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GLPman
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« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2011, 01:12:57 pm »
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Thank you for all the great comments and support!

Chapter VI: The Rising Tide

“There is no doubt that American families today are facing tough economic times.” – President Lloyd Bentsen, August 1991.

“Load up the guns and bring your friends, it’s fun to lose and to pretend.” – Nirvana’s Smells Like Teen Spirit, September 1991.

“Unemployment Rate Hits 7%”- The New York Times, October 1991.

Although the GOP field for the 1992 nomination was quickly becoming crowded and developing a stronger message, the Bentsen administration remained focused on the economy. In fact, re-election was not even on the President’s mind; he knew that if the economy continued to falter, or even got worse, any chance of re-election would be greatly reduced. The Republicans, on the other hand, continued to slam the President over the nation’s poor economic status. Polls showed that the economy was the primary concern of American voters across the country. The Republicans aimed to capitalize on the economic conditions. At one of his first rallies in Iowa, for example, New Mexico Senator Pete Domenici slammed Bentsen: “Our President is a great man, but quite frankly he’s in way over his head. We need a President who can turn this economy around.” While the majority of the Republican candidates focused on the economy, minister Pat Robertson cited an erosion of American values as the centerpiece of his campaign. Although the majority of American voters explained that the declining economy was their chief concern, Robertson’s message resonated strongly with voters in Iowa.


Pat Robertson criticizing President Bentsen in Des Moines

Nationally, Quayle still maintained a lead over the other Republican candidates. By late July, Quayle still maintained a dominating lead, with Robertson in second place. Polls showed that a Bentsen – Quayle matchup, however, would result in a strong Bentsen victory, with the President carrying 51% support to Quayle’s 38%. The reality was that, despite his national lead, the thought of a President Quayle scared everyone. Democrats mocked the idea of Quayle as the Republican nominee, while Republicans crossed their fingers in hopes of a more viable candidate.

NATIONWIDE POLL – JULY 27 1991
Which candidate would you support in the 1992 election?
President Lloyd Bentsen: 51.0%
Senator Dan Quayle: 38.6%
Unsure: 10.4%

The search for the anti-Quayle candidate began. Most Republicans refused to jump in the race, however, and privately admitted they would just endorse another candidate. Beginning in August, Quayle’s lead began to slip as the other candidates picked up more support and media attention. Nonetheless, Quayle was a familiar politician, which distinguished him from some of his competitors, such as Lamar Alexander and Pete Domenici. In a surprising move, though, Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole announced his intention to seek the presidency on August 12th. “I have seen first hand how this great nation lacks the leadership that is needed to get us back on track. I have stood up to President Bentsen for the past two years. America, I am your man, which is why I am hereby announcing that I will be running for President,” stated Dole during his announcement speech. Dole’s entry into the Republican primaries greatly shifted the balance of support. Polls released in late August showed that Dole was essentially tied with Quayle nationally and in second place in Iowa.


Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS) quickly proved to be the anti-Quayle candidate

IOWA POLL – AUGUST 23 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Robertson: 30.1%
Dole: 27.2%
Quayle: 23.7%
Alexander: 9.1%
Domenici: 7.9%
Unsure: 2.0%

NATIONWIDE POLL – AUGUST 23 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Quayle: 29.3%
Dole: 28.8%
Robertson: 23.5%
Domenici: 8.3%
Alexander: 6.6%
Unsure: 2.5%

Dole was quickly proving to be to the anti-Quayle. As a veteran, senior politician, and experienced legislator, Dole brought a much more appealing background to the table than many of the other candidates. The other candidates, however, bashed Dole for being a Washington insider. “Is there really a difference between Mr. Dole and our President? Both men are Washington insiders who have done nothing but contributed to this great nation’s decline,” commented Pat Robertson at a rally in Des Moines. Polling in September continued to show Dole, Robertson, and Quayle with the majority of support. Lamar Alexander decided to focus on New Hampshire instead of Iowa in hopes of pulling off an upset victory in the Granite State.

NEW HAMPSHIRE POLL – OCTOBER 15 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Quayle: 27.9%
Dole: 23.1%
Alexander: 22.4%
Robertson: 13.5%
Domenici: 6.9%
Unsure: 6.2%


Could Dan Quayle hold his lead?

President Bentsen remained focused on the economy. With unemployment rising and the economy still faltering, however, the Republican primaries received more attention. The Iowa Caucus was quickly approaching, yet the Republican field was still in chaos and bitterly divided.    
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« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2011, 01:17:48 pm »
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I'm rooting for Dole. War hero, experienced legislator, and a "cloth coat" Republican background.
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GLPman
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« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2011, 03:11:00 pm »
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Chapter VII: Can’t You Hear Me Knocking?

“With all due respect, Senator, if anyone understands the American Dream, it is I.” – Justice Joseph Hatchett, October 1991.

“I do not plan on endorsing until after the primaries.” - former Vice President George H.W. Bush, November 1991.

“I am certainly pleased that 1991 is over.” – Secretary of the Treasury Paul Vocker, January 1992.

As 1991 began to wind down, President Bentsen was forced to focus on the economy in wake of growing unemployment. The economy still had yet to rebound. It appeared that the growth and prosperity of the mid and late 1980s had ended. The White House needed to turn the economy around or else re-election would be tough. After much compromise, the 102nd Congress drafted a bill in October 1991 that would provide additional benefits to unemployed Americans. Despite such measures to turn the economy around, Bentsen’s approval rating held stead at 43%.


President Bentsen's approval ratings dropped

NATIONWIDE POLL – OCTOBER 2 1991
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 43.5%
No: 56.4%
Unsure: 0.1%

In mid October, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice, announced his intention to retire. The media immediately began speculating about Marshall’s replacement. The President interviewed more than a dozen candidates for the position, but knew his preference almost immediately. On October 18th, President Bentsen announced his nominee: Justice Joseph W. Hatchett of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. Years later in his autobiography, The New Court, Hatchett would write: “For as long as I live, I shall never forget those final few moments of my interview with President Bentsen. The President, with a somber look on his face, quietly remarked, ‘Joe, if you want this, it’s yours.’” Democrats unanimously praised the selection, but Republicans were hesitant to endorse. Hatchett, who had been appointed by Carter, was virtually unknown outside the Fifth Circuit. The 101st Congress had easily confirmed Sloviter, but Hatchett would face a tougher process in the 102nd Congress. Ultimately, the Senate would confirm Hatchett, with a vote of 57 – 43. Although four Republicans joined the Democrats in voting in favor of Hatchett, the vote would fall on party lines.


Justice Joseph W. Hatchett

On the campaign trail, the Republican candidates continued to blame the President for a faltering economy and high unemployment. “We need to get America back on the right track,” Dan Quayle remarked at a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire. By December, Quayle and Dole were virtually tied for the lead nationally. Lamar Alexander continued to focus entirely on New Hampshire, in hopes that he could pull off a win in order to throw off the other candidates. In Iowa, polls showed a dead heat between Quayle, Dole, and Robertson. As far as any political analyst was concerned in late December 1991, any prediction was valid. The primary schedule itself began with the Iowa caucus, followed by the New Hampshire primary, the Delaware primary, the Louisiana Caucus, and then the Arizona primary. These first five states would determine the rest of the primary season.

NATIONWIDE POLL – DECEMBER 29 1991
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Dole: 28.9%
Quayle: 28.0%
Robertson: 23.3%
Alexander: 13.2%
Domenici: 6.4%
Unsure: 0.3%

As 1991 and 1992 began, all eyes were fixated on Iowa in anticipation of the Republican primaries. On January 15th, the Iowa caucus was held. Voters rushed to the polls to vote for their preferred candidate. Political analysts predicted a win for small win for Robertson over both Dole and Quayle. For much of the night, Robertson held the lead. In an upset, however, Quayle seized first place, with Robertson coming in second and Dole coming in third. Robertson, aiming to pull off a large victory in the Louisiana caucus and one other state, vowed to his supporters that he would stay in. The Dole campaign, which suffered a major blow by placing third behind both Quayle and Robertson, also vowed to stay in. New Mexico Governor Pete Domenici, who came in fourth ahead of Lamar Alexander, bowed out: “Thank you for your support. We had a great run, but I have decided to hereby suspend my campaign,” Domenici announced in Des Moines. Finally, Alexander remained in the race, despite his dead-last finish, to see how he performed in New Hampshire.


Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN) gives his victory speech in Iowa

IOWA CAUCUS RESULTS
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 29.1%
Robertson: 27.8%
Dole: 26.7%
Domenici: 9.6%
Alexander: 4.8%

Greeting a crowd of supporters in Iowa, Quayle emphasized how his belief that he was the true conservative in the race. “I am in it to win. We are in it to win. Together, we will restore greatness to this country,” Quayle remarked during his victory speech. While Quayle focused on carrying his momentum into New Hampshire, the Dole campaign was determined to come back from the defeat in Iowa. Alexander, on the other hand, needed a strong performance if he wished to stay in the race. The New Hampshire primary proved to save the Dole campaign. Dole emerged victorious with 32% of the vote, with Quayle coming in second at 28%. Robertson finished a distant fourth, but vowed to remain in the race. Alexander’s campaign, on the other hand, did not have the momentum or the resources to continue. In Concord, New Hampshire, Alexander announced he would be suspending the campaign. With only three candidates left, the nation turned its eyes to the Delaware primary.


Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS) following his win in New Hampshire

NEW HAMPSHIRE PRIMARY RESULTS
Winner: Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 32.2%
Quayle: 28.5%
Alexander: 25.1%
Robertson: 14.2%
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« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2011, 03:17:10 pm »
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In 1988 Dole won Ipwa as the rural candidate. He did poorly in New Hampshire because of his refusal to sign a no tax raise pledge. Has Dole, four years later, agreed to sign it?
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« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2011, 03:24:51 pm »
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In 1988 Dole won Ipwa as the rural candidate. He did poorly in New Hampshire because of his refusal to sign a no tax raise pledge. Has Dole, four years later, agreed to sign it?

In most instances, the Republican electorate is divided on whether Quayle is a good choice or not. Quayle is familiar and not a Washington insider, like Dole. Much of Dole's support comes from a refusal to support Quayle or Robertson. Republicans who were unwilling to support Dole in 1988 are thus flocking to Dole out of fear that Quayle could win the nomination.
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« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2012, 05:25:10 pm »
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How/why did people like Pat Robertson again?  I'm seriously dumbfounded.

Hope to see this continue
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« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2012, 07:44:24 pm »
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Its Dole vs Bentsen and Dole wins.
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the birth of modern america & onward election Former Vice President Blanche Bruce defeats incumbent President Grover Cleveland in 1904. In an age of unpredictable election outcomes Bruce finds himself reelected in 1908 against an opponent whose name escapes me at the moment. Blanche Bruce served as Vice President under Frederick Douglas whom Cleveland defeated in 1900. His Vice President runs to replace Bruce in 1912.
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« Reply #32 on: April 04, 2012, 12:50:15 pm »
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Chapter VIII: For the Record

“There is only one man in this race who has the experience to know how Washington works and how to get this country back on track.” – Senator Bob Dole, February 1992.

“President Bentsen is a great ally and a great friend.” – Prime Minister John Major, February 1992.

“It’s Louisiana or bust.” – Staffer at Pat Robertson’s campaign headquarters, February 1992.

With the Republican Primary now down to only three men, the focus shifted to the upcoming contests in Delaware, Louisiana, and Arizona. The Dole campaign hoped that its win in New Hampshire could propel the Kansas senator to victory in Delaware. Early polls showed a virtual tie between Quayle and Dole, with Robertson trailing in a distant third. Dole’s victory in New Hampshire also proved to many undecided Republicans across the country that Dole had indeed proved himself as the anti-Quayle candidate, even for those candidates who had supported Bush over Dole four years earlier. In the national polls before the Delaware Primary, Dole began to solidify his lead over Quayle.


Dan Quayle campaigning in Wilmington, Delaware

NATIONWIDE POLL – FEBRUARY 1 1992
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Dole: 44.2%
Quayle: 37.1%
Robertson: 17.7%
Unsure:  1.0%

Meanwhile, President Bentsen prepared to enter re-election mode as February began. In the White House, the President and his staff knew that, at this point, re-election was going to be an uphill battle. Bentsen’s approval rating held firm at 45%, but the Republican primary seemed to be pulling away his support from independents. Unemployment continued to rise, reaching 7.2% by mid-February. In his autobiography, No Hesitation, years later, Bentsen would later remark that early 1992 was the lowest point of his presidency. The support that he had received from the Gulf War had essentially diminished. In an effort to curb the negative stigma of the economy, political advisors to the President urged him to focus on foreign affairs – no doubt, an area of success for him. Beginning in early February, Bentsen would travel to Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and Ireland. In particular, Bentsen would strengthen his relationship with John Major during this trip. Democrats utilized Bentsen’s visit to Europe to portray the President as a champion of foreign affairs, while Republicans criticized him as out of touch with Americans.


Bentsen during a press conference with Prime Minister John Major

Heading into Delaware, analysts widely agreed that Robertson had no chance at winning the small state and its delegates. Instead, Delaware would prove to be a battleground for the Quayle and Dole campaigns to determine who could gain the most momentum. At the end of the night, Quayle squeaked by Dole for the victory. Greeting a crowd of supporters in Wilmington, Quayle said, “We need a fresh face in the White House – someone who is going to bring in new ideas and not recycle the broken policies of the past. President Bentsen is out of touch. As Americans at home suffer from an ill economy, the President has decided that the best way to answer is to visit Europe.” The Dole campaign did not seem phased by the loss. In fact, Quayle’s win only further fueled anti-Quayle feelings among undecided GOP voters. In Dover, Dole assured his supporters that the race was far from over.

DELAWARE PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 45.9%
Dole: 42.2%
Robertson: 11.9%

The Robertson campaign, on the other hand, seemed to be on its final leg. Robertson poured all of his resources into winning the Louisiana caucus. All analysts agreed that a Robertson loss in Louisiana would result in the death of the pastor’s campaign. Despite an initially strong showing in Iowa polls, Robertson had failed to win any contest so far. Initial polls of Louisiana showed strong support for Robertson, but Quayle’s win in Delaware boosted his support as well. The Dole campaign also poured heavy resources into the state, hoping for an upset victory. At a campaign stop in New Orleans, Dole commented, “Republicans need a candidate with political experience that knows how to maneuver through Washington. I am that candidate.” In the end, Louisiana proved to be possibly the biggest upset of the GOP primary season. Dole managed to deliver a crippling blow to both the Robertson and Quayle campaigns by narrowly achieving victory. Dole was ecstatic with the victory, saying, “We are moving closer and closer towards the White House. Thank you, Louisiana, for voting for the experienced man in the race!” With his campaign virtually bankrupt and no victory, Robertson decided to bow out. “It is time for me to go,” said Robertson. “But, please, let us all continue our fight to restore America.”

LOUISIANA CAUCUS RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 35.1%
Robertson: 34.9%
Quayle: 29.0%


Robertson giving concession speech in Louisiana

With Robertson out, the GOP primary was now a two man race between Dole and Quayle. Unfortunately, the vigorous contest schedule left little time for a break for either of the candidates following the Louisiana Caucus. Less than a week later, the Arizona Primary was held. Dole easily won the contest by 8%. The victory further solidified Dole’s lead over Quayle nationally and gave him even more momentum.

ARIZONA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 54.0%
Quayle: 46.0%


Bob Dole delivers his victory speech in Phoenix

1992 Republican Primary Map

Red - Quayle
Blue - Dole
Green - Robertson

Dole’s victories in Louisiana and Arizona pushed him to the front of race. Quayle was confident he could make a come back, however. As the next set of contests approach, analysts wondered if Quayle could possible make a comeback.
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« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2012, 01:07:16 pm »
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Yeah, Dole's gonna win. Not sure about the general. What's going on with Ron Paul & Ross Perot? In '92, Paul was considering a GOP/Indy bid but decided against it to support Buchanan.
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« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2012, 09:56:54 am »
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Thanks for the comments - they really keep this thing going.

Ron Paul briefly considered running for the GOP nomination in 1992, but decided against the idea. Although he has not announced any further plans, some political analysts believe that he will throw his hat in the ring for the Libertarian nomination once again, as he did in 1988.

As for Ross Perot, rumors have developed in the first few months of 1992 that the Texas businessman is interested in running for president as an independent.
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« Reply #35 on: April 06, 2012, 06:57:23 pm »
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Thanks for the comments - they really keep this thing going.

Ron Paul briefly considered running for the GOP nomination in 1992, but decided against the idea. Although he has not announced any further plans, some political analysts believe that he will throw his hat in the ring for the Libertarian nomination once again, as he did in 1988.

As for Ross Perot, rumors have developed in the first few months of 1992 that the Texas businessman is interested in running for president as an independent.


[digs through drawer]

"Don't vote for more of the same; remember where it got us last time?"





Whoops, 20 years too early for that little diddy, let's see what else we got...

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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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« Reply #36 on: April 07, 2012, 12:08:43 am »
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[digs through drawer]

Nope.
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« Reply #37 on: April 08, 2012, 11:04:30 am »
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Nope.


You sir, sicken me.  Tongue  Jesse V in 93.
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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« Reply #38 on: May 25, 2012, 03:21:04 pm »
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Chapter IX: A Force to be Reckoned With

“Crime and Unemployment: The Modern Tale of New York City”Time Magazine, Feb. 1992

“Who the hell is Ross Perot?” Dole campaign staffer, March 1992

“Three seems like a crowd, wouldn’t you say?” President Lloyd Bentsen, March 1992

With his victory in Arizona, Dole had successfully solidified himself as the frontrunner of the Republican primaries. During a campaign rally in Charleston, Dole advocated a message of “Experienced Conservatism,” which would become the centerpiece of his campaign in the upcoming weeks. To counter Dole’s message, Quayle unraveled a new slogan: “Fresh Conservatism.” The two campaigns were thus defined. With four contests down, Quayle and Dole both headed to South Carolina. Polls in South Carolina showed Dole leading by two points. South Dakota would follow the Palmetto State, with Wyoming coming next.

SOUTH CAROLINA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole:  52.8%
Quayle: 47.2%


Dole following his win in South Carolina

Dole’s hot streak continued. There was little time for celebration, though, as the two candidates headed to South Dakota. Unlike Arizona and South Carolina, though, the latest poll in South Dakota showed a dead heat between Quayle and Dole. The Quayle campaign had heavily invested in South Dakota, hoping to halt Dole’s momentum. At a rally in Rapid City, Quayle criticized both President Bentsen and his Republican opponent: “I look at President Bentsen and Senator Dole and see two great men, but two men who are out of touch. This great country needs a leader who understands the tough times we face and can develop a modern, not outdated, solution to the problem.” The Dole camp, although not critical of Quayle, remained focused on attacking Bentsen, as well.

SOUTH DAKOTA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 50.2%
Dole: 49.8%

After a much longer night than any analysts had predicted, Quayle emerged victorious with a 0.4% of the lead. On stage at a manufacturing plant outside of Sioux Falls, Quayle greeted a crowd of supporters and thanked them. Privately, however, the Quayle campaign was far from happy with the victory. The campaign’s investment proved to be of little use against Dole. Quayle had barely defeated Dole in a state with a low delegate count. Furthermore, there was no evidence that Quayle had indeed halted Dole’s momentum.


Quayle's victory speech in Sioux Falls

Back in the White House, President Bentsen found himself gearing up for reelection. His campaign team had already assembled and, against the President’s wishes, decided that Washington, D.C. would serve as the campaign headquarters. Bentsen had pushed for a campaign headquarters in Texas, but his advisors had emphasized that such a move in the midst of a dreadful economy would only reinforce the Republican’s claims that Bentsen was out of touch. His approval rating remained just under 50%, which was higher than it had been in months. Despite this good news, though, the economy was still in bad shape.

NATIONWIDE POLL – FEB 27 1992
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 48.7%
No: 47.9%
Unsure: 3.4%

In Wyoming, both Quayle and Dole found themselves traveling across state to win over last minute voters. The Quayle campaign was dealt a heavy set back, though, when House Minority Whip Dick Cheney endorsed Dole – a move Cheney timed perfectly. At a rally in Cheyenne, Cheney introduced Dole as “the only man who can unseat President Bentsen this November.” While the endorsement itself was no surprise, the timing proved to be fatal to Quayle’s chances in Wyoming. When the caucus rolled around, Quayle didn’t stand a chance.


House Minority Whip Dick Cheney (R-WY) looks on during Cheyenne rally

WYOMING CAUCUS RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 54.3%
Quayle: 45.7%

Amidst the Dole campaign’s celebration, though, something remarkable happened. Texas businessman Ross Perot announced on television his intention to run as an independent candidate if he could capture enough support to get his name on the ballot in all fifty states.  The media immediately shifted all focus to Perot. The Texas billionaire explained his belief that President Bentsen had failed to take enough action to properly balance the federal budget. He also explained that his campaign would focus on gun-control policies, an expansion of the War on Drugs, and stricter trade agreements.


Ross Perot

Both the Democrats and the Republicans worried that Perot could significantly hurt their chances in November. Initial polls at the beginning of March showed good news for the Republicans, though: Perot seemed to take away more votes from President Bentsen than from either Dole or Quayle. Political analysts attributed the results to a disenfranchisement of left-wing liberals and democrat-leaning independents towards President Bentsen, whom, in their eyes, had not lived up to expectations. Most independents, for now, would remain with Bentsen or Dole.

NATIONWIDE POLL – MARCH 3 1992
Which candidate would you support in the 1992 presidential election?
Generic Republican (Senator Bob Dole/Senator Dan Quayle): 43.3%
President Lloyd Bentsen: 36.3%
Businessman Ross Perot:  12.1%
Unsure: 8.3%

Across the country, political analysts debated if Perot’s influence over the race would last. Meanwhile, Dole and Quayle geared up for Super Tuesday, which would most likely proved to be the final battle of the 1992 Republican presidential primaries.

1992 Republican Primary Map
Red - Quayle
Blue - Dole
Green - Robertson
« Last Edit: May 27, 2012, 05:11:03 pm by GLPman »Logged

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« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2012, 04:39:55 pm »
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Great to see this still Alive
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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« Reply #40 on: June 02, 2012, 05:10:18 pm »
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Chapter X: Battle Royale

“Is a Quayle comeback inevitable?”Newsweek Magazine, March 1992

“Conservatism in this country needs a fresh face.” – Senator Dan Quayle, March 1992

“Perot is looking better by the day.” – Resident of Helena, Montana, March 1992

Following Perot’s announcement of his intention to mount a third-party bid for the presidency, the media became sensationalized with the Texas billionaire. Across the nation, various media networks devoted hours upon hours of coverage to the remote possibility that Perot could derail the traditional two-party system. Others, however, were skeptical that the Texas businessman would present a drastic influence, if any, in the upcoming presidential election. Regardless, for now Perot and his supporters focused on placing his name on the ballot in as many states as possible.

Meanwhile, President Bentsen rallied with top Democratic congressional leaders and announced the intention to deliver a ban on assault gun use for civilians within the upcoming weeks. Gun violence had continuously proven an escalating problem throughout the country. Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell explained, “I see absolutely no reason why a civilian has the need to purchase an assault gun.” The Democrats’ initiative immediately sparked debate among pro-gun lobbies and interest groups, such as the NRA. Initial polls showed that independent voters slightly favored such a ban, but not overwhelmingly. The road ahead would prove difficult, especially with a sluggish economy and a do-nothing Congress, but Bentsen vowed to do everything in his power to ensure the passage of the ban.


Bentsen would rally with Democrats on the ban

With Super Tuesday quickly approaching, Dole and Quayle each made last minutes campaign stops in an effort to rally voters. Dole continued to maintain his lead nationally, though Quayle was not far behind. A whole slew of states would hold their contests on Super Tuesday: Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Rhode Island, and Vermont. While Dole had focused heavily on the Northeastern states, the Quayle campaign had their eyes on Michigan and Minnesota. Quayle knew that he had to perform well if he wanted to stay in the race. Both men continued to advertise their slogans on the campaign trail, too – Quayle’s “Fresh Conservatism” versus Dole’s “Experienced Conservatism.”


Quayle at a rally in Minneapolis

COLOARDO PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 53.3%
Quayle: 46.7%

CONNECTICUT PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 53.6%
Quayle: 46.4%

GEORGIA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 57.4%
Quayle: 42.6%

MAINE PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 52.1%
Quayle: 47.9%

MARYLAND PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 52.9%
Dole: 47.1%

MASSACHUSETTS PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 53.2%
Quayle: 46.8%

MICHIGAN PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 52.1%
Dole: 47.9%

MINNESOTA CAUCUS RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 53.7%
Dole: 46.3%

RHODE ISLAND PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 51.9%
Dole: 48.1%

VERMONT PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 52.8%
Quayle: 47.2%

Quayle emerged victorious in Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, and Rhode Island, while Dole had won the remaining states. For Dan Quayle, these victories were enough to stay in the race. Political analysts were particularly surprised with Quayle’s wins in Michigan and Rhode Island. Was it possible that the Dole campaign was beginning to erode? Dole himself was rather upset at the loss in Michigan, but knew it wouldn’t derail his campaign. In recent weeks, he had come to regard Quayle as more of a pain in the ass than a serious obstacle. Dole thanked supporters at a rally in Georgia, saying, “Thank you! We are now one step closer to taking the White House back in November.”


March continued on and the primary schedule became even busier. The New York Primary was two days following Super Tuesday. The subsequent day, Kentucky, Oklahoma, and Oregon would hold their contests. While Dole was favored in New York and Oklahoma, Quayle maintained a lead in Oregon. Kentucky, at this point, was considered a toss-up. When asked on Larry King Live about his perception of his changes in the upcoming contests, Quayle explained, “I've met countless people throughout the country who are ready for a new breed of conservatism. Just yesterday I was in Louisville and the energy there is extremely vibrant. People are tired of this administration’s failure, and I think many conservative voters agree with my stances.”

NEW YORK PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 56.4%
Quayle: 43.6%

KENTUCKY PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 54.3%
Dole: 45.7%

OKLAHOMA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 58.9%
Quayle: 41.1%

OREGON PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 57.2%
Dole: 42.8%

Could Quayle make a comeback?


Although Dole emerged victorious in New York and Oklahoma, Quayle had successfully peeled Kentucky and Oregon away from the Dole column. Although Dole maintained more delegates than Quayle, Quayle was certainly making his dent on the Kansas senator’s lead. The majority of the Republican establishment had thrown their support behind Dole, yet Quayle had proven to stick around much longer than anyone had anticipated. In hopes of sealing Quayle’s fate, Dole courted several crucial endorsements from senators and governors. By March 16th, polls showed that the Dole held a mere three-point lead over Quayle.

NATIONWIDE POLL – MARCH 16 1992
Which candidate do you support for the GOP nomination?
Dole: 51. 8%
Quayle: 48.2%

FLORIDA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 53.6%
Quayle: 46.4%

MISSOURI CAUCUS RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 54.0%
Quayle: 46.0%

WISCONSIN PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 53.0%
Dole: 47.0%

1992 Republican Primary Map
Red - Quayle
Blue - Dole
Green - Robertson
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« Reply #41 on: June 02, 2012, 07:17:48 pm »
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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Chapter XI: When Push Comes to Shove

“This ban will result in a safer America.” – Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell, April 1992.

“America is ready to diverge from this president’s failed policies.” – Bob Dole, April 1992.

“Unemployment Rate Hovers Above 8.3 Percent.” – Washington Post, April 1992.

The battle between Quayle and Dole for delegates continued as March concluded. Four remaining states would hold their contest before April began: Nevada, Alabama, Indiana, and Ohio. Both campaigns were determined to win in Ohio – for dole, it would solidify his status as a frontrunner, while a Quayle victory would certainly upset Dole’s lead and possibly even turn the tables against Dole.

NEVADA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 50.4%
Dole: 49.6%

Quayle had barely edged out Dole in Nevada. Dole disregarded the loss and remained focused on Alabama and Ohio. There was little doubt that Indiana was a lost cause since it was Quayle’s home state.  Polls showed Quayle and Dole tied in Ohio, which concerned both candidates. Quayle’s Midwestern roots from neighboring Indiana were helping him with voters in the Western portion of the state, yet likely voters showed a stronger preference for Dole based on his experience.  In an effort to gain ground over Quayle, the Dole campaign decided that Dole would attack the Indiana senator instead of strictly focusing on Bentsen. To the Dole campaign, the disastrous consequences of a potential Ohio loss justified the means. Outside Cincinnati, Dole remarked to a crowd of supporters, “Mr. Quayle is a good man, but he’s the wrong man for the job. After decades of serving the American people during my time in the Senate, I know what Americans are looking for. A Dole presidency would restore this great nation. A Quayle presidency would not.” On the rebuttal, Quayle criticized Dole for being out of touch during a rally in Toledo: “Senator Dole claims to know what Americans need, but he isn’t in touch with our needs and demands. He has failed to fight for our needs in the Senate.”


Quayle on the attack against Dole

ALABAMA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 55.1%
Quayle: 44.9%

INDIANA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 60.1%
Dole: 39.9%

OHIO PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 51.1%
Quayle: 48.9%

Dole had emerged victorious in Ohio, which dealt a devastating blow to the Quayle campaign. Could this be the beginning of Quayle’s demise, pundits wondered. The Dole campaign desperately needed victories in the next three states – Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wyoming. Initial polls showed a large chunk of undecided voters in both Pennsylvania and Washington, with Texas leaning towards Dole. There was no doubt that Dole’s victory in Ohio would boost the Kansas senator’s numbers, but by how much?

All during this time, President Bentsen continued to work with his party in an effort to pass the assault gun ban. Bentsen’s close relationship with Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell allowed the President to not only present a unified front against Republican opposition, but also reach out to more left-wing members of his party. Indeed, Mitchell would be Bentsen’s bridge to those members of the Democratic Party who were unhappy with the Bentsen presidency. The president knew that, if passed, the legislation would be a landmark of his administration.  Speaker Tom Foley, House Leader Dick Gephardt, and House Whip David Bonior would also push for the ban and attempt to rally House Democrats.


Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell (D-ME)

Meanwhile, Ross Perot continued his effort to get his name on the ballot in all fifty states. The Texas businessman held campaign stops in several western states, including Montana, Idaho, and Utah, where he called for a change to the two party system. Although Perot used this sentiment as a core part of his platform, there was little evidence that the American people were tired of the two-party system or the candidates. Polls indicated that roughly 50% of Americans held a positive view of President Bentsen, 49% a positive view of Dole, and 41% a positive view of Dan Quayle. Of course, with the election still months away, anything was bound to change.

Voting station outside Philadelphia

PENNSYLVANIA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 53.9%
Quayle: 46.1%

TEXAS PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 54.2%
Quayle: 45.8%

WASHINGTON PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Dan Quayle (R-IN)
Quayle: 52.0%
Dole: 48.0%

Quayle had lost out to Dole in the two states where he needed victories the most. Delegate-rich Pennsylvania and Texas had gone to Dole and completely opened up his lead over Quayle. While Dole greeted his victory speech crowd in Pennsylvania, Quayle vowed to stay in. “This is not the end, my friends,” he announced in his speech outside Houston. But with a wider lead, Dole was able to secure more donations, which meant more campaign stops and negative ads against Quayle. Dole saw his lead over Quayle open up to the largest throughout the entire primary season.

NATIONWIDE POLL – APRIL 10 1992
Who do you support for the GOP nomination?
Dole: 54.1%
Quayle: 45.7%
Undecided: 0.2%

The next Tuesday hosted the contests for New Jersey, Tennessee, and California. Initial polls showed Dole with a solid lead in each state. Political analysts believed that a Dole victory in each of the three states could be enough to push Quayle out of the race. California additionally had enough delegates that a Dole victory would deliver the Kansas senator just shy of the required amount to be the party’s nominee.

NEW JERSEY PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 54.9%
Quayle: 45.1%

TENNESSEE PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 55.7%
Quayle: 44.3%

CALIFORNIA PRIMARY RESULTS:
Winner: Senator Bob Dole (R-KS)
Dole: 55.2%%
Quayle: 44.8%

Following his three losses, Quayle, seeing no path to victory, prepared a concession speech. Half an hour after the California results were called, Quayle announced that he would be suspending his campaign. “It has been my great privilege to campaign this nation for the past few months and meet some truly wonderful people. Although my time to exit this race has come, remember that we must fight together to regain the White House this November. Thank you and God Bless you all!” With Quayle out, Dole became the GOP’s presumptive nominee. On a stage in front of a Los Angeles crowd, Dole gave an energizing speech: “We now march forward to reclaim this great nation from failed leadership. This campaign has been fueled by our core belief that our greatest days are ahead, that we won’t give up on our country.  That belief will propel us, together, to Pennsylvania Ave!”


Dole, the GOP presumptive nominee

1992 Republican Primary Map

Red - Quayle
Blue - Dole
Green - Robertson
« Last Edit: June 12, 2012, 11:34:41 pm by GLPman »Logged

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« Reply #43 on: June 23, 2012, 01:41:50 pm »
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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« Reply #44 on: June 23, 2012, 03:06:52 pm »
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Wonder who'll be chosen for VEEP.
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Thanks for the comments!

Chapter XII: An Unquenchable Thirst

“Looting and Fires Ravage L.A.”Los Angeles Times, April 1992.

“Bob Dole is the man to get this country back on track.” – Former VP George H.W. Bush, May 1992.

“We have a choice in this election: we can either continue to make progress or we can go with the same policies that gave us spending cuts and large deficits.” – President Lloyd Bentsen, June 1992.

President Bentsen continued to work with the Democrats on the assault gun ban. Advisors close to Bentsen believed that the successful passage of the ban would secure the far-left vote that Bentsen definitely needed, as well as reel in many independent voters. Senate Democrats were fully on board, yet some House Democrats, particularly Southern Democrats, were reluctant to support the bill. All talks were interrupted on April 29, however, when the four LAPD police officers accused of beating Rodney King were acquitted from trial. The acquittal sent shockwaves throughout the Los Angeles community and massive riots quickly broke out. The riots, which would last six days, would prompt President Bentsen to call in the National Guard. Overall, the riots would claim over fifty deaths and cause $1 billion in damage.


Riots in Los Angeles

With the Republican primaries over and Dole as the GOP’s presumptive nominee, the Kansas senator switched all of his focus to campaigning against President Bentsen. As he had reiterated throughout the primary season, Dole preached the cornerstone of his campaign to crowds across the nation: a 15% reduction in income tax rates and overall smaller government. The struggling economy and high unemployment rate significantly helped Dole bring in support. On May 3, former Vice President and 1988 Republican presidential nominee George H.W. Bush endorsed Dole at a rally in Orlando. “Bob Dole is the man to get this country back on track,” Bush explained. “He has my full support.” The Republican establishment was now behind Dole.


George H.W. Bush endorsing Bob Dole

With the Republican establishment’s support, though, came the demand for Dole to step down as Senate Minority Leader. Now that the Kansas senator was the party’s presumptive nominee, his duties lay with campaigning instead of leading the party in the Senate. On May 6, Dole formally announced his resignation from the Senate. “I cannot both campaign and lead my party in the Senate. From here, it’s either the White House or home,” he explained. Dole had served as Senate Minority Leader since 1987. Two candidates to replace Dole emerged: Alan Simpson of Wyoming, the Minority Whip, and Senator Ted Stevens. While Simpson was viewed as the favorite, Stevens had also served as Whip under Reagan. Furthermore, Stevens also had a more extensive Senate career and seen as someone who could stand up against the Senate Democrats. On the third ballot, Stevens won and was declared the new Senate Minority Leader.


Senator Ted Stevens (R-AK), the new Senate Minority Leader

Meanwhile, Ross Perot continued campaigning for the presidency. Polls showed that his support came from both Bentsen and Dole. Unlike earlier months, however, Perot’s support seemed to decline: only 8% now supported the Texas businessman, which was down from his all-time high of 12%. Perot still worked towards getting his name on the ballot in all fifty-states. Polls showed that his support was strongest in Northwestern states and weakest in Southern states. The media reports rumors that the Perot campaign was incredibly disorganized and that Perot was secretly reconsidering his decision to enter the race.

NATIONWIDE POLL – MAY 28 1992
Which candidate will you support in the 1992 presidential election?
Senator Bob Dole: 45.0%
President Lloyd Bentsen: 40.9%
Businessman Ross Perot: 8.1%
Unsure: 6.0%

Finally, after much deliberation, the Democrats finally came together for the assault gun ban in the beginning of June. Shortly thereafter in the month, the Federal Assault Gun Ban of 1992 was signed and passed into law. Republicans remained extremely opposed to the law, even Senator Dole spoke out against it on the campaign trail. Polls indicated that the majority of independents approved of the bill. Furthermore, the unemployment rate fell back down to 8.2%. The President received a minor bump in support and, for the first time in months, saw his approval rating climb above 50%.

NATIONWIDE POLL – JUNE 18 1992
Do you support President Bentsen?
Yes: 52.2%
No: 47.0%
Unsure: 0.8%

The good news for President Bentsen did not translate to good news for all Democrats, though. The sluggish economy led many political analysts to expect an extremely competitive election year for House Democrats. Overall, the Democrats still remained extremely divided. The liberal branch of the party felt largely forgotten under President Bentsen’s policies while more moderate and conservative Democrats support Bentsen across the board. The division of the party had been evident throughout the past three years, ranging from the President’s Federal Reduction Act of 1989 up to the recent Federal Assault Gun Ban of 1992. While such a scenario where the Republicans picked up the House was extremely unlikely, many analysts predicted large Republican gains, particularly in Midwestern and Rust Belt states.

The end of June and beginning of July consisted of both the Bentsen and Dole campaigns in full-swing. The President, who had recently launched a five-state tour of the Midwest, spoke out against Dole at a rally in Ohio: “Senator Dole has led the same party that gave us record-high deficits and spending cuts. A vote for Senator Dole would be a huge step backward.” At a rally in Iowa, Dole blasted back at Bentsen, remarking, “The President has failed us. Our economy has not improved, unlike what the President says, but instead become even worse.”


President Bentsen chats with First Lady Beryl Bentsen at a rally

As July began, both the Republican and Democratic National Conventions were on the horizon. The Republicans would hold their convention at the end of July, while the Democrats would hold theirs in August. With the conventions for both parties rapidly approaching, there was much speculation about who Dole would select as a vice presidential nominee. Several names were thrown around by the media, none of which with any backing. At the beginning of July, a short-list of possible picks was leaked to the media. The Dole campaign did not claim responsibility for the leak of the list and argued that the list merely speculated. The media nonetheless utilized the list as further speculation.

Leaked List of Possible Dole VP Candidates:
Senator Phil Gramm (R-TX)
Governor Carroll Campbell (R-SC)
Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA)
Senator Pete Domenici (R-NM)
Governor John Engler (R-MI)
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« Reply #46 on: June 23, 2012, 08:56:17 pm »
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Domenici would be interesting. It'd also be cool to see Republicans take the Industrial Mid-West (cough cough).
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« Reply #47 on: June 24, 2012, 01:38:30 pm »
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Domenici would be interesting. It'd also be cool to see Republicans take the Industrial Mid-West (cough cough).

Meaning blue collar voters in MI?  I hope so too Wink
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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« Reply #48 on: June 24, 2012, 05:53:05 pm »
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Domenici would be interesting. It'd also be cool to see Republicans take the Industrial Mid-West (cough cough).

I won't give anything away, but the Democratic and Republican parties ITTL will definitely differ from those in OTL.
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« Reply #49 on: June 24, 2012, 06:04:31 pm »
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More please Wink
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Endorsements:
President: Hillary Clinton
Governor: Brown (CA), Corbett (PA), Scott (FL)
House: Emken (CA)
Other: Rob McCoy (CA Assembly)

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