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Author Topic: A Re-Do of That Really Crappy TL I Did That One Time  (Read 2268 times)
feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« on: February 12, 2011, 08:17:03 pm »
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During my early days here, I remember doing a TL where Hillary Clinton beat Mitt Romney to become POTUS. It was pretty crappy (although it was my first TL) and I'm going to do a re-do right now (mostly because I'm bored). Here we go....



July 17, 2007: Plagued with financial and staffing problems, Senator John McCain (R-AZ) drops his campaign for the GOP nomination for President of the U.S., endorsing Rudy Giuliani. McCain had previously been considered as a frontrunner for the nomination:
Rudy Giuliani 27%
John McCain 17%
Fred Thompson 17%
Mitt Romney 10%
Mike Huckabee 3%
Ron Paul 2%
Tommy Thompson 1%
Sam Brownback 1%
Unsure/Other 22%

July 21, 2007: Polls after McCain's announcement show that former Governor Mitt Romney (R-MA) has crept up to a position as a frontrunner.
Rudy Giuliani 30%
Mitt Romney 20%
Fred Thompson 15%
Ron Paul 5%
Tommy Thompson 3%
Mike Huckabee 2%
Sam Brownback 1%
Unsure/Other 24%

August 2007: Polls show that the race is shaping up to be a dead heat between Romney and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani of New York City.
Rudy Giuliani 25%
Mitt Romney 25%
Fred Thompson 14%
Mike Huckabee 7%
Ron Paul 6%
Tommy Thompson 4%
Sam Brownback 3%
Unsure/Other 16%
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feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2011, 09:03:18 pm »
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Iowa Republican Caucus Results:
Mitt Romney 38.2% (20)
Mike Huckabee 34.4% (12)
Fred Thompson 13.4% (2)
Ron Paul 9.9%
Rudy Giuliani 3.4%
Others 0.7%

Fred Thompson announces that he is dropping his campaign for President, and will endorse Mike Huckabee. There is no word on how Giuliani will continue the campaign.

Romney's campaign proceeds to claim victory in Wyoming, New Hampshire, Michigan, Nevada, Hawaii, Florida, and Maine. Huckabee won only in South Carolina and Louisiana. Prior to Super Tuesday, Rudy Giuliani withdrew his campaign and gave a reluctant endorsement to Romney.

Map as of Super Tuesday (including February 9 states):

Romney - 883 delegates
Huckabee - 373 delegates
Paul - 18 delegates
Thompson - 2 delegates
« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 01:12:04 pm by Rolanda Burris »Logged

Cath
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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2011, 09:13:11 pm »
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I actually remember reading that timeline (I think). Did it end with Mitch Daniels being elected in 2016?
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America.
feeblepizza
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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2011, 09:15:04 pm »
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I actually remember reading that timeline (I think). Did it end with Mitch Daniels being elected in 2016?
Yes, and he was succeeded by Sarah Palin in 2020, although I didn't describe her admin.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2011, 09:17:43 pm by feeblepizza »Logged

tmthforu94
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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2011, 10:35:35 pm »
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Cheesy Any timeline involving Romney winning is good.
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feeblepizza
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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2011, 10:46:27 pm »
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Cheesy Any timeline involving Romney winning is good.
Lol, Romney ended up getting beat. But who knows, things may change in the revised version Wink.

Update tomorrow, or earlier if I get bored enough.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2011, 10:48:19 pm by Rolanda Burris »Logged

Mexino Vote
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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2011, 11:55:40 am »
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2008-2032
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Boomer Sooner!

Economic score: +6.77
Social score: +6.17

Texas Bound! After I graduate from OU I will be heading off to Dallas!

Damn those Mexinos and Mexinans...
feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011, 01:11:08 pm »
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Potomac Primaries

District of Columbia
Mitt Romney - 74.8% (16)
Mike Huckabee - 16.8%
Ron Paul - 8.1%

Maryland
Mitt Romney - 54.9% (37)
Mike Huckabee - 38.5%
Ron Paul - 6.0%

Virginia
Mike Huckabee - 51.4% (60)
Mitt Romney - 44.4%
Ron Paul - 4.5%



Mitt Romney - 936 delegates
Mike Huckabee - 433 delegates
Ron Paul - 18 delegates
Fred Thompson - 2 delegates
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feeblepizza
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« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 02:24:35 pm »
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Wisconsin
Mitt Romney - 57.7% (34)
Mike Huckabee - 37.6% (6)
Ron Paul - 4.8%

Ohio
Mitt Romney - 60% (79)
Mike Huckabee - 31%
Ron Paul - 5%

Rhode Island
Mitt Romney - 68.1% (13)
Mike Huckabee - 22.8% (4)
Ron Paul - 6.9%

Texas
Mike Huckabee - 51% (80)
Mitt Romney - 38% (16)
Ron Paul - 5%

Vermont
Mitt Romney - 77.6% (17)
Mike Huckabee - 15.3%
Ron Paul - 7.1%



Mitt Romney - 1,152 delegates
Mike Huckabee - 546 delegates
Ron Paul - 18 delegates
Fred Thompson - 2 delegates
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feeblepizza
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« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2011, 02:50:09 pm »
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Mississippi
Mike Huckabee - 79% (36)
Mitt Romney - 13%
Ron Paul - 4%

Pennsylvania
Mitt Romney - 53% (74)
Mike Huckabee - 36%
Ron Paul - 11%



Mitt Romney - 1,238 delegates
Mike Huckabee - 594 delegates
Ron Paul - 18 delegates
Fred Thompson - 2 delegates

After winning the crucial Pennsylvania primary on April 22, Mitt Romney became the presumptive Republican nominee for President of the United States. Mike Huckabee withdrew his campaign and gave an enthusiastic endorsement to Romney. Ron Paul, however, vowed to stay in the race until every last delegate is pledged.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 03:01:52 pm by Dubie for Senate »Logged

feeblepizza
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« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2011, 03:52:07 pm »
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And, fast forward two months.....

June 3, 2008: The race for the Democratic nomination is a tight one: Senators Hillary Clinton (D-NY) and Barack Obama (D-IL) have been fighting ever since Iowa. Today, however, the race came to an end when Hillary Clinton won contests in South Dakota and Montana, giving her the nomination. Obama gave a gracious concession and agreed to campaign for Clinton all the way to November. This makes her the first ever female presidential nominee for a major party.

The big news until the Conventions will revolve around the candidates' running-mates. Suggestions for Clinton include Senator Joe Biden (D-DE), Senator Evan Bayh (D-IN), Governor Tim Kaine (D-VA), Governor Kathleen Sibelius (D-KS), Governor Bill Richardson (D-NM), and even Obama.

The Romney campaign is considering Mike Huckabee, Governor Mark Sanford (R-SC), Governor Charlie Crist (R-FL), Governor Tim Pawlenty (R-MN), Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and former DHS Secretary Tom Ridge (R-PA).

August 23, 2008: Hillary Clinton announces at a Norfolk, Virginia rally that Barack Obama will be her running-mate.

August 28, 2008: At a rally in Ohio, Mitt Romney announces that Mark Sanford will be his running-mate.



The polls show Clinton with a lead of 242 EVs to 202 (94 undecided). CO, IA, MO, MI, OH, and FL are considered the swing states. Traditionally Republican states like IN, WV, VA, NC, and AR are closer then usual but are not considered swing states just yet. NH is close as always, but Clinton has a broader lead than usual, enough to keep pundits from calling is a swing state.



Conventions next. Please comment.
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feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2011, 04:22:31 pm »
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August 25-28, 2008: At the Democratic National Convention in Denver, CO, speakers include Bill Clinton, Jim Leech, Al Gore, John Kerry, Evan Bayh, Jimmy Carter, Tim Kaine, Bill Richardson, and Dick Durbin. The keynote is delivered by Senator Mark Warner (D-VA). Vice-presidential nominee Barack Obama's speech, delivered on the 27th, actually received a bigger viewership than nominee Hillary Clinton's.

September 1-4, 2008: At the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, MN, speakers include Laura Bush, Ann Romney, George W. Bush, Joe Lieberman, Fred Thompson, Norm Coleman, Mike Huckabee, and John McCain. The keynote was delivered by Rudy Giuliani. Mitt Romney delivered a speech which inspired the hopes of millions of conservative Republicans across the nation: "We may be going into this election as the underdogs, but let me tell you something: we will win. Our ticket is 100% conservative, 100% effective, and 100% pro-American. Conservatism will make a comeback, and that comeback will happen in 2008!!!"

In mid-September, bad news hits when the stock market crashes and the unemployment rate begins to skyrocket. Many Americans blame the Republican Administration George W. Bush, causing Romney's poll numbers to take a hit:



Clinton/Obama - 305
Romney/Sanford - 152
Toss-up - 84



Debates next. Please comment.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 04:24:41 pm by Feeble »Logged

feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2011, 04:07:16 pm »
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September 26, 2008: The first debate between Romney and Clinton, held at the University of Mississippi, was centered primarily around national security and foreign affairs, but a few questions on the economy snuck in.

Who Won the Debate?
Clinton 49%
Romney 41%
Unsure 10%

September 27-October 1, 2008: Senator Clinton temporarily halted her campaign so that she could go to Capital Hill and work on a bailout package to help the economy. Senator Obama and Bill Clinton campaigned in her stead.

October 2, 2008: The one and only vice-presidential debate between Governor Mark Sanford and Senator Barack Obama, was held at Washington University at St. Louis. It was held over a variety of subjects, from the economy to foreign affairs and from education to the environment. Although most seemed to side with Obama on policy, Sanford made the point that he was more fit for executive office were Romney to die if elected.

Who Won the Debate?
Obama 50%
Sanford 41%
Unsure 9%

Who Would Make a Better President - Obama or Sanford?
Obama 42%
Sanford 42%
Unsure 16%

October 7, 2008: The second presidential debate, held at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, was in a town hall format. Although there was no set subject matter, most questions concerned the economy. Although both candidates seemed at ease and remained civil, Clinton was the favorite as to who won the debate.

Who Won the Debate?
Clinton 53%
Romney 40%
Unsure 7%

October 15, 2008: The third and final presidential debate, held at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, was on the economy. Clinton attacked Romney for being a multi millionaire businessman who hadn't been hurt by the economic meltdown and thus wasn't in touch with the needs of Main Street America. Romney, while remaining calm and collected, could do little to counter her accusations.

Who Won the Debate?
Clinton 63%
Romney 31%
Unsure 6%



Clinton/Obama - 318
Romney/Sanford - 152
Toss-up - 68
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feeblepizza
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E: 4.45, S: -0.26

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« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2011, 08:43:12 pm »
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The general election between Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton was anti-climactic: Clinton won in a landslide. Her popularity in the rust-belt and the South, combined with American distrust of the government (and the governing party) catapulted her to the highest office in the land, making her the first female President, and the first President to have previously served as First Lady. Mitt Romney conceded and told supporters outside of his Belmont, Massachusetts home that it was time to unite and work together for a stronger America and a better future.



Hillary Clinton (D-NY)/Barack Obama (D-IL), 54% PV, 390 EV
Mitt Romney (R-MA)/Mark Sanford (R-SC) 46% PV, 148 EV

Overall, the election went as expected. Hillary took the swing-states of MO, AR, IN, OH, WV, and NC, plus MT, where Ron Paul (listed on the ballot as the nominee for the Taxpayer Party) garnered 2% of the vote. She also made a surprising victory in NE02.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 08:46:22 pm by feeblepizza »Logged

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