour County, Alabama, was now sure. God saved and gave him the last chance. Last chance to quit immoral drinking and starting a life again. Although most of specialist would simply say this was mere a still drunken man halucination, Wallace remembered a words he heard on the empty beach. The God show him a path he should now enter. And George took it deadly seriously.

After spending severeal weeks on recovering his, forgotten during an insane pursit for a power, Christianity, by September, Wallace started to appear in a radio show of the local station, talking about his experience and encouraging people to born again.
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« Reply #35 on: July 29, 2010, 05:53:57 am »
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As DeGraffenried term approached to the end, most of the observers assumed that either incumbent Lieutenant Governor Albert Brewer or his predecessor and 1966 election runner-up Jim Allen, will became the next Governor.

Despite their memorable clash over 1907 Alabama Obscenity Law, Brewer due to similarity on the most issues was DeGraffenried preferred candidate, and due to lack of better candidate, Allen still was Big Mules prime choice for that position.

In an unusual primary and then election year, only four candidates run in the primary, thing almost unthinkable in Alabama. Beside Brewer and Allen they were an arch-segregationist Asa Carter and, naturally, tireless Shorty Price. Charles Woods, a third placer from 1966, opted against running and aimed at the Lieutenant Governorship instead.

Alabama Democratic gubernatorial primary (May 5, 1970)

Albert Brewer: 46%
Jim Allen: 44%

Shorty Price: 6%
Asa Carter: 4%

A presence of two minor candidates (with a joke candidate Shorty again gaining second-to-last place and overperforming) caused both Brewer and Allen to have a runoff.


Asa Carter poor last place showed the decline of an appeal of traditional race-baiting rhetorics

Alabama Democratic gubernatorial primary runoff (June 2, 1970)

Albert Brewer: 54%
Jim Allen: 46%

And now it seemed that a moderate path of Democratic Governance conducted by Folsom and DeGraffenried is safe for another four years. However, in a great shocked, shorty after declaring Brewer a Democratic nominee, in a last, truly desperate attempt to save an declining influence of Big Mules, Allen announced that he’ll continue his campaign as an “Independent Democrat”.

Charles Woods won a nomination for Lieutenant Governor without problems in a first round.

Meanwhile, nobody really payed an attention to the Republican primary, as whoever would get the nod, was perceived as a sure loser in general. It was clear for the observers that the election is going to be a Democratic prolonged inside fight.

Thus, when Congressman William Louis Dickinson, who won a seat in 1964 defeating George Wallace, entered the race instead of seeking reelection in a now safe district, most of the people said he’s committing a political suicide.

However, all predictions went wrong. Due to massive vote splitting Alabama get the first Republican Governor since the reconstruction.

Alabama gubernatorial election, 1970

William Louis Dickinson (Republican): 35%
Albert Brewer (Democratic): 34%
Jim Allen (Independent Democrat): 31%

Charles Woods went to win a race for Lieutenant Governor without a Republican candidate opposing him.


William Louis „Bill“ Dickinson
The First Republican Governor of Alabama since the Reconstruction

Governors of Alabama:

42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 20, 1947 – January 15, 1951
43rd: S. Gordon Persons (D), January 15, 1951 – January 17, 1955
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 17, 1955 – January 19, 1959
44th: John M. Patterson (D), January 19, 1959 – January 3, 1963
45th: Albert B. Boutwell (D), January 3, 1963 – January 14, 1963
42nd: James E. Folsom (D), January 14, 1963 – January 16, 1967
46th: Ryan DeGraffenried (D), January 16, 1967 - January 18, 1971

47th: William L. Dickinson (R), January 18, 1971 -

Lieutenant Governors of Alabama:

16th: James C. Inzer (D), January 20, 1947 – January 15, 1951
17th: James B. Allen (D), January 15, 1951 – January 17, 1955
18nd: William G. Hardwick (D), January 17, 1955 – January 19, 1959
19th: Albert B. Boutwell (D), January 19, 1959 – January 3, 1963

Vacant, January 3, 1963 – January 14, 1963
20th: James B. Allen  (D), January 13, 1963 – January 16, 1967
21st: Albert P. Brewer (D), January 16, 1967 - January 18, 1971
22nd: Charles Woods (D), January 18, 1971 –
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« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2010, 08:09:57 am »
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This is a great timeline. I can really see Wallace become the poster child for the religious right. Keep it coming!
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« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2010, 10:33:47 am »
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Smiley I like how you gave Wallace a "Amazing Grace " moment.
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« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2010, 02:18:36 pm »
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A Republican victory in the gubernatorial race in Alabama was, as said, a real shocker. However, some observers pointed out that from 1967 to 1971 Florida already had a Republican in the state house, while Georgia almost got one. In both cases, just like in Alabama, the key factor were splitting or division of the Democratic votes. Claude R. Kirk was elected when Conservative Democratic fraction refused to support Miami Mayor Robert High King, who upsets an incumbent Haydon Burns in primary. In Georgia, meanwhile, a strong, independent campaign run by a liberal former Governor Ellis Arnall against a suprise conservative nominee Lester Maddox, after presence of moderate third candidate Jimmy Carter caused a runoff, allowed Bo Callahan to win a plurality and only thanks to overwhelming Democratic majority in Legislature Maddox went to the office.

Although in 1970 Kirk lost reelection in Florida while Republicans had no shot up in Georgia, some pundits said, that a narrow Dickinson victory under similar as in 1966 circumstances, is just another illustration that Alabama, although still little slower, is moving to a camp of moderate Southern states in Florida and Georgia mood, instead of those like Mississippi.
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« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2010, 04:40:14 pm »
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Presidential swearing-in is usually a bittersweet ceremony. Joyfull for the one just ascending the highest office of the land, and, in the most of cases, sad one for those who are leaving, whether defeated or term-limited.

Yet, there are an exceptions from the rule. One of such exceptions took place on the day of February 3, 1971 in the White House Cabinet Room, just an hour after President Humphrey was found unconsciousness at his Oval Office desk.

No one was in a good mood, nor even had to pretend a sombrely. Especially the new White House chief occupant, who despite his usual energy and ambitions had no idea, what to do next.

Mr. Vice President, are you ready to take an constitutional oath?, the Chief Justice Abe Fortas, one of the last LBJ’s appointees, asked pro forma.

I am, Mr. Chief Justice, an unusually tall man with a graying hairs, who now, especially now, after he realizes that he have to take a rein under such circumstances, didn’t reminded a notorious Southern Populist he used to be years ago, replied.       

I, James Elisha Folsom, do solemnly swear...

I, James Elisha Folsom, do solemnly swear

That I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States...

That I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States

And will to the best of my Ability...

And will to the best of my Ability

Preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

Preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, so help me God.
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« Reply #40 on: July 30, 2010, 07:25:44 am »
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President Folsom was immediately confronted with a number of an urgent tasks.

In his very brief speech following taking an oath of office, he quickly reassured his commitment to already ongoing Humphrey’s projects and initiatives, such as peace talks with North Vietnam, detente with the Soviet Union and new relations with the European allies.

That wasn’t, of course, suprising, especially since most of the observers pointed out the new President’s total lack of experience regarding foreign affairs. So it was widely assumed he’ll from now on merely preside over a works continued by administration specialist.

Perhaps the first and most urgent task was to appoint, for the first time since passing the 25th Amendment, the new Vice President. As the Democrats already had to think seriously about 1972, the team was supposed to be balanced, which already rules out a nomination of a Southerner.

After several consultations with the Democratic national a congressional leader, President Folsom already decides to pick someone to balance his foreign policy weakness. Although some suggested to pick a candidate from already safe Democratic states, on March 23, 1971 President had announced a selection of Senator Frank Church of Idaho, Senate Foreign Committee active member, for his second in command.

Beside making a clear signal regarding foreign policy, Church was also a part of a developing 1972 strategy. A ticket featuring a pro-civil rights Southerner and a representative of Western states, both acceptable for the Democratic base.

As excepted, Church was easily and quickly confirmed by the Congress and took an office on May 8, 1971.


Frank F. Church (D-ID), 40th Vice President of the United States
May 8, 1971 -
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« Reply #41 on: July 30, 2010, 12:30:03 pm »
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This is really good. Keep it coming!
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« Reply #42 on: July 30, 2010, 01:28:42 pm »
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Since I'm little dry for ideas for Folsom Presidency as well as Patterson, I'll focus more, for some time, on new George Wallace's career, hoping that it won't destroy a chronology.
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« Reply #43 on: July 30, 2010, 04:23:32 pm »
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I’ve talk to the people many times, but I never talked with them. I was blind, blinded with my petty and arrogant pursuit for a power. I’ve paid a great, but well-deserved, price for my arrogance and blindness. But God Almighty gave me the last chance and here I am.

This voice, once familiar from a rumping political speeches, had become known all around Alabama once again. Yes, that was the same voice, but a diffrent man.

In the mid 1972, Reverend George Wallace started his public crusade to make Barbour County a dry county and, after he achieved this goal, to bring a prohibition back to Alabama.


Radioevangelist, Reverend George Wallace during one of his sermons

I know the true values of the life I almost lose and this is a duty for me, a common man, after God saved me in the last moment, to share these experiences and knowledge with you.


(A special thanks to Han for inspiring plot idea Smiley
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« Reply #44 on: July 31, 2010, 07:34:15 pm »
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”Big Jim”... excuse me, now it’s The Honorable James E. Folsom... had always been a classical personality politician. After all the South has a rich traditions of, politely speaking, flamboyant public figures, who builds their position primarily on their image (less politely speaking: a clowns).

So yes, he fits very well for Alabama political scene for at least two reasons: first, it was his amazing ability to connect with voters, despite a firm commitment to rather (in their eyes) controversial policies. Second, Governors of Alabama, even so conflicted with a legislature and the establishment as Folsom was, wields an unusual, for the most of the country, executive power and, thorough a purely executive actions, are able to enforce their will, like we saw regarding integration or some other programs accomplished under his watch in Birmingham.

Yet, the presidential independently executive power can’t possibly match what the Governor can do within Alabama limits. And for Folsom that’s something absolutely new.

Yes, he was a very good Vice President, fulfilling the task Hubert Humphrey assigned to him very well. But what about the Presidency now?

There are clearly positive signs. Knowing his weakness in foreign policy, President Folsom seems committed to preside over an unchanged course, and had already invited another valuable experts to the team, most notably Vice President Church, who’s now projected to take a key role in this area, just as under Humphrey Folsom took a key role in the racial transition issue.

But we still don’t know how things will go, with so many challenges and just started projects in the domestic affairs. How will President Folsom deal with the Congress and other pockets of influence, he could ignore in Birmingham, but can’t in the D.C.



TIME Magazine article (June 1971 issue).
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« Reply #45 on: July 31, 2010, 08:08:03 pm »
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Humphrey-Folsom Administration (1969-present)

President:
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN), 1969-1971
James E. Folsom (D-AL), 1971-

Vice President:
James E. Folsom (D-AL), 1969-1971
Frank F. Church (D-ID), 1971-


Secretary of State: Dean Rusk (D-GA), 1969
, William W. Scranton (R-PA), 1969-
Secretary of the Treasury: Wilbur D. Mills (D-AR)
Secretary of Defense: Cyrus Vance (D-NY)
Attorney General: Walter F. Mondale (D-MN)
Secretary of the Interior: Morris K. Udall (D-AZ)
Secretary of Agriculture: Frank B. Morrison (D-NE)

Secretary of Commerce: Elmer L. Andersen (R-MN)
Secretary of Labor: J. Lane Kirkland (D-SC)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Harold E. Hughes (D-IA)
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr. (D-MD)
Secretary of the Transportation: Alan S. Boyd (D-FL)



Notes:

After Rusk remained, as a holdover, in office for the first half of 1969, President Humphrey nominated, in order to show a bipartisian character of his foreign policy, as well as to strenght his appeal to the moderate Republicans, former Pennsylvania Governor William Cranston. Along with Commerce Secretary Elmer L. Andersen, they were only (Liberal) Republicans in Humphrey, then Folsom, cabinet.

Hughes declined to run for Senate in 1968, as he was approaching the end of his Governorship, planning initially to retire from politics, but President Humphrey was able to convince him on accepting the position in his cabinet.

Walter Mondale had, of course, to give up his Senate seat in order to led Justice Department.

In an interesting twist, Mo Udall succeeded his older brother Stewart, both as Representative and the Secretary.

Boyd was a holdover from the Johnson administration.


(I HATE making such a detailed lists Angry)
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« Reply #46 on: August 06, 2010, 11:35:50 am »
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Well, I stucked. Thus, any ideas regarding Folsom administration up to 1972 are really welcomed.
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« Reply #47 on: August 07, 2010, 01:38:27 pm »
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Although how the Folsom administration will do was still a bit of enigma, without better basis than a suspicions, Republicans already realized that the President himself is posing a direct and serious threat to their strategy.

1964 was a revolution in the American politics. The LBJ landslide election confirmed the strength of the liberal spirit of the day as well as cemented Democratic Party switch to these positions. On the other hand, Goldwater victory over Nelson Rockefeller for the presidential nomination was also a critical event.

Although he lost badly, his victory marked an end of the longtime moderate-to-liberal faction, historically led by figures like Willkie, Dewey and then Rockefeller, dominance within a party and the change of political geography, with former liberal Republicans turning to the Democrats, and many former conservative Democrats, most notably in the South, to the GOP. Carrying almost all former Solid South by the Republican Goldwater/Miller ticket was the first sign of Republican takeover over this bloc. They needed now the South, just as much as the Democrats needed before.

Folsom was the problem. Even before his Vice Presidency, not to mention a sudden Presidency, a former flamboyant Alabama Governor has turned out to be one of the most formative and influential figures in changing the political landscape in the U.S. 

During his third snit in Birmingham, thanks to his executive actions, he played a significant role in easing transition and, thus, both allowing the Democrats to retain some of their earlier influence in new environment, and seriously hurting Republican “Southern Strategy”, that directly appealed to scared and disoriented Whites. He also denied them a pleasure of carrying Alabama that fall.

The second sign of his influence comes in 1968, when, as Humphrey running-mate, he helped in a large part the Democrats to retain a White House for a third term. Although 1968 marked an increase of the conservative sentiments, an attempt to conduct a “revolution” that would make it permanent, failed.

Still a popular figure both in Alabama and the South at large, and now with a powers of President and, by a custom, Democratic Party leader, who can unite Northern liberals and Southern Populist, preventing the latters from flying, Folsom was now a serious problem for increasingly conservative GOP.

The Republicans were scared but also had a hopes that all President’s flaws may benefit them.

The great battle was coming and there were no much than winning a revolution at stake.
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« Reply #48 on: August 07, 2010, 01:45:05 pm »
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Great update! I'm interested to see what the Republican opposition will do to Jim Folsom.
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« Reply #49 on: August 07, 2010, 06:21:49 pm »
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Great update! I'm interested to see what the Republican opposition will do to Jim Folsom.

As well as what Folsom himself will do as president. I wish I had some ideas to help you along on that front, but I'm stumped as well.
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