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« Reply #125 on: April 29, 2012, 03:14:25 pm »
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The At-Large Delegate
"It was one of the greatest miracles I've ever seen. On the first ballot, Edmunds had scored a measly 93 votes. However, on the second, the shifts began to occur. By the third ballot, all of Arthur's Northern support had gone over to Arthur, giving Edmunds 214 votes. On the fourt ballot, somehow the support of John Sherman's 25 votes had been wrested from him and by the sixth, Edmunds had made great gains with Arthur's southern votes and with a number of delegates uneasy about Blaine. It took quite a while, but Edmunds was able to win on the tenth ballot. And it was all thanks to one man, then but a delegate and a state assemblyman from New York, and a man who's now in the headlines every day it seems, Theodore Roosevelt."
-Attorney General William McKinley, 1897

Edmunds, nominated with War Secretary Robert Todd Lincoln, went onto defeat the Democratic nominee Grover Cleveland by a close margin, typical of the period, and become the 22nd President of the United States of America.

Senator George F. Edmunds (R-VT)/Secretary of War Robert Todd Lincoln (R-IL) 233 electoral votes
Governor Grover Cleveland (D-NY)/Congressman Thomas Hendricks (D-IN) 168 electoral votes

Coming into office, Edmunds promised to continue the reforms led by Arthur. The main issue of the period was Civil Service Reform and Edmunds attempted to make the system as meritocratic as possible. Joining him in his cabinet was Secretary of State John Sherman of Ohio. Under the foreign policy laid down by Edmunds and Sherman, American plans for the Nicaragua Canal began rolling. As well, American fishing rights off the coast of Canada were defended, due mainly to Edmunds' own New England roots, and he withdrew from the Senate the Berlin Conference Treaty which was favored by many of the pro-business elements in his party.

In economics, the first piece of anti-trust legislation was introduced under Edmunds and he supported it. The issue of currency proved a controversial one, as Southern and Western politicians were in favor of silver and North-Easterners in favor of gold. The Mid-West for its part was an area where support for either and both were favored. Edmunds, himself a North-Easterner but a liberal one at that, stood firm on promoting gold as the standard for currency.

As for the young delegate Theodore Roosevelt, he left the New York Assembly following the convention and headed West, becoming a rancher. However, hearing of the commencement of the Nicaragua Canal building, he shipped south and became a foreman for American operations down there. Returning home in 1888, Roosevelt was made Civil Service Commissioner.

1888
With President Edmunds declining to seek a second term, the nomination appeared wide open. The main front-runner was former Secretary of State and Senator James G. Blaine of Maine. However, Edmunds took control of the convention and made sure Blaine wouldn't come near the nomination. Instead, he promoted his own Secretary of State John Sherman, a moderate bi-metallist and political ally. Sherman, with the popularity of the Nicaragua Canal plans, the Mid-West supporting him, and having earned respect from the North-East over the issue of fishing rights, was easily nominated. For Vice President, Robert Todd Lincoln insisted he not be nominated. Instead, Civil Service Commission President Dorman B. Eaton was nominated in the wake of the popularity of reform.

For the Democrats, it seemed that the conservative Bourbon Democrats were still in control as Senator Thomas F. Bayard of Delaware won the nomination. Governor Isaac P. Gray of Indiana was nominated for Vice President in order to compete in the Mid-West. The election marked a significant gain for the Democrats in the North-East, not seen since 1852. With Democrats putting out threats that Sherman, a bi-metallist, wouldn't protect the Gold Standard, and immigrants coming out in full force of Bayard who straddled the issue of Civil Service Reform, Democrats captured states like New Hampshire and New York they hadn't seen success in, on a presidential level, in years.

Senator Thomas F. Bayard (D-DE)/Governor Isaac P. Gray (D-IN) 223 electoral votes
Secretary of State John Sherman (R-OH)/Civil Service Commissioner Dorman B. Eaton (R-VT) 178 electoral votes

« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 11:10:46 am by Cathcon for Student Council 2012 »Logged

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« Reply #126 on: April 29, 2012, 07:14:49 pm »
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Democrats celebrated as they had won the White House for the first time since the year 1856 and Bayard was their first President in 28 years. With Democrats happy following this victory, they felt no need to pursue Civil Service Reform despite the urgings of Attorney General Grover Cleveland. Instead, both Dorman B. Eaton and Theodore Roosevelt, active and Republican members of the Civil Service Commission, would find themselves without jobs come March, 1889. Patronage returned with Democrats entering a number of lower level positions. Though filling of the positions was meritocratic, it was made sure that the successful applicants were Democrat.

In domestic policy, Bayard promoted the Gold Standard and decreased the silver supply. While Eastern businesses rejoiced at Bayard's stand on currency, Bayard also lowered the tariff rates dramatically, much to the ire of Eastern Republicans. This had a good effect on the economy as businesses were helped by defense of the gold standard and at the same time, there was much greater competition with more foreign products entering the market. The biggest opponents were the Western silverites and Mid-Western and Eastern labor supporters. Among Bayard's chief opponents was Ohio Congressman William McKinley who was a large supporter of tariffs and labor and was moderate on the gold standard.

In foreign policy, Bayard took a conciliatory and anti-interventionist stand. While he liked and encouraged trade, he did not view the purpose of the government or the military to be to clear the way for companies across the globe. Instead, that was the job of the companies in the President's mind. A rare point of Bayard using the military came in 1891 with the Baltimore Crisis. In Chile, American sailors on leave were arrested following tensions between the US and Chile. These tensions had been caused by the Ambassador to Chile giving refuge to Chileans seeking refuge from the ongoing civil war. Bayard threatened to deploy the Navy and cut off diplomatic relations with Chile and the prisoners were released, war averted.

1892
President Bayard found himself at the peak of his popularity. With a good economy, the Gold Standard popular, and peace continuing, there was little reason to vote against him. That is, if you were in the East. In the West, however, farmers were still struggling from debt. They had indeed been helped by lowering of tariffs. However, pro-silver Western politicians had begun to "raise Hell" over currency issues and farmers, laiden down with debt they'd like to be able to easily pay off, rallied with them. Therefore, when the 1892 election rolled around, the Republicans found their convention in chaos. Ultimately, four major candidates came forth. From the West came silverite Henry M. Teller. From the Mid-West came former Secretary of State John Sherman. Some had pushed for Congressman William McKinley, however, he stepped aside in favor of his state's favorite son and instead would find himself nominated for Vice President. From New England came 1888 Vice Presidential nominee Dorman B. Eaton campaigning on Civil Service Reform and pushing a moderate agenda. Finally, defending Eastern business interests was Governor Levi P. Morton of New York. With the pro-silver, bi-metallist, and pro-gold candidates going head to head, Eaton who at first was favored to win, found himself pushed aside despite his popularity. Eventually, with Sherman losing support in the Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan delegations, Teller was able to cobble together a majority.

While some would say that another candidate, say Dorman Eaton or even John Sherman would've stood a chance against Bayard, Teller had no geographical base outside the West and was attacked as a liberal radical. Even with an entire geographic region locked up, there were little electoral votes to be found out in Colorado and Teller went down to defeat.

President Thomas F. Bayard (D-DE)/Vice President Isaac P. Gray (D-IN) 304 electoral votes
Senator Henry M. Teller (R-CO)/Congressman William McKinley (R-OH) 140 electoral votes

Beginning his second term, Bayard and the nation were struck with a severe recession in early 1893 caused by over speculation. While support for gold had, in hindsight, helped lessen the damage of the panic, it was still a sharp downturn from the previously good economy. With Bayard refusing to act in response to the recession, the economy was left to recover on its own. In response to this, the call for the coinage of free silver was as strong as ever. With Republicans having seemingly cemented themselves, for the time being at least, as the pro-silver party following 1892, they were a constant and painful thorn in the side of the President. Led by William B. Allison of Iowa, the Senate came within a few votes of passing a large silver purchase.

1896
With political opportunists rallying on both sides in preparation for a year that as bound to be an election of importance, 1896 was a much awaited campaign. With President Bayard stepping down, the pro-gold mantle would be taken up by Senator John Palmer of Illinois. However, the pro-silver Democrats won the day. Delegate and former congressional candidate William Jennings Bryan successfully won the nomination for former Congressman Richard P. Bland of Missouri. Bryan who himself had no official political experience but was a valuable asset to the campaign, was given the Vice Presidential nomination.

As for the Republicans, they were in an even greater state of chaos than four years before. Governor Theodore Roosevelt of New York, a proponent of the Gold Standard but with great appeal to the West due to his former residence there as well as his short stint as Senator from North Dakota, had waged an incredible, odds-defying campaign against William McKinely preceding the convention. The Illinois convention had proved the biggest battle ground. McKinley had been positioning himself for four years in preparation for 1896, boosting his resume with his election to the Governorship in 1893 and re-election in 1895. He had prepared a populist campaign prepared to fight the party bosses for the nomination by first gaining the support of the people. However, his show was stolen as Roosevelt burst onto the scene, narrowly gaining the support of Illinois' delegation at its state convention. At the national convention, the contest was between the Eastern Roosevelt, the Mid-Westerner McKinley, and the silverite Westerner William B. Allison. Despite the support of some party bosses, Allison ultimately failed in his bid for the nomination as did McKinley. Roosevelt not only was able to take in his home state of New York and the surrounding delegations as well as Illinois, he also managed, on the second ballot, to win the support of both the Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana, and Minnesota. On the third ballot, he was nominated, having gained much of Allison's support as well as winning the Michigan and Indiana delegations. In order to appease the party bosses and select an older and more experienced statesman for Vice President, former Secretary of State John Sherman was chosen under the assumption he would serve only one term.

The general election was filled with barn-storming on both sides. Roosevelt did his own campaigning and proved to be an eloquent defender of the Gold Standard and Republican principles. While he made much less stops than the Democratic Vice Presidential nominee Bryan did, Roosevelt spoke to much larger audiences. Bryan for his part criss-crossed the Mid-West several times, getting his message out. However, Roosevelt had geography on his side when it came down to election day. His support in the North-East, the support from the Mid-West thanks to Sherman's presence and its Republican tradition, and support in the West due to his image as a "cowboy" and his former residency and career there helped him win the election handily.

Governor Theodore Roosevelt (R-NY)/Former Secretary of State John Sherman (R-OH) 274 electoral votes
Former Congressman Richard Bland (D-MO)/Delegate William Jennings Bryan (D-NE) 173 electoral votes
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« Reply #127 on: May 11, 2012, 07:41:10 pm »
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Coming into office, Roosevelt's cabinet was a combination of allies and rivals. With friends Thomas B. Reed and Henry Cabot Lodge taking Secretary of State and War respectively, 1896 rival William McKinley headed the Justice Department and William B. Allison became Agriculture Secretary.

His term would be recognized as one that acted as a pivot for American history. America would no longer be staunchly isolationist and confined to its own continent. Instead, within his first one hundred days, Roosevelt ordered a build-up of the Navy under friend and fellow expansionist, Navy Secretary William Howard Taft. As well, following the Spanish-American War in late 1897 and the resulting massive gains of American territory in both the Pacific and the Carribean, he announced the Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine where-in any European attempts to expand in the Western Hemisphere would be decided by the United States and Latin America especially would fall under U.S. jurisdiction. Of note would be Roosevelt's own performance during the Spanish-American War. Headquarters were temporarily re-located to Cuba so as to be as close to "the action" as possible. Roosevelt himself, never having had the privilege of serving in the military, decided to engage in battle, joining Leonard Wood's Rough Riders on the beaches of Cuba. The photo of the President himself, only in his thirties still, charging up a hill made Roosevelt an American and international legend.

In domestic policy, the Gold Standard was established much to the chagrin of Silverites in both parties. However, Roosevelt also signed off on some of the first anti-trust legislation in the United States, and the first since the Edmunds Presidency. As well, tariffs were raised moderately. Throughout all this, the American economy began picking up again and wheels that had been spinning without traction for a while now found solid earth to kick off on. With the Gold Standard set in stone, Eastern businesses began expansion again leading to greater employment and lower prices.

1900
With the enactment of the Gold Standard, the return to prosperity, and American victory in the Spanish-American and subsequent American expansion, President Roosevelt was a shoo-in for re-election. With the death of Vice President John Sherman in 1900, it was clear that a VP had to be nominated. While some were thinking to nominate Leslie M. Shaw of Iowa as a reliable Progressive, the third most popular man in the nation, Leonard Wood, was instead nominated. Head of the volunteer "Rough Riders" in Cuba and formerly Roosevelt's personal doctor, the only two people more popular than him were of course President Roosevelt and Admiral Dewey.

The Democrats found themselves nominating Congressman (since 1899), delegate, and 1900 Vice Presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska out of sheer desperation and lack of an actual front-runner. While Bryan worked hard, it was obvious there was little chance of him winning. In the end, Roosevelt won a resounding landslide.

President Theodore Roosevelt (R-NY)/Colonel Leonard Wood (R-NH) 290 electoral votes
Congressman William Jennings Bryan (D-NE)/Former Attorney General Grover Cleveland (D-NY) 157 electoral votes

Riding high following his land-slide re-election, Roosevelt decided to embark on a world-wide tour with the newly refurbished Navy. Bringing the entire Roosevelt immediate family as well as some of the extended family including his distant relative Franklin Roosevelt who at that point was a student at Harvard and who looked up to the vigorous and aggressive leadership style of his fifth cousin. While in Germany meeting with the government there, a member of the crowd, angered at Roosevelt for his foreign policy--which the Germans had been against--shot the nation's 24th President twice. Roosevelt, a strong man, survived the immediate shooting and in fact lept over the balcony to pursue his shooter. Catching the man, Roosevelt beat him severely a few times before collapsing, dead, on August 3rd, 1901. This left Vice President Leonard Wood in charge of a country in mourning.


President Leonard Wood however found himself unprepared for the Presidency. While he was courageous on the battlefield, in the U.S. Senate he found himself lost. Instead, the Republican controlled House and Senate were practically in charge and Secretary of State Thoms B. Reed was the nation's strongest executive. During Wood's Presidency, a small number of anti-trust laws were passed and tariffs were hiked to their pre-Bayard levels. For the most part though, the Wood administration was laissez-faire.

1904
In the minds of many Democrats, the liberals and populists had shown their weakness and inability to win and thus the power at the convention returned to the hands of the Bourbon Democrats in the form of Judge Alton Brooks Parker of New York. The Republican National Convention on the other hand was a chaotic affair. However, following the fifth ballot, President Leonard Wood announced he would step down. As well, he proclaimed he intended to re-enter military affairs where he felt more at home. Instead, Senator Josaph B. Foraker, a Conservative, won the nomination on the seventh ballot with Progressive Governor Leslie M. Shaw of Iowa as his main rival.

Justice Alton B. Parker (D-NY)/Senator Murphy J. Foster (D-LA) 263 electoral votes
Senator Joseph B. Foraker (R-OH)/Governor Robert M. La Follette (R-WI) 213 electoral votes
« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 11:33:41 am by Cathcon for Student Council 2012 »Logged

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« Reply #128 on: May 12, 2012, 04:17:40 pm »
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The Parker administration proved to be uneventful. Parker stood his ground against a liberal congress attempting to pass various forms of Progressive legislation including conservation and anti-trust acts. Despite continued prosperity that had started in 1898, the uneventful presidency left the country wanting more from a President.

1908
In order to give the country a safe nominee, former Secretary of the Navy William Howard Taft was nominated by the Republicans. One of the most active members of the Wood Administration during the Wood's rather low key term, Taft was known as a great legal mind of the Progressive movement. For Vice President, Governor Curtis Guild Jr. of Massachusetts was nominated to help hold down New England and the East.

Former Secretary of the Navy William Howard Taft (R-OH)/Governor Curtis Guild Jr. (R-MA) 343 electoral votes
President Alton B. Parker (D-NY)/Vice President Murphy J. Foster (D-LA) 140 electoral votes

During his time as President, Taft was dubbed "The Great Trust Buster". During his first term alone, over 90 large trusts were broken. As well, the first conservationist President was inaugurated as a large amount of acres out West were set aside to create national parks. However, Taft did run into trouble with some more adamant Progressives who wanted an even larger amount of land set up. As well, Taft lowered tariffs a moderate amount as part of a compromise with the Democrats. Among Taft's cabinet were Secretary of War, former President Leonard Wood, Secretary of State Philander C. Knox, and Secretary of the Treasury Elihu Root.

Of note was the beginning of the career of Franklin Roosevelt. An admirer of his cousin's administration, Roosevelt himself intended to follow in his footsteps. While not the physical equal of his uncle who had worked his entire life to turn himself from an asthmatic young boy to a powerful man, Franklin intended to be his political equal. Working with a New York Wall Street firm, Franklin began working to make connections. He attended the 1908 Republican Convention as a delegate and was elected State Senator from the 26th District. By 1912, Roosevelt was working under fellow New Yorker, Secretary of State Elihu Root.

1912
President Taft was re-nominated resoundingly at the convention despite grumblings from the party's conservative wing and complaints from the most ardent progressives. America was experiencing prosperity and the first Progressive reform in decades. For Vice President, Albert B. Cummings of Iowa was nominated. As for the opposition party, Senator John W. Kern of Indiana was nominated with incredibly little fanfair. Governor Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey, the Vice Presidential nominee, was the real star. His speech attempted to directly challenge Taft on Progressivism, instead bringing up what he called "the Triple Wall of Privilege" of tariffs, trusts, and banks.

President William Howard Taft (R-OH)/Governor Albert B. Cummings (R-IA) 370 electoral votes
Senator John W. Kern (D-IN)/Governor Woodrow Wilson (D-NJ) 161 electoral votes

Taft's second term would be marked by turmoil overseas. Being a protege of the inimitable Theodore Roosevelt and himself an expansionist, Taft called for intervention in Europe to help halt the Central Powers. However, domestic troubles would take precedent as he ran into troubles with Congress. The Progressives, led by Robert La Follette of Wisconsin, finally turned on Taft. Done with his talk of restraint and adherence to Constitutional and legal limits on government, a Progressive Bloc made up of both Republicans and Democrats worked to block any and all legislation supported by Taft. This all played a large part in the lead up to the 1916 election.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2012, 11:43:06 am by Cathcon for Student Council 2012 »Logged

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« Reply #129 on: May 12, 2012, 09:21:07 pm »
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Excellent update Smiley Sad to see the Parker presidency go down though.
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« Reply #130 on: May 12, 2012, 10:20:26 pm »
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Excellent update Smiley Sad to see the Parker presidency go down though.

Thanks. Don't worry though, the Dems will be back within the next coupl'a elections (get prepared for Republican dominance for a while though).
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« Reply #131 on: May 12, 2012, 10:58:40 pm »
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1916
With "Fighting Bob" La Follette the best known contender for the Republican nomination, the rest of the party found itself reacting in response to him. Taft found himself pushing the moderate Senator Charles W. Fairbanks of Indiana while the Eastern Conservatives from the banking and business sectors pushed Senator John W. Weeks of Massachusetts. La Follette swept a number of Western primaries where he was supported by his fellow Progressives. However, at the convention, Weeks and Fairbanks had the advantage. After rounds and rounds of balloting, Weeks was finally nominated, but only with his promise to include Secretary of State Philander C. Knox as Vice President.

Green-La Follette
Blue-Weeks
Red-Fairbanks
Yellow-Ford

Meanwhile on the Democratic side, a similar large fight was shaping up. Congressman and 1900 nominee William Jennings Bryan, who had continued to be active in the party and was seen as the greatest champion of the Western and Mid-Western farmers in the party, found himself in a battle with Governor Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey and former Vice President Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana. Foster represented the South and the Bourbons, Wilson represented the intellectual Progressives and the internationalists who supported entry into the war in Europe, and Bryan represented the old isolationists Populists who had long been pushed out of power in the party. Wilson's star had risen, however, and he was able to win the nomination. Supporting what he called a global "New Freedom", both Bourbon and Populist isolationists found themselves appalled. For Vice President, Former Cleveland Mayor Newton D. Baker was nominated with a rousing and emotional speech that focused on the need for peace and Democracy to spread across the globe.

Blue-Wilson
Green-Bryan
Red-Foster
Yellow-Favorite Sons

However, the nominations did not end there. Frustrated with the party establishments, La Follette met Bryan shortly after the Democratic National Convention and the two agreed to run on a third "People's Party" ticket extolling isolationism and trust-busting, championing the farmer and the laborer, and in opposition to the two major party nominees. La Follette would head the ticket and Bryan would be nominated for Vice President.

With a three-way race underway, America was due for one of its most exciting elections in decades. Weeks defended business and promised a continued national prosperity. Wilson, meanwhile, was able to eloquently make the case for American internationalism to what was a very isolationist nation. the People's Party nominees meanwhile took the West out of contention of the other two parties, complicating matters.

Senator John W. Weeks (R-MA)/Secretary of State Philander C. Knox (R-PA) 273 electoral votes, 38% of the popular vote
Governor Woodrow Wilson (D-NJ)/Former Mayor Newton D. Baker (D-OH) 180 electoral votes, 39% of the popular vote
Senator Robert La Follette (P-WI)/Congressman William Jennings Bryan (P-NE) 78 electoral votes, 18% of the popular vote
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« Reply #132 on: May 13, 2012, 12:28:44 pm »
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Entering the White House, is was known that Weeks had lost the popular vote. Nevertheless, Weeks was a capable and honest administrator and intended to serve as a faithful executive. He appointed Henry Cabot Lodge, his Senate colleague, Secretary of State. Filling the Secretary of War position Wood had left, former Governor of Cuba Charles Magoon was appointed. To head the nation's financial system, the conservative Andrew W. Mellon was appointed. As well, former Assistant Secretary of State (1912-1913) Franklin Roosevelt was appointed Ambassador to Great Britain.

The main issue of 1916 and 1917 was the war in Europe raging between the Allies and the Central Powers. Weeks had no intention of entering into European affairs until it began affecting American markets. With America's trading partner, Britain, under attack, a wall of protective tariffs was put in place. Meanwhile, Weeks agreed to sign the Lend-Lease Act, which let Britain, France, Russia, and their allies borrow weaponry, guns, and war-ships. As well, privateers were soon contracted to make sure the shipments were safe and protected from German sub-marine warfare. However, their efforts did not succeed as in early 1918, a large shipment of not only weaponry, but civilian passengers was sunk. As well, news that Germany had attempted to lure Mexico into the war was brought forward. Following a new wave of unrestricted sub-marine warfare, a Declaration of War was signed on June 5th, 1918. By Fall, Americans had liberated the German-held Paris and with the help of the reconstructed French Army, had driven back the German advance by Winter. With that American push, the balance tipped in favor of the Allied Forces and by Spring, 1919, a peace agreement had been made.

While domestic policy had been pushed to the backburner by mid-1918, before that, Weeks had managed to push through Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon's economic plans which included the lowering of business taxes and the raising of income taxes. As well, Weeks continued Taft's moderate conservationist streak with the creation of "National Forests" in New England. While the economy had suffered in 1918, by the time the war was over, the economy had reached its high point, a point that would be sustained past the 1920 election. With American production in full force and normal tariffs restored by summer of 1919, "Boom Time" had come.

1920
The 1920 Democratic National Convention seemed like a rematch between two old foes. On one side was William Jennings Bryan who was calling for a renunciation of "American Imperialism" and a return to Progressive and pro-farm economic policies. On the other end was 1916 nominee Woodrow Wilson who saw the recent war as a chance for America to join the international community and form a "League of Nations". Wilson, however, chose to run a surrogate in his place, 1916 Vice Presidential nominee Newton D. Baker. Coming up the middle was a newer face, Massachusetts Senator John F. Fitzgerald, one of the first Catholics to run for President. He called for a lowering of tariffs in the wake of the end of the war, a "Return to Normalcy" in foreign policy, and a lowering of income taxes. The Democrats, in a fit over who to nominate, eventually chose Oklahoma favorite son Senator Robert Latham Owen. For Vice President, Governor Alfred E. Smith of New York was nominated as a compromise with Fitzgerald.

The Republican National Convention, four years ago plagued with conflict, was instead a standing ovation to President Weeks' success. Where-as four years ago President Taft had been a center of controversy, the former President--now Chief Justice of the Supreme Court--was looked upon as a successful party elder. As well, former President Leonard Wood who had redeemed himself through his commanding of American forces in France in what was now dubbed "The Great War", was himself in a place of honor and seen as, like Taft, a respected party elder. The Vice Presidential nomination went to Senator Howard Sutherland of West Virginia.

President John W. Weeks (R-MA)/Senator Howard Sutherland (R-WV) 373 electoral votes, 54.6% of the popular vote
Senator Robert Owen (D-OK)/Governor Alfred E. Smith (D-NY) 158 electoral votes, 42.5% of the popular vote
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« Reply #133 on: May 13, 2012, 07:46:07 pm »
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The momentum that came with Weeks' land-slide re-election soon dissipated with the so-called Panic of 1922. The prosperity of the last twenty-four years finally had its backlash with the incredible up-swing in 1919. The massive surge in speculation and over-extension of businesses that resulted from the war and resulting "super-prosperity" had back-fired and come back on the Weeks Administration. With that, America turned inward, trying to solve its own problems. Weeks, though conservative, was also pragmatic. Acting quickly, Weeks authorized a new string of public works projects not seen since the days of the Trans-Continental Railroad. At the same time, Weeks' experience and connections with banking and industry allowed him to have a certain amount of leeway in convincing the banks to step in and finance a recovery. Meanwhile, companies agreed to continue hiring--funded mainly by government subsidies--thus making the recovery a ball that kept rolling. In theory. For the most part, it actually worked. However, the economy was far from well. While a disaster had been averted and Weeks had been given great credit for it, unemployment was still at 11% and a number of companies and banks had closed down. Weeks had been smart and lucky in the face of crisis, but that combination did little to save the Republican party in the 1922 and 1924 elections.

In terms of cabinet re-adjustments, Andrew Mellon was dismissed in late 1922 and replaced by mining engineer, businessman, humanitarian, head of Food Relief in Europe during the Great War, and "financial genius" Herbert Hoover. Hoover's actions in collaboration with Weeks in the face of the crisis earned him renown. Secretary of State Henry Cabot Lodge also left the cabinet, by his own accord, in 1922 and was replaced by Ambassador to Britain Franklin D. Roosevelt.

1924
Following the Panic of 1922, Republicans' chances seemed ruined for the election. Competing for the nomination, nonetheless, were former Illinois Governor Frank O. Lowden, Vice President Howard Sutherland, and Secretary of State Franklin D. Roosevelt. However, the nomination was won by none other than Senator Robert La Follette of Wisconsin. Despite his temporary bolting from the party eight years earleir, La Follette now seemed like the only statesman left to save the party. Meanwhile, Senator John F. Fitzgerald of Massachusetts was nominated over rivals such as Senator Carter Glass of Virginia and Governor Charles W. Bryan of Nebraska. To act as a geographical counter-balance, Senator John W. Davis of West Virginia was chosen.

Senator John F. Fitzgerald (D-MA)/Senator John W. Davis (D-WV) 420 electoral votes, 56.3% of the popular vote
Senator Robert M. La Follette (R-WI)/Governor Frederick W. Steiwer (R-OR) 111 electoral votes, 42.2% of the popular vote
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« Reply #134 on: May 18, 2012, 04:30:37 pm »
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The Fitzgerald Presidency proved to be an important and effective one. Not only of course had a Catholic been elected President and a Democrat won in the midst of Republican unpopularity, but also for the first time in many many years, national momentum was swinging back towards the Democrats. With a competitiveness in New England not seen since the Bayard Presidency and Democratic gains in the Mid-West and West, it seemed a new era in politics was about to be embarked on.

In assembling his cabinet, Fitzgerald found himself appointing close personal friends to more low key positions that were closer to the President. Meanwhile, large appointments went to more universally acceptable nominees. For Secretary of State for example, popular former rival, former Congressman William Jennings Bryan was appointed. (Fitzgerald and Bryan generally agreed on the issue of American involvement internationally) As well, the popular Herbert Hoover was made Secretary of the Treasury and Alabama Senator Oscar W. Underwood was appointed Attorney General. Meanwhile, his own son-in-law, Joseph P. Kennedy would be appointed Secretary of Commerce and ally Alfred E. Smith became the Secretary of Labor. As well, a new West Wing "Council on Economic Recovery" was set up containing a number of Fitzgerald allies from Boston as well as being co-chaired by Smith and Kennedy.

In policy, Fitzgerald governed rather moderately. While setting up a new regulatory agency in order to keep better track of the goings-on of Wall Street and forming what was called the "Social Safety Net", he also cut both tariffs and income taxes, the two taxes that had been highest during the Weeks Presidency. With the Wall Street turmoil of the early 1920's having subsided and the momentum of the Fitzgerald Presidency providing a new stroke of public confidence, the economy found itself kicking back into gear. "While we definitely won't be calling this 'The Roaring Twenties'", commented Commerce Secretary Kennedy, "In 1928 people are definitely going to be looking back and saying they're better off now than they were four years ago."
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« Reply #135 on: May 18, 2012, 06:45:07 pm »
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1928
Despite his popularity, President Fitzgerald nonetheless found himself facing opposition for the Democratic nomination in the former of Governor Huey P. Long of Louisiana. A populist liberal who had been elected four years previous in 1924, Long called for what he referred to as "A New Deal" for the American people. As opposed to the President's moderate course on the economy, Long called for the nationalization of the banking firms that in his mind had cause America's economic troubles to begin with. As well, he advocated a 100% income tax on all those making over $200,000 a year. With a number of people still struggling despite the obvious re-mobilization of the economy, Long began to pick up support, especially in the rural West.

Red-Fitzgerald
Green-Long

At the convention, Fitzgerald was re-nominated almost unanimously. In order to hold down any attempts by Long to win the support of Western and Southern delegates, Speaker of the House John Nance Garner of Texas was nominated for Vice President.

Meanwhile, the Republicans couldn't seem to decide on a nominee. The nomination came down to an incredibly weak field, considering the position of power the party had held only eight years ago. Among this field were former Governor Frank Lowden of Illinois, Senator William E. Borah of Idaho, Senator Joseph B. France of Maryland, former Governor Calvin Coolidge of Massachusetts, and Senator Frederick Hale of Maine. Among the potential major candidates who declined running were former Secretary of State and Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York, former Vice President Howard Sutherland of West Virginia, and Senate Minority Leader Charles Curtis of Kansas. Hale eventually took the nomination on the fourth ballot when Lowden and Coolidge both dropped out to endorse him. The Vice Presidential nomination was much less contested. While some called on agricultural advocate, newspaper editor, and Borah supporter Henry A. Wallace (son of Weeks' Agriculture Secretary Henry C. Wallace, 1919-1924) to run for Vice President, he declined and instead supported the nomination of Curtis.

In the general election, "Fitz" faced an easy re-election in the face of the uninspiring and unenthusiastic Republican ticket. While Hale kept a healthy schedule on the campaign trail, he drew few crowds and even fewer supporters as he attempted to spell out just what exactly the Republicans stood for. With confusion as to which wing of the party he represented, the Progressives under Borah, or the Conservatives under Arthur Vandenberg, people came to his speeches with questions and left with even more. With the ticket still trying to decide whether they wished for more government intervention, less, or a modified version of what existed, it is no wonder that they lost in a land-slide to a popular incumbent in the wake of an economic recovery.

President John F. Fitzgerald (D-MA)/Speaker John Nance Garner (D-TX) 480 electoral votes, 58.2% of the popular vote
Senator Frederick Hale (R-ME)/Senator Charles Curtis (R-KS) 51 electoral votes, 39.4% of the popular vote
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« Reply #136 on: May 18, 2012, 08:55:04 pm »
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The second term of President Fitzgerald would be marked by complete economic recovery as well as a new focus on foreign affairs. With the death of Secretary of State Bryan in 1926, Fitzgerald had appointed Henry Ford, the famous automobile manufacturer and fellow isolationist, to the spot. During that time, Ford had aided in the expansion of American industry overseas, entering into trade agreements with a number of nations. However, come 1929, Ford had decided to retire. To fill the appointment, Fitzgerald was left with a wide array of options. After considering many options, Fitzgerald decided to choose someone he could trust, Senator David I. Walsh of Massachusetts, to take the position. A fellow isolationist, it was believed by Fitz's foreign policy team that America should expand only through trade and not through arms, and that America should concentrate on solving its own problems before solving those of the world. During Fitz's second term, the United States oversaw the international ratification of Non-Aggression Pact, swearing a number of nations to not only not attack one another, but as well to limit their arms. With Fitzgerald looking for a balanced budget at home, he saw the pact as a good opportunity.

1932
For the Democrats, eight years of national recovery and international peace had already passed and it was believed by many that the Democrats now had the opportunity to begin their own period of dominance, akin to the 16 years the GOP had experienced, 1909-1925 and the 24 years they'd experienced 1861-1885. Therefore, when Vice President Garner, representative of the last eight years of national progress, decided to campaign for the Presidency, the party welcomed him with open arms, pairing him with Governor William Comstock of Michigan.

Three candidates dominated the 1932 Republican National Convention. Finally once again ready to run, now-Senator Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York found his path to the nomination blocked by the Progressive William E. Borah and the Conservative Arthur H. Vandenberg. Roosevelt himself was a moderate on domestic policy, supporting Progressive measures such as anti-trust laws and public works projects, but also possessing a "Hamiltonian" like view on economics. With both Conservatives and Progressives fired up to win the nomination following the "moderate failure" Frederick Hale, Roosevelt's stance as the senior statesman in the room didn't helpl him. Instead, they fought tooth and nail for the nominaiton. Eventually, with fatigue from Progressive Republican policies and them controlling the party, Vandenberg was nominated, choosing Congressman Joseph W. Martin of Massachusetts for Vice President.
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« Reply #137 on: May 26, 2012, 12:51:51 pm »
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Vice President John Nance Garner (D-TX)/Governor William Comstock (D-MI) 355 electoral votes, 53.4% of the popular vote
Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg (R-MI)/Congressman Joseph W. Martin (R-MA) 176 electoral votes, 45.8% of the popular vote
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« Reply #138 on: June 09, 2012, 08:35:58 pm »
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While the economy continued along the path of prosperity, the public soon grew bored of the Garner Presidency. Despite the peace and economic well being, the people wanted more of a leader than someone just to preside over a good time, and that's what they went looking for in the 1936 election.

1936
Coming into the 1936 election, the Republicans seemed to have one obvious choice left: Senator Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York. A leader in the party since 1924 and a loyal agent of it since 1910, he was also the natural heir to his late cousin's political dynasty. Like Teddy, he was an enemy of both the Progressive and Conservative wings. However, his enthusiastic campaign in the preceding primaries, his savviness with the party leadership, and his sheer personal magnetism when speaking at the convention, led him to be nominated on the first ballot with massive applause, beating Progressive Henry Wallace and Conservative Robert Taft. However, Roosevelt was forced to make a concession in the nomination the progressive Iowa Governor for Vice President. In the general election campaign, Roosevelt successfully made the case that not only was it time that America re-invested in itself through building of new roads and schools, but also that it was time to make America once again a known presence across the globe.

Senator Franklin D. Roosevelt (R-NY)/Governor Henry A. Wallace (R-IA) 328 electoral votes, 54.8% of the popular vote
President John Nance Garner (D-TX)/Vice President William Comstock (D-MI) 203 electoral votes, 44.3% of the popular vote


The inauguration of the second President Roosevelt--on the twentieth anniversary of the first President Roosevelt--was the most energetic since John Fitzgerald's twelve years before. With members of his 1936 campaign lining the streets and filling up the national mall, he read his inaugural address to an adoring and accepting crowd. "It is time for the government to make a New Deal to the American people. A New Deal to ensure the national health, the national education, and the national prestige. While the world swarms around us, America has receded into itself. We have in us the opportunity to become like a shining city upon a hill, one filled with trade, commerce, and prosperity, or we can choose to look backwards and become a backwards nation. I'd like to say that last November, America made the first choice!"

During his first 100 days, President Roosevelt had scheduled a trip to Europe. Much like his cousin's, 35 years later, this one was to help America re-enter the international stage. After all, during the first Roosevelt Presidency, international diplomacy had helped make America's first entrance, and then to ensure the rapid and massive expansion of American business and commerce across the globe. As well, the public relations work that it did for FDR, mainly having the American people think he was "setting the standard for American Democracy in a land of monarchies" did wonders for the already popular President.

In Europe, which Roosevelt saw much of the sunny side of, something darker was brewing. The economic collapse that hit the world in the early 1920's hadn't fully recovered in many places such as Eastern Europe and Russia. Nationalist controlled Germany and Communist controlled Russia both held an inherent distrust in London finance and viewed the Western banking establishment as a mutual enemy of their two countries. Seeing the former Allied Powers as mutual enemies, a non-aggression pact was signed in 1935 ensuring that they would not attack each other. Meanwhile, England and France were in the works of signing a treaty that agreed that if Germany decided to again flex its imperialistic (and now supposedly greatly weakened) muscles again, they would react in kind. Meanwhile, President Roosevelt's trip had worked hard to help renew the earlier trade that had gone on between England and the United States, tying them closer together. In 1938, when Germany invaded France, international Hell broke loose. With Britain and France on one side and the "Commu-Nazis" on the other, Europe was torn in half once more.

President Roosevelt and his internationalist allies in Congress were able to successfully pass a second Lend-Lease Act. This was only the first of various measures Roosevelt was intent on passing in order to unofficially oppose what were now called the Axis Powers. On a trip to China with Ambassador Herbert Hoover, a deal to sell a large amount of newly minted American weaponry was forged in order to strengthen the weak nation against both Russian and Japanese aggression. As well, the President chose to retain, not set free, the Philippines and bolster their defenses as well.
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« Reply #139 on: June 09, 2012, 08:43:07 pm »

Shades, damn you!

Good to see my old Congressman on a national ticket. Smiley
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« Reply #140 on: July 17, 2012, 01:02:42 pm »
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On June 7th, 1939, the President was rushed out of bed to hear the awful news: American military installations in Alaska had been decimated by a Soviet air attack. With three hundred soldiers dead, a deliberate act of war had been perpetrated by the Soviet Union. Arriving in Congress later that day after having been briefed on the position of the U.S. military, President Roosevelt gave a stirring speech that was broadcast nationwide, lamenting the death of the troops and calling upon Congress for a declaration of war, which it gladly granted.

1940
With the war going smoothly on election day, the American people saw no reason to deny Roosevelt his second term. However, at the Republican National Convention, per the President's wishes, Vice President Wallace was dumped for the much more agreeable Governor Alfred Landon of Kansas. The Democrats in turn nominated former Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts and former Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt (R-NY)/Governor Alfred Landon (R-KS) 363 electoral votes, 58.3% of the popular vote
Governor Joseph P. Kennedy (D-MA)/former Senator Burton K. Wheeler (D-MT) 168 electoral votes, 40.6% of the popular vote
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« Reply #141 on: July 22, 2012, 10:17:00 am »
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Roosevelt's second term saw the conclusion of what would be termed as "The Second Great War". Commu-nazi expansion had been halted, and bombing runs by the Allies had destroyed German industry and Russian agriculture, leaving the citizens of the two countries crying out for an end to the war. meanwhile, Russia had also found itself in a newly made war with Japan over imperialist ambitions in China. Finding itself fighting a new front, Russia was the first to cripple and the official surrender was made in November, 1942. With its ally now out of the war, Germany soon capitulated. With the peace agreement finalized in February of 1943, it was one of the greatest international triumphs the globe had seen in decades. Roosevelt was now firmly fixed as an American hero in the eyes of many citizens. It was assured that he'd be running for a third term. Then tragedy struck.

While on vacation on Campobello Island in Canada in August, 1943, on a two week span before a scheduled visit with the Canadian Prime Minister, the President contracted Polio, paralyzing him from the waste down. While he could still function well mentally, and physically above the waste, he would not feel the freedom of movement again. Immediately carted home to the White House, he was attended to by White House doctors, but to no avail. The rest of his presidency would be concentrated on therapy as he was resigned mostly to signing bills that came his way. After months of strange silence from the White House, on January 12th, 1944, President Roosevelt went to the same radio mic he had spent many nights on, consoling America about the war, and told the nation what had happened. He finished up with a very sincere acknowledgement of the doctors he'd worked with over the past months, his family, and to the American people who'd been patient with him. As he ended the speech, he made clear he would not be seeking a third term for the Presidency.

1944
"Dammit! Roosevelt is more dangerous to us like this than he ever was as a candidate!", raged former Governor Joseph Kennedy, a contender for the Democratic nomination. At the Democratic National Convention, Kennedy wasn't the only one who'd set his sights on the Presidency. Richard B. Russell, the esteemed Senator from Georgia, was the main contender. A supporter of the war effort, he now stood as one of the few men in his party who "got it right". As well, a proven conservative, he had the support of "Cactus Jack", the old former President and the only one who had offered his endorsement that season. After the failure of his son-in-law four years earlier, President Fitzgerald was refusing to step in for him this time. However, old Joe was not done yet. His years as Fitzgerald's protege had helped him to learn a few things about the inside of the political process. He was able to goad both his former running mate, the progressive Burton K. Wheeler, and his Massachusetts ally David I. Walsh into putting their names into contention. With the field becoming more and more crowded, especially with the introduction of names like General MacArthur, it was obvious a compromise candidate was needed. With Wheeler dropping out to support his former running-mate (in exchange for a guaranteed appointment to Secretary of State), Walsh throwing in the towel (he would be getting Secretary of the Treasury, hypothetically), and Russell having long lost strength, Kennedy, a tried and tested nominee already, and the heir to the Democrats' last truly successful President, was nominated. In his acceptance speech, he lambasted the Republican's "patty cake playing" with Russian communism, "They think that one surrender makes them our best friends." No mention of course, was made of Roosevelt, a nationally loved figure. The Vice Presidential nomination was made with regional balance in mind. Senator Harry S. Truman, a moderate from the moderate state of Missouri, was chosen.

The RNC on the other hand was a coronation for Vice President Landon. With the President pulling the strings to make sure no one challenged him, a unanimous first ballot nomination of Landon was the greatest gift they could give him. For Vice President, popular Governor Thomas Dewey of New York was nominated.

The general election marked one of the last "old time" elections, where campaigns would be done primarily by train. With Kennedy failing miserably in the Reader's Digest poll, the former Governor embarked on a whistle stop tour throughout the mid-west and the West. Never mind his status as an easterner, his fiery rhetoric against communism was able to whip up a crowd easily. As well, Truman was able to do the same, discussing economic issues including the lagging economy that had come into effect since the end of the war. While it was unclear whether the Democrats were running as conservatives or liberals, it worked. Meanwhile, both Landon and Dewey were awful campaigners. Landon's only comments of note on the campaign trail were vary vague platitudes combined with references to President Roosevelt. While another pair might have easily won the election, those two through it away.

Former Governor Joseph P. Kennedy (D-MA)/Senator Harry S. Truman (D-MO) 291 electoral votes, 49.2% of the popular vote
Vice President Alfred Landon (R-KS)/Governor Thomas Dewey (R-NY) 240 electoral votes, 47.7% of the popular vote
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« Reply #142 on: July 23, 2012, 09:47:57 am »
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In terms of domestic policy, Kennedy's presidency was uneventful. Some deregulation took place, and some farm programs were made in order to appease the South and West of the party, but other than that, it seemed foreign policy would be the main focus of the next four years. In the Soviet Union, where the Allied Forces were preparing to lend large amounts of money for re-building, President Kennedy took the stand at the Allied headquarters and announced that there would be no American money for reconstruction unless the old Communist party was abolished and reparations and repayment plans were set in place. He soon gained the support of a number of smaller members of the Allies, including the newly inducted member, China, which had been most directly affected by Russian aggression, as well as Eastern European countries. Eventually, with the help of new Secretary of State John Dulles, other countries were convinced to sign off on the "Kennedy Plan", and it came to a vote at the Allied Headquarters and passed. However, it was required to be ratified by the United States Senate and that was where Kennedy met difficulty.

Henry Wallace, formerly Vice President of the United States and now in the Senate, began to filibuster the plan, claiming that Soviet policy should not be based on "the radical anti-socialist ideology of the White House". Wallace gained the support of a small caucus of internationalist and liberal colleagues and proceeded to continue his filibuster. Eventually, Wallace fainted and his small caucus dispersed. Following that, the plan was free to pass. However, Wallace remained a thorn in the President's side. Kennedy, sick of Wallace's attempts to block legislation, ordered Attorney General J. Edgar Hoover to begin investigating Wallace. On a hot summer night in 1947, an agent of the Justice Department was caught breaking into Senator Wallace's office. The subsequent investigation revealed a paper trail leading up to Hoover's office, and possibly even to the President.

1948
Despite him being charged by the media with thing like "running a secret government from within the White House" and being referred to as "an Imperial President", President Kennedy was re-nominated at the Democratic National Convention, beating back two liberal challengers. Vice President Harry Truman as well stayed on the ticket.

The Republicans faced an incredibly split convention. The liberal Henry Wallace was attempting to win the nomination and had been hoping that news of the break in and the President's corruption would help him. However, he was seen as far too radical to ever be the nominee. Instead, the front-runner was Thomas Dewey, the 1944 Vice Presidential nominee and two-term Governor of New York. Competing against him were conservative Robert Taft of Ohio and liberal Harold Stassen of Minnesota. After several ballots and no nominee, a man, who had chosen to watch the convention form the back of the suite, finally answered calls to be wheeled onto the stage. Former President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a national icon and four years retired, agreed to be nominated. Despite his illness, he was still strong mentally and physically, above the waste, and answered the calls of the delegates to be nominated. The Vice Presidential nomination went to Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts. Furious, Wallace chose to split from the party and run his own campaign.

Former President Franklin D. Roosevelt (R-NY)/Senator Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (R-MA) 337 electoral votes, 53% of the popular vote
President Joseph P. Kennedy (D-MA)/Vice President Harry S. Truman (D-MO) 194 electoral votes, 45% of the popular vote
Senator Henry A. Wallace (P-IA)/Senator Glen Taylor (P-ID) 2% of the popular vote
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« Reply #143 on: July 23, 2012, 09:07:55 pm »
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List o' Presidents
22. George F. Edmunds (Republican-Vermont) 1885-1889
23. Thomas F. Bayard (Democrat-Delaware) 1889-1897
24. Theodore Roosevelt (Republican-New York) 1897-1902
25. Leonard Wood (Republican-New Hampshire) 1902-1905

26. Alton Brooks Parker (Democrat-New York) 1905-1909
27. William Howard Taft (Republican-Ohio) 1909-1917
28. John W. Weeks (Republican-Massachusetts) 1917-1925

29. John F. Fitzgerald (Democrat-Massachusetts) 1925-1933
28. John Nance Garner (Democrat-Texas) 1933-1937

29. Franklin D. Roosevelt (Republican-New York) 1937-1945
30. Joseph P. Kennedy (Democrat-Massachusetts) 1945-1949
31. Franklin D. Roosevelt (Republican-New York) 1949-?
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« Reply #144 on: November 23, 2012, 07:49:33 pm »
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1952

Vice President Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (Republican-Massachusetts)/Senator Andrew F. Schoeppel (Republican-Kansas) 295 electoral votes, 49.7% of the popular vote
Senator Estes Kefauver (Democrat-Tennessee)/Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (Democrat-Minnesota) 295 electoral votes, 48.8% of the popular vote

1956

Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (Democrat-Minnesota)/Governor Joseph Russo (Democrat-Massachusetts) 357 electoral votes, 51.2% of the popular vote
President Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. (Republican-Massachusetts)/Vice President Andrew F. Schoeppel (Republican-Kansas) 147 electoral votes, 43.2% of the popular vote
Senator J. Strom Thurmond (States Rights-South Carolina)/Senator John Sparkman (States Rights-Alabama) 27 electoral votes, 4.8% of the popular vote

1960

President Hubert H. Humphrey (Democrat-Minnesota)/Vice President Joseph Russo (Democrat-Massachusetts) 328 electoral votes, 45.8% of the popular vote
Governor Cecil H. Underwood (Republican-West Virginia)/Former Secretary of Transportation Nelson Rockefeller (Republican-New York) 201 electoral votes, 43.3% of the popular vote
Senator Barry M. Goldwater (Conservative Democrat-Arizona)/Senator H. Styles Bridges (Conservative Republican-New Hampshire) 8 electoral votes, 9.7% of the popular vote
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« Reply #145 on: November 25, 2012, 06:59:10 pm »
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1964
The race between Vice President Russo and Governor Nelson Rockefeller proved to be one of the closest and most contentious. On one hand was the Italian Catholic Democrat Russo whose entire political life had been campaigns against men like the well-born WASP Rockefeller. Meanwhile, Rockefeller was dealing with a new coalition of Republicans. In the West, states that had largely voted in favor of Democrats in the past were favoring the Republicans, largely due to Republicans campaigning there against Humphrey's "brash overreach of the federal government". In 1962, Barry Goldwater, who had run a third party campaign in 1960, officially switched over to the Republican Party--the party that had typically been in favor of a strong federal government. With that, Rockefeller was given the challenge of attempting to unite the West with the North-East, the Mid-West, and the growing Republican strength in Appalachia. While in large part he succeeded, Democratic strength in the South and their growing strength in the Farm Belt--due mainly to Humphrey's support for popular farm programs and the nomination of South Dakota Governor George McGovern for Vice President--carried the day for the Democrats.

Vice President Joseph Russo (Democrat-Massachusetts)/Governor George McGovern (Democrat-South Dakota) 304 electoral votes, 49.4% of the popular vote
Governor Nelson Rockefeller (Republican-New York)/Governor Paul Laxalt (Republican-Nevada) 234 electoral votes, 49.0% of the popular vote

1968
Despite his charisma and status as the third Catholic President, Russo's presidency did not fare well. His decision to involve America in the conflict between businessmen and pro-nationalization forces in the Middle East, while at first initially popular, began losing public support due to the failure of American forces to properly keep the peace and protect property in the Middle East. Meanwhile, Humphrey's agriculture policies had inflated food prices, leading to President Russo enacting a new tariff on wheat and corn in order to protect American farmers and their rising prices. With wheat and corn prices nonetheless continuing to rise, causing other foods such as beef and milk to follow suit, many citizens were feeling the pain at the dinner table. With the conflict in the Middle East heating up, President Russo announced in November 1967 that he wouldn't be seeking re-election.

1968
For George McGovern, he faced challenges from the anti-war Senator Eugene McCarthy of Minnesota and the Russo surrogate Congressman Mario Procaccino of New York. However, McGovern was able to eek out a majority at the convention. Meanwhile, the 1968 Republican National Conventions was just as hectic, with John Volpe of Massachusetts being endorsed by Rockefeller, and Goldwater the new icon of the party's growing conservative wing endorsing Paul Laxalt. Meanwhile, a number of smaller candidates including Congressman John Lindsay, Governor Louie B. Nunn, and Senator Edward Brooke all vied for support. Eventually, Laxalt was able to claim a majority and Volpe was selected for Vice President.

Governor Paul Laxalt (Republican-Nevada)/Governor John Volpe (Republican-Massachusetts) 332 electoral votes, 52.6% of the popular vote
Vice President George McGovern (Democrat-South Dakota)/Senator Albert Gore Sr. (Democrat-Tennessee) 206 electoral votes, 46.8% of the popular vote
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« Reply #146 on: December 01, 2012, 06:26:24 pm »
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1972

President Paul Laxalt (R-NV)/Vice President John Volpe (R-MA) 467 electoral votes, 59.2% of the popular vote
Senator Walter Mondale (D-MN)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA) 71 electoral votes, 39.9% of the popular vote
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« Reply #147 on: April 28, 2013, 03:11:27 pm »
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The Arnold Schwarzenegger Story
A Very Hackish Story


2008
After sixteen years of Democratic rule--the last eight plagued by war, economic recession, and natural disasters--the Republicans are soul-searching for a savior. In 2000, Vice President Al Gore was narrowly elected to the Presidency, defeating George W. Bush, the Governor of Texas. The close election left a cautious feeling for the country. However, Gore was given his true mandate with 9/11 and subsequent Democratic gains in 2002. The invasion of Afghanistan and subsequent war however proved a hard battle to win.

Vice President Albert S. Gore, Jr. (D-TN)/Senator Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) 270 electoral votes, 48.4% of the popular vote
Governor George W. Bush (R-TX)/Former Defense Secretary Richard B. Cheney (R-WY) 267 electoral votes, 47.8% of the popular vote
Abstaining: 1 electoral vote, 0% of the popular vote
Activist Ralph Nader (I-DC)/Activist Winona LaDuke (I-CA) 0 electoral votes, 2.7% of the popular vote

Come 2004, things would find themselves returning to their pre-9/11 status quo. The War in Afghanistan was not going well, and rumors of unrestrained "Weapons of Mass Destruction" and outside funding for Al-Qaeda persisted. Meanwhile, Senator John McCain of Arizona narrowly claimed the nomination against Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, Senator Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, Congressman Ron Paul of Texas, and Governor Mike Huckabee of Arkansas. In order to shore up the conservative base, he chose supporter Fred Thompson for Vice President. Despite an enthusiastic Republican campaign, Gore was able to rally the Democratic base with his talks about environmentalism and a newly-passed economic stimulus package.

President Albert S. Gore, Jr. (D-TN)/Vice President Joseph I. Lieberman (D-CT) 291 electoral votes, 50.1% of the popular vote
Senator John S. McCain III (R-AZ)/Senator Fred Thompason (R-TN) 247 electoral votes, 49.3% of the popular vote

However, Gore's second term would prove a disastrous one. The mishandling of Hurricane Katrina, the slow decline of the economy, the collapse of the housing market, and the decline of America's status in the war in Afghanistan all contributed to Gore's unpopularity as the 2008 election approached. As well, his failure to advance many of his key issues including that of battling climate change, contributed to continue disillusionment with the Gore administration by the party's liberals. Thus the stage was set for 2008...
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« Reply #148 on: April 28, 2013, 04:02:55 pm »
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In 2004, in a rather stupid effort to appease the Hispanic community, President Gore had supported a constitutional amendment allowing those not born in America to run for and even hold the office of President. The official amendment was passed in 2006, set to take effect in time for the 2008 election. In that same year--2006--Arnold Schwarzenegger was re-elected as Governor of California by a comfortable margin. With this victory, people began talking about a possible Schwarzenegger candidacy. After all, the last Republican president to be re-elected was himself a former actor and California Governor. Finally, on July 5th, 2007, Governor Schwarzenegger announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination. It would not be easy. The previous election's also-rans Ron Paul, Mike Huckabee, and Lincoln Chafee would be joined by 2004 Vice Presidential nominee Fred Thompson, and Governor Mitt Romney of Massachusetts. However, Schwarzenegger had one advantage: he was pretty awesome.

On the Democratic side, Vice President Lieberman was being challenged by Senator Hillary Clinton who promised a return to the prosperous days of the 1990's, and liberal Senator Barack Obama who spoke about giving the nation a way forward. Obama was able to eek out a narrow win in the Iowa Caucuses. Lieberman was able to catch his breath with a narrow New Hampshire win. However, despite winning Florida, it was Clinton who was able to pick up the anti-Obama vote and on a coalition of the South-West, Mid-West, Appalachia, and the North-East, won a decisive primary victory over Obama. Lieberman dropped out shortly after his failure to gain traction on Super Tuesday. Before the convention, Obama dropped out and endorsed Hillary, in return receiving the Vice Presidential nomination. Lieberman however, was not so happy with the state of the party...

Red - Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York
Green - Senator Barack H. Obama of Illinois
Blue - Vice President Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut

Meanwhile, Arnold Schwarzenegger was fighting his own battles. In Iowa, Mike Huckabee was able to beat out other contenders and become he main alternative to the California Governor for the party's right-wing. Meanwhile, the Romney campaign was collapsing and Chafee failed to gain traction, leaving Schwarzenegger with the center and left of the party, and thanks to his charisma and past as a movie star and several photos with Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, much of the right.

Blue - Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger of California
Red - Former Governor Michael Huckabee of Arkansas
Green - Governor Willard "Mitt" Romney of Massachusetts

In order to appease conservatives and the South, as a shout-out to George H.W. Bush who he'd been in at least one photo with, and as a strategic reminder of both the extremely close election of 2000 and the 1980's, Senator and former Governor Jeb Bush of Florida was chosen for Vice President. Thus, the election was set.
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Citizen Superique
Superique
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« Reply #149 on: April 28, 2013, 04:06:31 pm »
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Im confused =(
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"When people want less of taxes and more of everything else, you've got a problem." Jerry Brown

"Government has become so vast and impersonal that its interests diverge more and more from the interests of ordinary citizens." George McGovern

"Don't pray for easy lives, pray to be stronger man." John F. Kennedy
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