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#Ready4Nixon
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« Reply #50 on: April 21, 2011, 09:31:57 pm »
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Nixon went on to become one of the nation's greatest Presidents in terms of foreign policy acheivments and popularity. It seemed that after twelve years out of office the Republicans had officially regained steam. One of his greatest accomplishments internally was the blending of the State, Navy, and War departments to create the Department of National Security.

1976
The Republicans were glad to renominate the successful President Nixon. However, Vice-President Winthrop Rockefeller would be stepping down from the ticket, given his battles with cancer the last four years. He even declined the cabinet position of Agriculture Secretary, saying he was done for good. In his place Nixon chose his good friend National Security Secretary John Connally of Texas, a former Democrat.

The Democrats, after the defeat of their "Happy Warrior" four years ago, were left without a true leader. Their Congressional leaders Mike Mansfield and Carl Albert didn't seem interested in the Presidency, and such Governors as Jimmy Carter and George Wallace didn't make the cut. Eventually, a leader was able to emerge in the form of Senator Frank Church of Idaho, a favorite of the Liberals and the establishment alike. For Vice-President, retiring Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota would be chosen.

President Richard M Nixon (R-CA)/National Security Secretary John Connally (R-TX) 395 electoral votes, 56.2% of the popular vote
Senator Frank Church (D-ID)/Senator Eugene McCarthy (D-MN) 143 electoral votes 43.6 % of the popular vote

Richard Nixon, who had spent his entire political life working to acheive higher office, had at last been re-elected by a landslide to the greatest American political office of all, the Presidency. His rise had been a long one, from Congressman, to Governor, to Vice-President, to Senator. However, he had acheived it. Sadly, Nixon would not live to see the completion of his dream, as he was assassinated in 1977.

With John Connally's ascension to the Presidency less than a year after his predecessor had won re-election, he hoped he would be able to live up to the hopes of the American people. He himself had had an interesting  political rise. He had been Johnson's chief of staff while Johnson was still majority leader, and had been Navy Secretary from 1961 to 1967. In 1968 he was elected Governor of Texas and won re-election in 1970. In 1973 he had stepped onto Nixon's cabinet as War Secretary and later National Security Secretary until stepping down in 1977 to take the reigns of the Vice-Presidency, where he had been when Nixon died.

Over Connally's term as President, things did not go "swimmingly" for the Texan. His economic policies, while Conservative when surrounded by Democrats, were moderate at best for the Republicans, who objected to his allowing of wag and price controls, and a massive increase of the debt ceiling in order to provide "economic stimulus". Many, such as Senators Goldwater, Heston, and Buckley, rejected the idea of "Big Government Conservatism", a phrase coined by Buckley. As the deficits grew and protests erupted on the right and left from a declining economy, it seemed that America needed a new leader, and new leadership.

1980
The Democrats, seeing 1980 as their chance to "re-affirm" their leadership of the country, faced a crowded field including Senators George McGovern, Eugene McCarthy, and Walter Mondale; and Governors Jimmy Carter, Jerry Brown, and Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Eventually, Jerry Brown, campaigning as the "new face" of the Democratic party in; contrast to McGovern's progressivism, Moynihan's Old School, New Deal Liberalism, and Carter's folksy Southern appeal; would win the nomination. In a very Western friendly ticket (reminiscient of 1976), Senator Mike Gravel of Alaska would win the Vice-Presidential nomination.

President Connally found himself facing challenges from both sides when looking for the Republican nomination*. On the right stood Senator Charlton Heston of California, like Connally, a former Democrat. He had been elected to the Senate in 1970. On the left was Congressman Pete McCloskey, also of California, who was far more Liberal than either the President, or the Senator. In a three-way battle for the Presidency, Connally would barely come out politically alive. For Vice-President, Connally chose Senator John Chaffee of Rhode Island, who was at the time the Chairman of the Senate Armed Services committee. With both Connally's and Chaffee's m ilitary experience, they hoped to drastically outdo the "unexperienced" Democratic ticket of Brown and Gravel.

As far as third parties went, a far right ticket of Congressman John Schmitz of California and Phil Crane of Illinois would run under the "America First" banner.

Governor Edmund G "Jerry" Brown Jr. (D-CA) 370 electoral votes, 57.1% of the popular vote
President John B Connally (R-TX)/Senator John Chaffee (R-IL) 168 electoral votes, 41.5% of the popular vote
Congressman John Schmitz (AI-CA)/Congressman Phil Crane (AI-IL) 0 electoral votes, .9% of the popular vote

In 1980, Jerry Brown would be elected the first Roman Catholic President the nation had. Ironically, he would also govern as a Libertarian, generally cutting taxes, lowering the deficit, ending the war on drugs, lowering the military budget and generally ushering in hies "era of limits" Against the expectations of economists and politicians, mostly in Brown's own party, his economic strategy would work and by 1983 the economy and deficit would both be in much better conditions.

1984
Despite rumors of a far left challenge, the popular Brown would be re-nominated unanimously.

The Republicans on the other hand, were thrown into chaos. The fight came down to Senator George Bush of Connecticut, Senator John Tower of Texas, Governor Charlton Heston of California (elected in 1982), and Senator and 1980 VP candidate John Chaffee of Rhode Island. Eventually, after severl concession including appointments to State and Defense, Chaffee and Tower would bow out to make way for Bush, who chose Senator Paul Laxalt of Nevada for Vice-President.

President Edmund G "Jerry" Brown Jr. (D-CA)/Vice-President Maurrice R "Mike" Gravel (D-AK) 453 electoral votes, 59.1% of the popular vote
Senator George Bush (R-CT)/Senator Paul Laxalt (R-NV) 85 electoral votes, 40.6% of the popular vote
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#Ready4Nixon
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« Reply #51 on: April 21, 2011, 09:32:35 pm »
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Well, I finally updated.
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« Reply #52 on: April 22, 2011, 10:16:32 am »
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Interesting map (1984). will vermont trend democrat in "future" elections? =)
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My evolution (by The Political Matrix):
E: -6.06 -> -6.97 -> -6.97 -> -8.13 -> -7.29 -> -8.26 -> -8.65 -> -7.03
S: -6.78 -> -6.09 -> -7.30 -> -7.13 -> -8.09 -> -8.35 -> -9.04 -> -8.61
#Ready4Nixon
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« Reply #53 on: April 22, 2011, 03:16:11 pm »
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Interesting map (1984). will vermont trend democrat in "future" elections? =)

Depends on how the Republican party trends. If it continues its Southern trend started by Goldwater (in 1968, not 1964), then yes. Actually, thinking about where I have the Republicans going in 1988, yes it'll go Democratic.
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« Reply #54 on: April 28, 2011, 03:17:23 pm »
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As 1984 progressed to 1985 and no economic issues seemed to grab the public attention, the newly re-inaugurated President Brown would turn towards social and foreign policy issues. Secretary of National Security Mark Hatfield and Ambassador to the United Nations George McGovern were both pushing for nuclear freeze negotiations with the Soviet Union and had waited all through Brown's first term when the President was concentrated near wholly on economic issues.

However, Brown and his foreign policy team, finally agreeing that it might not be the best time to work towards a nuclear freeze, agreed to focus mainly on human rights and to push for nuclear containment. In the summer of 1987 those negotiations would finally come to a head with the the Arms Production Ban Treaty, the "nuclear freeze" that President Brown wnated seemed to have arrived.

On social issues Brown would push for the full legalization of gay marriage in all fifty states. Meeting up with stiff opposition, Brown would not be dettered, saying "It is high time equality be legalized". However, the congressional battle would not be an easy one. Eventually, as the 1988 election approached, congressional powers would be at a stalemate.

1988
For Vice-President Gravel, he would see enemies from both the Conservative and Liberal factions of the party for his belief in full fifty-state abortion legalization and his calling for a flat tax. Eventually, Governor Daniel Patrick Moynihan of New York would become his greatest rival for the nomination, representing both those that were pro-life in the party as well as those that were more fiscally liberal. Gravel would prevail, however, with the support of President Brown. Instead of reaching out to Moynihan or another rival, Gravel chose Massachusetts Senator Paul Tsongas for Vice-President.

The Republicans would also face a tough primary season. Two-term Governor and former Senator Charlton Heston of California seemed to be the rightful nominee after two failed bids and coming in second place for the nomination. “The party’s Liberals have failed” he would say, referring to the 1984 defeat. Former Senator and 1984 Vice-Presidential nominee Paul Laxalt would also run, but he failed to gain traction, having failed to even bring in his home state in 1984. The man that was Heston’s major rival for the nomination was House Minority Leader John Anderson of Illinois. Being a representative of the GOP’s Liberal wing, he had become known as “President Brown’s greatest ally in Congress in terms of social and foreign policy issues”, and the only major difference between Brown and Anderson was that Anderson supported raising taxes to balance the budget while Brown had focused more on cuts to government. Heston won the nomination, choosing the moderate Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee for Vice-President.

Anderson, disgusted by “Heston Conservatism”, announced an Independent run, allying with the even more Liberal Senator Pete McCloskey of California, who had been elected in 1982 taking Heston’s place.

Governor Charlton Heston (R-CA)/Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker (R-TN) 291 electoral votes, 46.6% of the popular vote
Vice-President Maurrice K “Mike” Gravel (D-AK)/Senator Paul Tsongas (D-MA) 240 electoral votes, 45.5% of the popular vote
Congressman and former House Minority Leader John B Anderson (I-IL)/Senator Pete McCloskey (I-CA) 7 electoral votes, 7.5% of the popular vote

In an incredibly close election where Heston won California only by 34%, Republicans would return to the Whitehouse.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 06:03:02 pm by South Side of the Sky »Logged

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« Reply #55 on: April 29, 2011, 06:16:46 pm »
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President Heston ftw
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#Ready4Nixon
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« Reply #56 on: May 07, 2011, 05:53:28 pm »
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As President, Heston would follow the plans of Secretary of National Security William F Buckley, and the "Buckley Doctrine". It stated that while the United States could no longer engage in the production of nuclear weaponry, that didn't stop it from using proxy-wars in Warsaw Pact countries in order to drive out or wear down Soviet forces and puppet governments there. With this as Heston's guide a new phase of the Cold War would begin. No longer would there be negotiation and publicized missile reduction summits, but indtead fighting in the mountains and cities of Soviet puppet governments.

Domestically, Heston would "stay the course" that Brown had charted in terms of the economy, with defenders saying "It worked the last eight years and it will work now. The fundamentals of our economy are strong." Under Heston's watch the economy continued its growth and Americans were happy with their leader.

1992
For President Heston, despite rumors of a challenge from former Senator Lowell Weicker of Connecticut (who had been defeated in the Republican primary in 1988 by Joe Lieberman), those rumors dissipated after Weicker polled an incredibly weak 3% in a hypothetical Republican poll between the President and Weicker.

The Democrats on the other hand were struggling to define themselves. Under Brown they had been steered down the road of fiscal Conservatism combined with social and foreign policy Liberalism, a near 180 from the Johnson years. Representing the Populist wing would be Governor Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, representing moderates was Governro Al Gore of Tennessee, representing Liberals was the popular Governor Mario Cuomo of New York, and representing the Brown wing was Senator Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts. Eventually, the Brown wing would once again obtain victory, but it was by no means a satement of the party's place in the future, and he was forced to choose the pro-life Governor Al Gore of Tennessee.

President Charlton Heston (R-CA)/Vice-President Howard Baker (R-TN) 412 electoral votes, 56.3% of the popular vote
Senator Paul Tsongas (D-MA)/Governor Albert Gore Jr. (D-TN) 126 electoral votes, 43.3% of the popular vote

The only good news for the Democrats would be surprising gains in the North-East as they captured not only New Hampshire, which had gone for both Brown and Gravel, but also Vermont and Main by close margins. They had made significant gains in that area since 1980 and it appeared that the gaining control of the NorthEast might be complete. However, that was the only thing as Heston had been able to gain large chunks of working class voters, delivering New Jersey to him and almost giving him Pennsylvania and West Virginia. This coined the term "Heston Democrats", or Democrats that felt Republicans, at least that time around, better represented the American people.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2011, 07:04:50 pm by South Side of the Sky »Logged

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« Reply #57 on: May 07, 2011, 06:43:22 pm »
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I predict a Baker victory in 1996.
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#Ready4Nixon
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« Reply #58 on: May 20, 2011, 02:52:24 pm »
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The rest of Heston's term would be marked by continued economic prosperity that had existed since the early '80's. Meanwhile, in foreign events, the Soviet Union collapsed in 1995 after having been unable to sustain its fighting of various proxy-wars in their own countries. Heston was hailed by some in the party as "the greatest defender of Conservative values since Henry Cabot Lodge Senior!"

1996
Vice-President Baker, a member of the party's moderate wing, would be the early front-runner for the nomination. He would soon be joined by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, Governor Barry Goldwater Jr., Congressman Lincoln Chaffee, and White House Communications Director Patrick J Buchanan. Baker, after narrowly defeating Dole in Iowa and beating back Goldwater and Buchanan in New Hampshire, would cruise to victory. For Vice-President, Senator Joseph Lieberman, a moderate, would be chosen. He would be the first practicing Jew on a major party ticket.

The Democrats would nominate the popular two-term Texas Senator Ann Richards, who had beaten back the challenges made by Senator Joseph Kennedy III (son of War Secretary Joe Jr.), Governor Mario Cuomo, and Senator Gary Hart.

"We stand four years away from a new century. Now, we must choose a leader he can lead us in the right direction. On one hand, we face a Republican moderate who will only give ground to the Democrats in the terms of social issues and will aise taxes if he views it is needed. On the other hand we see a Populist Democrat who wishes to expand government into every corner of one's life. There needs to be a third option." spoke Patrick J Buchanan, White House Communications Director and Conservative activist. Running with Congressman Ron Paul of Texas, he would spoil Baker's chances.

Senator Ann Richards (DE-TX)/Governor Mario Cuomo 356 electoral votes, 48.6% of the popular vote
Vice-President Howard Baker (R-TN)/Senator Joseph Lieberman (R-CT) 169 electoral votes, 41.2% of the popular vote
Whitehouse Communications Director Patrick J Buchanan (I-DC)/Congressman Ronald E Paul (I-TX) 13 electoral votes, 10.3% of the popular vote
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« Reply #59 on: May 20, 2011, 04:58:51 pm »
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Richards, despite being popular, did not come into her term with a lot of momentum. Republicans, despite losing the Senate, had held the House of Representatives, and House Speaker Dick Cheney (elected to Congress in 1982 after serving three years as as Whitehouse Chief of Staff), was unwilling to give way. Along with that, the economy was winding down as the boom years between 1982 and 1997 were coming to an end. Fifteen years of immense prosperity were finally sunsetting and Richards would bear the brunt of it. Despite that, fighting multiple factors, she remained personally popular.

2000
After four years of stalls in Congress as law makers were unable to compromise, Richards would face a challenge in the form of former Brown administration Environment Secretary Ralph Nader, a hard leftist. However, she would emerge very much politically alive and ready to go into the 2000 election with all guns firing.

The Republicans on the other hand, seemed unable to decide whose turn it was as people debated whether their loss had been Baker's or Buchanan's fault. Finally, the charismatic Governor Jack Kemp of New York, former Urban Secretary for the Heston Administration and before that a Congressman, was able to lay claim to the nomination. He chose House
Speaker Dick Cheney, a popular figure among the base and a fellow insider, for Vice-President.

Finally, Ralph Nader, claiming that neither party was qualified to "stand up to corporations, special interests, and theocrats", announced his own independent bid. Choosing Maine Congressman John Eder, a former Democrat and by that point an Independent who had been elected in 1996, for Vice-President.

Governor Jack Kemp (R-NY)/Speaker Dick Cheney (R-WY) 271 electoral votes 48.8% of the popular vote
President Ann Richards (D-TX)/Vice-President Mario Cuomo (D-NY) 267 electoral votes 46.7% of the popular vote
Former Environmental Secretary and Activist Ralph Nader (I-CT)/Congressman John Eder (I-ME) 0 electoral votes, 4.1% of the popular vote

The effect that Nader had on the race was significant as North-Eastern states that had a chance of going for Richards given the right circumstances were thrown to the Republicans, and for years to come, Democrats would blame Nader and his supporters for throwing the election.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 07:36:15 pm by Vote Cathcon when writing in for Mid-East Assembly »Logged

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« Reply #60 on: May 20, 2011, 07:43:24 pm »
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Hopefully this incredibly long min-tl will be done soon and I can move onto the next one, whichever that is.
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« Reply #61 on: May 20, 2011, 08:39:38 pm »
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Kemp, like Richards, would also come into office popular. However, unlike Richards, would be able to maintain that popularity. The economic recovery that followed would only help the popular President. Kemp's anti-poveryt initiatives, seen not only as more effective than Richards', but also more committed, would help to strengthen the economy and unemployment, after months hovering around 7 or 8%, would go down to between 5 and 6%.

2004
With President Kemp's popularity, the Democrats would nominate, from a weak field, Governor Howard Dean of Vermont, a "true Progressive". In order to balance the ticket, former Richards National Security Secretary Wesley Clark would be chosen for Vice-President. While Dean initially had a lot of momentum, even leading Kemp in a couple of polls, a string of gaffes and his famous "I have a Scream" speech sunk him in the polls. Kemp, working to organize every faction of the Repbulican party, from moderates to Conservatives to Libertarians to Populists, worked hard to crush Dean, and did so come election day.

President Jack Kemp (R-NY)/Vice-President Dick Cheney (R-WY) 405 electoral votes, 56.8% of the popular vote
Governor Howard Dean (D-VT)/Former National Security Secretary Wesley Clark (D-IL) 133 electoral votes, 42.9% of the popular vote

With that, Kemp finally received his mandate to govern, continuing his "war on poverty" as well as working to pass legislation relating to national security, abortion, and immigration. Hailed by some as "the Second President Heston", Kemp worked instead to try to create his own legacy. Despite remaining popular throughout the remaineder of his term, Republicans would still face an uphill battle because of the twenty year "era of Republican dominance".

2008
With Vice-President Cheney choosing not to run because of his age, a number of other candidates stepped in including former Governor Ron Paul of Texas, Governor Jeb Bush of Connecticut, Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, National Security Secretary Colin Powell of Pennsylvania, and former Governor Robert Taft II of Ohio. After a rough early weeks of 2008, Powell's campaign would recover with an unexpectedly easy victory in Iowa. Bush won an expected victory in New Hampshire following his fellow Connecticut resident and former opponent Joe Lieberman's endorsement. However, what wasn't expected was the close margin of victory. In Nevada, Paul would claim his first victory. South Carolina would be the deciding primary as Powell battled the "North-Eastern Conservative" Jeb Bush and the Libertarian Ron Paul for first place. From there on out, Powell had the advantage. Finally becoming the presumptive nominee, Jeb Bush would join him on the ticket in a very strongly  North-East ticket.

The Democrats also faced a tough primary. Senator Rudy Guiliani of New York would become an early frontrunner following the endorsement of former Vice-President Mario Cuomo. However, former President Richards would have her own endorsement of North Carolina Senator John Edwards. The third major candidate was New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson who had the possibility of becoming the first Hispanic President of America. In Iowa, Richardson would win out while Guiliani as the resident North-Easterner would follow suit in New Hampshire. Richardson received his second victory in Nevada before South Carolina, where Edwards won. Ricahrdson, in carrying crucial Western states of Texas and California, would narrowly win the nomination, choosing Senate Majority Leader Joe Biden for Vice-President.

In a crucial battle of "who will be first?", for the first time, an African American was on a ticket, and for the first time a Hispanic was on a major party ticket. The election, because of this was very competitive and resulted in a very strange electoral map.

Governor Will Richardson (D-NM)/Senate Majority Leader Joseph R Biden (D-DE) 304 electoral votes, 50.8% of the popular vote
National Security Secretary Colin L Powell (R-PA)/Governor John Ellis Bush (R-CT) 234 electoral votes, 48.9% of the popular vote

With that, in a very historic election, one of the most historic in America's history, America would elect its first Hispanic President. After Powell conceded the eleciton, relations remained cordial and Powell in fact stayed on in Richardson's cabinet, continuing his role as Secretary of National Security.

List of "At the Behest of Roosevelt" Presidents
29. Henry Cabot Lodge (R-MA)/Hiram Johnson (R/P-CA) March 4th, 1917-November 9th,1924
30. Hiram Johnson (P-CA)/vacant November 9th, 1924-March 4th, 1925
31. Alvan T Fuller (R-MA)/Henry Ford (R-MI) March 4th, 1925-March 4th, 1933
32. John Nance Garner (D-TX)/Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY) March 4th, 1933-January 20th, 1941
33. Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY)/Cordell Hull (D-TN) January 20th, 1941-June 5th, 1945
34. Cordell Hull (D-TN)/vacant June 5th, 1945-January 20th, 1949

35. Robert Taft (R-OH)/Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA) January 20th, 1949-July 31st, 1953
36. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA)/vacant, Richard M Nixon (R-CA) July 31st, 1953-January 20th, 1961

37. Lyndon B Johnson (D-TX)/Hubert H Humphrey (D-MN) January 20th, 1961-January 20th, 1969
38. Hubert H Humphre (D-MN)/Terry Sanford (D-NC) January 20th, 1969-January 20th, 1973

39. Richard M Nixon (R-CA)/Winthrop Rockefeller (R-AR), John B Connally (R-TX) January 20th, 1973-October 19th, 1977
40. John B Connally (R-TX)/vacant October 19th, 1977-January 20th, 1981

41. Edmund G "Jerry" Brown Jr. (D-CA)/Maurrice K "Mike Gravel (D-AK) January 20th, 1981-January 20th, 1989
42. Charlton Heston (R-CA)/Howard Baker (D-TN) January 20th, 1989-January 20th, 1997
43. Ann Richards (D-TX)/Mario Cuomo (D-NY) January 20th, 1997-January 20th, 2001
44. Jack Kemp (R-NY)/Dick Cheney (R-WY) January 20th, 2001-January 20th, 2009
45. William Richardson (D-NM)/Joseph R Biden (D-DE) January 20th, 2009-Present

The End
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« Reply #62 on: May 20, 2011, 08:46:04 pm »
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Any suggestions for what I should do next?
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« Reply #63 on: May 20, 2011, 08:54:40 pm »
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Any suggestions for what I should do next?

Humphrey winning 1968?
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« Reply #64 on: May 20, 2011, 08:56:19 pm »
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Any suggestions for what I should do next?

A political alignment where the main division is East/West instead of North/South?
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« Reply #65 on: May 22, 2011, 05:04:24 pm »
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Camelot's Completion:
A World Withou Chappaquiddick

Ted Kennedy, having risen in the Senate since the death of his brother Bobby, and finally looking to complete the dream of his two brothers, announced in mid-1971 that he would be running for President in 1972. Competing against George McGovern, George Wallace, and Shirley Chisholm, the endorsements of both Hubert H Humphrey, Henry M Jackson, and Edmund Muskie would help him greatly in the primaries. By the time he got to the convention, he had gained a large amount of momentum and was only a few points behind Richard Nixon in the polls. For Vice-President, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter, a moderate, would be chosen.

Despite a post-convention bump, Kennedy would face an uphill battle against President Nixon. However, on election day, he would succeed.

Senator Edward M Kennedy (D-MA)/Governor James E Carter (D-GA) 270 electoral votes, 49.8% of the popular vote
President Richard M Nixon (R-CA)/Vice-President Spiro T Agnew (R-MD) 268 electoral votes, 49.5% of the popular vote

With that incredibly close victory, even closer than in 1960, President Nixon would be crushed. Retiring to his home in Yorba Linda California, he would be described as "an angry, lonely, bitter man, who feels that opportunity was yanked mercillesly away from him by the Liberal North-Eastern elite."

As for Ted Kennedy, he was elated. In his cabinet would be Secretary of State Frank Church, Secretary of the Treasury Hubert H Humphrey, and HUD Secretary Shirley Chisholm. President Kennedy's first priority would be to end the war in Vietnam. Finally agreeing on a resolution with the North-Vietnamese leader Le-Duch-To, Kennedy declared victory and began shipping American troops home. Among Kennedy's domestic accomplishments would be the pardoning of all draft-dodgers, a final end to the draft, and becoming known as "the greatest school desegregator in American history".

1976
With all those accomplishments behind him, Kennedy faced no opposition to his re-nomination. The Republicans on the other hand faced a vicious battle between former Vice-President Agnew, former Governor Ronald Reagan, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, and Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield. Finally, Agnew claimed victory, choosing Congressman John Ashbrook of Ohio as his runningmate.

President Edward M Kennedy (D-MA)/Vice-President James E Carter (D-GA) 378 electoral votes, 54.7% of the popular vote
Former Vice-President Spiro T Agnew (R-MD)/Congressman John Ashbrook (R-OH) 160 electoral votes, 44.8% of the popular vote
« Last Edit: May 24, 2011, 03:17:07 pm by Veteran of the Psychic Wars »Logged

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« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2011, 03:32:33 pm »
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As President Edward M Kennedy was sworn in for a second time, it seemed as if he would be unstoppable in the four years to come. However, he would have to fight as hard as he could against a lagging economy that many tried to blame on him. The main thing that he wanted to get off his plate was universal healthcare. Title the Comprehensive Healthcare Coverage Package, CHCP, it would be a brutal fight in the Senate to pass the legislation. However, the President would emerge triumphant in early 1978 having passed it. With that spike in his approval ratings, Kennedy tried to concentrate on foreign policy, hoping that with a combination of celebration over CHCP and a foreign policy acheivment or two, he could whether the storm of the 1978 mid-terms, which Republicans were resting their hopes on in order to come back from the defeats in 1972, 1974, and 1978. In August, at a summit in Sweden, SALT II would be signed with Leonid Brezhnev. Present there on the American side, besides the President, were Secretary of State Edmund Muskie and Defense Secretary Stansfield Turner.

In the mid-terms, the Democrats would only take one loss in the Senate. However, in the House, there was a number of gains made by the Republicans and in the Governorships, the Republicans made heavy gains. With a lagging economy and losses in the mid-terms, the Democrats would head into the 1980 primary season.
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« Reply #67 on: May 24, 2011, 07:52:25 pm »
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"We now stand at the end. The end of the generation of the Kennedys. Since 1960, that name has captivated and captured America. Since then, we have seen more than one Kennedy rise to power, and over half of the last twenty years have had a Kennedy as President. For now, at least for now, it seems that the Kennedys have made their mark and we shall see instead new faces leading the Democratic party and the country"
-Commentator Patrick J Buchanan in American Future, (c) 1980

1980
Vice-President Jimmy Carter, with the full support of President Kennedy, would face many challenges in the primaries. Among them were Senator Henry M Jackson of Washington, Governor Jerry Brown of California, Senator Lloyd Bentsen of Texas, and Senator George McGovern of South Dakota. However, Carter would narrowly beat all of them. In order to attract working and middle class voters who were turning towards the Republicans because of the bad economy, Carter chose Senator Adlai Stevenson III of Illinois for Vice-President.

The Republicans would also have a crowded field which included Governor George Bush of Texas, Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker of Tennessee, Congressman Phil Crane of Illinois, Congressman John Anderson of Illinois, Senator Mark Hatfield of Oregon, former Treasury Secretary John Connally of Texas, Senator Bill Armstrong of Texas, and former Governor Ronald Reagan of California. However, the frontrunner had yet to enter. Finally, former Vice-Presidential candidate and by then one-term Ohio Governor John Ashbrook, who since 1976 had become one of the Conservative standard bearers, would enter the race, winning Iowa and New Hampshire. Finally claiming the nomination despite regional victories by Baker and Anderson, George Bush.

Governor John Ashbrook (R-OH)/Governor George Bush (R-TX) 333 electoral votes, 52.3% of the popular vote
Vice-President James E Carter (D-GA)/Senator Adlai E Stevenson III (D-IL) 205 electoral votes, 47.3% of the popular vote

On January 20th, 1981, John Ashbrook would take the Oath of Office, becoming the 39th President of the United States of America. Among his cabinet, former Vice-President Spiro T Agnew would become Attorney General, Texas Governor George Bush would become Secretary of Defense, former Senator James L Buckley would become Secretary of State, and former Governor Ronald Reagan would become Secretary of Commerce.

Sadly for President Ashbrook, he would be killed on March 29th by a crazed John Hinckley Jr., and Vice-President George Bush would become the 40th President of the United States. With the more moderate George Bush in office, it seemed that the "Ashbrook Revolution" would be halted, at least for the moment. For Vice-President, Congressman Jack Kemp would be chosen in order to draw in "Ashbrookites" (a world that did not flow well), and to keep moderates happy.

In foreign policy, Bush would continue the hawkish foreign policy begun by Ashbrook, and become a respected world leader for his facing down of Leonid Brezhnev. In economic policy, however, it seemed Bush would not focuse that much of his attention, instead barely getting into disputes with Congress. His domestic policy would instead be led by Vice-President Kemp and Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker.

1984
Despite rumors that a Conservative such as Phil Crane might try to challenge the President, George Bush would be unanimously renominated by the Republicans, who felt he was their man in 1984 after a successful economic recovery.

The Democrats would face very few willing to enter the race. However, former Senator Adlai E Stevenson III would step up to be the party's sacrificial lamb that year. For Vice-President, Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm of New York would be chosen.

President George Bush (R-TX)/Vice-President Jack Kemp (R-NY) 488 electoral votes, 56.3% of the popular vote
Former Senator Adlai E Stevenson III (D-IL)/Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) 50 electoral votes, 43.2% of the popular vote
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« Reply #68 on: May 25, 2011, 06:35:31 pm »
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Bush's second term would be marked by foreign policy successes and economic stabilization. However, Republican fatigue and a loss of the senate in 1986 would lead to an early starting point for the 1988 election as both Democrats and Republicans kicked into high gear in early 1987.

1988
The first man to enter the 1988 Democratic primaries would be former Senator Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts. Claiming to be the "reasonable alternative" to "Kennedy Liberals and Ashbrook Conservatives", Tsongas would have early appeal, especially in the early primary state of New Hampshire. However, his maverick New England style would soon be overshadowed by the presence of Governor Mario Cuomo of New York. A Liberal Catholic, Cuomo was an early favorite and threw his hat into the race in October. Other candidates were Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, Senate Majority Leader Walter Mondale, and Tennessee Senator Al Gore Jr. Cuomo would begin with an early win in Iowa, with Mondale coming in a close second due to being from the neighbroing state of Minnesota. In New Hampshire, Tsongas' victory would be offset by Cuomo's close second. Coming into the south, Gore would dominate, but Cuomo at the end of the season would emerge the winner by a large amount. For Vice-President, Gore would be chosen.

For the Republicans, Vice-President Kemp would face challenges both from the Right and the Left of the party as Congressman Phil Crane, a friend of the deceased Ashbrook, stepped in from the Right and Senator Lowell Weicker of Connecticut stepped in from the Left. In Iowa, the charismatic and popular Kemp would do well. However, New Hampshire, surprisingly enough, would be the major battleground state as Crane and Weicker went to work tearing each other apart. The two represented different ends of the New Hampshire Republican party. Crane represented the rural fiscal Conservatives of the "live free or die" state, while Weicker made himself the standard bearer of New England Liberal Republicanism. Eventually, Kemp came in a narrow third with Crane on top. After the rest of the primary season unfolded, the Vice-President found himself surprisingly in second as Crane charged forward with the "Ashbrook vote". However, things would turn out okay for Kemp as Bush put his 1984 political machine to work for his Vice-President. In order to help with moderates and hold the state of California, one-term Senator Maureen Reagan, daughter of former Governor (1967-1975) and Commerce Secretary (1981-1987), and who had been elected in 1982 to the Senate, would be chosen for Vice-President. Despite her father's image as a champion of Conservative ideals in the 1976 Presidential campaign, his daughter was much more moderate, especially on social issues.

Governor Mario Cuomo (D-NY)/Senator Albert Gore Jr. (D-TN) 277 electoral votes, 49.8% of the popular vote
Vice-President Jack Kemp (R-NY)/Senator Maureen Reagan (R-CA) 261 electoral votes, 49.3% of the popular vote

The election would come down to Ohio, where Cuomo, using trade as a large issue, would carry the day. In Georgia, former Vice-President Jimmy Carter, who after hsi Vice-Presidency returned to the Governorship from 1983 to 1987, would throw a large amount of support financially and politically into his home state to guarantee a Democratic victory there. In Cuomo's cabinet, Governor Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts would become Treasury Secretary. Congressman Dick Gephardt of Missouri would become Labor Secretary. Former Governor and Vice-President Jimmy Carter who had worked extremely hard for the ticket would be given the pleasure of becoming Secretary of State.

Cuomo's tenure as President would be marked with the halting of any and all free-trade legislation, the raising of taxes to bridge the deficit, and thawing of relations with the Soviet Union. However, the economy would slow down under his watch and his popularity with the middle class would wain as his taxes didn't help the economic situation. By 1992 a once popular President would face a challenge in the primaries from former Senator Paul Tsongas who was still bitter from the 1988 defeat and was campaigning once again on fiscal conservatism.

1992
While Cuomo would repeat his win in Iowa, Tsongas would have a much more convincing margin of victory in New Hampshire, and with no other opponents, Tsongas would carry all of New England and some Western states. However, he would never be able to completely overtake the incumbent President Cuomo.

The Republicans faced a large field in the wake of hearing that the Democratic incumbent would be challenged from within his own party. Candidates include Congressman Phil Crane and former Senator Lowell Weicker, both of whom were looking to make due on their campaign promises from four years ago. Other candidates included Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole, Texas Senator Phil Gramm, and businessman Steve Forbes. Crane, running on Conservative energy, would eventually win the nomination, choosing former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, who had worked in the House of Representatives (1977-1983), been Director of Central Intelligence (1983-1986), and had served as President Bush's final Defense Secretary (1986-1989) before returning to Wyoming. The reason Cheney had been appointed Secretary of Defense originally was after the resignation of then-Secretary of Defense John Tower (1982-1986) when allegations about womanizing and drunken behavior were made public.

In what was not so much of a surprise, former Senator Weicker announced an Independent bid for President, choosing former Massachusetts Governor Elliot Richardson for Vice-President. They would challenge Crane greatly in the North-East.

In the general election, Crane would make due on the "Ashbrook Revolution" of twelve years ago, receiving endorsements from famous Conservative politicians such as South Carolina Governor Carrol Campbell, former Commerce Secretary Ronald Reagan, Nevada Senator Paul Laxalt, and California Governor Barry Goldwater Jr.

Congressman Phil Crane (R-IL)/Former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney (R-WY) 314 electoral votes, 48.6% of the popular vote
President Mario Cuomo(D-NY)/Vice-President Albert Gore Jr. (D-TN) 209 electoral votes, 41.2% of the popular vote
Former Senator Lowell Weicker (I-CT)/Former Governor Elliot Richardson (I-MA) 15 electoral votes, 10.8% of the popular vote
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« Reply #69 on: June 18, 2011, 04:41:56 pm »
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Bump. I want to finish this thing up (I don't know why I ended up going off in this direction with the current TL) and get on to something else.
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« Reply #70 on: June 18, 2011, 06:31:52 pm »
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1996
After a recovered economy, fall of the Soviet Union, etc., President Crane easily wins re-election:

President Philip Crane (R-IL)/Vice-President Richard B Cheney (R-WY) 414 electoral votes, 56.7% of the popular vote
Former Vice-President Albert Gore Jr. (D-TN)/House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt (D-MO) 124 electoral votes, 42.7% of the popular vote

Crane's second term would not be quite so spectacular. However, his re-election had acheived the shifting of the Democrats from the Liberal Cuomo and Kennedy to more moderate Southerners, and that woudl be seen in the 2000 Presidential election.

2000
For the Republicans, after eight years of a good economy and foreign policy accomplishments, they were feeling good about themselves. In order to bridge a predicted primary fight between the Liberal and Conservative wings of the party, the establishment quickly put forth the man they viewed as their best choice:
Former Florida Commerce Secretary (1987-1992), United States Commerce Secretary (1993-1994), and since 1995 the Florida Governor Jeb Bush for President. For Vice-President, Senator Judd Gregg of New Hampshire was chosen.

The Democrats on the other hand were looking for a nominee who could beat the Republicans on their own turf: Fiscal responsibility and a strong defense. Virginia Senator Chuck Robb's insurgenct campaign would therefore pick up steam after a surprise second place finish in Iowa, and he would go on to win in South Carolina, thus being his first primary victory of many. For Vice-President, Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend of Maryland was chosen.

Senator Charles E Robb (D-VA)/Governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (D-MD) 299 electoral votes, 49.7% of the popular vote
Governor John Ellis "Jeb" Bush (R-FL)/Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH) 239 electoral votes, 49.6% of the popular vote
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« Reply #71 on: August 04, 2011, 08:45:43 pm »
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Okay, I'm rebooting this after seeing how much fun I had with "at the behest of President Roosevelt". I will not be continuing the Ted Kennedy in '72 tl, however, and am hoping of starting fresh. I'm doing this mainly to distract from my other tls which will require much more research and time to update properly. This timeline as well will start in the 1910's and hopefully get completed.


1912
Despite rumors circulating that in 1912, President Roosevelt would challenge his own protege President Taft for the Republican nomination, Roosevelt instead hartily endorsed Taft, whose only primary challenge proved to be from the Progressive Robert LaFollette. At the Republican National Convention, Taft was re-nominated by a large margin. For the Democrats, Speaker of the House Champ Clark was selected, choosing Woodrow Wilson in order to win over the support of William Jennings Bryan.

In October, Vice-President Sherman died, leaving the Republicans in a dis-array. In order to quickly choose a qualified successor, one-term Progressive Governor of California Hiram Johnson was chosen for Vice-President.

President William Howard Taft (R-OH)/Governor Hiram W Johnson (R-CA) 305 electoral votes, 54.6% of the popular vote
Speaker Beauchamp "Champ" Clark (D-MO)/Governor Woodrow Wilson (D-NJ) 226 electoral votes, 42.9% of the popular vote

Despite not winning as much as he had the previous year, Taft was happy as he was re-elected. Governing mostly as a moderate, the income tax and the Federal Reserve were created under his watch. In foreign affairs, Taft governed mostly as an isolationist, avoiding the storm clouds building in Europe as war threatened.

1916
In 1916, rumor once again abounded that Roosevelt might try for a third term. By 1916, Roosevelt was serving as Secretary of the Navy after his predecessor’s retirement. However, Roosevelt declined running, saying he was happy with his life, but that he would accept a cabinet appointment from the next Republican elected. At the convention, Vice-President Hiram Johnson, who was supported by Roosevelt, La Follette, and Taft, faced off against Conservative opposition, headed by former Vice-President Charles W Fairbanks. Eventually a compromise was reached with the Vice-President heading the ticket and Charles Evan Hughes being put on the bottom of the ticket.

At the Democratic National Convention, Woodrow Wilson, 1912 Vice-Presidential nominee, was able to win the nomination on the promise that the Populist Oscar W Underwood be chosen for Vice-President. Wilson’s attempt was successful and he emerged from the convention triumphant.

In the general, the main issue was foreign intervention. Wilson espoused an interventionist foreign policy, especially concerning Europe where England, France, Germany, Russia, and Austria-Hungary were at war. Since 1914 and the beginning of the war in Europe, America had done nothing despite Teddy Roosevelt’s urgings to do so. Hiram Johnson was determined to continue that course.

Vice-President Hiram Johnson (R-CA)/Associate Justice Charles Evan Hughes (R-NY) 324 electoral votes, 55.1% of the popular vote

Governor Woodrow Wilson (D-NJ)/Senator Oscar Underwood (D-AL) 207 electoral votes, 43.7%of the popular vote

Despite questions over continued Republican rule, Wilson proved unable to beat Republican strength in the North-East and Mid-West, and despite making in-roads in the West, was unable to beat out Johnson. Republican dominance would continue.

Johnson’s cabinet would represent his ideology and his campaign promises. Robert La Follette, a Progressive icon and a Johnson supporter, would be made Secretary of State. Former President Taft, a follower of isolationism, would head the War Department. As for Treasury, Albert B Cummins, formerly the Governor of Iowa, would be selected. As for Theodore Roosevelt, after talks with Johnson, decided he would retire from his position as Secretary of the Navy. In his place he left his distant cousin and Democratic protégé Franklin D Roosevelt who had served in the New York State Senate (Jan 1st, 1911-Dec 19, 1913) and Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Dec 19, 1913-Mar 4, 1917). FDR, as he was called, himself an interventionist like Teddy, would often run afoul with President Johnson until his resignation on June 3rd, 1918 to run for Governor of New York. FDR would be replaced by Senator Frank B Kellog.

Across the Atlantic Ocean, the war effort would worsen for the Allied Powers as Russia would drop out of the war due to the Communist Revolution that had overtaken the country. Without two fronts to fight, the Central Powers would march forwards, breaking the stalemate in France. While Johnson continually declined any attempts by Congress to send the country to war, volunteer efforts would start up all over the country. Some were even led by Johnson’s former mentor, Teddy Roosevelt as he campaigned for what would be called the “Liberty Brigade”, a volunteer army to fight the imperialist expansion in Europe.

In domestic policy, Johnson would continue the trust-busting of Roosevelt and Taft. However, on other issues he would push much farther to the Left, flinging aside Taft’s belief in limited government and TR’s corporatism. However, the Progressive era was ending as recession set in and economic stagnation took effect. Johnson’s Presidency was in danger.

1920
Johnson would face a large challenge by Illinois Governor Frank Lowden of the party’s Conservative wing. A man who had balanced his state’s budget and had helped organize Illinois’ Liberty Brigade, Lowden stood in stark contrast to the President and was able to win a number of North-Eastern and Mid-Western primaries. However, Johnson and the Progressives retained control over the party and Johnson was easily re-nominated. In a last blow to the party’s Conservatives, Charles Evan Hughes would be replaced by Senator Charles August Lindbergh of Minnesota, a through-and-through Johnson supporter.

The Democrats would in turn go towards Conservatism. Senator Henry Ford of Michigan and Governor Franklin D Roosevelt of New York would be the party’s nominees for President and Vice-President that year. Both sons of the Democratic year that was 1918, they seemed to represent the future of the party. FDR, though also an interventionist, was much different from his cousin in domestic policy. Incidentally, Woodrow Wilson, the so-called evil genius of the convention, was behind both nominees.

The race was immediately tilted towards the Democrats. With the popular and innovative Henry Ford and the charismatic and young Franklin Roosevelt campaigning against 24 years of Republican rule that included a bad economy and a large push for foreign intervention. With Conservatives fleeing the Republican ticket and Progressives in a dis-array, Henry Ford was swept into office.

Senator Henry Ford (D-MI)/Governor Franklin D Roosevelt (D-NY) 356 electoral votes, 54.7% of the popular vote
President Hiram W Johnson (R-CA)/Senator Charles A Lindbergh (R-MN) 175 electoral votes 44.8% of the popular vote
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« Reply #72 on: August 05, 2011, 12:50:34 pm »
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Comments?Tongue
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« Reply #73 on: August 05, 2011, 01:00:18 pm »
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Comments?Tongue

You suck, you immature hack. Now, if you only knew as much about politics as I do...

Just kidding, o/c. I enjoy your work, even if I have hard time buying Kennedy beating Nixon in 1972 Smiley
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« Reply #74 on: August 05, 2011, 04:24:43 pm »
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What happened with WWI?  Apparently the US didn't get in, but that's all we know.  Did Germany win, maybe after France experienced another revolution after a mass mutiny on the western front?  Or did the allies manage to starve Germany into submission?  These are big butterflies we're talking about here.
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