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cinyc
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« Reply #325 on: February 24, 2011, 03:26:34 pm »
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Alabama, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada and Utah are now out.  The highlights, in reverse alphabetical order:

Utah
In Utah, growth was largely in the Salt Lake City area, particularly in the I-15 corridor from Salt Lake City to Provo.  The state's fastest-growing cities were Lehi (+149%),  Spanish Fork (+71%), South Jordan (+71%), Draper (+67%), Riverton (+55%), West Jordan (+52%) and St. George (+47%), all but the last of which are in that corridor.  Salt Lake City proper barely grew (+3%) and suburban Sandy lost population (-1%).

The fastest-growing counties were Wasatch (+55%), on the other side of the mountains for which it is named from Provo (perhaps exurban spillover in the Heber City area - but the population is still under 25k), Washington (+53%), on the state's southwest corner in Utah's dixie, home to the city of St. George, Tooele (+43%), immediately west of Salt Lake County, and Utah (+40%), home of Provo and BYU.   Salt Lake County grew slower than the state (14.6% vs. 23.8%), but still picked up more residents than all but Utah County - and more residents than live in all but the top 5 counties.

The state's non-Hispanic white population grew by 16.7%.

Nevada
As expected, the overwhelming majority of Nevada's growth was in Clark County (Las Vegas), which grew faster than the state as a whole (41.8% vs. 35.1%).  Only Lyon County, arguably exurban Reno, grew faster at 50.7% - but from a much lower base.  And the only other county to grow faster than the state was Nye (35.3%).  I suspect much of its growth was in the Pahrump area, arguably exurban Las Vegas.  Washoe County (Reno) grew at a respectable 24.1%, and picked up more residents than live in any other county but Clark.  Ultra-rural Lander (-0.3%), Mineral (-5.9%) and Esmeralda (-19.1%) counties lost population.  Esmeralda's population fell to just 783.

On the city level, the fastest-growers were Fernley in Lyon County (+127%), North Las Vegas (+88%), Mesquite, on I-15 at the Arizona border (+63%), Henderson (+47%) and Sparks, near Reno (+36%).  Las Vegas proper grew by 22%, but picked up more residents than any other city.  Reno proper grew by 25%, but picked up more residents than any cities but Las Vegas and North Las Vegas.   Rural West Wendover (-7%), Lovelock (-5%) and Wells (-4%) lost population.   Boulder City barely grew.

The state's non-Hispanic White population grew by 12.2%.

Missouri
St. Louis City (-8.3%) and County (-1.7%) both lost population, while Kansas City (+4.1%) and most other cities gained population.  The fastest-growing of the top-20 cities were O'Fallon (+71.8%) in St. Louis' St. Charles County suburbs, Lee's Summit (+29.2%) in the Kansas City suburbs, the college town of Columbia (+28.4%) and Joplin (+10.2%) in the southwest corner of the state.  No other of the top 20 cities grew by more than 10%.  University City (-5.5%), adjacent to St. Louis, Raytown (-2.8%), adjacent to Kansas City, and Ballwin (-2.8%) in St. Louis County lost population.

On the county level, St. Louis County's population fell below 1,000,000, while neighboring St. Charles County grew by 27%.  Other counties with rapid growth include Christian (+43%), south of Springfield,  Lincoln (+35%), north of St. Charles, Pulaski (+27%), which includes Fort Leonard Wood, Cass (+21%), Platte (+21%) and Clay (+20%), all in the Kansas City area, plus Boone County (+20%), home of Columbia.

Missouri's non-Hispanic white population grew by 3.5%, half as fast as the state as a whole (7.0%).

Hawaii
The Neighbor Islands grew faster than Oahu (+8.8%), with the big Island of Hawaii leading the way at 24.5%.  Maui County was next, growing at a 20.9% clip, followed by Kauai County at 14.8%.  Nevertheless, Honolulu County (Oahu) picked up more residents than all the other counties combined.  Kalawao County, comprising the former leper colony of Kalaupapa on the island of Molakai, lost 38.8% of its residents and is now down to 90 residents.  Loving County, Texas is still smaller, with 82 residents.

Hawaii's census geography is a bit strange because it doesn't have municipalities below the county level, and census designated place borders have changed since 2000, rendering comparisons impossible.  Of the CDPs with the same borders in 2000, the Ewa Gentry CDP, presumably on Oahu west of Pearl Harbor, grew by leaps and bounds (359%), as did Pearl City (54%).  Kahului and Kihei CDPs on Maui grew 31% and 25%, respectively.  Interior Oahu Miilani Town CDP (-3%) and Windward Oahu Kaneohe (-1.1%) lost population.

Hawaii's non-Hispanic white population grew by 11.6%, almost as fast as the state as a whole (12.3%).  Hawaii's non-Hispanic African-American population fell by 4.4%, while its non-Hispanic Asian population grew at a relatively slow 3.9%.  The non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander population grew by 18.2%.   Non-Hispanics of two or more races increased by 20.7%, while Hispanics increased by 37.8%.

Alabama
The city of Birmingham lost over 30,000 residents in the past decade, 12.6% of its population. Despite only growing by 2.1%, the state capital of Montgomery ended up only about 6,500 residents away from passing Birmingham as the state's largest city.  

Birmingham's loss was its suburbs' gain - Vestavia Hills and Hoover in Jefferson County grew by 39.0% and 30.1%;  Alabaster in Shelby County by 34.2%.   But gains in suburban Jefferson County were not enough to offset population losses in Birmingham and Bessemer (-7.5%), causing the county as a whole to lose 0.5% of its residents over the past decade.  

Other cities with rapid growth include the Huntsville suburb of Madison (+46.4%), the Montgomery suburb of Prattville (+39.7%), Enterprise (+25.4%), near Fort Rucker in the southeast corner of the state, and the college town of Auburn (+24.2%).  The cities of Mobile (-1.9%) and Gadsen (-5.4%) both lost population.

On the county level, most counties in Western Alabama lost population.  The fastest-growing counties were generally in the Huntsville area, outer areas of the Birmingham metro, and Montgomery suburbs.  Shelby County, near Birmingham, led the pack with 36% growth, followed by Baldwin County on the Redneck Riviera across Mobile Bay from Mobile at 29%, Birmingham-area St. Clair County at 29%, Limestone County near Huntsville at 26%, Lee County (Auburn) at 22% Madison County (Huntsville) at 21%, and Elmore County north of Montgomery at 20%.  Madison, Shelby and Baldwin gained the most total population.
 
Alabama's non-Hispanic white population grew by 2.5%, one-third of the state's overall 7.5% growth.  The Hispanic population more than doubled (+144.8%).  Alabama's non-Hispanic black population grew slightly faster than the overall state population (+8.2%).
« Last Edit: February 24, 2011, 05:13:38 pm by cinyc »Logged
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« Reply #326 on: February 24, 2011, 10:22:46 pm »
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When I was a kid, St. George, Utah had about 5,000 people. It was a pit stop for folks coming up from LA going on to Salt Lake, Denver or Yellowstone or whatever. I knew the town well. Sleepy little place. My Dad had his booze in the trunk. Now it has quite vast housing tracks, golf courses and the like. It is the climate of course. It is kind of an LDS Palm Springs.
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« Reply #327 on: February 24, 2011, 10:45:12 pm »
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Surprising is that Salt Lake City could fall by the wayside as a state capital that is also the largest city in its state, while Montgomery could reclaim its claim.

Clark County doesn't quite have enough population for 3 of Nevada's 4 CD.  It is 74,000 short.  You can either go along the Utah border to Idaho, or take the entire pointed lower pointed part of the state to get enough population.  So now the cow counties are not only overwhelmed by Reno and Las Vegas they will be divided up.
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« Reply #328 on: February 24, 2011, 11:53:41 pm »
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Delaware, Kansas, Nebraska, North Carolina and Wyoming will be released next week.
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« Reply #329 on: February 25, 2011, 12:10:09 am »
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Surprising is that Salt Lake City could fall by the wayside as a state capital that is also the largest city in its state, while Montgomery could reclaim its claim.

Salt Lake City's still a long way off from being dethroned as the largest city in Utah.  Its population is about 186,500.  The next largest city, West Valley City, has about 57,000 fewer residents at about 129,500.   If West Valley City continues to grow at the same pace as 2000-2010, it would probably take 3 decades to pass Salt Lake City.    Same with fast-growing West Jordan - it's about 2 to 3 decades off from passing SLC, assuming current growth rates, which probably aren't sustainable.  Plus, Salt Lake City might have some land to grow out by the airport.

Montgomery, on the other hand...

Clark County doesn't quite have enough population for 3 of Nevada's 4 CD.  It is 74,000 short.  You can either go along the Utah border to Idaho, or take the entire pointed lower pointed part of the state to get enough population.  So now the cow counties are not only overwhelmed by Reno and Las Vegas they will be divided up.

I think you almost have to put Nye with the Clark County district, given it is pretty much exurban Las Vegas now that its population is centered in Pahrump instead of Tonopah.  After that, you'd need to find another 30,200 residents - most logically first from Lincoln, Esmeralda and Mineral Counties, and then either going up to White Pine and environs or across to take in southern Lyon and Douglas.  I'd probably do the former to keep as much of the Reno/Lake Tahoe/Carson City area together as possible.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 12:23:20 am by cinyc »Logged
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« Reply #330 on: February 25, 2011, 01:32:03 am »
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Large Missouri cities racial break downs (White/Not Hispanic, Black/Not Hispanic, Hispanic)

Kansas City: 59% W/30% B/10% H
St. Louis: 44% W/49% B/3% H
Springfield: 89% W/4% B/4% H
Independence: 86% W/6% B/8% H
Columbia: 79% W/11% B/3% H
Lee's Summit: 86% W/8% B/4% H
O'Fallon: 90% W/4% B/3% H
St. Joseph: 88% W/6% B/6% H
St. Charles: 87% W/6% B/4% H
Blue Springs: 88% W/6% B/5% H

Of 693391 African Americans in Missouri, 294700 live in KC or STL. And the 3rd largest number of African Americans in a Missouri city is University City (14535) but there's 15116 in Spanish Lake CDP.

Southwest City is now majority Hispanic. With 493 Hispanics in a 970 person town. It's on the Missouri/Arkansas/Oklahoma border. Hispanics almost have a majority in Noel, Missouri, which is east of Southwest City. Verona (SW MO, Lawrence County) and Milan (NE MO, Sullivan County) have over 40% Hispanics, while Milan's Hispanic percentage doubling in 10 years. And La Monte is 35.8% Hispanic. I think I know why Milan's Hispanic population is soaring (plants/jobs), and I think the same is true for LaMonte, where the percentage tripled in 10 years.

Would be fun to find the biggest demographic changes from 2000 to 2010 in the US though.

------------------

Also, Springdale, AR has 15332 some other race residents (21%) out of 69797 residents. Up from 11% in 2010. Partially thanks to the Marshallese population? And 5.7% classified themselves as Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander. A lower number of NH/OPI (3976) than the estimate of Marshallese in 2000 (4000). So, there's a strong shot that the Marshalese make up a lot more of the SOR than Hispanic/Latino origin residents.

Arkansas has 5863 NH/OPI residents. With 4128 in Washington County and 671 in Benton County and 3967 in Springdale. So you can do the math there.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 02:29:01 am by RBH »Logged

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« Reply #331 on: February 25, 2011, 02:14:35 pm »
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What's the nonhispanic SOR population.

Amazing. I noticed way back in 2000 that Arkansas' Pacific Islander pop. was elevated compared to what I'd expected, but I never guessed it was all in one place, and that not even Little Rock.
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« Reply #332 on: February 25, 2011, 03:24:57 pm »
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What's the nonhispanic SOR population.

Amazing. I noticed way back in 2000 that Arkansas' Pacific Islander pop. was elevated compared to what I'd expected, but I never guessed it was all in one place, and that not even Little Rock.

SOR in Springdale is 15332 and HLO is 24692. Which seems like a pretty big ratio (most ratios i've seen are 3:1 Hispanic:SOR)

I wish there were a break down for SOR too.
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« Reply #333 on: February 25, 2011, 03:35:10 pm »
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What's the nonhispanic SOR population.

Amazing. I noticed way back in 2000 that Arkansas' Pacific Islander pop. was elevated compared to what I'd expected, but I never guessed it was all in one place, and that not even Little Rock.
The SOR poulation is Springdale is almost all Hispanic.

The NHOPI population in the census is more than double what was being reported in the ACS.  Springdale is HQ of Tyson Foods, so they work in chicken processing plants.

In the 2005-9 ACS there were 1253 Other Micronesian (ie not Guamanian or Chamorro) in Arkansas.  1209 were in Washington County and 1207 were in Springdale.  

I found a story of a Marshallese who came in the 1980s and would always tell his relatives and friends of the jobs available.  Marshallese don't need visas, so they are preferred workers for low-paying unpleasant working conditions.  Supposedly, the food processing workers in Springdale have been assisted by relatives, as opposed to brought here by brokers, for employment in nursing homes and amusement parks.   The Marshall Islands opened a consulate in Springdale in 2009.
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« Reply #334 on: February 25, 2011, 03:56:04 pm »
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What's the nonhispanic SOR population.

Amazing. I noticed way back in 2000 that Arkansas' Pacific Islander pop. was elevated compared to what I'd expected, but I never guessed it was all in one place, and that not even Little Rock.

SOR in Springdale is 15332 and HLO is 24692. Which seems like a pretty big ratio (most ratios i've seen are 3:1 Hispanic:SOR)

I wish there were a break down for SOR too.
You can get the racial breakdown by Hispanics and by the total population, and take the difference to get if for Hispanics:

White: 45,185 total, 36,798 Non-Hispanic, 8,387 Hispanic = 18.6% Hispanic
Black: 1,251, 1,160, 91 7.3%
AIAN: 679, 534, 145, 21.4%
Asian 1363, 1336, 27, 2.0%
SOR 15332, 105, 15227, 99.3%
NHOPI 3976, 3967, 9, 0.2%
White-Black 252, 239, 13, 5.2%
White-AIAN: 574, 520, 54 9.4%
White-Asian: 151, 139, 12 7.9%
White-SOR: 601, 16, 585, 97.3%
Other 2+: 433, 291, 142 32.8%
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« Reply #335 on: February 25, 2011, 06:37:50 pm »
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Question for the northwesterners: why is Deschutes county (Bend, OR) growing so fast?

It's beautiful and a paradise.  It is on the east side of the Cascades, so it is sunny with a more continental climate.  It is home to the premier ski resort in the Cascades (Mt. Bachelor) and the large Sunriver Resort.   The Deschutes River is famous for fishing and rafting.   The 10,000+ ft. tall Three Sisters volcanoues and Mt. Bachelor tower off in the distance.  Black Butte, Newberry Crater, and Pilot Butte (Bend's extinct volcano) show off the area's volcanism.  

Sisters, Sunriver, and Bend are all popular vacation and retirement destinations.  Quite a few former pro athletes live in the county.

 

I think Bend also experienced growth the same way Las Vegas and Phoenix did--it was a low-cost housing market of a certain size convenient to some wealthy, high-cost housing markets.

Not at all.  Bend is isolated.  It is on the east side of the Cascade Range.  It also isn't that cheap.   I am sure it did experience growth from Californians cashing out and fleeing California, but so did everywhere else out west.
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« Reply #336 on: February 25, 2011, 09:13:35 pm »
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Changes! (North County, STL edition)

Bellefontaine Neighbors, MO
2000: 54% White/44% African-American (pop. 11271)
2010: 26% White/73% African-American (pop. 10860)

Riverview village, MO
2000: 58% White/40% African-American (pop. 3146)
2010: 27% White/70% African-American (pop. 2856)

Spanish Lake CDP, MO
2000: 42% White/55% African-American (pop. 21337)
2010: 20% White/77% African-American (pop. 19650)
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« Reply #337 on: February 25, 2011, 10:26:19 pm »
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That majority black MO-01 may be possible after all. The 2005-2009 ACS estimate for Bellefontaine Neighbors was 50.3% black, 48.4% white, so I guess the ACS did not pick up on white flight in North STL County very well. Had Riverview Village as 59.5% black, too (although was much closer for Spanish Lake, estimating 73.9% black).
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« Reply #338 on: February 26, 2011, 02:46:00 am »
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That majority black MO-01 may be possible after all. The 2005-2009 ACS estimate for Bellefontaine Neighbors was 50.3% black, 48.4% white, so I guess the ACS did not pick up on white flight in North STL County very well. Had Riverview Village as 59.5% black, too (although was much closer for Spanish Lake, estimating 73.9% black).

It's still going to be very difficult to do.  By my math, the average Missouri CD will have about 748,000 residents.  A majority would be about 374,000.  There are about 390,000 African Americans in St. Louis city and county combined - before taking into account Hispanic status.   I doubt you'd be able to draw a district that captures 95% of St. Louis City and County's African-Americans - and that's before deciding whether black Hispanics should qualify under whatever race-based standard you are applying.

I'm not sure why creating such a district is necessary, since any district centered on St. Louis city will likely vote for the Democrat, anyway, similar to how the African-American population would vote.
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« Reply #339 on: February 26, 2011, 10:33:19 am »

That majority black MO-01 may be possible after all. The 2005-2009 ACS estimate for Bellefontaine Neighbors was 50.3% black, 48.4% white, so I guess the ACS did not pick up on white flight in North STL County very well. Had Riverview Village as 59.5% black, too (although was much closer for Spanish Lake, estimating 73.9% black).

It's still going to be very difficult to do.  By my math, the average Missouri CD will have about 748,000 residents.  A majority would be about 374,000.  There are about 390,000 African Americans in St. Louis city and county combined - before taking into account Hispanic status.   I doubt you'd be able to draw a district that captures 95% of St. Louis City and County's African-Americans - and that's before deciding whether black Hispanics should qualify under whatever race-based standard you are applying.

I'm not sure why creating such a district is necessary, since any district centered on St. Louis city will likely vote for the Democrat, anyway, similar to how the African-American population would vote.

It's not only about the party preferred by the black population, but by the candidates preferred by the minority group. If there is a clear difference in voting preference between blacks and whites, even in the primary, and it is possible to create a >50% VAP black district, then failure to do so can be the basis for a federal VRA challenge.
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« Reply #340 on: February 26, 2011, 01:54:12 pm »
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That majority black MO-01 may be possible after all. The 2005-2009 ACS estimate for Bellefontaine Neighbors was 50.3% black, 48.4% white, so I guess the ACS did not pick up on white flight in North STL County very well. Had Riverview Village as 59.5% black, too (although was much closer for Spanish Lake, estimating 73.9% black).

It's still going to be very difficult to do.  By my math, the average Missouri CD will have about 748,000 residents.  A majority would be about 374,000.  There are about 390,000 African Americans in St. Louis city and county combined - before taking into account Hispanic status.   I doubt you'd be able to draw a district that captures 95% of St. Louis City and County's African-Americans - and that's before deciding whether black Hispanics should qualify under whatever race-based standard you are applying.

I'm not sure why creating such a district is necessary, since any district centered on St. Louis city will likely vote for the Democrat, anyway, similar to how the African-American population would vote.

It's not only about the party preferred by the black population, but by the candidates preferred by the minority group. If there is a clear difference in voting preference between blacks and whites, even in the primary, and it is possible to create a >50% VAP black district, then failure to do so can be the basis for a federal VRA challenge.

Yes.  But could a district that is at most 52% African-American still vote against the candidate the minority supposedly wants, anyway - and that's before doing whatever the VRA requires to be done with non-Hispanic blacks or even trying to figure out if a district that is majority VAP black is possible in the St. Louis area.  My guess is that it can't be drawn and even if it is, it won't matter because the incumbent black Democrat, William Clay, will win MO-01 regardless of how it is drawn as long as it includes most of St. Louis City.

This racial stuff is overrated and unnecessary in a country that has elected a black President.  I hope the Supreme Court strikes down the VRA when states overreach this cycle.
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« Reply #341 on: February 26, 2011, 06:48:58 pm »
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Alabama, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada and Utah are now out.  The highlights, in reverse alphabetical order:

Utah
In Utah, growth was largely in the Salt Lake City area, particularly in the I-15 corridor from Salt Lake City to Provo.  The state's fastest-growing cities were Lehi (+149%),  Spanish Fork (+71%), South Jordan (+71%), Draper (+67%), Riverton (+55%), West Jordan (+52%) and St. George (+47%), all but the last of which are in that corridor.  Salt Lake City proper barely grew (+3%) and suburban Sandy lost population (-1%).

The fastest-growing counties were Wasatch (+55%), on the other side of the mountains for which it is named from Provo (perhaps exurban spillover in the Heber City area - but the population is still under 25k), Washington (+53%), on the state's southwest corner in Utah's dixie, home to the city of St. George, Tooele (+43%), immediately west of Salt Lake County, and Utah (+40%), home of Provo and BYU.   Salt Lake County grew slower than the state (14.6% vs. 23.8%), but still picked up more residents than all but Utah County - and more residents than live in all but the top 5 counties.


Where are you getting the tabular form for data like this? The website is hard to navigate.
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« Reply #342 on: February 26, 2011, 08:33:02 pm »
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Alabama, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada and Utah are now out.  The highlights, in reverse alphabetical order:

Utah
In Utah, growth was largely in the Salt Lake City area, particularly in the I-15 corridor from Salt Lake City to Provo.  The state's fastest-growing cities were Lehi (+149%),  Spanish Fork (+71%), South Jordan (+71%), Draper (+67%), Riverton (+55%), West Jordan (+52%) and St. George (+47%), all but the last of which are in that corridor.  Salt Lake City proper barely grew (+3%) and suburban Sandy lost population (-1%).

The fastest-growing counties were Wasatch (+55%), on the other side of the mountains for which it is named from Provo (perhaps exurban spillover in the Heber City area - but the population is still under 25k), Washington (+53%), on the state's southwest corner in Utah's dixie, home to the city of St. George, Tooele (+43%), immediately west of Salt Lake County, and Utah (+40%), home of Provo and BYU.   Salt Lake County grew slower than the state (14.6% vs. 23.8%), but still picked up more residents than all but Utah County - and more residents than live in all but the top 5 counties.


Where are you getting the tabular form for data like this? The website is hard to navigate.
If you go to this site,

http://2010.census.gov/news/press-kits/redistricting.html

Click on a state in those that have been released, and then under "Release Information" in the box in the upper right click on "Custom Tables" which is a link to Excel (.xls) spread sheets with some summary information.  Only the 20 largest cities and counties are included.

If on the above page you click on the map, you will get an interactive widget that lets you put the cursor and get a population read out for each county.

And the data is now in the American Fact Finder.  If you haven't used the new version of American Fact Finder, run some of the tutorials - or it probably won't make any sense.
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« Reply #343 on: February 26, 2011, 09:58:54 pm »
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Alabama, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada and Utah are now out.  The highlights, in reverse alphabetical order:

Utah
In Utah, growth was largely in the Salt Lake City area, particularly in the I-15 corridor from Salt Lake City to Provo.  The state's fastest-growing cities were Lehi (+149%),  Spanish Fork (+71%), South Jordan (+71%), Draper (+67%), Riverton (+55%), West Jordan (+52%) and St. George (+47%), all but the last of which are in that corridor.  Salt Lake City proper barely grew (+3%) and suburban Sandy lost population (-1%).

The fastest-growing counties were Wasatch (+55%), on the other side of the mountains for which it is named from Provo (perhaps exurban spillover in the Heber City area - but the population is still under 25k), Washington (+53%), on the state's southwest corner in Utah's dixie, home to the city of St. George, Tooele (+43%), immediately west of Salt Lake County, and Utah (+40%), home of Provo and BYU.   Salt Lake County grew slower than the state (14.6% vs. 23.8%), but still picked up more residents than all but Utah County - and more residents than live in all but the top 5 counties.


Where are you getting the tabular form for data like this? The website is hard to navigate.

What jimrtex said, plus looking at the county population change jpeg maps that come with the press release announcing the data for each state.   The press releases are usually first put here.

I've been doing the summaries shortly after the press release at about 3PM.  Additional data may or may not have been put up on American Factfinder since then.  And yes, the new American Factfinder is a bit confusing when you first try to use it.
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« Reply #344 on: February 28, 2011, 05:20:38 pm »
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Nebraska shipped to legislators today, and is expected to be released to the public around 3PM tomorrow.
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« Reply #345 on: March 01, 2011, 03:34:02 pm »
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Nebraska was just released.

The fastest-growing of the top 20 counties was Sarpy (+29.6%), in Omaha's south suburbs.  That was followed by Lancaster (+14.0%), home of the state capital of Lincoln, and Douglas (+11.5%), home of Omaha and its western suburbs.  No other of the top 20 counties grew by more than 10%, though Hall (+9.5%), Buffalo (+9.1%) and Washington (+7.7%) did grow faster than the state (+6.7%).   Hall and Buffalo are home to the market towns of Grand Island and Kearney, in central Nebraska; Washington is immediately north of Omaha.  Gage (-3.0%), Madison (-1.0%) and Dawson (-0.2%) counties lost population - as did most smaller counties in the state.  Those three counties are home to smaller market towns that also likely lost population.

Omaha is still the state's largest city, growing 4.9% since 2000.  Its population is over 400,000.  The two fastest-growing cities in the state were LaVista (+34.7%) and Papillion (+15.5%), both Omaha suburbs in Sarpy County.   Lincoln was next, growing at a 14.5% clip, followed by the Omaha suburb of Bellevue (+13.0%), Grand Island (+13.0%), Kearney (+12.2%) and South Sioux City (+12.0%).   South Sioux City is across the Missouri River from its Iowa namesake.  Alliance (-5.2%), in Western Nebraska, York (-3.9%), east of Grand Island, and Beatrice (-0.3%), in Southeast Nebraska, lost population.

Nebraska's non-Hispanic white population grew by just 0.4%.  The Hispanic population grew by 77%, non-Hispanic Asians by 47% and non-Hispanic Blacks by 20%.   Omaha has about as many Hispanics as African Americans (before taking into account whether those blacks are Hispanic or not Hispanic).  Lexington, west of Kearney on I-80, is majority Hispanic.  South Sioux City is almost half Hispanic.

Census hasn't said whether it shipped any of the 4 remaining states promised this week to legislators today.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 03:36:27 pm by cinyc »Logged
Verily
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« Reply #346 on: March 01, 2011, 03:55:07 pm »
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Lexington was majority Hispanic in 2000, too. What's the percentage now?

Also, with Douglas and Sarpy Counties both growing faster than the state, what will they do with NE-02?
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 03:58:02 pm by Verily »Logged
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« Reply #347 on: March 01, 2011, 04:40:18 pm »
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Delaware and (more interestingly) North Carolina shipped today.
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cinyc
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« Reply #348 on: March 01, 2011, 05:04:01 pm »
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Lexington was majority Hispanic in 2000, too. What's the percentage now?

Also, with Douglas and Sarpy Counties both growing faster than the state, what will they do with NE-02?

60.4%.

Douglas plus Sarpy has about 67,000 more residents than required for one CD (about 609,000).  They are now about 11% over the population required for one district, versus about 3% over in 2000.   I'm not sure much would need to change except which portions of Sarpy are included with Douglas.  But that doesn't necessarily mean the legislature or whomever is drawing the lines might not want to do something else, like split Douglas.
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« Reply #349 on: March 01, 2011, 08:06:57 pm »
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For whatever reason, the 2009 census estimate for Omaha was way off - 454,731 versus an actual Census 2010 population of 408,958.  The estimate for Douglas County as a whole, though, was accurate - 510,199 versus 517,110.   About 10,000 of Omaha's 18,951 new residents were gained in the annexation of the former city of Elkhorn, per the Omaha World-Herald.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 08:08:52 pm by cinyc »Logged
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