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Dallasfan65
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« Reply #250 on: July 20, 2012, 08:54:51 am »

James Garner's in the Senate!?

James "Fergie" Ferguson Garner, a nephew of Cactus Jack. His '82 election to Bentsen's vacated seat was seen as a big win for Republicans.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2012, 08:56:42 am by Dallasfan65 »Logged

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« Reply #251 on: August 05, 2012, 08:15:46 pm »

Not To Rest on Laurels: 1983

Following the defeat of the National Right to Life Act, the Senate continued with relatively pedestrian business, and Thad hastily departed for Areus’ estate. Upon entering, he was greeted by a hired hand that directed him to the lounge. Thad recognized several of the people there, but there were nearly three dozen, all carried off in their individual conversations, tuned to the cadence of wine glasses clanging every few seconds.

“Oy, over here Thad!” someone called out. He turned his head to see Scott Westman in a leather-upholstered chair, with Alice Luce cradled in his lap. He seemed particularly gregarious, and it was dubious as to whether he was intoxicated by lust or by alcohol. Still, Thad broke from his demure and morose demeanor and greeted him with glee. “I gotta say, it was a close call but we did some fine work.” Westman said. Thad nodded in agreement.

After some idle banter with Westman, Thad excused himself to replete his drink, but was accosted by Areus on his way. “As you wished, the nays accounted for a plurality of the vote,” Thad said with a grin. “Yes,” replied a nonchalant Areus, who continued, “There is still the matter of the senate election in your own Maine. I suggest finding somebody with the wherewithal to finance a statewide campaign, and also with some prior experience under his belt.” Thad nodded with a bit of uncertainty, muttering, “I will try to fulfill your expectations.”

Thad returned to the lounge and jubilance among all as the night went on. The next day, though, Thad had his bags packed and was en route to Maine. The gravity of his task began to sink in on his way back, as Thad pondered, “Who has money? Who can win on their own? Who might be amicable to our cause?”

When Thad arrived in Maine, he stepped out of his car and began walking toward the door of the Stevenson Brewery.
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« Reply #252 on: August 09, 2012, 09:52:01 am »

Paying Old Debts: 1983

Gypsy - Fleetwood Mac

Thad O’Connor gazed upon the door with reverence, before twisting the handle and walking through. As he trotted through the hallway, the head of nearly every worker turned. Some gave looks of intrigue, some of awe, but the majority were those of disgust. After several minutes of meandering, he heard a voice call out from behind him, saying, “You sure have a lot of nerve to be coming back here.” As if anticipated, Thad calmly turned around.

The speaker did not share his tranquility, as evidenced by his hastened march and the rolling up of his sleeves. “What the hell are you doing here, you son of a bitch?” he queried, during his march. Thad took a step back and raised his hands, as if to offer a meager repellant. “While those hands look clean to you, I can see the blood of my uncle as clear as the day it was drawn. Give me one good reason not to hospitalize you,” he continued.

The man in question was Ralph Stevenson, a nephew of Hank’s. Following the death of his uncle he had, for all intents and purposes, taken over the bar, despite it being in his aunt’s name. He wore a plaid shirt and stood at six-feet and three inches in height, but was much leaner than his uncle. His hair was black, shiny, and hung just over his eyes.

“You must forgive me, Ralph. The circumstances regarding your uncle’s death are unconscionable, but they are not my doing. Despite our falling out, I still think of him whenever I gaze upon the façade of my own home, for I owe that to him and so much more.” Said Thad. “Bullsh*t. It was your sonofabitch campaign worker that did the dirty work, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you cooked that little scheme up!” shouted Ralph.

“That man was fired the second his machinations came to light. He was a henchman of Davis Griffin’s, which is more to the point of why I came here.” Responded Thad. “Explain,” said Ralph. “Were it not for your uncle’s cocaine addiction, you likely would have a relative in the Senate. Instead, it ruined his career, our friendship, and ultimately took his life. Davis Griffin was his supplier, and used it to keep Hank under his thumb.”

Ralph eyed Thad suspiciously. “So, if what you say is true, why are you here? I don’t see where I fit into this,” he queried. “It is likely that Cohen will declare again, and Griffin will back him as a means of stopping those sympathetic to my aims. There would be no more fitting end, than for the nephew of Hank Stevenson to thwart his plot. What say you?” Thad asked.

“The bar has fallen behind these past few years, due to my uncle’s mismanagement leading up to his death. I can’t neglect this simply for a long-shot campaign that will end in failure,” said Ralph. Thad looked Ralph in the eyes, responding “For the man who gave so much to me, I will do all I can to reciprocate his generosity. Provided you let me sleep somewhere in this building, I will sell my house and devote the proceeds to repairing this brewery, paying off any debt against it, and to contribute to the finance of your campaign,” he said.

Ralph looked at him with a half-hearted grin. “You’re goddamn crazy. I just hope you know what you’re doing here,” he said. Within two weeks, Ralph had filed to run for Senate, and Thad found himself sleeping in the storage room once more.
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« Reply #253 on: August 19, 2012, 01:42:51 am »

TIME – SUMMER DEBATE SHOWS GOP DIVIDED
July 28th, 1983

Republican presidential hopefuls kicked off the first primary debate in Sioux City, IA on July 2nd, 1983. While all felt free to take shots at the President, the candidates were just as apt to do so at each other, and the debate showed that whomever the nominee was would have their work cut out for them in uniting the party.

The recently defeated abortion amendment was the first to divide the participants. Dole, while emphatic in his support of the amendment, let out a Freudian slip in saying, “it is essential our nominee supports this, to retain conservative support.” Laxalt jumped on the remark, accusing Dole of being non-committal and pandering. Mathias, opposed to the amendment, blasted the two but also made a dig at Hatfield, saying, “… though to their credit, they had the gall to cast a vote one way or another.”

Later in the debate, John Paul Hammerschmidt drew blood by reminding the audience that Laxalt had agreed to several tax increases while Governor of Nevada. Laxalt defended his record by pointing out the surplus that followed, but Dole and several others pounced.

Perhaps the largest wedge, however, was the matter of the war in Iran. Dole assured his confidence, stating, “As one who has been overseas, I would not be voting to send our boys unless victory was assured.” The others were visibly reverent of Dole’s service, but Mathias and Hatfield were resolute in their stated opposition to ceasing the conflict.



HEAD-TO-HEAD MATCHUPS

July 16th, 1983

Key:

Safe Republican: >10%

Slight Republican: 4-9%

Tossup: 3% difference

Slight Democratic: 4-9%

Safe Democratic: >10%

Jackson vs Laxalt


3688486

Jackson vs Dole


299108131

Jackson vs Hatfield


36510964

Jackson vs Mathias


319108111



Presidential Approval Ratings

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« Reply #254 on: August 28, 2012, 12:41:24 am »

WHO'S WHO IN WASHINGTON?

Areus Ho'kee
Governor of Nevada: 1971 - 1975
Representative from Nevada's At-Large Congressional District: 1975 - Present


Areus Ho'kee is a name heard rarely by the national media, but one frequently whispered in Las Vegas alleyways and amongst Republican legislators. Areus started out as an affluent businessman in Las Vegas, Nevada whom later inherited further wealth by marrying the daughter of the late Nelson Rockefeller. Despite his lack of seniority, a combination of Republican casualties and smooth inter-personal dealings have allowed him to move up the ranks quickly, and he is considered a frontman for his party.

Nevada Gubernatorial - 1970

Areus Ho'kee (R) - 51.33%
James Santini (D) - 47.45%
Others - 1.22%

Lawrence I. Coventry
Senator from Vermont: 1971 - Present


Lawrence Coventry is the junior Senator from Vermont. Appointed upon the death of Winston Prouty, he surprised many pundits by defeating the popular Governor Thomas Salmon in the 1976 Senate race, to win a full term. Much like with Areus Ho’kee, a large number of Republican casualties elevated him to the position of Minority Whip. In contrast, however, he is said to be a much more solemn, reticent, and austere individual than his gregarious counterpart from Nevada.

Vermont Senatorial – 1976
Vermont Senatorial - 1982


Lawrence I. Coventry (R) – 52.91%
Thomas P. Salmon (D) – 47.09%

Lawrence I. Coventry (R) – 72.20%
Jerome Diamond (D) – 25.80%

James “Fergie” Garner
Senator from Texas: 1983 – Present


The Garner name still carries a bit of weight in Texas. James Garner is a relative of the late Vice President, once known as “Cactus Jack.” James Garner, however, has a less boisterous and more reserved demeanor than his relative. He is best known for his tall physical stature, imposing figure, and his constant adornment of sunglasses. He is a quiet, yet effective freshman and has been firmly opposed to the Administration’s agenda in the Senate, which makes him a target given that he shares a state with the Vice President.

Texas Senatorial – 1982


James “Fergie” Garner (R) - 43.13%
Harold Barefoot Sanders (D) - 37.30%
Edwin A. Walker (AI) - 19.57%

Patton Wyde
Senator from Mississippi: 1979 – Present


This boisterous and rambunctious Senator shows that there is still some fire in the belly of Ole’ Miss. Elected in 1978, he hit the ground running as an opponent of the “elitist Republican administration” and never passed up a chance to stall President Ford’s agenda. He was the keynote speaker at the Democratic National Convention, and has been conspicuous in both national media and on the Senate floor. Never backing down from a fight, he earned the ire of the Democratic Party’s left-wing when he was on the frontlines for the National Right to Life amendment.

Mississippi Senatorial – 1978


Patton Wyde (D) – 61.80%
Charles Evers (R) – 38.20%
« Last Edit: August 28, 2012, 04:17:15 pm by Dallasfan65 »Logged

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« Reply #255 on: August 28, 2012, 04:04:53 pm »
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Cool stuff. Wyde seems like an interesting fellow, as does Garner. Any of these guys real? (I know Ho'kee and Coventry probably aren't)
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« Reply #256 on: August 28, 2012, 04:18:30 pm »

Cool stuff. Wyde seems like an interesting fellow, as does Garner. Any of these guys real? (I know Ho'kee and Coventry probably aren't)

Negatory.
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« Reply #257 on: August 28, 2012, 04:26:20 pm »
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Cool stuff. Wyde seems like an interesting fellow, as does Garner. Any of these guys real? (I know Ho'kee and Coventry probably aren't)

Negatory.

Not even Garner? Cry
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« Reply #258 on: August 28, 2012, 06:22:38 pm »
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Cool stuff. Wyde seems like an interesting fellow, as does Garner. Any of these guys real? (I know Ho'kee and Coventry probably aren't)

Negatory.

Not even Garner? Cry

Jefferson Dent is real.
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« Reply #259 on: September 02, 2012, 12:17:29 am »

TIME – Two Years in Review (Editorial)

President Jackson is no Alexander the Great

It was in March of 1982 that the President announced to a surprised nation that a vengeful, heavy-handed campaign had been sprung on Iran. Americans were by-and-large in favor of excursion, and Republican and Democrat were finally united as American boots treaded Iranian sand. In private circles, many neoconservatives in the State Department were eager to launch the campaign, in hopes that Iran would be a demonstration of “American brass.”

Such hopes were built on pillars of air, however. While the Americans have induced high casualties on the Iranian military, they have proven to be a tenacious and resilient bunch. American casualties exceeded 8,000 in October of 1982, and are speculated to have gone upwards of 11,000, following the battle of Qom, which many speculate will be a pyrrhic victory.

Additionally, the United States’ relationship with other countries has, by and large, grown much more contentious. Attacks on US staffers and engineers happen sporadically, and while the Panamanian government claims no responsibility, there has been much animosity felt between the people of the two countries.

An Economy in the Doldrums

When he assumed the Presidency, unemployment was at 10.6%. Inflation ran rampant, and there was a deficit of trust in the government as far as its capacity to keep the economy in check. President Jackson launched an ambitious program of large infrastructure building, geared primarily toward the military in hopes of making America a more formidable foe to the Soviet Union.

Unemployment is now at 7.8%, yet inflation runs rampant and many laid off workers have rejoined the work force with significantly lower wages than when they had left. With the added bite of inflation, Americans still struggle to make ends meet and the emerging zeitgeist has been a mix of discontent and settling for less. Graphs and superficial statistics may drive investors wild but will do little to assuage the plight of the worker.
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« Reply #260 on: September 04, 2012, 10:24:21 pm »

Uphill: 1983

It had been three weeks since Ralph’s declaration, and the two did not spare a day in an effort to collect signatures and garner early support. However, when they would present signature petitions, Republican figures as low as the town level would often spurn them, showing indifference to Stevenson and outright disgust to O’Connor, with one even quipping, “This isn’t a homeless shelter.” After several days and several ounces of shoe-leather being burnt for naught, they went to Thad’s native Washington County to scrounge as many signatures as they could.

The two had stopped at a local diner in Columbia, Maine. It was a rather shoddy place with an improvised feel to it, the cook having introduced himself as “the cook, the cashier, the waiter, and the proprietor.” Upon receiving their orders, he turned to lather up the grill with butter, only to glance over his shoulder and ask, “Hey, wait a minute. You’re Thad O’Connor, ain’t you?” Thad merely grinned and nodded.

“Why, goddamn, you were a hero in ‘Nam!” At this claim, Thad leaned back in his seat and looked toward the ground, as if in recoil from the pang of guilt and uncertainty. He had never been proud of those days, yet declined to tip his hand. “You are correct. I also reserve the honor of representing you, amongst other Mainers, in the Senate.” The cook had forgotten about the butter-laden grill and was in awe.

He was similarly received throughout the rest of Washington County. Though its sparse population made gathering difficult, they stopped at every pub, diner, tackle shop, and blueberry farm they could, and there was nary a Mainer that did not offer their signature. Some were even as hospitable to let the two travelers sleep on the guest bed, rather than their car. At a meet-and-greet in Jonesboro, one denizen was so forthcoming that she volunteered her services for the campaign.

She stood at five-foot-seven when aloft in her heels, relatively eye level with O’Connor; who had long since ditched his lifted boots. Her thick, tousled, curly hair hung over her head like a headdress, and her hips swayed almost exaggeratedly so. Her pale, smooth skin gleamed in the light like the moon in a starlit sky, and her effervescence had the intensity of an upstream current.

“My gosh, is it really you? Thad O’Connor?!” she exclaimed. “Much obliged,” Thad said as he tipped his fedora. “Well, call me crazy, but I was wondering if I could help with the campaign.” She said as she brandished a clipboard, as if it were a hallmark of her devotion. “I can only speak for myself, but I think you would be an asset to the campaign for the interim,” Thad said in a non-committal tone. Yet inside, he realized he had just found the second building block to revamping the Maine Republican Party.
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« Reply #261 on: September 04, 2012, 10:31:59 pm »
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Of course wimpy O'Connor came back from the war with shame! A real man like Mattingly came back and was just bitter and pissed off!
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« Reply #262 on: September 10, 2012, 11:06:50 pm »

A Hard Day’s Work: 1983

The night continued with no impediment, and the two had accrued several dozen more signatures. “Well, it’s been a nice few days, but we’ve probably gotten enough mileage out of Washington County for now,” said Ralph, feeling tired but also accomplished. “I must thank you for all the help you’ve been out here,” he continued. “It is in keeping with atoning for what happened last year. I am uncharacteristically optimistic about our prospects here; Cohen has the advantage, but if we creep across the backwaters of Maine we may win yet,” he responded.

The female from Jonesboro had decided to join them in their endeavor. Her name was Cynthia Lancaster, and her enthusiasm had persisted throughout the night. The spry, nubile girl seemed more interested in Thad himself, than in the endeavor, yet he politely stuck to the task at hand. He had other, far more professional concerns in mind.

As the night drew on, Cynthia went to bed early and the two casually discussed politics over several drinks. Inevitably, the discussion turned to their new companion, and Thad said, “I have much in mind for Cynthia. I think she will exceed my expectations.” Ralph grinned, responding, “Yeah, she looks like a lot of fun. Good lay I bet.” Thad tossed him a look of admonition, before glancing over his shoulder at the cabin.

“Actually, my hope is that she run for Cohen’s seat, the second the ink dries on his petition papers,” said Thad. “The bench is rather lacking, and I suspect manpower and time will make the difference.” Ralph looked unsure, asking “Are you sure this girl is even old enough to run? We scarcely have any idea who she is.” Thad merely nodded. “She was drawn to us like moth to a light, and I am sure her aims are similar to our own. This movement will not be built on cracked, moss-donning bricks. It shall be painted, like a work of art, on a freshly stretched canvas.”

The next morning, he called Areus to report his success thus far. “Excellent,” replied Areus. “If we are on track to have two candidates while the opposition still slumbers, then victory will surely be ours. Davis Griffin and his thugs have grown complacent; the noose shall be taut before he realizes he’s aloft the stool.” Thad merely nodded, though Areus interpreted his response through the phone. “I’d like you to come back to D.C. next week, Thad.”
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« Reply #263 on: September 11, 2012, 06:24:09 pm »
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“I have much in mind for Cynthia. I think she will exceed my expectations.”

You go Thad. Grin
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« Reply #264 on: September 24, 2012, 11:47:13 pm »

All for One and One for All: 1983

At Areus’ beckoning, Thad returned to D.C. during the last week of August. Thad went to Scott Westman’s house to stay at his “home away from home” only to intrude on Westman dallying with Alice Luce of Connecticut. After greeting the couple awkwardly, Thad quickly shut the door and headed toward the Drunken Dutchman, where he stumbled upon one of his compatriots.

Thad was signaled by the trail of smoke that billowed from the cigarette aloft his fingers. The stress of today’s tumultuous times had taken their toll, as he looked haggard and fatigued. With a half smile, he turned toward Thad, saying “Fancy seeing you here,” with a hint of southern drawl. It was Senator Jefferson Dent, who pulled a seat back for Thad.

“It has been a long time my friend,” he continued. “Indeed, and I have longed for your company,” responded Thad. Jefferson Dent brushed his hand. “Spare me the formalities. We’re here to speak business. We have five months to go and Hatfield is fighting for third place. What the ?” At this point Westman entered the bar, and took it upon himself to sit with the two.

“It is crunch time, my friends,” said Jefferson Dent. “We need to go on the offensive for Hatfield. Mark wants to play this nice guy routine, but it won’t fly. And if we need to do his dirty work for him, so be it.” Westman cleared his throat. “I suppose now is just as good a time as any to officially come out of the closet as a Hatfield supporter to the public. If Dole or Laxalt wins, it’ll be at least four more years of prudery, war mongering, and general douchebaggery regardless if Jackson wins.”

“Aye,” nodded Thad. “And the consequences may be irrevocable. To arms, gentleman!” Thad boasted, while offering a toast.
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« Reply #265 on: October 01, 2012, 12:38:15 am »

TIME – DOLE SLIPPING
Sept 23rd, 1983

The Republican Primary remains divided as ever despite the fact that the Iowa Caucuses are only a few months away. The same four are at the top – Laxalt, Dole, Hatfield, and Mathias – although the dynamic seems to have changed a bit. As casualties mount and the war’s popularity continues to wane, the conservative candidates have paid the cost, though it seems to have disproportionately affected Senator Dole.

Senator Dole has been billed as being the most electable, and has been the favorite of the “mainstream” wing of the Republican Party. However, he is being blasted on one side by the likes of Hatfield and Mathias, and on the other side by Laxalt. The bloodletting was exacerbated by a remark made in the last debate on the National Right to Life Amendment [1] with campaign workers on both sides accusing him of being a career politician.

Senator Hatfield has been the biggest winner over the past few months, having picked up the endorsements of several Republicans, such as Thad O’Connor, Lee Dreyfus, and Areus Hok’ee. Still, Senator Charles Mathias holds on to fourth place, and is undoubtedly weighing Hatfield down.



Polling:
Laxalt: 29%
Dole: 15%
Hatfield: 14%
Mathias: 14%
DuPont: 4%
Hammerschmidt: 4%
Undecided: 20%

[1] During the July 28th debate, Dole said “it is essential our nominee supports [The National Right to Life Amendment], to retain conservative support.” The implication being that Senator Dole only supported it for political reasons.
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« Reply #266 on: October 01, 2012, 07:57:18 am »
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How is Ford's post-Presidency going so far? And also, I'm wondering, is the New Hampshire primary going to be the one in OTL 1980 that voted for Reagan, or the one in OTL 2000 that vote for McCain?
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« Reply #267 on: October 01, 2012, 08:38:52 pm »
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Illinois was a swing state in the 80s.  Why is it lean Jackson?
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« Reply #268 on: October 02, 2012, 03:44:23 pm »

How is Ford's post-Presidency going so far? And also, I'm wondering, is the New Hampshire primary going to be the one in OTL 1980 that voted for Reagan, or the one in OTL 2000 that vote for McCain?

Ford is remembered rather poorly by most Americans and has lived a quiet retirement. He likes to coach high school football sometimes, though. Smiley

As far as New Hampshire is concerned, the Bay State migrants that made the state more Republican still exist, though in diminished numbers as Governor Ed King (D-MA) has vetoed all tax increases. They are hard-liners on the tax issue and are currently supporting Laxalt, though Dole may be cooking up a scheme to win them over. Smiley Laxalt was also endorsed by the Manchester Union Leader.

One must remember that Connally narrowly carried this state over Howard Baker, in what was considered to be an upset. The amount of ballots cast for Chafee was greater than Connally’s margin of victory, though some historians argue that Chafee had already dropped out and such voters may have simply not shown up. Hatfield has a real shot here, but strong support for Mathias in Cheshire County may weigh him down.

Illinois was a swing state in the 80s.  Why is it lean Jackson?

Short answer? Because the election is lean Jackson. Smiley

Long answer? Jackson has made great strides in restoring the old Democratic strength in downstate Illinois, where Carter did well in 1976. Rock Island Arsenal has also put their eggs in the Jackson basket, because of the “Fortify America” Act and Jackson’s traditional coziness with the defense industry. He certainly can’t win without Cook County, but he has broadened the base a little bit.

However, Illinois is still considered a building block to any Republican victory. Jackson got 54% here in 1980, compared to 58.67% nationally.
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« Reply #269 on: October 02, 2012, 04:40:38 pm »
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Cool stuff. I hope Ford gets a chance to recover from his disastrous presidency, the same way Carter did, what with Habitat for Humanity and some diplomatic work. Maybe a moderate Republican in '88 puts him to work on something?

Anyway, and I'm sure you know this, Dole historically in OTL had a bad record with New Hampshire, losing it both times he was a serious contender for the nomination, 1988 and of course 1996.

Also, since Ford's policies weren't touched on much (or since I don't remember them), did Ford continue detente, or follow Rumsfeld's advice more and put more towards military funding. The late 70's in OTL were the point where the Soviets surpassed us in ICBM numbers--and they continued to lead us until their collapse--and I'm wondering if that's changed.
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« Reply #270 on: October 03, 2012, 06:29:37 pm »

Cool stuff. I hope Ford gets a chance to recover from his disastrous presidency, the same way Carter did, what with Habitat for Humanity and some diplomatic work. Maybe a moderate Republican in '88 puts him to work on something?

Anyway, and I'm sure you know this, Dole historically in OTL had a bad record with New Hampshire, losing it both times he was a serious contender for the nomination, 1988 and of course 1996.

Also, since Ford's policies weren't touched on much (or since I don't remember them), did Ford continue detente, or follow Rumsfeld's advice more and put more towards military funding. The late 70's in OTL were the point where the Soviets surpassed us in ICBM numbers--and they continued to lead us until their collapse--and I'm wondering if that's changed.

Ford has continued the policy of détente, in keeping with the Helsinki Accords. Ford’s number one policy goal ITTL is to curb inflation and lower the debt – which is a bit of a fool’s errand with this timeline’s congress. Though Ford came back from overseas “a converted internationalist” some speculate he was returning to his roots as an isolationist.

One noteworthy difference is that the Panama Canal remains in U.S. control, despite some international pressure for the United States to hand it over to Panama. U.N. Ambassador Paul Wolfowitz said in a U.N. meeting, “we built it,” which has become a political punchline as it is in real life, though for different reasons. As was noted earlier, there have been some terrorist acts but the official policy of Panama condemns such acts.

Ford made a second attempt to restore U.S. relations with Cuba, but any such progress has been overturned by the Jackson administration, which pledges to “starve Castro himself into submission.”
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« Reply #271 on: October 16, 2012, 12:27:04 am »

Brass Tacks: 1983

It was early in the morning when Thad O’Connor plopped himself in a restaurant booth, quickly scooting in to accommodate Scott Westman. On the opposite side, Lawrence Coventry and Jefferson Dent had shuffled in. Moments after they went through the formalities of greeting each other, a vim waitress readily presented the four of them with menus and coffee. She wore skimpy shorts and a short apron, but her wispy, frizzy blonde hair, wrinkled thighs, and cigarette-worn voice defied her young spirit.

“Straight to business, gentlemen,” said Lawrence after sipping his coffee. “On the sunny side, we’ve entered talks with the Mathias camp, and Charles is willing to work with us for the greater good. Areus has been quite preoccupied acting as a diplomat, but it looks promising based on what he’s told me. If one adds his polling total with ours, that puts us in contention for first with Laxalt.”

At this point the waitress had returned. “I’ll order the blueberry pancakes,” said Thad. Scott Westman looked incredulous, saying “We come to an upscale place for goddamn lobbyists and congressmen and you order pancakes? I’ll take the Feta Pepper omelet.” Whilst he handed his menu over, Jefferson Dent said, “I’ll have two over easy eggs and a side of grits.” Lawrence Coventry ordered waffles “with extra maple syrup.”

“The bad news is, I have it on good information that Dole is going whole hog on the tax issue. Dramatic slashes to the tax rates, in an effort to cut into Laxalt’s support. He’s also putting all of his eggs in the Iowa and New Hampshire basket,” Coventry paused to take another sip of coffee. “Needless to say, if this passes and he pulls enough support to win an early state he could consolidate the vote of conservative malcontents and win.”

“Needless to say, I’m naturally opposed to trickle-down nonsense. You can count on me,” said Dent. “While the current tax rates are a bit outlandish, I think it’d be irresponsible to lower taxes with the “spend first, ask questions later” President that we have.” Said Westman. Thad merely nodded. “I am glad to see we are all in agreement,” said Coventry. “The next few months could be pivotal.”

The waitress then brought over the food, handing Thad his pancakes. Scott Westman shook his head in disappointment.
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« Reply #272 on: October 16, 2012, 03:52:08 pm »
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Pancakes! Yummmm!
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« Reply #273 on: October 19, 2012, 10:41:29 pm »

TIME – DOLE’S GAMBIT?
Oct 10th, 1983

At a campaign stop in the Bow, New Hampshire Bob Dole proudly unveiled a new tax bill to a crowd of five hundred. “No longer will the job producers be subject to draconian rates, no longer will the fuel to economic growth be bottled up by dreamers wishing for spending cuts!” proclaimed an enthusiastic Dole.

The news came to the pleasant surprise of many conservative activists and columnists, disillusioned with both the Jackson administration for its opposition to tax cuts and with the Republican leadership for an unwillingness to tackle the issue. Many are still licking their wounds from the Kemp-Roth debacle.

Co-sponsored with Rep. Humphrey Wilkinson, the bill would drop the top-marginal rate from 78% to 61%. When asked, the President was not as obstinate as he had been in the past, saying, “I doubt we’ll come to an agreement, but I’m willing to listen to what Mr. Dole has to say.” Dole acknowledged, “Compromises may have to be made.”

Some hard-liners were skeptical of this new move by the Senator. Pete duPont quipped, “This is the same man who was on board with the tax increases when President Ford was proposing them.” This may indeed be part of a new campaign strategy, and in conjunction with heavy investments in Iowa and New Hampshire; it seems to have been paying for the Senator.

Senator Laxalt holds on to a small national lead, primarily due to large margins in the South, but these have been slightly eroded by the efforts of Rep. Hammerschmidt. Also, the Southern primaries are later, with the earliest being the February 14th Tennessee contest. Complacency could be the Nevadan’s undoing.



Polling:
Laxalt: 27%
Dole: 19%
Hatfield: 17%
Mathias: 11%
Hammerschmidt: 6%
DuPont: 3%
Undecided: 17%
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« Reply #274 on: October 21, 2012, 11:37:51 pm »

Cakewalk: 1983

Scott Westman approached the podium as the Senate President granted him time to speak. “My fellow Senators, I would like to speak on the bill at hand – or rather, Bob Dole’s attempt to get a leg up in the primary. The aim of this bill is to lower taxes on the wealthiest of Americans down to 61%. While I agree that the current rate is draconian, it does not make any fiscal sense to lower revenues while this administration plays fast and loose with our dollars. I yield my remaining time.”

Bob Dole took the stand next. “The Senator from Montana is seeing the forest for the trees. What this bill does is lower taxes on Americans who, yes, while they may be wealthy, have also earned their wealth and know how to spend it productively. These people also just hire accountants and exploit loopholes – they don’t pay taxes!  So, over the next few years, this would actually increase revenues to the government and finally get us out of this recession that has lasted over a decade. Tax cuts are an innovative way to stimulate growth; President Kennedy realized this in the sixties, and we need to realize it now.”

“The chamber yields to the gentleman from Alabama,” said the Senate President. Jefferson Dent approached the podium where Scott Westman stood. “The Senator would lead us to believe that an employer paying his employee less money would benefit the employee. This defies common sense. I acknowledge that this administration has failed the public, but to suggest that the middle-class shoulder the burden for the largesse of the wealthy is absurd.”

After that, Jefferson Dent left the stand and Patton Wyde approached. “I am genuinely intrigued by this bill, and the Senator’s premiss that these tax cuts would increase government revenue. I approached him with the offer that we earmark modest increases in general welfare spending on this bill, but he was obstinately opposed to the idea. Also, if it is true that the wealthiest of the wealthy aren’t paying taxes, why hasn’t the Senator alerted the IRS? I am open to revisiting the issue with him, but feel he is being disingenuous,” said the Senator.

The debate lasted for hours.    



VOTE ON DOLE-WILKINSON TAX REFORM ACT OF 1983

Aye: Howell Heflin (D-AL), Ted Stevens (R-AK), Bob Stump (D-AZ), Gary Hart (D-CO), Bill Armstrong (R-CO), William Roth (R-DE), James McClure (R-ID), Richard Lugar (R-IN), Bob Dole (R-KS), Russell B. Long (D-LA), David Durenburger (R-MN), John Danforth (R-MO), Paul Laxalt (R-NV), Harrison Schmidt (R-NM), Bob Duncan (D-OR), John Heinz (R-PA), Strom Thurmond (R-SC), Larry Pressler (R-SD), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Harry Byrd (D-VA), Malcolm Wallop (R-WY), Alan Simpson (R-WY) (21)

Nay: Jefferson Dent (D-AL), Clark Gruening (D-AK), Dennis DeConcini (D-AZ), David Pryor (D-AR), Dale Bumpers (D-AR), Alan Cranston (D-CA), Pete McCloskey (R-CA), Lowell Weicker (R-CT), Christopher Dodd (D-CT), Joe Biden (D-DE), Lawton Chiles (D-FL), Richard McPherson (D-FL), Sam Nunn (D-GA), Herman Talmadge (D-GA), Daniel Inouye (D-HI), Spark Matsunaga (D-HI), Frank Church (D-ID), Alex Seith (D-IL), Dan Rostenkowski (D-IL), Birch Bayh (D-IN), John Culver (D-IA), Dick Clark (D-IA), Joan Finney (D-KS), Walter Huddleston (D-KY), Wendell Ford (D-KY), Bennet Johnston Jr. (D-LA), William Hathaway (D-ME), Thad O’Connor (R-ME), Paul Sarbanes (D-MD), Charles Mathias (R-MD), Ted Kennedy (D-MA), Carl Levin (D-MI), Walter Mondale (D-MN), Patton Wyde (D-MS), Thomas Eagleton (D-MO), Scott Westman (D-MT), Max Baucus (D-MT), James Exon (D-NE), Thomas McIntyre (D-NH), John Durkin (D-NH), Clifford Case (R-NJ), Millicent Fenwick (R-NJ), Bruce King (D-NM), Jacob Javits (R-NY), Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY), Robert B. Morgan (D-NC), John Ingram (D-NC), Quentin Burdick (D-ND), Warren F. Ford (R-ND), John Glenn (D-OH), Paul Pfeifer (R-OH), David Boren (D-OK), Wes Watkins (D-OK), Mark Hatfield (R-OR), John Murtha (D-PA), Claiborne Pell (D-RI), John Chafee (R-RI), Ernest Hollings (D-SC), George McGovern (D-SD), Marilyn Lloyd (D-TN), Jim Sasser (D-TN), Bob Krueger (D-TX), James F. Garner (R-TX), Jake Garn (R-UT), Lawrence Coventry (R-VT), Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Andrew Miller (D-VA), Santiago St. Avila (R-WA), Jasper Morrill (R-WA), Jennings Randolph (D-WV), Robert Byrd (D-WV), William Proxmire (D-WI), Gaylord Nelson (D-WI) (74)

Not Voting: Paul Tsongas (D-MA), Mic Ceriel (R-MI), John Stennis (D-MS), Edward Zorinsky (D-NE), Howard Cannon (D-NV) (5)
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