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GLPman
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« on: December 16, 2010, 12:47:03 pm »
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Since I finished my "2000 Timeline" a while ago (which can be found here: http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=97263.0), I figured I would give another one a shot. Here it is.

The Other Texan

Chapter I: This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Two of Us

“I am reminding you of the American Dream. Yes, the concept that serves as a cornerstone of our great nation; the concept that compels millions of people across the globe to study in our schools, to pursue a career in our cities, and to invest in America. Do we still have the same confidence in the American Dream that we once had, though, or has it fallen by the wayside?” – Democratic nominee Lloyd Bentsen, Democratic National Convention, July 1988.

“And this has been called the American Century, because in it we were the dominant force for good in the world. We saved Europe, cured polio, we went to the moon, and lit the world with our culture. And now we are on the verge of a new century, and what country's name will it bear? I say it will be another American century.” - Vice President George Bush, Republican National Convention, August 1988.

“Vote Texan!” - Billboard outside San Antonio, September 1988

Dukakis had dropped out. With the Massachusetts Governor out of the race, Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen was the nominee. For Bentsen, the conclusion of the primaries came as a relief. Dukakis had been a viable candidate, as had Gephardt and Hart, but Bentsen knew he was the man to take down Vice President Bush in the battle for the White House. At a speech in Austin, Texas, where his entire campaign began, Bentsen announced to his supporters, "There is no doubt that we have a long road ahead of us in the upcoming months, but we will make it to Pennsylvania Avenue. We will fight and we will win."

Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX) , the Democratic nominee for President

On the opposing side of the isle was Vice President Bush. Bush represented the success of the Reagan years and many Americans believed that Bush would continue that success if he was elected President. Bush utilized his experience and Reagan's popularity in an effort to gain support among independents.

Vice President George H.W. Bush (R-TX), the Republican nominee for President

Bush campaigned heavily on his promise that he would not implement any new taxes. He also openly supported gun rights, abortion, and many other cornerstone issues of the GOP. Bentsen, on the other hand, spoke out against the enormous debt that the country had accumulated during the Reagan years. "Taxes may not be our best friend, but neither is our national debt at this point," Bentsen explained to a crowd in Tampa. Bentsen also promised to fight the wealth gap in the country, as well. "Perhaps we're seeing the downside of Reganomics after all these years," he stated. Despite his opposition to the Republicans, though, Bentsen was still seen as a Conservative Democrat. Bentsen supported capital punishment and endorsed public school prayer. In fact, many liberals from the left-wing of the party were angered that Bentsen held a conservative stance on several issues.

As the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta approached, Bentsen was pushed to select a more liberal Vice Presidential candidate to please the upset members of the Democratic party. Bentsen eventually selected Delaware Senator Joe Biden, a man who had considered running for the Presidency earlier on in the primary season, but had decided to drop out. Biden was extremely popular among the Democrats and received thunderous applause after his acceptance speech in Atlanta. During his speech, Bentsen pleded to reduce the national debt, promote the traditional way of American life, support equal rights and civil rights, and continue to secure American's position as superpower in the world.

Joe Biden (D-DE), the Democrats' VP nominee

Polls at the end of the convention showed Bentsen and Bush in a dead-heat tie, with both candidates receiving 48%. The Republican Convention was held in the middle of August. Bush chose Indiana Senator James Danforth "Dan" Quayle as his running mate. During the convention, Bush delivered an extremely powerful speech, referred to as the "Thousand Points of Light" speech, in which Bush emphasized his conservative values. The speech was able to push Bush ahead of Bentsen in the national polls - by the end of August, Bush held 52% to Bentsen's 47%.

Bush and Quayle at the Republican National Convention

Two months remained until the 1988 presidential election. Just as Bentsen had emphasized, the Democrats knew they had a long road ahead of them if they were to defeat Bush.

NATIONWIDE POLL - SEPTEMBER 1, 1988
Which ticket do you support for President?
Bush/Quayle: 52.1%
Bentsen/Biden: 47.7%
Other: 0.2%
« Last Edit: December 13, 2011, 06:33:16 pm by GLPman »Logged

GPORTER
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« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2010, 12:54:17 pm »
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This is good, please continue.
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http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=195483.new#new
the birth of modern america & onward election Former Vice President Blanche Bruce defeats incumbent President Grover Cleveland in 1904. In an age of unpredictable election outcomes Bruce finds himself reelected in 1908 against an opponent whose name escapes me at the moment. Blanche Bruce served as Vice President under Frederick Douglas whom Cleveland defeated in 1900. His Vice President runs to replace Bruce in 1912.
Dallasfan65
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« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 01:04:26 pm »

I can already tell this is gonna be good.
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Vazdul (Formerly Chairman of the Communist Party of Ontario)
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« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2010, 04:06:15 pm »
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I can already tell this is gonna be good.
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Seriously, it was time to change back to the real avatar.
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« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2010, 06:18:31 pm »
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I agree with the last two posters. Bush/Quayle!!! Cheesy
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GLPman
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« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2010, 02:45:26 pm »
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Chapter II: You've Been Quayled

“Nobody has ever voted for Dan Quayle and not regretted it.” Democratic VP nominee Joe Biden, September 1988

“We’ve all heard the Vice President talk about the many accomplishments of the Reagan administration, yet he seems to neglect our massive $220 million deficit that has accumulated since 1980.” – Democratic nominee Lloyd Bentsen, October 1988

“I’ve been sitting in my car for the past twenty minutes because I can’t decide which one of those gentlemen I’d like to vote for.” – woman outside a voting station in Colleyville, Texas, November 1988.

The Democrats headed into September trailing the Republican ticket by only a few points. Polls showed that Americans had favorable ratings of both Bentsen and Bush. Bush began campaignign heavily in the Industrial Midwest in states such as Ohio and Michigan, along with the Northeast, while Bentsen targeted upper Midwestern states like Minnesota and Iowa. In many Midwestern states, however, the candidates were essentially tied.

Bentsen (D-TX) campaigning in St. Louis in September '88

The eyes of the nation were not only on the Midwest, though, but also on Texas. Both Bentsen and Bush were from the Lone Star State and were big-time Texas political stars. Before becoming Vice President, Bush had been elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1966 and served all the way until 1971, when he was appointed US Ambassador to the UN under President Nixon. The Bush family also had a huge history in the Texas oil business. Bentsen, on the other hand, was a Texas native and had initiated his career by working as a judge in Hidalgo County and then in the Texas House of Representatives until 1955. Following his work in Houston's financial sector, Bentsen ran for Senate in 1970 and defeated Bush to win the seat. Who would win the Lone Star State?


Would Bush or Bentsen win Texas?

Both Texas utilized their VP picks during campaigning, as well. Biden and Quayle were seen as the fresh faces of the Democrats and Republicans respectively. The Bush campaign quickly discovered, however, that Quayle and gaffes went hand-in-hand. Many of Quayle's comments left Americans scratching their heads. In September, for example, Quayle remarked, "The Holocaust was an obscene period in our nation's history. I mean in this century's history. But we all lived in this century. I didn't live in this century." Comments like this forced people to speculate if Quayle was suited for Vice President and, if something happened to Bush, even President. Biden, on the other hand, came off as much more competent and well-versed.


Was Dan Quayle a good choice?

As the first presidential debate approached, polls showed Bush slightly ahead of Bentsen. Viewers agreed that both Bentsen and Bush performed well in the first debate. Bush properly responded to Bentsen's attacks and Bentsen successfully deflected criticism by the Vice President. Viewers also saw that Bentsen was not the traditional liberal Democrat - instead, he was much more conservative than many members of his party on a whole host of issues, including capital punishment and public school prayer. In the vice presidential debate, Biden crushed an out-of-touch and flustered Quayle. Voters agreed almost 2-to-1 that Biden had outperfomed Quayle and was more prepared.

NATIONWIDE POLL
Who you do believe won the VP debate?
Biden: 60.7%
Quayle: 39.3%

There was no doubt that the Bush campaign was hindered by Quayle's performance. In the second and final presidential debate, Bentsen managed to squeak out a win over Bush by attacking him about his inability to address the federal deficit and establish a budget. Following the debates, the two candidates once again hit the road to campaign for the final few weeks before the election. Both tickets campaigned heavily in the midwest and Texas as a last chance effort to pull support to their side.

Vice President Bush (R-TX) campaigning in Dallas

Election Night, 1988
Eventually, after what had seemed like years, November 8th arrived and the 1988 presidential election was held. Americans scrambled to the polls. The only thing that Americans knew for certain is that the next President would be a Texan. Going into the night, both candidates were especially confident. Voter turn-out proved to be relatively high compared to recent elections, as well, since both parities had effectively energized their bases. In the end, Bentsen was able to steal the election away from Bush. Bentsen's southern roots had helped him win support in states like Missouri and Florida, while Bush had managed to capture a majority of the Northeast and Ohio. Furthermore, Bush's connection to successful President Reagan helped the vice president secure the Golden State. One of the largest surprises would be Texas going for Bentsen later on in the night by a razor-thin margin. Lloyd Bentsen would be the next President of the United States.

Senator Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX) / Senator Joe Biden (D-DE): 276 EVs, 50.9%
Vice President George H.W. Bush (R-TX) / Senator James Danforth "Dan" Quayle (R-IN): 262 EVs, 48.6%
« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 11:34:16 pm by GLPman »Logged

GPORTER
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« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2010, 02:49:58 pm »
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Florida does not make sense. Florida goes dem, but not California?
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http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=195483.new#new
the birth of modern america & onward election Former Vice President Blanche Bruce defeats incumbent President Grover Cleveland in 1904. In an age of unpredictable election outcomes Bruce finds himself reelected in 1908 against an opponent whose name escapes me at the moment. Blanche Bruce served as Vice President under Frederick Douglas whom Cleveland defeated in 1900. His Vice President runs to replace Bruce in 1912.
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« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2010, 06:44:53 pm »
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Florida does not make sense. Florida goes dem, but not California?

^^^^^^
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GLPman
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2010, 05:19:28 pm »
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Gporter, I'll explain to you why this works: Bush carried California narrowly on the coattails of Reagan's popularity. Progressive Democrats in California are turned off by Bentsen's southern roots and conservatism and feel that he is a watered-down version of Bush. There is the exact opposite effect in Florida, however, where Southern independents and Southern Democrats are drawn to the Democratic ticket because of Bentsen's more conservative record and southern background.

If everyone really has their panties in a knot over it, i'll add California to the Dems.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2010, 05:21:55 pm by GLPman »Logged

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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2010, 06:19:33 pm »
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Gporter, I'll explain to you why this works: Bush carried California narrowly on the coattails of Reagan's popularity. Progressive Democrats in California are turned off by Bentsen's southern roots and conservatism and feel that he is a watered-down version of Bush. There is the exact opposite effect in Florida, however, where Southern independents and Southern Democrats are drawn to the Democratic ticket because of Bentsen's more conservative record and southern background.

If everyone really has their panties in a knot over it, i'll add California to the Dems.

In 1976 Florida went D with CA going GOP as well, with a Southern moderate as a Democratic nominee. Beside, CA was really a stronghold for the GOP in the presidential elections between 1968 to 1988.
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GLPman
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« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2011, 06:42:57 pm »
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I'm reviving this old gal. Stay tuned for an update soon.
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« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2011, 07:06:09 pm »
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Yay!
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GLPman
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« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2011, 10:10:07 pm »
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Chapter III: The Southern Gentleman

“The world is changing. We face many challenges both abroad and here at home. We must come together, Democrats and Republicans, young and old, rich and poor, to solve the problems that confront our great nation today to ensure future prosperity and the continuation of freedom.” President Lloyd Bentsen, Inaugural Address, January 1989

“I am proud of a number of the things that we've done together while you have let me be your Speaker. I am proud of the record of the 100th Congress. Many people feel that it is the most responsive and most productive Congress in perhaps 25 years. And all of you who were here in that Congress had a part in that.” Speaker Jim Wright, Resignation Speech, May 1989

“Berlin Wall Tumbles” – London Herald Headline, November 1989

On January 20, 1989, Lloyd Millard Bentsen was inaugurated as the 41st President of the United States. In his inauguration, Bentsen expressed his goals of eliminating the federal deficit, which had tripled since 1980. "If we do not confront this problem together, as Americans, as Democrats and Republicans, our country will head down a dangerous road. We have an obligation to ourselves to fix this serious problem." Bentsen also pledged to reduce the level of poverty in the United States, which had risen dramatically during Ronald Reagan's tenure as President. On foreign policy, Bentsen explained, "There is no challenge that is too great for the United States." Early polls following the President's inauguration showed his approval rating hovering around 59%. Republicans remained bitter towards the President for stealing what they envisioned as Reagan's third term.

President Bentsen's approval rating remained at 59%

NATIONWIDE POLL - JANUARY 31, 1989
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 59.2%
No: 30.7%
Unsure: 10.1%

Luckily for President Bentsen, the Democrats had control of both the House and the Senate. Republicans viewed this as especially dangerous, knowing that Bentsen and Congressional Democrats planned to raise taxes in order to curb the deficit. Following a meeting with Speaker of the House Jim Wright in the beginning of February 1989, President Bentsen said of the Speaker, "I think we're going to get along just fine." Bentsen and Congressional Democrats began working on deficit reduction legislation almost immediately following the President's inauguration. In an interview on Larry King Live, the President highlighted his goal, explaining "I hope that this country's deficit will be erased by the time I leave office, whether that's in four years or in eight years." Unfortunately, the President and Congressional Democrats ran into problems almost immediately. Bentsen, who was a much more Conservative Democrat than many of the Democrats in the House and Senate, pushed for a low-to-moderate tax increase, while Congressional Democrats pushed for drastic measures on raising taxes. Bentsen promised Americans that deficit-reduction legislation would be signed by April.

Republicans wasted no time in criticizing the President for not uniting with his party. Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole, who would remain an outspoken critic of Bentsen during his presidency, attacked Bentsen for an inability to unite the Democrats. Liberal Democrats were also quite angered with the President. Nonetheless, President Bentsen wouldn't budge. "There is no need for excessive tax increases. This deficit isn't going to disappear tomorrow. But, if we chip away at it through low tax increases, American families can continue to prosper and reducing the deficit will not come at the risk of Americans' success." Bentsen continued to push for a low tax increase. While very liberal Democrats believed that a low tax increase would not be enough, the remaining Democrats fully endorsed the idea. Furthermore, even a few liberal Republicans said they saw the idea as a great compromise. By mid-March, support for low tax increases overwhelmed opposition. The Federal Deficit Reduction Act of 1989, composed of low tax increases, was passed and signed by the President. Bentsen had successfully negotiated with Democrats and a few liberal Republicans to pass his first piece of monumental legislation.

NATIONWIDE POLL - MARCH 23, 1989
Do you support the Federal Deficit Reduction Act of 1989?
Yes: 60.4%
No: 38.3%
Unsure: 1.3%


President Bentsen answers questions about the Federal Deficit Reduction Act of 1989

Bentsen’s victory with the passage of the Federal Deficit Reduction Act of 1989 signaled the conclusion of the President’s honeymoon period as spring came to a close. Bentsen saw himself as fortunate given the fact that the Democrats held majorities in both the Senate and House. This fortune quickly wore off, however, as May rolled around. Halfway through May, media rumors concerning John Mack, an aide of Speaker Jim Wright, began circulating. Several sources confirmed that Mack had violently attacked a woman named Pamela Small sixteen years earlier. Although the police had arrested Mack, the aide’s correspondence with Wright led to a mere 27-month parole sentence instead of fifteen years behind bars. The controversy not only tainted Speaker Wright, but also the Democratically-controlled House. Republicans wasted no time in calling for Wright’s resignation. More extreme members of the GOP attempted to link Wright’s corruption to the White House. In order to preserve his credibility with the American people and avoid unnecessary media scrutiny, Bentsen distanced himself from the Speaker. Bentsen would later admit in his book, No Hesitation, that he had secretly met with the Speaker on numerous occasions and eventually asked him to step down. On June 6, 1989, Speaker Wright resigned from his duties as Speaker. Tom Foley (D-WA) was inaugurated as the new Speaker of the House.


Tom Foley (D-WA), the new Speaker of the House

Extending beyond domestic policy, the remainder of 1989 was centered on foreign policy. Beginning in September of 1989, mass protests broke out in East Berlin. By October, the protests grew in size as more and more people demanded– just as President Reagan had called for two years prior – the demolition of the Berlin Wall. In November 1989, deconstruction began on the Berlin Wall as citizens on both sides of the wall gathered with sledgehammers and other tools. The fall of the Berlin Wall marked yet another sign that tensions between the West and East were easing. President Bentsen took this opportunity to meet with Gorbachev in Malta in late November. While no agreements were signed, the meeting between Bentsen and Gorbachev was seen as a landmark in US-Soviet relations. Indeed the meeting proved to be one of the first stepping stones of the post-Cold War transition. “It has become evident that we are entering a new era. Not an era defined with weapons and fear, but with diplomacy and hope for a better world,” Bentsen remarked upon returning back to the White House. Democrats rallied behind Bentsen for the President’s initiative to meet with Gorbachev. At the conclusion of November, Bentsen maintain an approval rating in the mid 50s.


The Berlin Wall falls

NATIONWIDE POLL – NOVEMBER 29, 1989
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 54.2%
No: 45.5%
Unsure: 0.3%

1989 concluded with Operation Just Cause, the American invasion of Panama. Citing the defense of human rights in Panama, as well as the preservation of democracy, President Bentsen authorized a military invasion on December 19, 1989. The operation marked one of the first U.S. military operation unrelated to the Cold War. U.S. forces quickly captured dictator Manuel Noriega, although the invasion would continue until January 1990.


U.S. forces storm Panama in Operation Just Cause
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« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2011, 10:21:34 pm »
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So far, so good.
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« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2011, 11:10:17 pm »
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So far, so good.
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« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2011, 08:35:30 am »
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« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2011, 03:15:29 pm »
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Chapter IV: A Conservative Coalition

“We answer to these events not out of some misplaced sense of self-righteousness, as some have suggested, but because we, as Americans, have the obligation to protect freedom in all corners of the world.” – President Lloyd Bentsen on the Gulf War, Aug. 1990

“As far as I’m concerned, Ronald Reagan never left the White House.” – Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA), October 1990.

“We are not intimidated by the size of the armies, or the types of hardware the U.S. has brought.” – Saddam Hussein, November 1990.

By mid-January, the United States had accomplished its goals in Panama and Operation Just Cause concluded. The first military operation since the conclusion of the Cold War was seen in a mostly positive light, with roughly 80% of Americans approving.

Operation Just Cause was winding down

Beginning in 1990, however, the Bentsen administration faced numerous challenges. The Democratic Party remained in turmoil, with the left wing of the party claiming that Bentsen was not liberal enough. The President’s push for a lower tax rate and his support of more conservative positions, such as school prayer and capital punishment, caused a rift between the left wing of the Democratic Party and more mainstream Democrats. Furthermore, with the 1990 midterms coming up in a few months, some Democratic candidates adopted more conservative positions – branding themselves as “Bentsen Democrats” – in order to become more competitive in certain Southern districts.

Two events during 1990 ultimately left the left wing of the Democratic Party feeling disenfranchised from the President: a declining economy and the Gulf War. To begin with, the economy had been on a slow decline since the end of 1989. By mid 1990, though, there were no signs of economic improvement. The Republicans cited the Federal Deficit Reduction Act of 1989’s tax increase as the problem, explaining that it was over taxing families across the nation. During a Larry King Live interview, Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole explained, “The reason that this country’s economy is not seeing any improvement is because the government has bogged down low and middle class families with these ridiculous tax rates under the Federal Deficit Act of 1989.” Other Republican leaders agreed with Dole’s statement. Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS) even cited the tax increase as the source of the economic problem.


Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS) was an outspoken critic of the Bentsen administration

The criticism over the economy did not only come from Republicans, though. A few Liberal Democrats took the exact opposite position from their Republican colleagues, arguing that the Federal Deficit Reduction Act did not raise taxes enough. According to these few politicians, President Bentsen had no done enough to prevent an economic decline. This coalition of Liberal Democrats, mostly made up of House members from the Northeast, were at odds with other members of the Democratic Party, however, who claimed that the economic decline was natural. Senator Chuck Robb (D-VA) dismissed Democratic criticism of the President as “a bunch of nonsense.” Many Democrats distanced themselves from the Liberal Democrat coalition in an effort Despite criticism from both isles, however, President Bentsen retained a 60% approval rating among independents by May 1990. His approval rating, however, had declined since the beginning of 1990 from 51% to 48%. In fact, for the first term since his inauguration, the President’s disapproval ratings were higher than his approval ratings.


President Bentsen defending the FDRA during a press interview

NATIONWIDE POLL – MAY 3 1990
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 48.6%
No: 50.6%
Unsure: 0.8%

Republicans continued their attacks on Bentsen as the summer of 1990 began. On August 2, 1990, Iraqi forces, under the orders of Saddam Hussein, invaded Kuwait. The U.N. Security Council immediately issued sanctions upon Iraq. In response, President Bentsen deployed American troops into Saudi Arabia in preparation to intervene against Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait. During a press conference, Bentsen explained his decision to deploy troops to the region in order to halt the Iraqi invasion and restore peace to the region. On the international stage, the United States developed a coalition of nations. When diplomatic efforts proved to be ineffective, the United States led the coalition in battle against Iraqi troops. Saddam initially offered a complete withdrawal from Kuwait if the United States and other Western nations met a list of outrageous demands, but the Bentsen administration quickly dismissed such a possibility. By the end of August, the United States was still battling Iraqi forces. The conflict was quickly dubbed the Gulf War. Presiding over a war, Bentsen initially saw his approval ratings sky-rocket to 85%.


August 1990: The Gulf War begins

NATIONWIDE POLL – AUG 29 1990
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 85.4%
No: 14.5%
Unsure: 0.1%

The President’s decision to intervene in Iraq generally hushed Republican opposition during August and the first few weeks of autumn. The Gulf War enraged the outspoken Liberal Democrats, however, who were already quite dissatisfied with Bentsen’s presidency. Several Liberal Democrats compared him to Ronald Reagan and cited that the President was not executing his duties as he promised in the campaign. In his autobiography, No Hesitation, Bentsen would later remark in 1998, “Contrary to anything they said, the extreme left was nothing more than a whining child during my presidency.” Outspoken anti-war critics highlighted that the Gulf War directly contradicted Bentsen’s efforts to curve the deficit, as well.

Although Bentsen dismissed the far left’s complaints, he knew that he could not abandon them. In October 1990, SCOTUS Justice Brennan announced his intention to retire. White House advisors suggested that Bentsen nominated a more conventionally liberal justice in order to please the far left, who were already expressing extreme discontent over the economic climate and the Gulf War. Bentsen nominated Dolores Sloviter from the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. If the Senate confirmed her, she would be the second woman on the Court and the sixth Jewish justice. In late October, the Senate overwhelmingly confirmed Sloviter.


Justice Dolores Sloviter

By November, the economy was still shaky and the Gulf War continued in the Middle East. The 1990 midterm elections quickly approached. The Democrats aimed to hold onto their 55 seats in the Senate and maintain the House, while the Republicans hoped to make gains in both. Political analysts predicted that the ideological split among Democrats would lead to Republican pickups in several important states. Several Democrats, dubbing themselves “Bentsen Democrats,” adopted a more conservative platform in order to distance themselves from the far left. In the end, The Republicans gained two seats in the Senate bringing the composition of the Senate to 54 Democrats and 46 Republicans. In the House, the Democrats gain a mere three seats, bringing their total to 263.

1990 mid-term results:
Senate -2, +2: 54, 46
House: +3, -3: 263, 172

Notable results:
New Jersey: Christine Todd Whitman (R) defeats Senator Bill Bradley (D)
Minnesota: Senator Rudy Boschwitz (R) narrowly wins re-election over Paul Wellstone (D)
Florida: Governor Bob Martinez (R) is outsted by Lawton Chiles (D), a self-proclaimed “Bentsen Democrat.”
« Last Edit: December 27, 2011, 01:44:06 pm by GLPman »Logged

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« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2011, 04:38:22 pm »
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Good job. Smiley Im wondering who is in Lloyd's cabinet. Specifically, State, Justice, Treasury, & Defense, & also if any prominent DLCers are in it.
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« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2011, 10:01:27 pm »
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Good job. Smiley Im wondering who is in Lloyd's cabinet. Specifically, State, Justice, Treasury, & Defense, & also if any prominent DLCers are in it.

Thanks!

Upper Cabinet of President Lloyd Bentsen
President: Lloyd M. Bentsen
Vice President: Joe R. Biden
Sec of State: Warren M. Christopher
Sec of Treasury: Paul A. Vocker
Sec of Defense: Lee H. Hamilton
Attorney General: Bruce E. Babbitt

Another update coming soon.
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« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2011, 12:06:07 am »
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Drink Too Much:
http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=147022.0

An Empire of Stars and Stripes:

http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=156974.0

Quote
FOOL!  I AM Cathcon!

Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

---------------------------------------

Libertarian Internationalist Monarchist
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« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2011, 01:44:36 pm »
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GLPman
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« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2011, 10:53:13 pm »
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Chapter V: The New Opposition

“We need to adopt a strategy, Mr. President, that honors our coalition, reduces casualties, and ultimately restores sovereignty to the Iraqi people.” Secretary of Defense Lee Hamilton, February 1991.

“I do not foresee any obstacles in the President’s path to re-election.” – Vice President Joe Biden, June 1991.

“Restore American values. Vote Robertson.” – Sign outside Fort Dodge, Iowa, July 1991

Beginning in the first few months of 1991, the Gulf War began to wind down as Coalition forces entered Iraq and combated Iraqi troops. As the Coalition forces pushed onward, numerous uprisings occurred across the nation. February arrived and the Bentsen administration faced the question of what to do with Saddam. Advisors in the administration initially pushed for Bentsen to allow U.S. forces to remove the dictator before more harm was done. Others, however, including Secretary of Defense Lee Hamilton, advocated for a strategy that allowed the Iraqi people to overthrow Saddam. Pursuant to this strategy, the United States would depart from Iraq and return sovereignty to the Iraqi people. Furthermore, the potential for American casualties would be eliminated, as would the potential for the U.S. to become embroiled in a Vietnam-like situation in Baghdad. Bentsen, who had entered the Senate during the height of the anti-Vietnam era, wanted to avoid another Vietnam-like conflict at all costs. By early February, the administration announced that U.S. forces would depart from Iraq following the completion of the mission.


U.S. forces leaving Iraq

Republicans seized this opportunity to cite Bentsen as weak for failing to capture Saddam and install a new government. “The President’s logic is flawed – a lack of action will only result in the return of our brave men and women to Iraqi soil,” explained House Minority Leader Bob Michel. President Bentsen’s decision thus gave the Republicans the opportunity to portray the policy as weak. At the end of the day, though, it was difficult to argue in favor of a conflict that could parallel Vietnam. President Bentsen saw his approval ratings hover at 52%.

NATIONWIDE POLL – MARCH 15 1991
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 52.4%
No: 47.6%
Unsure: 0.1%

By April 1991, the deficit had been reduced to around $170 million. The economy, however, was still in rough shape and there were no signs of improvement. The new 102nd Congress, which had passed a moderate gun control bill earlier on in the year, made more of an effort to the address the declining economy than the 101st Congress, yet Democrats and Republicans were remained divided on how to approach the declining economy. The American public was quickly growing frustrated and President Bentsen’s approval ratings fell below 50% by May 1991.

With the Republican primaries only months away, speculation began about who would throw their hat into the ring. Former Republican presidential nominee and vice president George H.W. Bush announced that he had no intention of seeking the office. In June, former Vice Presidential nominee Dan Quayle announced his bid for the presidency. Citing a declining economy, Quayle explained that a Quayle presidency would be better than a Bentsen presidency. Quayle immediately started campaigning in Iowa.


Former VP nominee Dan Quayle (R-IN) campaigning in Iowa

Many Americans still viewed Quayle, however, as the clumsy and not-too-bright vice presidential nominee from a few years earlier.  Quayle’s decision to throw his hat in the ring led other Republicans, who had formerly dismissed the idea of running, to rethink their plans. In late June, Baptist minister Pat Robertson announced his intention to run in Sioux City, Iowa. Robertson, portraying himself as the true conservative candidate, immediately won the hearts and minds of the Conservative right. Former Governor of Tennessee Lamar Alexander also announced his intention to seek the presidency. In early July, New Mexico Senator Pete Domenici also declared that he was running. Early July polls showed Robertson in the lead in Iowa, but Quayle in the lead nationally. Nonetheless, summer had only begun. There was plenty of time for other candidates to get in the race.


Minister Pat Robertson held a lead in Iowa by July 1991

IOWA POLL – JULY 10 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Robertson: 24.4%
Quayle: 20.6%
Alexander: 12.5%
Domenici: 9.0%
Unsure: 33.5%

NATIONWIDE POLL – JULY 10 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Quayle: 25.9%
Robertson: 21.0%
Domenici: 13.4%
Alexander: 11.1%
Unsure: 28.6%
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General White
Vegetaboi
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Political Matrix
E: 3.45, S: 3.75

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« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2011, 11:20:45 pm »
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so far very good.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2011, 11:23:17 pm by Vegetaboi »Logged

Niemeyerite
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« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2011, 10:56:43 am »
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My evolution (by The Political Matrix):
E: -6.06 -> -6.97 -> -6.97 -> -8.13 -> -7.29 -> -8.26 -> -8.65 -> -7.03
S: -6.78 -> -6.09 -> -7.30 -> -7.13 -> -8.09 -> -8.35 -> -9.04 -> -8.61
morgieb
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« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2011, 03:54:17 am »
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I hope Quayle wins the primaries, just so I can hear Bensten sledge him again.
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