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Author Topic: Contemporary Polish Politics With Prewar Parties Ressurected  (Read 461 times)
Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« on: June 19, 2015, 01:18:25 pm »
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Yes, I'm finally back on this board.

I don't know whether anobody's going to be interested in this, but I wanted to to such a project from a long time.
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Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2015, 01:20:45 pm »
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1: Centrist Parties


Polish People's Party-Piast (Polskie Stronnictwo Ludowe-Piast)

PSL-Piast is a centrist-christian democratic agrarian party, more conservative than "Wyzwolenie" (see the next instalment) and especially strong in the East. PSL was briefly reunited in 1990, when the United People's Party (ZLS), which until 1989 was a confessional party under communist domination, merged with PSL-Wilanowskie (that represented oppositionist roots) and agrarian branch of "Solidarity" trade union. Just a year later, the party divided again, into two waring branches. Through it's predecessors, both Piast and Wyzwolenie can claim to be second oldest Polish parties, after PPS (see the next installment).

Piast is known as the main swing bloc in the Sejm, willing to enter government coalitions with both left and right, depending on circumstances.

Among most prominent Piast members can be named Roman Bartoszce, Józef Ślisz, Gabriel Janowski, Artur Balazs (former oppositionist), Waldemar Pawlak, Aleksander Bentkowski, Zdzisław Podkański, Franciszek Stefaniuk, Józef Zych, Stanisław Żelichowski (formerly ZSL) .



Alliance of Democrats (Stronnictwo Demokratyczne)

Alliance of Democrats is the second centrist swing party in Sejm, although since 1990 it has been more willing to cooperate with the right than the left, despite having a minority centre-left wing.

SD is dating all the way back to 1939, having been a second, along with ZSL, confessional party before 1989. Due to it's privileged status under communism, SD is rightly considered the wealthiest Polish political party.

SD is somewhat of a limited big tent party, ranging from of confirmed centrists, such as Bronisław Geremek, Władysław Frasyniuk, Grażyna Staniszewska, thorough moderate conservatives (Hanna Suchocka, Bronisław Komorowski, Aleksander Hall), neoliberals (Leszek Balcerowicz), to centre-left (Jan Lityński, Marek Edelman), and even former communists (Marcin Święcicki, Aleksander Kwaśniewski). This diversity leads critics to describe SD as an opportunistic party of the system.

Internationally, the party is a member of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe.



Bloc of National Minorities (Blok Mniejszości Narodowych)

BMN is a coalition various ethnic minorities in Poland, primarily Germans, Belorussians, Lithuanians and Ukrainians. Although one of the largest party in the Second Republic (when ethnic minorities constituted 1/3 of total population), it's a minor party now, due to a dramatic decrease of ethnic minorities number after 1945.

The Bloc is not running nationwide, as local minority committees are exempted from reaching 5% of the vote nationally. Instead, Germans are running in Opole, Belorussians and Lithuanians in Podlasie, and Ukrainians in Warmia and Masuria and Pomorze, where many were relocated during the internal deportations under Stalinism. The BNM is too small to form a parliamentary club (as one needs to have at least 15 MPs). As of 1993, their caucus constitutes 7 MPs (three German, two Belarusian, one Lithuanian and one Ukrainian).

Politically, the Bloc is focusing on representing the minorities' interests and usually supports (but never partake) present government, unless it's hostile toward them.

Henryk Kroll (German Minority) and Eugeniusz Czykwin (Belarusian) are the bloc's leading figures.
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Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2015, 01:23:18 pm »
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2: Leftist Parties

Polish Socialist Party (Polska Partia Socialistyczna)

PPS was the first prewar party to be reestablished, which happened already in 1987, while still under the communist rule. In 1990, that underground formation merged with the exile-based PPS and, through this, the modern PPS can be easily considered the oldest Polish political party, dating all the way back to 1893.

A democratic socialist, PPS is the main leftist party in Poland. Due to it's dissident roots, the party primarily constitutes former oppositionists, such as Jan Józef Lipski, Jacek Kuroń, Józef Pinior, Andrzej Celiński, Zbigniew Bujak, Aleksander Małachowski, Ryszard Bugaj, Karol Modzelewski, exiles (Lidia Ciołkosz, Kazimierz Wąsik) or people who were politically dormant under communism (Jan Mulak, Izabela Jaruga-Nowacka). With time, however, PPS accepted some reformed former members of the Communist Party, like Marek Borowski, Józef Oleksy, Tomasz Nałęcz and Wiesława Ziółkowska.

PPS is a member of Socialist International and Party of European Socialists.



Polish People's Party-Liberation (Polskie Stronnictwo Ludowe-Wyzwolenie)

PSL Wyzwolenie is the second major agrarian political party in Poland, unlike Piast trending visibly to the left, and therefore stronger in the West. Wyzwolenie frequently collaborates with PPS and the two were always parts of the same coalition when in power. Aside of appealing to the more progressive rural voters, the party enjoys some popularity among urban intelligentsia.

Among the best known politicians of Wyzwolenie are former Marshal of the Contract Sejm Mikołaj Kozakiewicz, Roman Jagieliński, Andrzej Aumiller, Krzysztof Janik, Mariusz Lipiński and, contemporary, Wojciech Olejniczak.



Polish Left (Polska Lewica)

PL is a direct heir of the Polish United Workers' Party, formed just after the party's dissolution in January 1990. A socialist-social democratic party, it's primarily constituting reformed former communists, that couldn't find a place anywhere else, although there are significant unreconstructed elements. PL was included to this scenario in place of prewar Communist Party of Poland (as it would be difficult for any openly communist party to exist after 1990).

The PL has been especially hostile toward PPS (and vice versa), which consistently refused to cooperate with this post-communist movement.

Among the party's most notable members are Leszek Miller, Izabella Sierakowska, Jerzy Jaskiernia, Włodzimierz Czarzasty, Marek Dyduch, Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz, Adam Gierek.

PL is a member of the Socialist International.



Polish People's Party-Left (Polskie Stronnictwo Ludowe-Lewica)

PSL-Left is a breakaway group from PSL-Piast, formed before the 1993 election by some of the remaining centre-left elements. Despite basically appealing to the same electorate, PSL-Left did not merge with PSL-Wyzwolenie, since they exists basically only in Galicia region (and Wyzwolenie hardly so). Because of their inability to run a national ticket, members of the PSL-Left are running on the PPS list, electing two MPs as of 1993.
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Cranberry
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2015, 09:17:48 am »
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This is very interesting. Consider me intrigued.
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Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 02:19:50 pm »
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This is very interesting. Consider me intrigued.

Since at least you read this, I'll continue Tongue

The right is going to be funny.
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RedPrometheus
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2015, 06:19:38 am »
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Will you update this? I find it quite interesting Smiley
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Political Matrix

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kataak
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2015, 02:28:16 am »
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I really feel like PSL-Wyzwolenie should be more Samoobrona based. Also should have more support in former Kingdom of Poland (post-Vienna) voivodships, not only in western parts of country.
And lack of Stronnictwo Pracy/Narodowa Partia Robotnicza is kinda sad Sad
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Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2015, 12:03:56 pm »
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I really feel like PSL-Wyzwolenie should be more Samoobrona based. Also should have more support in former Kingdom of Poland (post-Vienna) voivodships, not only in western parts of country.
And lack of Stronnictwo Pracy/Narodowa Partia Robotnicza is kinda sad Sad


Historically, it should, but the scenario can't be 100% based on pre-1939 period due to diffrent political and social geography. You've got some point with Samoobrona and given their strenght in the West, I switched Wyzwolenie there.

SP is most widely classified as Christian Democratic, so I planned to wait for the right side to include this.
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kataak
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« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2015, 01:24:50 pm »
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Elections 2005 Tongue
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Senator and SoEA Kalwejt
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« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2015, 05:48:26 pm »
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I'm intending to update this and address comments as soon as possible.
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