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Poll
Question: Who should gain the honor of the name of this department?
Madeleine Albright   -0 (0%)
Kofi Annan   -0 (0%)
Ivo Andric   -0 (0%)
Ban Ki-Moon   -0 (0%)
Otto von Bismarck   -1 (50%)
Boutros Boutros-Ghali   -0 (0%)
Chester Bowles   -0 (0%)
George Herbert Bush   -1 (50%)
Lawrence Durrell   -0 (0%)
António Egas Moniz   -0 (0%)
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Total Voters: 2

Author Topic: Metternich-Talleyrand Building of the Department of External Affairs  (Read 1649 times)
SJoyce
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« on: May 14, 2012, 06:16:15 pm »
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Welcome to the Department of External Affairs
Bienvenue sur le ministère des Affaires extérieures
Bienvenido al Departamento de Relaciones Exteriores
欢迎到对外事务部/歡迎到對外事務部
विदेश विभाग में आपका स्वागत है/وزارت خارجہ کے سیکشن میں آپ کا استقبال ہے
مرحبا بكم في وزارة الشؤون الخارجية
Bem-vindo ao Departamento de Assuntos Externos
Добро пожаловать в министерство иностранных дел
Willkommen bei der Abteilung für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten
Selamat datang kepada Jabatan Hal Ehwal Luar/Selamat datang di Departemen Luar Negeri
خوش آمدید به وزارت امور خارجی
Karibu katika Idara ya Mambo ya Nje
வெளியுறவு துறை வரவேற்கிறது
Benvenuti al Dipartimento degli affari esteri
Welkom bij het ​​Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken/Welkom by die Departement van Buitelandse Sake
Vestibulum Donec forinsecus
Καλώς ήρθατε στο Υπουργείο Εξωτερικών
Dış İşleri Bakanlığı hoşgeldiniz
Üdvözöljük a Department of Külügyek
Bonvenon al la Fako de Eksteraj Aferoj
外部本文学科へようこそ*

* The DoEA does not take responsibility for unfortunate errors in translation. Blame Google.  Thank you.

Quote from: John Dingell
War is failure of diplomacy.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 02:15:43 pm by SoEA SJoyceFla »Logged

Warner for Senate '14
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2012, 08:39:24 pm »
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I nearly named my office after Prince Metternich, so I suggest him.
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GM Napoleon
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2012, 08:56:31 pm »
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Some guy who came to power following the French Revolution?
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I told my mom, tears blurring my vision
He said, "Mort, you've loved God since before circumcision"
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2012, 08:59:48 pm »
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Some guy who came to power following the French Revolution?

One of the most important diplomats of all time, as well as the architect of the Concert of Europe.
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2012, 09:03:30 pm »
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Some guy who came to power following the French Revolution?

One of the most important diplomats of all time, as well as the architect of the Concert of Europe.
Roll Eyes
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When I was in the third grade, I thought that I was Jewish
Because I could count, my nose was big, and I kept my bank account fullish
I told my mom, tears blurring my vision
He said, "Mort, you've loved God since before circumcision"
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benconstine
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2012, 09:13:58 pm »
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Roll Eyes

He doesn't have to pick Metternich Tongue
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2012, 09:15:42 pm »
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Metternich is a fine pick but why not choose a bolder man, like Mr. Bonaparte?
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When I was in the third grade, I thought that I was Jewish
Because I could count, my nose was big, and I kept my bank account fullish
I told my mom, tears blurring my vision
He said, "Mort, you've loved God since before circumcision"
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benconstine
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2012, 09:17:23 pm »
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Metternich is a fine pick but why not choose a bolder man, like Mr. Bonaparte?

Because I prefer Metternich, and this is a diplomatic office.
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"Now let me be clear...I...I...um...uh...now let me be clear.  I strongly condemn the affirmative in the strongest possible terms, and I am closely monitoring their arguments.  Let me be clear on this."
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« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2012, 09:18:09 pm »
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Metternich is a fine pick but why not choose a bolder man, like Mr. Bonaparte?

Because I prefer Metternich, and this is a diplomatic office.

Maybe it is now. Wink
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When I was in the third grade, I thought that I was Jewish
Because I could count, my nose was big, and I kept my bank account fullish
I told my mom, tears blurring my vision
He said, "Mort, you've loved God since before circumcision"
SJoyce
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« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2012, 09:23:39 pm »
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So I didn't type them all out before my browser crashed, and I can't find how to edit poll options, so I'll throw up a new poll over in the elections forum here
« Last Edit: May 14, 2012, 09:48:39 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

Senator Polnut
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« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2012, 10:15:41 pm »
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Metternich is a fine pick but why not choose a bolder man, like Mr. Bonaparte?

I won't be thrilled naming a EA office after someone with small man's complex - oh and a warmonger...
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SJoyce
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« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2012, 10:17:56 pm »
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Metternich is a fine pick but why not choose a bolder man, like Mr. Bonaparte?

I won't be thrilled naming a EA office after someone with small man's complex - oh and a warmonger...

Precisely why he isn't a poll option.
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SJoyce
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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2012, 07:51:14 pm »
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Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to pressure the government to change course, not to change the regime itself. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: The Americas

Antigua and Barbuda: Normal
Argentina: Normal
Bahamas: Normal
Barbados: Normal
Belize: Normal
Bolivia: Normal
Brazil: Most Priority
Canada: Most Priority
Chile: Normal.
Colombia: Normal.
Costa Rica: Normal
Cuba: Normal. Atlasian policy regarding Cuba is currently F.L. 18-6, Cuban Relations Act.
Dominica: Normal
Dominican Republic: Normal
Ecuador: Normal
El Salvador: Normal
Grenada: Normal
Guatemala: Normal
Guyana: Normal
Haiti: Normal, though we have concerns regarding corruption and political instability.
Honduras: Normal
Jamaica: Normal
Mexico: Most Priority, though we have serious concerns about the drug warlords conflict.
Nicaragua: Normal
Panama: Normal
Paraguay: Normal
Peru: Normal
Saint Kitts and Nevis: Normal
Saint Lucia: Normal
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Normal
Suriname: Normal
Trinidad and Tobago: Normal
Uruguay: Normal
Venezuela: Normal

DoEA Policy: Europe

Albania: Normal
Andorra: Normal
Armenia: Normal
Austria: Normal
Azerbaijan: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held, civil liberties respected and transparency is restored.
Belarus: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held and civil liberties respected.
Belgium: Normal
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Normal. Atlasia welcomes the apparent political stability and peaceful ethnic relations.
Bulgaria: Normal
Croatia: Normal
Czech Republic: Normal
Denmark: Normal
Estonia: Normal
Finland: Normal
France: Most Priority
Georgia: Normal, though we have concerns over civil liberties and notably about the status of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The DoEA reserves the right to military restrictions if we feel that it is needed in view of current events in the country or the Caucasus.
Germany: Most Priority
Greece: Normal
Hungary: Normal, though we have concerns regarding political freedom.
Iceland: Normal
Ireland: Normal
Italy: Normal, though we have concerns about corruption.
Kosovo: Normal
Latvia: Normal
Liechtenstein: Partial economic restrictions; we call for a complete transition to democracy and full transparency in banking.
Lithuania: Normal
Luxembourg: Normal
Macedonia: Normal, although we have concerns about corruption, ethnic minorities and relations with Greece.
Moldova: Normal. Atlasia is pleased overall with democratic evolution in Moldova, though we have serious concerns about corruption, political instability, drug trafficking and the Transnistria issue.
Monaco: Normal
Montenegro: Normal
Netherlands: Normal
Norway: Normal
Poland: Normal
Portugal: Normal
Romania: Normal
Russia: Partial military and economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about democracy, civil liberties, press freedom and the situation in Chechnya and the Russian Caucasus.
San Marino: Normal
Serbia: Normal
Slovakia: Normal, though we have some concerns about worrying nationalist trends in the country and their negative effect on internal and external ethnic relations.
Slovenia: Normal
Sweden: Normal
Switzerland: Normal
Turkey: Most Priority, although concerns remain about treatment of Kurds, and increasing trend away from secularism.
Ukraine: Normal, but we have concerns regarding current political stability, corruption, and various other problems
United Kingdom: Most Priority
Vatican City: Normal
« Last Edit: June 03, 2012, 07:19:48 pm by SoEA SJoyceFla »Logged

SJoyce
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« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2012, 07:52:49 pm »
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Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to pressure the government to change course, not to change the regime itself. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, drugs, woman's rights (see pending legislation) and other issues.
Australia: Most Priority
Bahrain: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  The Atlasian Government strongly condemns the measures taken against protesters in Bahrain.
Bangladesh: Normal
Bhutan: Normal
Brunei: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Burma (Myanmar): Partial military and no economic restrictions.  The DoEA applauds the Government for beginning to make the transition towards democracy, and hopes to see such progress continue.
Cambodia: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and civil liberties.
China: Partial military restrictions and no economic restrictions, though we are very concerned over human rights, and political liberties. We realize that China is a major economic partner and full economic restrictions would be counter-productive to the Atlasian and global economy.
East Timor: Normal
Federated States of Micronesia: Normal
Fiji: Full military and partial economic restrictions.
Gaza Strip: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned about acts of terrorism against Israel committed by the Hamas and the human rights situation.
India: Most Priority
Indonesia: Most Priority
Iran: Full military and economic restrictions will remain in place until the Iranian regime makes full, honest and lasting overtures to democracy, as well as fully renouncing any attempt at a nuclear program.
Iraq: Normal, though we have major concerns about corruption and other issues.
Israel: Normal; the DoEA urges Israel to end all settlements and alter the current non-Green Line route of the West Bank separation barrier, in which case Most Priority status shall be granted. We also urge Israel to work harder towards reaching a settlement to the Palestinian crisis.
Japan: Most Priority
Jordan: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Kazakhstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We want a full transfer to democracy.
Kiribati: Normal
Kuwait: Normal.
Kyrgyzstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Laos: Normal, though we have concerns about human rights and basic freedoms.
Lebanon: Full military and no economic restrictions.
Malaysia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Maldives: Normal
Marshall Islands: Normal
Mongolia: Normal
Nauru: Normal
Nepal: Normal
New Zealand: Normal
North Korea: Full military and economic restrictions
Oman: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Pakistan: Partial military and no economic restrictions; we are extremely concerned about the apparent role of the ISI in harboring terrorists.
Palau: Normal
Papua New Guinea: Normal
Philippines: Normal
Qatar: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Samoa: Normal
Saudi Arabia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about the human rights situation and urge the government to make major democratic reforms.
Singapore: Normal, though we would like a true democracy.
Solomon Islands: Normal
South Korea: Normal
Sri Lanka: Normal, though we are concerned about a few issues. We urge the government to build a modern, peaceful, democratic and multi-ethnic state with peaceful ethnic relations in the wake of the end of the civil war.
Syria: Full military and economic restrictions.  The regime of Bashar al-Assad has committed significant human rights violations against its people, and it is time for Mr. Assad to accept the will of his people and resign his position and allow Syria to become a democratic state.
Tajikistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Thailand: Normal
Tonga: Normal
Turkmenistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Tuvalu: Normal
United Arab Emirates: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about workers rights and political freedoms.
Uzbekistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Vanuatu: Normal
Vietnam: Normal
West Bank:Normal. We are concerned about the current political situation, support a two state solution and would, in the near future, like a democratic and independent State of Palestine.
Yemen: Full military and no economic restrictions.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2012, 07:14:10 pm by SoEA SJoyceFla »Logged

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« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2012, 07:55:32 pm »
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Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to pressure the government to change course, not to change the regime itself. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.


DoEA Policy: Africa

Algeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Angola: Normal
Benin: Normal
Botswana: Normal
Burkina Faso: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and certain political freedoms.
Burundi: Normal, though we are still concerned about ethnic violence, corruption and certain political freedoms.
Cameroon: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Cape Verde: Normal
Central African Republic: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms and certain civil liberties.
Chad: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms, certain civil liberties and the political situation.
Comoros: Normal, though we are concerned by the current political situation
Congo: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the massive corruption and lack of political freedoms.
Cote d’Ivoire: Normal
Democratic Republic of the Congo: Full military and economic restrictions because of serious concerns about the political situation, continued violence, basic rights, corruption and treatment of women.
Djibouti: Full military and partial economic restrictions
Egypt: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We are very concerned about the lack of a full transition to democracy, and hope that Egypt can continue on its path to democratic reform.
Equatorial Guinea: Full military and economic restrictions
Eritrea: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns about the current situation, civil liberties and illegal weapons trading with Somalia.
Ethiopia: Normal.  We have concerns about political freedoms, internal violence and relations with Somalia.
Gabon: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Gambia: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Ghana: Normal
Guinea: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruptions. We support a return to civilian government.
Guinea-Bissau: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We are very concerned about the recent coup and its effects on the people.
Kenya: Normal
Lesotho: Normal
Liberia: Normal
Libya: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  It is the hope of the DoEA that Libya can make the transition to democracy.
Madagascar: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and political instability.
Malawi: Normal
Mali: Partial economic and no military restrictions.  We are very concerned about the recent coup and its effects on the people.
Mauritania: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: Normal, though we are concerned about certain political freedoms. On the matter of Western Sahara, we demand immediate negotiations concerning the status of Western Sahara, and the failure of Morocco to engage into talks will results in recognition of Sahrawi independence.
Mozambique: Normal
Namibia: Normal
Niger: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms and basic rights.
Nigeria: Normal.  There needs to be serious political reform and we are also worried about violence in the Niger Delta and the situation in the north.
Rwanda: Partial military and no economic restrictions, though we have concerns pertaining to freedom of the press and politics.
Sao Tome and Principe: Normal
Senegal: Normal
Seychelles: Normal
Sierra Leone: Normal
Somalia: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns regarding piracy and continued violence.
Somaliland: Normal.
South Africa: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption and their response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Sudan: Full military and economic restrictions. We strongly condemn the situation in Darfur, and would like to see an end to conflict with South Sudan.
South Sudan: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  While the DoEA wants South Sudan to succeed, it needs to abide by international law and respect its boundary with Sudan.
Swaziland: Full military and economic restrictions
Tanzania: Normal
Togo: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Tunisia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Uganda: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the political situation, human rights and corruption.
Zambia: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Zimbabwe: Full military and economic restrictions


A copy I can edit in case of amendments.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 07:59:52 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

SJoyce
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« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2012, 04:22:16 pm »
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Statement on Iran

Atlasia strongly condemns the Iranian nuclear test, conducted in violation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. We would like to make clear that any use of nuclear weapons against our allies in the region, such as Turkey, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and others, will result in a strong counter-response.

I request that the President transfer additional forces into the Gulf region for the time being to safeguard our crucial allies. I additionally request that a resolution condemning the Iranian action and demanding disarmament be introduced to the United Nations Security Council immediately. I shall take additional action after discussions with top officials of relevant key nations.
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« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2012, 05:16:10 pm »
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Statement to the United Nations Security Council

The Islamic Republic of Iran has recently tested a nuclear weapon, which poses a grave threat to the security and stability of the Middle East and the world. I urge this council to act swiftly in passing a resolution dealing with this threat, condemning it, and demanding that Iran immediately disarm. The international community must recognize the urgency of this threat and act now to impose sanctions banning the sale of arms, dual-use items, aircraft, aircraft equipment, and any nuclear or ballistic missile items to Iran, prohibiting the purchasing of Iranian debt, forbidding dealing with Iranian government-owned/controlled shipping companies or financial institutions, and freezing the assets of senior administration officials. A resolution doing exactly that has been submitted by the Atlasian ambassador to the United Nations, and is currently supported by the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Portugal.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 05:28:27 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

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« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2012, 09:24:54 pm »
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Recommendation on Israel and NATO

The Secretary of External Affairs formally recommends (with the President's consent) Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen invite Israel to join NATO's Partnership for Peace (including possible later Individual Partnership Action Plan and Intensified Dialogue), and notes that this is not necessarily a precursor to NATO membership, only designed to better Israel's trust with other NATO members in light of Iran's recent nuclear test.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 09:27:12 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

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« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2012, 04:25:03 pm »
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Statement on the Arrow 3 Project

The Department of External Affairs Missile Defense Agency has been directed to prioritize development of the new Arrow 3 antiballistic missile system and to allocate additional funds from the agency's budget towards the development and production of that missile system. The missile, developed by a combination of Israeli and Atlasian companies (such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Ceradyne, Raytheon, and Alliant Techsystems), is designed to intercept and destroy ballistic missiles, such as would be used to deliver a nuclear weapon.
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« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2012, 04:27:07 pm »
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Great moves...
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« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2012, 05:27:06 pm »
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Great moves...

Working on a more formal treaty of alliance now too.
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« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2012, 08:09:28 pm »
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Treaty
between the Republic of Atlasia and the
State of Israel for Defense and Security Cooperation

[Location], [Date]


As presented to the Senate
by the Secretary of External Affairs
by Command of the President
[Month, Year]



TREATY BETWEEN THE REPUBLIC OF ATLASIA AND THE STATE OF ISRAEL FOR DEFENSE AND SECURITY COOPERATION
The Republic of Atlasia and the State of Israel, hereinafter referred to as "The Parties",

Recalling that their foreign and defense policies are founded on common interests, values and responsibilities,

Mindful of their rights and obligations under the Charter of the United Nations,

Believing that greater defense and security cooperation strengthens the ties between their nations and international security,

Bearing in mind that they do not see situations arising in which the vital interests of either Party could be threatened without the vital interests of the other also being threatened,

Determined to address strategic challenges, promote international peace and security, ensure collective security, deter and dissuade against potential aggressors and counter threats, including terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and cyber-attacks,

Seeking to improve further the effectiveness and interoperability of their armed forces,

Recalling that the control of their armed forces, the decision to employ them and the use of force shall always remain a matter of national sovereignty,

Convinced that a technological and industrial defense base which is robust and competitive is both a strategic and an economic necessity for the two Parties,

Have agreed as follows:

ARTICLE 1
Objectives
The Parties, building on the existing strong links between their respective defense and security communities and armed forces, undertake to build a long-term mutually beneficial partnership in defense and security with the aims of:

1. maximizing their capacities through coordinating development, acquisition, deployment and maintenance of a range of capabilities, facilities, equipment, materials and services, to perform the full spectrum of missions, including the most demanding missions;

2. reinforcing the defense industry of the two Parties, fostering cooperation in research and technology and developing cooperative equipment programs;

3. deploying together into theatres in which both Parties have agreed to be engaged, in operations conducted under the auspices of the United Nations or in a coalition or bilateral framework, as well as supporting, as agreed on a case by case basis, one Party when it is engaged in operations in which the other Party is not part.

ARTICLE 2
Scope
The Parties agree that cooperation undertaken under the provisions of this Treaty
shall include:

1. the strengthening of the cooperation between the armed forces of both Parties which shall include increasingly close cooperation in the following fields: the conduct of joint exercises and other training activities; joint work on military doctrine and exchange of military personnel; sharing and pooling of materials, equipment and services, and, subject to the provisions of Article 5(2), close co-operation in contributing to and pooling forces and capabilities for military operations and employment of forces;

2. continuing and reinforcing the work on industrial and armament cooperation, involving industry as appropriate, through a long-term joint approach aimed at delivering effective military equipment in the most efficient manner, minimizing national constraints and strengthening industrial competitiveness;

3. the building and joint operating of such facilities as may be agreed between the Parties;

4. the sale or loan of materials, equipment and services by one Party to the other Party or the procurement by both Parties from third Parties;

5. the development of their defense technological and industrial bases around key technologies with efficient corporate governance mechanisms;

6. the attachment or exchange of personnel between the Parties;

7. the exchange of information relating to the political, policy, planning and decision-making processes involved in the planning, launching and command and control of bilateral and multilateral military and civil-military operations;

8. subject to national security regulations, the exchange of classified data and information relating to the performance of different defense equipment and systems as well as for operational purposes.

ARTICLE 3
Deployment and Employment of Forces
1. The deployment and employment of the armed forces of each Party shall remain a national responsibility at all times.

2. The deployment or employment of the armed forces of one Party together with or on behalf of the other Party in any operation shall be on the express command of the first Party and in agreement in writing with the other Party. Such deployment or employment shall involve, after careful consideration by both Parties, a direction by the Parties to their respective authorities concerning the strategic objectives, scale of operation, mission, duration and end state. The Parties shall form, in advance of deployment or employment, a common understanding of the purpose and the legal basis under international law for such deployment or employment and appropriate and complementary rules of engagement.

3. Appropriate command and control arrangements shall be agreed by both Parties for all bilateral deployments or operations.

ARTICLE 4
Access to Facilities, Equipment or Support Functions
1. Each Party undertakes to make available and to guarantee unhindered access to any facility, equipment and support function where cooperation undertaken under this Treaty has led to both Parties sharing facilities, equipment or support functions or to dependence by one Party on facilities, equipment or support
functions of the other Party, subject to any exceptions to such access set out in any applicable agreement or arrangement relating to such cooperation.

2. If such agreement or arrangement is terminated, its substantive provisions and the obligations referred to in paragraph 1 above shall continue to apply until such reasonable time as the other Party has generated or established or has access to an alternative facility or to an alternative source of such equipment or support function. Any modalities for implementing such continued application, where necessary, shall be defined in appropriate agreements or arrangements between the Parties.

3. In paragraphs 1 and 2 above the provision of support functions includes any necessary personnel.

ARTICLE 5
Procurement and Future Capability Programmes
The Parties undertake to compare, at the earliest possible dates, capability objectives and prospective programs and, to the greatest extent practicable, to harmonize timelines and requirements. The Parties undertake to consult before taking any decision on significant capability programs or procurement.

ARTICLE 6
Transfer, Access to the Market and Export Licensing
1. In implementing laws, regulations and any stated policies on the export of armament materials and technology, the Parties undertake to facilitate to the greatest extent possible the transfer of defense and security equipment and services between the Parties, consistent with their national licensing procedures.

2. Each Party undertakes not to hinder legitimate access to its markets and to its Government contracts in the field of defense and security.

3. The Parties agree to facilitate and promote the export of defense and security equipment jointly produced by Atlasian and Israeli entities to third parties, by agreement and within the framework of their respective national legislation.

4. The rights and obligations set out in paragraphs 1 to 3 above shall be subject to the international rights and obligations of the Parties, and shall accordingly be given effect in a manner consistent with such rights and obligations.

ARTICLE 7
Industry and Technology
1. The two Parties undertake to develop and to preserve key industrial capabilities and defense technologies so as to improve their independence in relation to key defense technologies and to increase their security of supply and to develop the operational capabilities of their armed forces.

2. To those ends, the Parties shall work to minimize unnecessary regulatory hindrance, improve dialogue between the defense companies of both Parties and foster their rationalization with the objective of enabling the purchase of equipment best suited to the performance and cost requirements of both Parties.

ARTICLE 8
Costs and Benefits
The Parties shall share equitably all costs and benefits incurred as a result of their involvement in the totality of cooperation undertaken under this Treaty, including all overhead and administrative costs unless otherwise provided for in related agreements or arrangements.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012, 08:16:01 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

SJoyce
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« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2012, 08:13:45 pm »
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ARTICLE 9
Information
1. The Parties shall enter into arrangements to facilitate the exchange of information, including classified information, for the purposes of co-operation under this Treaty.

2. As regards information in which intellectual property rights exist, nothing in this Treaty authorizes or governs the release, use, exchange or disclosure of information, whether classified or not, in which intellectual property rights exist, until the specific written authorization of the owner of those rights has been obtained, whether the owner is a Party to this Treaty or a third party.

ARTICLE 10
Claims and Liability
In the event of damage to property or injury or death caused by a willful act or omission or through gross negligence of one Party, its employees or agents, that Party shall be fully responsible for meeting or dealing with any resulting claims.

ARTICLE 11
Other Defense and Security Agreements
The provisions of this Treaty shall not affect the rights and obligations of each Party under other defense and security agreements to which it is a Party.

ARTICLE 12
Duration, Withdrawal and Termination
1. This Treaty shall continue in force until such time as either Party decides to withdraw from it after having given the other Party at least one months’ notice of its intention to do so.

2. During the notice period, the Parties shall decide on satisfactory
arrangements for the settlement of any outstanding liabilities. All provisions of this Treaty shall continue to apply during this period. Cooperation undertaken in accordance with specific agreements or arrangements shall continue after the termination of this Treaty in accordance with the provisions of the specific agreements or arrangements. The Parties may make any necessary amendments to those agreements or arrangements.

ARTICLE 13
Disputes
Any dispute regarding the interpretation or application of the provisions of this Treaty shall to the extent possible be resolved by consultations between the Parties. If a dispute cannot be resolved by consultations, the Parties may decide to refer it for settlement under a dispute settlement mechanism. The Parties shall decide upon the appropriate mechanism.

ARTICLE 14
Amendments
This Treaty may be amended at any time, in writing, by the agreement of both Parties.

ARTICLE 15
Entry into Force
This Treaty shall enter into force on the first day of the second month following the deposit of the later of the two instruments of ratification.


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, duly authorized by their respective Governments have signed this Treaty,

DONE at [Location] on the [Day] of [Month], [Year], in duplicate in the English and Hebrew languages, each text being equally authentic.

For the Republic of Atlasia:

For the State of Israel:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks to Senator Ben for sponsoring this.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012, 08:29:28 pm by Secretary of External Affairs SJoyceFla »Logged

Warner for Senate '14
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« Reply #23 on: May 22, 2012, 08:47:30 pm »
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Thanks to Senator Ben for sponsoring this.

Happy to my good man Smiley
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Obama High's debate team:

"Now let me be clear...I...I...um...uh...now let me be clear.  I strongly condemn the affirmative in the strongest possible terms, and I am closely monitoring their arguments.  Let me be clear on this."
SJoyce
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« Reply #24 on: May 24, 2012, 04:46:44 pm »
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Statement on the Recent Initiative Launched by the Attorney General

The Department of External Affairs is strongly opposed to the recent move by Attorney General Fuzzybigfoot to record the license plate numbers of all Muslims currently residing in Atlasia. The Department finds this action to be unnecessary, illogical, and detrimental to the relations of the Atlasian government with the Islamic community both here and abroad. In particular, the Department finds important allies such as Turkey, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia will be less likely to trust and work with Atlasia due to the Attorney General's actions, casting doubt as they do upon the loyalty and trustworthiness of Muslims. The Department of External Affairs would like to remind the Atlasian populace and the international community that they are not supportive of this action, and that the actions of the Attorney General do not necessarily correlate with our ability to co-operate with other nations. We hope that Atlasia can continue to work with Islamic nations such as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Turkey, and Pakistan in order to constrain Iran, despite this incident.
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