Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 20, 2014, 11:06:33 pm
HomePredMockPollEVCalcAFEWIKIHelpLogin Register
News: Please delete your old personal messages.

+  Atlas Forum
|-+  Other Elections - Analysis and Discussion
| |-+  International Elections (Moderator: PASOK Leader Hashemite)
| | |-+  British General Election constituency maps 1955-2001 (New)
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: British General Election constituency maps 1955-2001 (New)  (Read 3599 times)
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« on: February 07, 2012, 09:05:11 am »
Ignore

Ages and ages ago I made a thread (which is linked to on the Special Threads thread) that showed the results of British General Elections from 1955 onwards at constituency level using the Boothroyd maps. I decided a while back (after noting that said maps were actually quite good; I'll make a few changes to the 1955-1974 one, but other than that...) that it might be an idea to occasionally do a few again, with my new standard key and some fairly detailed notes. This does not replace (not at all) any other projects I might be occasionally working on, obviously. The idea is to introduce, more or less.

So the way is this will work is that I will post a map. Underneath there will be some information relating to the election and to the context in which the election was fought. That kind of thing.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
afleitch
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 21909


Political Matrix
E: 2.45, S: -8.17

View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2012, 09:39:21 am »
Ignore

I have attempted creating a series of bitmaps to replace the Boothroyd template. I created a set of constituency maps from 1918 for Scotland which you’ll notice I now use, but never got further than a base county outline for England and Wales. Is it fun re-inventing the wheel? Yes. If I have the time I might get round to trying again.
Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 10:38:39 am »
Ignore

I thought I'd get the worst one out of the way first:



Conservatives 397 seats, Labour 209 seats, Alliance 23 seats, SNP 2 seats, Plaid 2 seats, Northern Ireland 17 seats.

Popular vote for Great Britain: Conservatives 43.5%, Labour 28.3%, Alliance 26.0%, Others 2.2%

The Alliance was an electoral coalition of the Liberal Party (17 seats) and the SDP (6 seats). The SDP was a new party, formed in 1981 from members of the Manifesto Group of right-wing Labour MPs and was perhaps a tad top heavy.

The Tories were led by Margaret Thatcher (Finchley) and Labour by Michael Foot (Blaenau Gwent). The Liberals were led by David Steel (Tweeddale, Ettrick & Lauderdale) and the SDP by former Labour cabinet minister and former EEC President Roy Jenkins (Glasgow Hillhead).

As for context, there was rather a lot so this is only a very brief (and rather biased) summary. The Conservative government elected in 1979 had embarked on a radical plan aimed at curbing inflation and ending the Post War social democratic settlement. One notable consequence of this was the rapid destruction of large parts of Britain's industrial base and subsequent mass unemployment. Ordinarily this would have meant certain defeat, but things did not work out that way. The Labour Party entered the most brutal civil war in its history (which is saying something) almost as soon as it lost office in 1979. Bit by bit this internal conflict damaged its credibility with both swing voters and its base. The departure of the bulk of the Manifesto Group in 1981 did not end the civil war, but actually increased its intensity. The SDP-Liberal Alliance briefly seemed poised to capitalise, but it stood for very little other than what it was not and its support was incredibly soft. The second factor, of course, was the Falklands. The result was a Tory landslide, but a very strange one; if you look closely, you'll note that some majorities in strongholds were surprising low as a result of Alliance strength. Labour generally did terribly, but there were swings in its favour in some areas of especially high unemployment.

The next map will be of 1955.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
only back for the worldcup
Lewis Trondheim
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 58778
India


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2012, 10:40:12 am »
Ignore

Conservatives 397 seats, Labour 209 seats, Alliance 23 seats, SNP 2 seats, Plaid 2 seats, Northern Ireland 17 seats.

Popular vote for Great Britain: Conservatives 43.5%, Labour 28.3%, Alliance 26.0%, Others 2.2%
Just how yellow would a two-party Labour-Alliance map look I wonder?

Loads and loads of oddities of course. Tories sweep Nottingham while Labour hold Crewe & Nantwich. I'll assume for the sake of my sanity that Carlisle is a very very very light Labour color (because I seem to recall recalling something along those lines), not a Liberal seat.
Also trying to make sense of the Ayrshire and Renfrewshire constituency boundaries.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 10:46:34 am by Minion of Midas »Logged

"The secret to having a rewarding work-life balance is to have no life. Then it's easy to keep things balanced by doing no work." Wally



"Our party do not have any ideology... Our main aim is to grab power ... Every one is doing so but I say it openly." Keshav Dev Maurya
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 11:38:37 am »
Ignore

Loads and loads of oddities of course. Tories sweep Nottingham while Labour hold Crewe & Nantwich.

Stranger than that; Labour gained Crewe & Nantwich, which was notionally Tory in 1979 (and not by about three votes). Dunwoody was quite the candidate. Labour did terribly in Notts in 1983 and 1987; look at Mansfield as well (and that was with a longserving right-wing MP).

Quote
I'll assume for the sake of my sanity that Carlisle is a very very very light Labour color (because I seem to recall recalling something along those lines), not a Liberal seat.

That's right, yeah. Back then it was just the city proper, as you can see.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
joevsimp
Full Member
***
Posts: 246


Political Matrix
E: -5.95, S: -4.00

View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2012, 12:43:51 pm »
Ignore

ant particular reason for Stockton South?

interesting that you can see a diagonal line from baisingstoke to crewe where the tory vote drops to the east of it, that'll be a stron SDP/Liberal showing I take it
Logged
ObserverIE
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 829
Ireland, Republic of


Political Matrix
E: -3.87, S: -1.04

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 02:57:43 pm »
Ignore

ant particular reason for Stockton South?

Labour-turned-SDP MP defending; Conservative candidate turned out half-way during the election campaign to have been a relatively recent election candidate for the National Front.
Logged

Phony Moderate
Obamaisdabest
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8218
United States


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 06:20:36 pm »
Ignore

One thing to note about the 1983 campaign: There was a big swing from Labour to the Alliance in the last two weeks or so, which probably allowed the Tories to win a bigger majority than they otherwise would have done. Oh, and isn't it interesting that the Labour and Alliance vote shares weren't all that different to the 2010 Labour and Lib Dem vote shares?
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 06:22:39 pm by Joseph Gordon Levitt »Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2012, 06:27:10 pm »
Ignore

Much as in 2010 it's questionable how 'real' the Alliance's surge in the polls during the campaign actually was. There was a similar surge in 1987, though earlier in the campaign.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2012, 06:29:17 pm »
Ignore

interesting that you can see a diagonal line from baisingstoke to crewe where the tory vote drops to the east of it, that'll be a stron SDP/Liberal showing I take it

That's right, yeah. Also note that the Tory majorities in the Home Counties are not quite as huge as you'd expect for a landslide.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
Phony Moderate
Obamaisdabest
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8218
United States


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2012, 06:42:37 pm »
Ignore

Someone has been kind enough to upload every election night programme from 1974-2010 in full on YouTube (and someone else has uploaded the 1970 programme too), so everytime a map is posted I'll link to the relevent playlist (that's if Al doesn't mind).

Election Night 1983.

Probably the most accurate exit poll of all time?!

(Oh, and there are also shorter videos of the 1955, 1959, 1964 and 1966 election nights IIRC, so I'll post those too.)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 06:46:21 pm by Joseph Gordon Levitt »Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2012, 06:45:02 pm »
Ignore

I've no objection to those links being posted whatsoever.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
You kip if you want to...
change08
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8682
United Kingdom


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2012, 06:54:15 pm »
Ignore

One thing to note about the 1983 campaign: There was a big swing from Labour to the Alliance in the last two weeks or so, which probably allowed the Tories to win a bigger majority than they otherwise would have done. Oh, and isn't it interesting that the Labour and Alliance vote shares weren't all that different to the 2010 Labour and Lib Dem vote shares?

And the Tories winning 37% in a amazing year for them as opposed to 43% says so much about what's been happening in the country since 1983 as well.
Logged

Harry Hayfield
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1800
United Kingdom


Political Matrix
E: -1.55, S: 0.00

View Profile
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2012, 07:11:43 pm »
Ignore

I have the BBC Parliament election replays of Elections 1955  - 2001 and the BBC election nights of 2005 and 2010 on video tape. I already have the 1955 general election in a format that computers can understand however, my upload speeds (330kbps) prevent me from uploading it onto YouTube
Logged

Pilchard
Rookie
*
Posts: 25
United Kingdom


Political Matrix
E: 0.13, S: -1.22

P P P
View Profile
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2012, 07:58:07 pm »
Ignore

hmm, Clement Freud's constituency really stands out down in my part of the world, never realised that before.

What's with the boundaries of Norwich South, snaking off to the east along what I assume is the river?
Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2012, 08:18:09 pm »
Ignore

What's with the boundaries of Norwich South, snaking off to the east along what I assume is the river?

For some reason a large stretch of the river is technically in Norwich.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
Antonio V
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 30922
France


Political Matrix
E: -6.45, S: -4.87

P P P

View Profile
« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2012, 04:48:57 am »
Ignore

Very interesting map. I'd love to see 2-way comparisons (Lab vs Torie, Lab vs Alliance, Torie vs Alliance) if it doesn't bother you too much. Smiley
Logged

Quote from: IRC
22:15   ComradeSibboleth   this is all extremely terrible and in all respects absolutely fycking dire.

It really is.



"A reformist is someone who realizes that, when you bang your head on a wall, it's the head that breaks rather than the wall."

Peppino, from the movie Baaria
afleitch
Moderators
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 21909


Political Matrix
E: 2.45, S: -8.17

View Profile
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2012, 07:31:03 am »
Ignore

21 Tory seats in 1983 Sad

Also trying to make sense of the Ayrshire and Renfrewshire constituency boundaries.

Boothroyd's map squishes Scotland. The Ayrshire boundaries remained untoched right through to 2005 and broadly untouched in the 1st Holyrood Review. Likewise with Renfrewshire, though Greenock was a seat by itself. Greenock at that time took in Port Glasgow but not Gourock or Cloch. Renfrew West and Inverclyde was therefore as Tory friendly a seat as you could create. Notionally in 1979 it was just Labour. Some have disputed that but given Norman Buchan's personal vote a narrow Labour win could have been likely. It was won by the Tories in 1983 but fell to Labour, somewhat unexpectedly in 1987.
Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2012, 01:40:25 pm »
Ignore

The general patterns are very familiar. The details seem strangely distant, but only just out of reach, or perhaps as seen through mist. 1955:



Conservatives 345 seats, Labour 277 seats, Liberals 6 seats, Sinn Fein 2 seats.

The Conservative total includes the Ulster Unionists (not seen on this map) and 45 candidates who ran as National Liberal & Conservative.

Popular vote for the UK (I don't have the GB figures to hand and can't be bothered to look them up) - Conservatives 49.7%, Labour 46.4%, Liberal 2.7%

The Liberals ran just 110 candidates, meaning that most constituencies were two party Labour/Tory affairs, meaning that the meaning of the popular vote figure is quite different from that of an election after 1974.

The Tories were led by Anthony Eden (Warwick & Leamington) and Labour, somewhat surreally, by Clement Attlee (Walthamstow West). Attlee had led Labour for two decades and remained in post mostly to prevent Herbert Morrison from taking over. The Liberals were no longer an organised party in 1955 and were less than irrelevant (being utterly dependent on the Tories not opposing their few remaining MPs), but were technically led by Clement Davies (Montgomery).

As for context, this was still an election fought in a country still recovering from the War, but one lacking a genuine Post War feel. It is perhaps best seen as being the first election during the 'Golden Age of Capitalism', and in that respect it was an important one because it meant that the Tories would be the party to reap the full electoral benefits of the longest and deepest of economic booms. This was in large part due to Labour spending the bulk of the 1951-1955 parliament engaged in (yeah, familiar theme is familiar) a nasty civil war, as the Cold War froze sharp (and often strange) internal divisions in place. It was also because the Tories made the pragmatic decision that it was safer to accept the bulk of the Attlee government's work, and established a political settlement (never a consensus) in which they cast themselves as moderate and pragmatic. They also benefited from having the wildly popular Anthony Eden as their leader. Insert a fairly predictable remark about Suez and amphetamines about here.

To return to the opening comment about the oddly distant (but perhaps only just out of reach) details of the map, the great wave of post-war suburbanisation had only just begun. Middle class urban lifestyles had yet to penetrate most English agricultural districts, and many of said agricultural districts still had a very large rural proletariat. Most of the people who would bring their middle class lifestyles to rural England were still living in historically middle class districts of nearby cities. Sectarianism was still a factor in Glasgow and Liverpool, while the newly formed National Union of Mineworkers was one of the largest unions in the country. Ancient traditions of Working Class Toryism were still just about viable in and around Manchester, while the docks remained a major part of the economy and political geography of London. In most of Wales the Labour Party had a mass appeal that stretched well beyond normal class boundaries in part because the Attlee Government's policies had revived the near-dead Welsh economy (something that legitimised socialism to some most unlikely communities), while in Scotland the Unionists (as the Tories were then known there) reaped the rewards that came from their position as the Scottish patriotic party of record.
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
Phony Moderate
Obamaisdabest
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 8218
United States


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2012, 02:02:50 pm »
Ignore

A clip of Eden taking part in a press conference during the campaign.

The BBC election night programme coming to an end. Presented by Richard Dimbleby (who incidentally was the father of the current election night presenter David Dimbleby).

Liberal Party election broadcast.

Conservative Party election broadcast.

Logged
YL
YorkshireLiberal
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 1202
United Kingdom


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: February 08, 2012, 02:24:29 pm »
Ignore

The general patterns are very familiar. The details seem strangely distant, but only just out of reach, or perhaps as seen through mist. 1955

The mist seems particularly thick in mainland Scotland north of the Central Belt, Liverpool, rural Norfolk, and Doncaster.  It also seems strange from an early 21st century perspective not to have a single splash of yellow in the English countryside.

The two Tory seats in Sheffield would both have been Lib Dem on those boundaries in 2010.  Indeed the Boundary Commission's proposed boundary between West & Penistone and South-West has a certain retro flavour.
Logged

Yorkshire County Champions 2014
joevsimp
Full Member
***
Posts: 246


Political Matrix
E: -5.95, S: -4.00

View Profile
« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2012, 04:40:06 pm »
Ignore

there's a few on that map that wouldn't look out of place in this year's review, Maldon and Witham?!? and that horseshoe thing arounf the edge of Southampton
Logged
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2012, 01:10:58 pm »
Ignore

but never got further than a base county outline for England and Wales.

I'm just ever so slightly curious. Do you still have it?
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
only back for the worldcup
Lewis Trondheim
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 58778
India


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2012, 01:15:10 pm »
Ignore

What I really want to see is series of maps of counties or groups of counties (say, ca.6-20odd constituencies) over the entire period, not the national maps. They're pretty, but hard to read in many places.
Logged

"The secret to having a rewarding work-life balance is to have no life. Then it's easy to keep things balanced by doing no work." Wally



"Our party do not have any ideology... Our main aim is to grab power ... Every one is doing so but I say it openly." Keshav Dev Maurya
Sibboleth
Realpolitik
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 56619
Saint Helena


View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2012, 01:19:04 pm »
Ignore

Is that a hint? Tongue
Logged

"I have become entangled in my own data, and my conclusion stands in direct contradiction to the initial idea from which I started. Proceeding from unlimited freedom, I end with unlimited despotism. I will add, however, that there can be no solution of the social formula except mine."
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Logout

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines