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Cathcon
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« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2011, 05:19:45 pm »
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While at the very beginning, Paul had his honeymoon period, he feel from grace in months, beginning with the bombing of the World Trade Center and other continued terrorist activities. While Paul promised to secure the border and make cities more secure, that was all he did. People on the Left and the Right criticized him. Conservatives wanted complete pursuit of the terrorists while Democrats such as former Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton wanted the terrorists prosecuted. However, Paul's paleo-conservative leaninigs didn't allow for "lengthy quagmires in unknown territory". By 1992 after large losses to pro-national security Democrats in the 1994 mid-terms, the Democrats were ready to take back the Whitehouse.

1996
For President Paul, he faced a strong primary challenge from the pro-war Republican Congressman and former Army Secretary Oliver North of Virginia, Paul survived that challenge with campaigning by former President Goldwater who was much more popular than his successor.

The Democrats faced a three way race between Governor Robert Casey of Pennsylvania, Senator Chuck Robb of Virginia, and Senator and former Vice-President Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York. Moynihan, with establishment support and experience dating back to the 1950's (he worked as an aide during the fifties, and as a social scientist during the sixties; His political offices since then were Labor Secretary 1969-1977, Ambassador to the United Nations 1977-1980, Senator from New York 1981-1983, Vice-President 1983-1985, and Senator from New York 1987-Present). Despite Robb having been the nominee the last time around, Robb was chosen for Vice-President to help carry the South, which was a region that the Democrats seemed to be losing strength in for the past twelve years. Robb was glad to be chosen as it offered a life-line on his political career and gave him a chance to win the nomination in 2000 or 2004.

Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY)/Senator Charles Robb (D-VA) 333 electoral votes, 54.2% of the popular vote
President Ronald Paul (R-TX)/Vice-President Jack Kemp (R-NY) 205 electoral votes, 45.3% of the popular vote

In the aftermath of the election, Vice-President Kemp would often joke that both times he had been on a national ticket, he had faced a fellow New Yorker.

With his large victory in the 1996 election, President Moynihan faced what he beleived to be a mandate to govern.
Among his accomplishments in his first term was the creation of a program that would be called "Kindercare" which would provide healthcare for those under the age of thirteen. He would also sign the partial birth abortion ban and order complete securing of the borders because of the possibility of future terrorist attacks.
While he never was able to accomplish health care reform or universal healthcare, a sub-committee that he had opened was able to go a long way in finding a way to finance healthcare and would be instrumental in the future.

2000
Much to everyone's surprise, President Moynihan announced that he would be running for re-election despite his age. He faced no challenger in the primaries.

The Republicans, after the large defeat in 1996 were still struggling to come up with a front-runner. Names came forward such as New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson or business mogul Donald Trump. However, eventually Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, who had formerly served as the first Administrator of the Bureau of Veteran Affairs* in the Goldwater Administration would win the nomination. For Vice-President Senator Judd Gregg of New Hampshire was chosen. It was a decidedly moderate ticket in contrast to the Conservative-Libertarian tickets of the past four elections. The ticket was reminiscient of twenty years ago when the moderate former Defense Secretary Mark Hatfield won the nomination.

In the general, Moynihan went in with the advantage of a still good economy and restored national security without having to go to war. Accusations that he might be too old for the Presidency were made, however, he brushed them off**

President Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY)/Vice-President Charles Robb (D-VA) 382 electoral votes, 55.4% of the popular vote
Senator Charles Hagel (R-NE)/Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH) 156 electoral votes, 45.1% of the popular vote

*The alternative to the department of Veterans' Affairs. Goldwater wanted something to deal with the issue, but didn't want to create another department. However, he did eliminate or merge other departments.
**Like Reagan in 1984.
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Dallasfan65
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« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2011, 11:58:33 pm »
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I couldn't help but notice you took a leaf out of my page with the phrase Jackson Democrats. I am honored! Smiley
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Cathcon
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« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2011, 03:19:53 pm »
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I couldn't help but notice you took a leaf out of my page with the phrase Jackson Democrats. I am honored! Smiley

Thanks. Smiley After becoming more familiar with Scoop Jackson after hearing about him in your timeline, I think he could've much more successfully united the middle and working class behind the Democrats than say Carter. I was intirgued with his Presidency that you portrayed in your timeline.

PS: Update your Gerald Ford timeline!
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Cathcon
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« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2011, 06:06:39 pm »
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Moynihan's second term would start off well. However, on September 11th, 2001, while on a diplomatic mission to Iran, the President would be shot and killed. It was only the start of the problems. After Vice-President Robb took office, more acts of terrorism would occur with attacks on ambassies and army bases across Northern Africa and the Middle East. President Robb vowed to respond with force, and in December of 2001 American boots would hit the ground in the first American military confrontation since withdrawal from Vietnam.

At the funeral, one attendee would say to the other in what would become an almost infamous gaffe, but also hold true "Ironic that one who so admired Scoop Jackson and was elected twenty years after he was would fall prey to the same curse that he did". This remark was caught on video by accident and the media didn't know what to think of it.

However, Robb's popularity would not last as news of the war throughout 2002 and 2003 would become less than good. While approval of continued military operations after the fall of Tehran in February of 2003 would dip, Robb still maintained over 50% approvals and the public by-and-large supported the war.

At the same time, the economy was beginning to slow from its economic roar lasting from 1987 to 2001. Not only was the boom subsiding, but at the same time the market had been thrown into chaos by the conflict in Iran and oil prices were shooting up as control over the Persian Gulf was thrown into question.

2004
All the chaos set the stage for the 2004 race for the Republican nomination. There was a pluthura of candidates including Senator Oliver North of Virginia, Governor George W Bush of Texas, Senator John McCain of Arizona, and Governor Gary Johnson of New Mexico. After a shaky win in the caucus state of Iowa despite an insurgent Bush, Johnson would score a solid victory in New Hampshire. From there on out he became the front-runner, with North and Bush splitting the Southern primaries which Johnson lost by wide margins. To appease moderates, Senator Susan Collins of Maine would be chosen for Vice-President. She would also be the first female Vice-Presidential nominee in the nation's history.

For the Democrats, President Robb would be unanimously re-nominated and Vice-President Bill Bradley, who had been chosen by Robb in 2001, would run with the President on the Democratic ticket.

In the general election, despite the war, President Robb would have the advantage with Johnson's lack of charisma and failure to galvanize the Republican base despite receiving endorsements from former Presidents Goldwater and Paul and from other Libertarian minded Republicans. Eventually, Johnson's call for complete de-criminalization of marijuana and complete withdrawal from Iran proved to be too much for middle America. Despite Johnson's loss, however, inroads would be made in both Washington and the North-East, losing Connecticut by a narrow margin.

President Charles E Robb (D-VA)/Vice-President Bill Bradley (D-NJ) 318 electoral votes, 52.3% of the popular vote
Former Governor Gary E Johnson (R-NM)/Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) 220 electoral votes, 46.9% of the popular vote
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Cathcon
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« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2011, 07:39:52 am »
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During his second term, President Robb's approval ratings continued to declined due to the ongoing conflict in Iran. While a vast majority of the American people had supported intervention after President Moynihan's death, years of war had led people to think otherwise. Meanwhile, the economy seemed to be in decline and rising gas prices were becoming a large problem for voters.

2008
For the Democrats, Vice-President Bradley won the nomination after a convention and primary fight with a multitude of challengers. In order to help to at lest get the South in what looked to be a Republican year, he chose Alabama Senator Jim Folsom Jr. for Vice-President.

For the Republicans, Massachusetts Senator Mitt Romney; who had served as Governor from 1999 to 2002, and as a Senator from 2003 to that point. Before then he had been a businessman; was the nominee. In orde to help in the West and the South, Governor George W Bush of Texas was chosen for Vice-President

With twelve years of Democratic rule, the American people voted Republicans that year.

Senator Willard "Mitt" Romney (R-MA)/Governor George W Bush (R-TX) 290 electoral votes, 52.4% of the popular vote
Vice-President William Bradley (D-NJ)/Senator James E Folsom Jr. (D-AL) 248 electoral votes, 47.3% of the popular vote
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« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2011, 09:37:36 am »
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Dubya/Romney would have been a lot better of a ticket, but I'll hold my peace Smiley.
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Cathcon
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« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2011, 07:48:40 pm »
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Dubya/Romney would have been a lot better of a ticket, but I'll hold my peace Smiley.

Well it is a Romney in '68 timeline (though a wild one at that), so I felt it fitting that another Romney win the Presidency. If it were a Bush timeline, I'd probably have at least one other Bush winning the Presidency. Same with a Roosevelt or a Kennedy timeline.

I'm not too sure what to do next as I want to develop both the rise of the Conservative Party, and a separate timeline about the rise of the Libertarian Party into full-fledged timelines.
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Cathcon
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« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2011, 09:37:29 pm »
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Romney in '68 Presidential List
37. George W Romney (R-MI)/Paul Fannin (R-AZ) 1969-1977
38. Henry M Jackson (D-WA)/Morris K "Mo" Udall (D-AZ) 1977-1983
39. Morris K "Mo" Udall (D-AZ)/Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY) 1983-1985

40. Barry M Goldwater Jr. (R-CA)/Lenore Romney (R-MI) 1985-1993
41. Ronald E Paul (R-TX)/Jack F Kemp (R-NY) 1993-1997

42. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY)/Charles Robb (D-VA) 1997-2001
43. Charles E Robb (D-VA)/William J "Bill" Bradley (D-NJ) 2001-2009

44. Willard E "Mitt" Romney (R-MA)/George W Bush (R-TX)
« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 02:21:46 pm by Cathcon for Student Council 2012 »Logged

Cathcon
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« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2011, 10:21:05 pm »
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At the behest of Roosevelt

At the 1916 Republican National Convention, at the behesting of former President Roosevelt, Senator and Roosevelt friend Henry Cabot Lodge, the Senator from Massachusetts, entered the balloting for the Republican nomination. Upon winning the nomination, California Governor Hiram Johnson would be nominated for Vice-President, which appeased both the Progressives and the Isolationists.

Lodge would go on to defeat President  Wilson by a narrow margin in the general election, thus returning Republican power after only four years of absence.

Senator Henry Cabot Lodge (R-MA)/Governor Hiram Johnson (R-CA) 279 electoral votes, 49.6% of the popular vote
President Woodrow Wilson (D-NJ)/Vice-President Thomas R Marshall (D-IN) 252 electoral votes, 47.8% of the popular vote

Upon taking office, Lodge would make several popular cabinet appointments, such as the appointment of former President Roosevelt to Secretary of War*, businessman Henry Ford to Secretary of the Treasury, Supreme Court Justice Charles Evan Hughes to Attorney General (whom he replaced by appointing former President Taft to the court), and businessman Herbert Hoover to Commerce.

Lodge's tenure would be marked by the wrapping up of the Great War. However, no attempt at any "League of Nations" would be made as it was seen as a giving up of American sovereignty. Instead, Lodge would position the military to control the Central Powers while being re-constructed and it would once again usher in the not-so-long-ago age of "American Imperialism".

1920
With a good economy and a victory in the Great War, America would re-elect President Lodge over former State Secretary William Jennings Bryan and California Governor William McAdoo.

President Henry Cabot Lodge (R-MA)/Vice-President Hiram Johnson (R-CA) 356 electoral votes, 55.3% of the popular vote
Former Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan (D-NE)/Governor William McAdoo (D-CA) 175 electoral votes, 43.8% of the popular vote

With the twenties came not only a second term for President Lodge, but newfound prosperity. Before, Lodge had been working to keep the economy going, but from 1922 on it seemed that he needn't work to help the economy. While some had advised that he hold a large conference on the limiting of arms and naval ships, Lodge's imperialistic streak wouldn't let him do it, and he wanted America to be prepared for any possible attack in the near future.

1924
With Lodge more popular than ever, it seemed like the Republicans' year to pick up a third term. Because of that, there was a large number of Republicans willing to try, including Vice-President Hiram Johnson, Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover, Treasury Secretary Henry Ford, and Wisconsin Senator Robert La Follette. However, eventually, Governor Alvan T Fuller of Massachusetts, who had become well known for deficit cutting initiatives, and, was of course from the same state as the President himself, won the nomination after receiving support from former Governor Coolidge, as well as a number of minor candidates. For Vice-President, Treasury Secretary Henry Ford would be nominated.

For the Democrats, after a large number of ballots, Senator Carter Glass of Virginia, a Conservative, would win the nomination. In order to attract Northerners and Catholics, Senator John F Fitzgerald of Massachusetts, who had been elected in 1916 after Lodge left to become President, would win the Vice-Presidential nomination, supported by New York Governor Al Smith.

In a surprise, Vice-President Hiram Johnson announced that he would be running once again as a Progressive, and this time at the top of the ticket. Joining him would be Senator Robert M La Follette of Wisconsin.

Governor Alvan T Fuller (R-MA)/Treasury Secretary Henry Ford (R-MI) 331 electoral votes, 43.6% of the popular vote
Senator Carter Glass (D-VA)/Senator John F Fitzgerald (D-MA) 144 electoral votes, 41.5% of the popular vote
Vice-President Hiram Johnson (P-CA)/Senator Robert M La Follette (P-WI) 56 electoral votes, 14.2% of the popular vote

With that Republicans would gain a third straight term, or so they thought. Only days after the election, President Lodge would be found dead, the twenty year curse having struck again, and Vice-President Johnson, still registered as a Progressive would take office.

*I admit, this one I copied from NiK (or is it N!K?), who in his Charles Evan Hughes TL had TR made Secretary of War.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2011, 11:16:36 am by Cathcon »Logged

Cathcon
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« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2011, 08:25:52 am »
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Throughout Alvan Fuller's first term, the prosperity of the Lodge and Johnson (well in his case months) continued. The economy grew even more, and by 1928, it was soaring.

One notable event during that time was the death of former President Roosevelt who during his life had been New York City Police Comissioner, a member of the New York State Senate, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Leader of the volunteer army the Rough Riders, Governor of New York, Vice-President, President, and, following Lodge's victory, Secretary of War, a position he held until 1925.

1928
Despite a weak challenge from former Senator Robert La Follette, President Fuller was near unanimously re-nominated.

For the Democrats, Senator Joseph T Robinson of Arkansas would win the nomination, rallying the Southern delegates after Glass' defeat in 1924. For Vice-President, Governor A Victory Donahey of Ohio would be chosen.

President Alvan T Fuller (R-MA)/Vice-President Henry Ford (R-MI) 467 electoral votes, 58.3% of the popular vote
Senator Joseph T Robinson (D-AR)/Governor A Victory Donahey (D-OH) 64 electoral votes, 41.4% of the popular vote

With that, Republicans would win a fourth consecutive term to the Whitehouse. However, it would not be all pretty as in mid-1929, a recession would begin, the natural backlash from years of prosperity. This recession would prove cripling to Fuller's Presidency, and in 1930, Democrats would take control of both Houses of Congress. Congressman John Nance Garner would become Speaker of the House.

1932
With the recession continuing, the Republicans' chances looked bleak at best. There were a couple of candidates running that year, but noticably absent was that of Vice-President Henry Ford who instead announced that he would be returning to the business world. The candidates included:
  • Four term Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover who had worked for Presidents Lodge, Johnson, and Fuller (1917-1932)
  • Calvin Coolidge, who had been Massachusetts Governor (1919-1923), Labor Secretary (1925-1927), and elected Senator from Massachusetts upon the retirement of John F Fitzgerald in 1928
  • Former President Hiram Johnson who, since 1929, had been serving in the Senate
  • Senator Arthur H Vandenberg of Ohio, who had been elected as well in the wave year of 1928

Eventually, Hoover's popularity would win out at the convention, and he would be nominated with the more Conservative Coolidge as the Vice-Presidential nominee.

For the Democrats, the race would be between:
  • Franklin D Roosevelt of New York who had been in the New York Senate (1911-1913), Assistant Secretary of the Navy (1913-1917), Assistant Secretary of War (1917-1920), and, since 1921, Senator from New York
  • House Speaker John Nance Garner who represented the Conservative wing of the party, he had served in the House since 1903, House Minority Leader (1929-1931), and House Speaker since 1931
  • Governor Huey Long of Louisiana, leader of the Populist wing of the party; he had been elected Governor in 1924

In the primaries, only Long and Roosevelt would run, with Long winning the South and Roosevelt winning the North. However, at the convention, Garner, with his clout among the party, would be the victor, choosing Roosevelt for Vice-President.

In a surprise, Senators William E Borah of Idaho and George Norris of Nebraska would announce a third-party bid under the Progressive banner, following up Teddy Roosevelt's 1912 campaign and Hiram Johnson's 1924 campaign.

Speaker of the House John Nance Garner (D-TX)/Senator Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY) 348 electoral votes, 53.6% of the popular vote
Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover (R-CA)/Governor Calvin Coolidge (R-MA) 136 electoral votes, 31.8% of the popular vote
Senator William E Borah (P-ID)/Senator George Norris (P-NE) 47 electoral votes, 14.2% of the popular vote

For the first time in sixteen years, a Democrat would be in the Whitehouse. "Cactus Jack's" trem began with the passing of what was called the "Fair Deal" through Congress. While primarily focused on tax cuts and farm aid, Vice-President Roosevelt made sure that it would include criteria for cities, labor, and industry. Among Garner's cabinet appointments were Senator Cordell Hull to War and businessman Jesse Jones to Treasury.

On foreign affairs, Garner had no inclination towards diplomacy and building up good international relations. That was left to Vice-President Roosevelt who was also serving as Secretary of State, something which was constitutionally permissible. It was Roosevelt who met with countries such as England and France who were readying for possible war with Germany; and it was Roosevelt who worked to establish ties with Latin America and build up good relations.

1936
President Garner, despite near record popularity after his Fair Deal, would be challenged from the Left of his party, and surprisingly, from someone from his own region. Former Governor Huey Long, a well known Populist, would run against Garner in the primareis. However, he only won two of all the primaries.
It was after this defeat that Long announced a third party bid on the Populist ticket, with Senator Emler Benson, a member of the Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party, as his Vice-President.

The Republicans, after a primary battle with Senator Arthur Vandenberg, would nominate Governor Henry A Wallace of Iowa-the first Progressive nominated by the Republicans since the Teddy Roosevelt era. For Vice-President, Governor Alf Landon of Kansas would be nominated. Wallace was the son of thd late Agriculture Secretary Henry C Wallace (1917-1924), and had been assistant Secretary of Commerce under Herbert Hoover (1928-1932), Commerce Secretary (1932-1933), and Governor of Iowa since 1935.


President John Nance Garner (D-TX)/Vice-President Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY) 480 electoral votes, 57.3% of the popular vote
Former Governor Huey Long (Pop-LA)/Senator Elmer Benson (MFL-MN) 31 electoral votes, 9.8% of the popular vote
Governor Henry A Wallace (R-IA)/Governor Alfred Landon (R-KS) 20 electoral votes, 32.7% of the popular vote
« Last Edit: April 10, 2011, 07:54:16 am by Cathcon »Logged

feeblepizza
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« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2011, 08:46:58 am »
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Great timeline so far.
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Cathcon
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« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2011, 10:53:52 am »
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With Jack Garner's re-election it seemed to prove that the Democrats were nwo on top, at least for the moment. During his second term, he would pass the "Second Fair Deal", which according to him, filled all the holes that the original Fair Deal didn't.

1940
For the Democrats with a popular incumbent, it seemed like 1940 was their year to re-affirm their current dominance over the American political system. They nominated the popular Vice-President Franklin D Roosevelt for President and War Secretary Cordell Hull for Vice-President. Despite Garner not being ideologically in line with the ticket, he gave it his support.

The Republicans were much more confused. After their horrible defeat in 1936, reminiscient of 1912 where a third party had won more than the Republican ticket, they weren't sure who to nominate. The Conservative faction seemed too far to the right to be palatable to the American people. At the same time, it seemed that the Liberal faciton had proven its uselessness. After all, after 1936, Henry Wallace became good friends with Roosevelt and openly endorsed him in 1940. The Conservatives hoped that 1940 could be their year to usher in control over the Republican Party, and they proved able to with the nomination of Senator Styles Bridges of New Hampshire and Senator Arthur Vandenberg of Michigan.

Taking advantage of Democratic fatigue after eight years of them in power, Bridges, despite being decried as "near radical" by the Roosevelt campaign, was able to swing several Western states his way. However, Bridges never came close to winning.


Vice-President Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY)/War Secretary Cordell Hull (D-TN) 423 electoral votes, 56.3 of the popular vote
Senator Styles Bridges (R-NH)/Senator Arthur H Vandenberg (R-MI) 108 electoral votes, 43.4% of the popular vote
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« Reply #37 on: April 08, 2011, 01:17:37 pm »
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I really can't see archcon Bridges doing better than Willkie.
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Cathcon
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« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2011, 01:45:13 pm »
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With Roosevelt's landslide eleciton, it seemed he had been given a mandate to govern as he saw fit, and he did. Among cabinet appointments was that of Vice-Presidet Cordell Hull to Secretary of State, continuing the tradition set by Garner of appointing the Vice-President to a cabinet position. Also, he appointed Progressive Republican Governor Henry Wallace to Secretary of Agriculture, a position his father had held twenty years ago.

Roosevelt's Presidency would be interrupted by events overseas as German aggression after years of being under American control would break out and there would be fighting and riots throughout Europe. A radical named Adolf Hitler headed the ensuing chaos and beat back American troops stationed there.

This lead Roosevelt's Presidency to switch drastically from that of a peace-time President to that of a foreign affairs dominated Presidency. American troops would be shipped overseas to Germany and Austria and the Second World War began.

1944
President Roosevelt, facing levels of popularity greater than Presidents Lodge, Fuller, Johnson, or Garner, would be unanimously renominated for President. Vice-President Hull had planned on retiring, however, in order to help ensure victory for the Democratic ticket, he decided to stay on-a choice that would prove crucial only months after the election.

After the defeat of a very Conservative ticket in 1940, the moderates and Liberal seemed poised to win the nomination. Eventually, California Governor Earl Warren and former Minnesota Governor Harold Stassen would be nominated. Stassen's presence on the ticket would help because of the fact he had resigned from the Governorship a year before to fight in World War II.

President Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY)/Vice-President Cordell Hull (D-TN) 481 electoral votes, 58.2% of the popular vote
Governor Earl Warren (R-CA)/Former Governor Harold Stassen (R-MN) 50 electoral votes, 31.6% of the popular vote

Despite President Roosevelt's massive victory in 1944, he would sadly die in June of 1945 and Vice-President Cordell Hull would take office. Hull, an aging man over seventy, would mainly concentrate on winning World War II by any means possible. However, no need was seen for the use of the atom bomb because victory in Germany was within sights and the only conflict that Japan had at that time was with China and Russia, not the United States.

After the resolution of World War II, President Hull announced that he would not be seeking re-election in 1948 and vowed to focus the rest of his term on re-building Europe, and helping the economy which seemed to be in decline.

1948
For the Democrats, Secretary of State George Marshall would easily win the nomination against a weak field. For Vice-President, Senator Harry Truman of Missouri would be chosen.

The Republicans would have a much more divided primary, but at the same time a stronger field. Comprised of former Governor Harold Stassen (MN), Senator Arthur Vandenberg (MI), Senator Robert Taft (OH), Governor Earl Warren (CA), and Governor Thomas Dewey (NY), it seemed that any of the candidates could be the next President. However, only one would with the nomination of Senator Robert Taft of Ohio. He was the son of President William Howard Taft, who had been defeated in a landslide in 1912. For Vice-President, another member of a political dynasty would be chosen with the nomination of Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. for Vice-President.

Senator Robert Taft (R-OH)/Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA) 277 electoral votes, 51.3% of the popular vote
Secretary of State George Marshall (D-PA)/Senator Harry Truman (D-MO) 254 electoral votes, 48.4% of the popular vote
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« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2011, 01:48:14 pm »
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I really can't see archcon Bridges doing better than Willkie.

Bias, partially. Tongue

Also, without the Great Depression (there is a recession, starting in 1929, but not a depression), there's less anethema towards Conservatism as a whole.
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« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2011, 03:19:42 pm »
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I love this timeline. Glad to see Taft as President too.
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America's like that hot chick everyone wants, and illegal immigrants are all the nerds that she should say "no" to.
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« Reply #41 on: April 08, 2011, 03:41:18 pm »
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I love this timeline. Glad to see Taft as

Thanks, though the Presidency won't be kind to him.
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« Reply #42 on: April 08, 2011, 03:42:28 pm »
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In all irony, Senator Robert Taft had been elected to the Presidency forty years after his won father had been elected to the Presidency. He didn't intend to go down in the same landslide that William Howard Taft had gone down in.

Taft's first priority was working to dismantle some of the more Liberal legislation of the past eight years. He instead, was devoted to allowing the "invisible hanf of the free market" repair the economy, the same way that there had been prosperity in the 1920's. This involved not only tax cuts, which were supported by Congress, but also cutting social programs, which didn't receive as much support in Congress. This would lead to several battles over how to repair the economy. He would co-operate with Southern Conservative Democrats as well as his own Northern and Western Conservative Republicans in order to "stop this horrible perversion of the free market". However, he had little success. Meanwhile, it seemed that former Agriculture Secretary Henry Wallace was determined to take down Taft. Despite Wallace having joined the Roosevelt Administration, he remained a Republican. Among notable events, Secretary of State Arthur Vandenberg would die in 1951 and be replaced with war hero Dwight D Eisenhower.

1952
In 1952 there seemed to be only very little economic recovery, and with Taft's Isolationist stance, America seemed to have turned against his idea not to intervene in Communist attempts to take over Korea. However, he would win a close re-nomination battle with his opponent Wallace.

The Democrats nominated Missouri Senator Harry Truman, who had been the 1948 Vice-Presidential nominee. He chose ally Adlai E Stevenson for Vice-President.

In a surprise, there would be two other parties to take electoral votes in the election. One was yet another incarnation of the Progressive Party, this time with former Agriculture Secretary Henry Wallace and former Governor Harold Stassen, both known Liberals. The other would be the States Rights Party, with the ticket of Richard Russell and Stom Thurmond. The Progressive Party would run because of Taft's Conservatism, and the States Rights Party would run in response to the Democrats putting a Civil Rights plank onto the platform at the Democratic National Convention.

President Robert Taft (R-OH)/Vice-President Henry Cabot Lodge (R-MA) 272 electoral votes, 43.2% of the popular vote
Senator Harry S Truman (D-MO)/Governor Adla E Stevenson III (D-IL) 181 electoral votes, 39.5% of the popular vote
Senator Richard Russell Jr. (S-GA)/Former Governor James Strom Thurmond (S-SC) 57 electoral votes, 12.4% of the popular vote
Former Agriculture Secretary Henry A Wallace (P-IA)/Former Governor Harold Stassen (P-MN) 5.2% of the popular vote

Taft was lucky. He had barely survived re-election by winning New York by200 votes. The excessive vote splitting, luckily for him, had mainly ripped apart the Democrats with Wallace taking the Progressives and Liberals, Truman getting the Liberals and Moderates, and Russell getting the Conservatives. However, Wallace was able to take Progressive Republicans, and Thurmond was able to take Conservative votes in the South. Without a mandate, President Taft grimmly looked ath the four years ahead of him. Nevertheless, he was determined to press on and stave off Congress just long enough to show them that his plans for economy recovery had worked. However, he would, sadly, never see that day, as he died in 1953. Vice-President Lodge took over, once again handing power to a political dynasty.

Lodge, a moderate, proved much better at dealing with Congress than Taft. However, it was this finesse that allowed Conservative bills that Taft would've supported to pass through Congress. In the 1954 elections, with the death of a President and a visible economy recovery, Republicans would make gains. However, they weren't enough to capture either House of Congress.

In foreign affairs, Lodge would trust two conflicting voices-those of War Secretary Douglas MacArthur and State Secretary Dwight D Eisenhower. Lodge would restrain from missile production, following Eisenhower's advice of fiscal responsibility, however, he would also work to make the military more efficient and effective, and poured a lot of money into space research.

1956
"Robert Taft would be proud to see this day", spoke President Lodge at the Republican National Convention. The economy had recovered, and it appeared that America's brightest days were ahead of it. For Vice-President, the convention would, after a tough fight with Senator Wayne Morse of Oregon, nominate the Conservative California Governor Richard Nixon to the Presidency.

The Democrats, who four years ago had seen the Presidency as theirs, seemed much mroe lost in 1956. Finally, the convention settled on Senator Estes Kefauver of Tennessee and Senator Hubert H Humphrey of Minnesota.

President Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA)/Governor Richard M Nixon (R-CA) 415 electoral votes, 53.6% of the popular vote
Senator Estes Kefauver (D-TN)/Senator Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN) 116 electoral votes, 46.9% of the popular vote

For the first time since 1928, the Republicans would have their landslide, a victory for Conservative Republicans. Meanwhile, for Senator Hubert H Humphrey, the future appeared bright.

On the issue of Vietnam, President Lodge decided to take the advice of War Secretary Douglas MacArthur and instead of sending in more troops as was recommended, or doing as Vice-President Nixon advised and "drop a few nukes on the place", President Lodge decided to de-escalate the conflict. Secretary MacArthur had long warned of a needless quagmire that would prove nothing except America's weakness, and Lodge didn't want that to happen.

Among Lodge's acheivments would be the first satellite launched into space, officially putting America ahead in the space race. This would encourage even more money for NASA funding, despite the advice of State Secretary Eisenhower of fiscal responsibility.

Economically, things would continue to improve and many would call it "only the beginning of the Golden Age". Also, in 1957, construction of the Interstate Highway System, which Eisenhower had advised on building, would begin. Eisenhower reasoned that not only would it improve transportation and possibly stimulate the economy, but it was a matter of natioanl security, as it would ease military transportation in case of an invasion or attack.
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« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2011, 09:03:07 am »
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1960
With twelve years of Republican rule behind them, the Republicans doubted their ability to win a fourth term. However, they pressed on. There were three major candidates for the Republican nomination that year-Vice-President Richard Nixon of California, Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, and Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York. While Nixon was the natural heir to the last eight years of success, there was no guarantee of a coronation. Goldwater seemed to represent the Cosnervatives after Taft's death in 1953, and Rockefeller represented the Liberals who last won the nomination in 1944 and lost by a landslide. Eventually, Nixon won the nomination, choosing Senator Prescott Bush of Connecticut for Vice-President.

The Democrats had four major candidates for the nomination: Senator Hubert H Humphrey of Minnesota, Former Governor Adlai E Stevenson of Illinois, Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B Johnson of Texas, and Senator Joseph P Kennedy Jr. of Massachusetts. Despite Kennedy's charisma and financial support, and victories in a plurality of the primaries, he proved unable to win the nomination as the convention nominated Johnson, who chose Humphrey as his runningmate.

In the campaign, Johnson promised a return to hsi fellow Texan's "Fair Deal", saying "Finally, every man will have the dignity he deserves and the food and clothing as well". Nixon would resopnd with speeches claiming "Johnson's plans will bankrupt the nation and only result in an altogether weaker nation". On election night, it would be close...

Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN) 291 electoral votes, 49.6% of the popular vote
Vice-President Richard M Nixon (R-CA)/Senator Prescott Bush (R-CT) 246 electoral votes, 49.2% of the popular vote

Johnson's Presidency was much more hawkish than those of Presidents Taft and Lodge. Among those in his cabinet who shared his more militaristic world-view, there was Secretary of State Henry Jackson, Secretary of War Joe Kennedy Jr., and Secretary of the Navy (who was also a close Connally friend) John B Connally.

Economically, Johnson proposed what was called "The American Lifestyle", a series of programs Johnson claimed would work to help the poor, improve health, and eliminate poverty. There would be easily passed in Congress.

1964
For the Republicans, it seemed that Prescott Bush, having been the Vice-Presidential nominee, might be the heir-apparent to the Republican nomination, however, he would face a serious challenge from the right of the party in the form of Senator Barry Goldwater. Goldwater's campaign ran on the ideas that A) there could be no compromise on "The American Lifestyle", it would add massively to the deficit as well as basically crush the human spirit and leave people reliant on the government rather than their own skills and wits; and B) that Johnson wasn't truly serious about besting the Russians-he was only adding to the deficit with wasteful military projects. However, the Party was not yet ready for someone that far to the right to win the nomination, and Prescott Bush was chosen. For Vice-President, Nelson Rockefeller would be nominated.

In the general, Bush appeared stiff, wooden, and un-charismatic against the "Raging Populist" Johnson, who had labor unions behind him as well as the "Solid South". The election would be historical because for the first time, Washington DC would be allowed to vote in a Presidential Election. While Bush was concentrated more on holding down Western states, Johnson promised a new era of Civil Rights to the people of Washington DC.

President Lyndon B Johnson (D-TX)/Vice-President Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN) 398 electoral votes, 54.3% of the popular vote
Former Senator Prescott Bush (R-CT)/Governor Nelson Rockefeller (R-NY) 140 electoral votes, 45.4% of the popular vote

Despite Johnson's re-election, there were notable Repbulican gains:
In Texas, George Bush, son of Prescott Bush, was elected to the Senate.
In New York, Conservative Party nominee William F Buckley would win in a tight election due to Liberal vote-splitting between the Republican and Democratic candidates.
Also, in 1961, when Johnson left his office of Senator to become President, Texas Republican John G Tower was elected in a special election.

Notable in Johnson's second term was the passing of the 1965 Civil Rights Act, the landing of America on the moon in 1968, and Johnson being the first President to establish diplomatic ties with the communist nation of Japan despite the protests of American ally China.

However, Johnson would also face the problem of inflation. His deficits incurred from both his military spending and his domestic spending were becoming a problem for the economy. At the same time, support for Israel in the Six-Day War had cost Americans money as gas prices rose throughout the country. 1968 would be tough year for Democrats...

1968
The Democrats faced a large amount of candidates in 1968 despite inflation and decreasing popularity. From the left came Senator Eugene McCarthy, from the New South came former Governor Terry Sanford, from the Deep South came former Governor George Wallace, from Northern moderates came the economically moderate and foreign policy hawk War Secretary Joe Kennedy Jr., and there was of course Vice-President Humphrey. Eventually, Humphrey would be nominated with Governor Sanford.

The Republicans also faced a number of candidates including Senator Goldwater of Arizona, Senator George Bush of Texas, Governor George Romney of Michigan, and Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York. With the moderates and libersl splitting between Romney, Bush, and Rockefeller, Goldwater was able to carry the entire Conservative base (despite slight bleeding to Bush), and use that to win at the convention. For Vice-President, Goldwater selected one of his own kind in Senator William F Buckley of New York for Vice-President.

Vice-President Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN)/Former Governor Terry Sanford (D-NC) 313 electoral votes, 50.8% of the popular vote
Senator Barry M Goldwater (R-AZ)/Senator James L Buckley (R/C-NY) 225 electoral votes, 48.9% of the popular vote

Despite a comfortable electoral vote, the popular vote was surprisingly close and some races were almost contested. However, Humphrey had won.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2011, 12:26:28 pm by Cathcon »Logged

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« Reply #44 on: April 09, 2011, 10:19:39 pm »
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President Cactus Jack seems to govern much more left-wing than expected, and I would expect a more isolationist pick for SoS (to coincide with Garner's views.)

Also, unless George Norris changes his residence, he is from Nebraska.

Regardless, this is fantastic stuff!
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« Reply #45 on: April 10, 2011, 07:56:45 am »
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President Cactus Jack seems to govern much more left-wing than expected, and I would expect a more isolationist pick for SoS (to coincide with Garner's views.)

Basically, I portrayed Cactus Jack as a Populist Conservative given his Texas roots. Also, he basically, at least in this timeline, didn't care about foreign policy so he gave FDR a free hand in it. He was mroe focused on domestic issues (ITTL, of course. I can't really go back in time to find out for myself).

Quote
Also, unless George Norris changes his residence, he is from Nebraska.

Changed it.

Quote
Regardless, this is fantastic stuff!

Thanks!
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« Reply #46 on: April 10, 2011, 06:01:14 pm »
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(I edited the 1968 election into the last post)

Dealing with inflation proved to be Humphrey's biggest difficulty as President. the Johnson years of increased military and domestic spending had done damage to the United States economy and to the US dollar. His first task would be lowering the military budget. However, when approached by a number of moderates including Senators George Smathers and John F Kennedy (brother to former War Secretary Joe Kennedy Jr.) to lower domestic spending, Humphrey refused, fully believing that the domestic spending was necessary.

Among the few bright spots of the Humphrey Administration was the landing of Man on the Moon in June of 1969. This was only one of many signs of United States military superiority over the Soviet Union since the end of World War II.

1972
President Humphrey would receive his share of challengers. From the Populist end of the party came Governor George Wallace of Alabama. From the Left of the party came former Senator Eugene McCarthy who claimed that Humphrey wasn't doing enough to cut the military budget and that even some domestic spending would have to be cut in order to ensure economic prosperity. However, Humphrey and Vice-President Sanford would secure re-nomination just the same.

For the Republicans, 1972 would be the year of the "Comeback kid" Richard Nixon who since leaving the Vice-Presidency had been elected to the Senate in 1962 and since 1970 has been serving as Senate Majority Whip. He had a long political career trailing back to 1946. He had been Congressman (1947-1951), Governor (1951-1956), Vice-President (1957-1961), and since 1963, a Senator. He had a long and accomplished career of public service. However, he would be faced with challenges from four tern (eight year) Arkansas Governor Winthrop Rockefeller, Kansas Senator Bob Dole, and Congressman John Ashbrook. Ashbrook would surprisingly do well in the primaries with the endorsements of Senators Goldwater and Buckley. However, Nixon would come out on top and choose Rockefeller as part of his "Southern Strategy" which was to cement the GOP in the south and extend their base of support.

Senate Majority Whip Richard M Nixon (R-CA)/Governor Winthrop Rockefeller (R-AR) 376 electoral votes, 54.6% of the popular vote
President Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN)/Vice-President Terry Sanford (D-NC) 162 electoral votes, 44.8% of the popular vote
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« Reply #47 on: April 16, 2011, 12:17:16 pm »
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I'm not really sure where to go with this.
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« Reply #48 on: April 16, 2011, 07:17:13 pm »
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I'm not really sure where to go with this.

How about the Nixon Presidency?
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Cathcon
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« Reply #49 on: April 16, 2011, 08:20:47 pm »
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I'm not really sure where to go with this.

How about the Nixon Presidency?

Thing is I had a certain plan and I think I pretty much shredded the plan, so I'm not sure what I'm going to do, though I suppose there's one option, as stereotypical as it might be.

Glad to see you're reading. I remember you had a  bunch of cool alternate Presidents list in that one thread.
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