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Poll
Question: Will Iceland and Norway ever join the EU?
Iceland, but not Norway   -8 (11.6%)
Norway, but not Iceland   -6 (8.7%)
Both   -24 (34.8%)
None of them   -31 (44.9%)
Show Pie Chart
Total Voters: 69

Author Topic: The Great Nordic Thread  (Read 20071 times)
politicus
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« Reply #375 on: October 22, 2014, 02:13:11 pm »
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Ten Kurdish men aquited for support of terrorism in the Copenhaghen City Court yesterday. They were accused of collecting 140 mio. kroner (roughly 25 mio. $) for PKK.
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politicus
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« Reply #376 on: October 25, 2014, 10:51:29 am »
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The Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsons Progress Party is at a post-election low with 8,7% in a new poll in Fréttablašiš (down from 24,4% in the 2013 election), while their coalition partners in IP are at 30%+. The opposition would win 37-26 if those numbers were to hold. Bright Future, which was close to being Icelands biggest party a couple of months ago, is down to 10,6%, far behind SDA and also behind the Left Greens. For the first time since the election the two leftist parties are above 1/3 at 36,2%.

PP 8,7% 6 (-13)
IP 30,3% 20 (+1)

SDA 23,1%
Left Greens 13,1%
Bright Future 10,6%
Pirates 10,1%

Others 4,1%
« Last Edit: October 25, 2014, 11:41:47 am by politicus »Logged

CrabCake
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« Reply #377 on: October 25, 2014, 11:05:28 am »
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Iceland has ... odd politics. Why is it the only country where Pirates have remained feasible for more than a year? Why does everyone still support IP? Why did Progress think it would be a good idea to campaign against Islamic immigration, in a country with pretty much no Islamic immigration?
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What does individual politics got to do with ANYTHING?

INDIVIDUAL POLITICS???

F U ridiculous MORON forum!!

F U

F U!

What's wrong with "you guys" Huh Huh

I know it was only down to one sole moronic soul who decided that this was beyond his worth as a human being to consider comedians as actual human beings.
politicus
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« Reply #378 on: October 25, 2014, 11:41:06 am »
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Iceland has ... odd politics. Why is it the only country where Pirates have remained feasible for more than a year?

Mainly because their leader Birgitta Jonsdottir has charisma and has proven to be a very capable politician. Its the classical one (wo)man populist party. The second reason is infighting among the Left Greens that would be the obvious alternative for many of their young voters.

Why does everyone still support IP?

Firstly, the centre-right is at 39% in this poll, so the overall picture is that the centre-left is solidly ahead. Secondly, 30% for IP is still low historically speaking (it used to be a 40%+ party). Thirdly, where else would conservative voters go? Especially with PP in crisis. The governments first 1,5 years in office has made it very clear, that IP is a more professional outfit and has far fewer loons than PP. Apart from one scandal involving leaks of confidential info from the Justice Department, all other "affairs" and gaffes (and there has been a lot) have involved PP politicians.  

Why did Progress think it would be a good idea to campaign against Islamic immigration, in a country with pretty much no Islamic immigration?

It wasn't a decision approved by the national party, but one made single-handedly by the lead candidate in the Reykjavik municipal election in a desperate situation where the party stood to be wiped out in the capital (and it worked..). PPs immigration policy (which is quite liberal), hasn't been changed afterwards.

PP is not in crisis because of the "Islam-stunt", but mainly because it is by now adamantly clear that their big idea of blackmailing foreign creditors to cough up with enough money to help out debt ridden Icelandic home owners was a giant bluff. On top of that you can add lots of small scandals, village idiot type gaffes and a clearly incompetent Foreign Minister + messing up the EU question with denial of a referendum and a stop to negotiations before they were finished (which satisfies their core supporters, but not all the new suburban and mainly centrist voters they got last time).
« Last Edit: October 25, 2014, 12:26:16 pm by politicus »Logged

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« Reply #379 on: October 25, 2014, 11:42:41 am »
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Iceland is an odd country so it should come as no surprise that it also has odd politics. Given the events of the past decade it's maybe not surprising that political life there has only got stranger. The Independence Party has deep roots; even in 2009 it could only be knocked down to 24%. It's difficult to truly kill a party that has a true social base, even if it disgraces itself spectacularly. This is obviously particularly true in a conservative society like Iceland.
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"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
politicus
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« Reply #380 on: October 25, 2014, 04:04:11 pm »
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The Independence Party has deep roots; even in 2009 it could only be knocked down to 24%. It's difficult to truly kill a party that has a true social base, even if it disgraces itself spectacularly.

The Independence Party having more members than all other parties combined with almost 10% of Icelandic voters as party members was certainly the main factor that allowed them to survive the crisis relatively unharmed, but there is also the sheer lack of a credible alternative on the right wing (which is still the case, since the rumoured pro-EU breakway party hasn't materialized yet).

Iceland is an odd country so it should come as no surprise that it also has odd politics. Given the events of the past decade it's maybe not surprising that political life there has only got stranger.

Even if Icelandic politics definitely still has its quirks the general trend has been towards normalization since the 2008-2010 rupture - where the citizens movement and joke parties challenged the system - most importantly with a new stable 6 party system replacing the traditional 4 party structure.

The pattern has been: old equilibrium-crisis-strong swing to the left-strong right wing correction in the 2013 election and now what seems to be a new equilibrium with 35-40% centre left, 35-40% centre-right and a social liberal party with 10-15% set to hold the balance of power if the numbers hold up. The only oddity in this party system is the Pirates, but having a populist party is relatively normal - Iceland's is just not of the common European right wing populist type - which reflects both its low level of non-European immigration and euroscepticism being a mainstream position already taking by (most of) the mainstream centre-right.

One of the last imbalances - the extremely weak left wing after the 2013 election - seems to be disappearing at the moment with the two traditional centre-left parties back above 35%.

... in a conservative society like Iceland.

As to Iceland being a conservative society I would say that Icelandic society exhibits its own peculiar mix of traditionalism, clientilism, nationalism, openmindedness, out of the box-thinking and very progressive attitudes and also combines rugged individualism and communal thinking in a way that is rather unique, but closer to certain parts of North America than continental Europe.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2014, 04:16:19 pm by politicus »Logged

politicus
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« Reply #381 on: October 27, 2014, 11:58:53 am »
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The pro-independence part of the Faroese opposition (Progress Party and Republicans) wants the Faroe Islands to gain control over their foreign policy, this demand comes after several conflicts between Denmark and the Faroes, the latest over sanctions against Russia, which the Faroese government has declined to follow, claiming it is a trade matter and not foreign policy!

The current Faroese centre-right government contains both unionist and separatist parties and this motion puts the pro-independence People's Party under pressure since they fully agree with its content, while the Lawman's ("Prime Minister") Union Party is strongly against it. The motion will come up for debate in the Lųgting in early November.

Apart from disliking that the Danish parliament implemented sanctions against Russia without consulting the Faroese government about possible economic consequences, they are also disgruntled about not being consulted regarding Danish participation in the ongoing air campaign against the Islamic State - getting formally involved in yet another military operation without being heard.

The most bitter conflict between Denmark and the Faroes stems from the EU ban on Faroese mackerel and herring export and landing last year, where the ban required Copenhagen to side with Brussels in the quota dispute and ban Faroese fishing vessels from entering Danish ports and stopping the islands export to Denmark. The Faroese feel that the Danish government was much too compliant towards EU and should have declined to implement sanctions against a part of its own state (and I fully agree with them...).

"Should the same country that recently imposed sanctions on us ask us to boycott Russia? That would be insane”

Lawman Kaj Leo Johansen (UP)

http://arcticjournal.com/politics/1104/mission-torshavn

#the Progress Party is not centrist as the article says, but the most right wing party on the Faroes.

See http://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=199587.0 for the current parliamentary situation and position of the parties.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2014, 04:05:53 pm by politicus »Logged

politicus
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« Reply #382 on: October 30, 2014, 06:40:06 pm »
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The Red-Greens and SPP want Denmark to recognize Palestine and will put forward a motion in the Folketing demanding the government to do so next week.

In their 2011 campaigns booth SD and the Social Liberals promised to recognize Palestine, but have since backtracked with arguments that it would undermine the peace process if some EU countries went solo on this. Now that Sweden has done it this argument has weakened (it was never a good one) and the government is forced to either give in or break yet anoter campaign promise (well, it has already been broken, but at least they have had an excuse until now..).
Minister of Foreign Affairs Martin Lidegaard (SocLib) says "its pointlesss to recognize Palestine before we now whether such a state has any possibility of existing."

The Palestinian "state" got diplomatic status in Denmark in 2013 and their representative became an ambassador.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2014, 07:00:40 pm by politicus »Logged

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