Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
April 24, 2014, 02:30:15 am
HomePredMockPollEVCalcAFEWIKIHelpLogin Register
News: Don't forget to get your 2013 Gubernatorial Endorsements and Predictions in!

+  Atlas Forum
|-+  General Discussion
| |-+  History
| | |-+  Alternative History (Moderator: True Federalist)
| | | |-+  Never Say Die! (Mark 2.0.)
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Print
Author Topic: Never Say Die! (Mark 2.0.)  (Read 2936 times)
Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« on: July 02, 2012, 04:31:05 pm »
Ignore

DISCLAIMER: After much consideration and consulting with fellow Americana veterans (those with AIM, to be precise), I decided to take another fresh try on Never Say Die!, starting in 1968, in order to provide actually complete picture.



November 6, 1968
Mobile, Alabama


...it's official: Richard M. Nixon elected nation's 37th President after a close, three-way race...

A man lying on the couch did not pay much attention to the radio, announcing victory of the candidate he voted for. He was one of those, who need some time after waking up to regain full awareness of what, where and when. And the fact he had a half of Jack Daniels bottle last evening wasn't helping a bit. After consuming two cups of strong coffee and smoking five cigarettes in the process, he decided against shaving. The race surely won't be called before tomorrow and all candidates agreed to not make any victory nor concession appearances before official certification.

The man was exhausted after spending last four months campaigning all across the state, sleeping at most three hours per day. F**k it, he decided, while making another coffee, I'm not going out today. Almost the same moment, someone knocked on the apartment's door.

S**t...

Jeff? Are you there? It's me, Walter.

The man reluctantly opened the door and let highly undesired, at this hour, guest in.

Christ, Walter, we agreed to meet at the evening, I'm kind of tired.

Sorry, Jeff, but I couldn't wait!

The man noticed a great excitement in Walter's voice. Would that really mean...

We did it?, he asked with a lot of scepticism, but also a lot of hope.

Yes, YES, Jeff! We totally did it!

We came in second?

Something better!

S**t... no, that's not possible... we reached 30%?

Jeff, we won!

Well, of course, 30% is a victory for us.

Jeff, you're not listening, we...

Came within 2%?

No.

Wow... I didn't expect this when while on weeds! How narrow?

Very, very narrow, but...

Allen or DeGraffenried?

Um...

Come on, Walter, I need to call the winner first thing.

Jeff, you're not going to call anyone.

Jesus, Walter, we've been discussing it already. There's a thing call tradition, protocol, something even Oklahoma Republicans are respecting. I need to make a concession call.

You're not conceding.

For the love of God, dude. We've accomplished something that exceeded our wildest dreams.  You want me to waste this by playing a sore loser? We never expected to win in first place, but these... how much exactly?

35%

... you're kidding me now.

I swear, Jeff. 35%

I won 35% of the vote in this state? This is a f**king victory and I have no reason to challenge it. Now, excuse me...

It's Allen who's going to call you.

Just stop... wait, now you're really kidding me...

No, Jeff, it's official and certain as all hell. You came in first.

The f**k...

That's right. You're the United States Senator-elect.

The man stayed quiet for a good minute.

Walter, that was never part of a plan for me to actually... get elected. The plan was to perform well and build some...

Jeff, isn't it wonderful?

What the f**k am I going to do now?!
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 04:32:51 pm by Vice President-elect Kalwejt »Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2012, 05:04:37 pm »
Ignore

Just got AIM. Hit me up next time.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2012, 12:02:17 am »
Ignore

UPSET IN ALABAMA
TIME, November 1968


Many people still don't quite realize the 1964 election was something more than a gigantic victory of an incumbent President over his opponent, perceived as "too extreme". While spectacularly failed to take the White House, Barry Goldwater not only changed the face of the Republican Party, by taking the reins away from an old, moderate Eastern guard, but also changed the political landscape.

Despite being buried in the biggest landslide nationwidely, Goldwater did something no Republican was able to accomplish since Reconstruction: carried five states in the Deep South, where white voters, outraged at LBJ's civil rights policies, decided to bury their historical hatred toward the GOP and back, with overwhelming numbers, a very diffrent kind of Republican. And no state better represented that than Alabama, the very "Heart of Dixie".

Not only Goldwater carried the state, but, riding on his coattails, the Republicans took a majority of the House seats, not to mention many other, local offices. Just as a lot of the Liberal Republicans, primarily in the Northeast, defected to the Democrats, many traditional Southern Democrats embraced their new party.

Yes, despite that, Alabama was fully expected to remain a solidly Democratic state on local level. After all even, George Wallace, who ran his third party campaign for Presidency, was formally listed on Alabama's ballot as "Democrat", while national nominee, Hubert Humphrey, was forced to appear as "Alabama National Democrat". In 1966, Alabama GOP lost a lot of their freshmen officeholders, which suggests that transition into at least two party state will take considerable time.

Taking it all under consideration, you can imagine the great suprise that came the same day Nixon, thanks to his Southern Strategy, won the Presidency, while Wallace confirmed his popularity in home state. Alabama elected her first Republican Senator since reconstruction.

And, what makes it even more bizarre, the Republican candidate clearly defied a nationwide trend, as he was indisputably, the most liberal of all three major candidates and is certainly going to be among Senate's most liberal members.

Until very end of the campaign, retaining the seat into Democratic hands was not a question. The question was, which Democrat is going to replace their retiring legend, J. Lister Hill.

After a bitter primary runoff former Lieutenant Governor Jim Allen, an archetypal conservative Southern Democrat and close Wallace's confidant, emerged as a winner with thin margin of about 230 votes. His main opponent, Tuscaloosa attorney and 1966 gubernatorial runner-up, Ryan DeGraffenried, refused to accept results and continued his campaign into general election as "Independent Democrat", picking up an endorsement from Hill himself. A moderate populist, DeGraffenried made it very clear if elected he's going to serve as Democrat, which essentially makes the whole race a matter within family.

Basically no one payed attention to the Republican candidate. While six years ago James Martin came within a hair to unseat veteran Hill, it was more a fluke than anything else. At least with his conservatism Martin fit well into Alabama politics. None of this could be said about Jefferson Dent.

Oddly, at first look he's representing a dream of the traditional Southern politician. A scion of one of the most prominent American political families, raised mostly at family plantation, graduated from the Yale Law School, where he belonged to the exclusive Skull and Bones secret society and volunteered in Vietnam, becoming the second living serviceman in this war decorated with Medal of Honor. Shortly: someone literally born into a traditional establishment, especially in the patriarchal Dixie.

And yet, 30-years old Dent was always a contarian or, shall we rather say, an infant terrible, rejecting the family's legacy and stubbornly following his own path, which during school years frequently landed him in trouble. During the height of the civil right struggle, he dedicated his spare time to aid both native Black activists, as well as freedom riders. After graduation, he defended his Black friend, accused of rape, but was unable to spare him from the electric chair, which tragic experience led him to seek a new beginning in the Navy. After being discharged, he briefly decided to follow a conventional path, by accepting a job of Assistant County Attorney, offered to him by his an old family friend. Yet, even more disillusioned with Alabama's court system and freshly remembering Vietnam experiences, he quit and dedicated his time to organize an antiwar movement in Alabama.

A Republican since 1958, Dent explained, that the civil rights issue led him to choose his affiliation. At that time, it was a logical choice for such a loose cannon like me in such state, he said. I've been an Alabama Republican way before it became fashionable and I'm not going to leave just because there's a bunch of new kids with diffrent taste, joining the club.

Shortly after his shocking victory, Dent admitted he did not run to win. It was simply impossible. We focused on something actually possible: coming as close as we only could and use the capital in future, perhaps for the House.

With this minimalistic goal, Dent restlessly campaigned through the entire state, while both Allen and DeGraffenried were busy fighting each other. He became the first politician in the Deep South to court newly enfranchised Black voters, trying to build a coalition of them, educated urban liberals and Jim Folsom's populists. This marathon, during which he fully utilized his sharp, witty style, was full of adventures, like when during a meeting in some Black town, an elderly woman cried: Christ, another Dent?! Haven't you Dents killed enough of us?!, or in Selma, where he was arrested after delivering a speech with memorable line: If someone else than George Wallace and Jim Allen were in State Capitol, we wouldn't have Gestapo beating the people of Selma on their streets

A murderous campaign paid off. Dent not only outperformed, he actually won. A memorable victory, even giving the circumstances of three-way race and, we already heard, no one was more surprised than the Senator-elect himself.

Now, despite actually winning was not part of the plan, Dent is going to Washington. Logically thinking, odds that he'll end up as one term wonder are great, but there will be interesting six years to watch.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2012, 07:07:04 am »
Ignore

As of January 1969:



Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2012, 08:07:41 am »
Ignore

Even though I've read much of this before in other threads and whatnot, still interesting. Part of me wants to wonder what if Dent was a bit more moderate and had chosen to stay with the GOP, creating a much different Southern party than we see today.
Logged

True Federalist
Ernest
Moderator
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 26693
United States


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 01:35:34 pm »

How did Wikipedia get going in the 1960's?  Wink
Logged

Daily Reflections on the Revised Common Lectionary

Bible thumping kept to a minimum unless you go to sleep!
The below comic stars me!
Dallasfan65
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5454


Political Matrix
E: 5.68, S: -9.74

View Profile
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2012, 10:56:23 pm »
Ignore

Thrilled to see you've given this a whirl, Kal. Smiley I think this will give us a much more in depth view of Jefferson Dent's tribulations through politics, and I am more than confident a writer of your caliber will do marvelously with this more protracted approach.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2012, 12:29:30 am »
Ignore

With Hill, who felt a lot of schadenfreude due to Wallace's machine unexpected humiliation in the Senate race the same day Wallace himself carried the state in landslide, deciding to resign his seat earlier, Jefferson Dent was sworn-in on December 15, 1968, which gave him an edge of seniority over other Senators elected in 1968, except of Kentucky's Marlow Cook.

Coming to Washington, he became, due to his background and circumstances surrounding his unexpected victory, an instant sensation, being refereed to by one of the capitol's newspapers as "Rhett Butler with Yale degree". Within days in office, he appeared as "mystery quest" in CBS's What's My Line?

However, Senate work proved to be very difficult. He was not only a member of the minority party, but also a liberal within increasingly conservative caucus, while many Democrats looked at him with suspicion due to his affiliation. Ironically, the only senior Senate member he was able to form, strictly personal not political, closer relationship was Mississippi's veteran segregationist James O. Eastland, whom he knew since childhood.

Dent was assigned to three committees by Minority Leader Everett Dirksen: Rules and Administration, Labor and Public Welfare and Small Business, with the first being totally powerless, and the freshman Senator himself having little idea and practically no experience in affairs second and third were handling. Naturally, he was passed over Foreign Relations, Judiciary and Armed Services.

Despite running an inspiring, witty and, in many ways, historical campaign, with new, hostile environment, Dent was unable to bring himself to speak on the Senate floor well until April, which led TIME to conclude: "we at least expected him to be entertaining and he's a great disappointment so far".
« Last Edit: July 04, 2012, 12:32:11 am by Vice President-elect Kalwejt »Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2012, 03:54:35 am »
Ignore

March 7, 1969
United States Senate chamber


A debate about food stamps, with Sen. Norris H. Cotton (R-NH) currently raging against their increase before almost empty chamber.

Dent: Mr. President, point of order?
President: The Senator from Alabama.
Dent: Mr. President, I'd like to ask if the Senator from New Hampshire would be willing to yield the floor for a brief moment.
Cotton: Mr. President, I yield the floor to the Senator from Alabama.
Dent: Thank you, Senator. Mr. President, this debate about food stamps is missing one important element, which need to be said right now. The Senator from New Hampshire just said that the calls for increasing food stamps are strictly politically motivated and I must strongly disagree. There's no way you can make political points on hunger. Those facing extreme poverty are not even registered to vote. But the fact they don't vote doesn't make their hunger any less real. I just want to add that during my campaign a few months ago I visited a lot of poverty stricken areas, particularly in the Appalachian part of my state, and even while I had an abstract knowledge about the existence of this problem, I was simply shocked when seeing the gravity of it on my own eyes. Thank you, Mr. President, I yield the floor back.
President: The Senator from New Hampshire.
Hm, Dent thought, sitting back at his desk and resuming reading PLAYBOY. It wasn't so hard.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2012, 04:29:53 pm by Vice President-elect Kalwejt »Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2012, 04:50:48 pm »
Ignore

A WASTED SEAT
Dothan Eagle, February 1969


We, in South in general and in Alabama in particular, have pretty high expectations toward our representatives in Congress. They are not just some folks we're sending up to D.C. to participate in national politics, as required by the Constitution. They are foremost our representatives, watching out for Alabama's interests.

A long line of veteran statesmen like Lister Hill, John Sparkman, the Bankheads, just to recall few of the most distinguished examples, dedicated their magnificent careers to make sure the people of Alabama won't be forgotten in Washington and that we'll, as the great state, get our fair share.

Highly unfortunately, our new United States Senator, a man who "replaced" the great Hill, is certainly the worst prepeared man to do this vital task.

Jefferson Dent is not only young and inexperienced. Worse, this immature, radical agenda, that is surely making his distinguished ancestors, who are justly remembered among the greatest sons of the Southland, rolling in their graves, as well as total isolation within both parties, makes it virtually impossible for him to accomplish anything, even if he wishes to.

Democracy is democracy. We elected Jeff Dent, aka "Hippie Senator", for six years and we'll have to stick with it, despite damage for Alabama's affairs his presence in D.C. is already causing. Fortunately, we won't have to stick with him for a lifetime. This fluke will go away in time and things shall return to normal order.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2012, 05:13:24 pm »
Ignore

DON'T LET US DOWN, JEFF!
The Progressive, March 1969.


Despite a lot of deliberately bad press he's already receiving from the conservative medias, as well as a "liberal" establishment, Jefferson Dent, the new United States Senator from Alabama, has already accomplished a great thing. His election alone was a victory for progressive ideas, a true bright spot in otherwise bad year of 1968.

Take a moment and think about it's significance. Not only he was elected on an outspoken civil rights platform in the very heart of Deep South, it's also about who he became. A heir to arguably the most powerful Southern political dynasty, that symbolized the dark years of racial oppression and egoistic elites power, who choose to take his own path, a very difficult one, and, despite all probabilities, achieved success. We can already say that he is the first representative of new generation in national politics, the generation that is opposing our shameful war in Vietnam, which Dent experienced on his own skin, and is demanding more freedom and openness. One reactionary columnist called him "a counterculture Senator" and I don't think there's any reason he should be ashamed of it, to the contrary!

Jeff, we understand that, under fossil Senate rules, you are powerless. No seniority, no political machine, no foothold within either Democratic or Republican causes. But you do have voice, and you do have a platform!

You can choose to play by the rules and, certainly, fail to accomplish anything this corrupt way without betraying yourself, of you can use your position to become a voice for the new generation and the new values, that were without voice and without a spokesman until now.

You can be a pathmaker, a pioneer of the new spirit in national politics, that had no place in the corridors of power before. Please, don't let us down!
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2012, 06:21:14 pm »
Ignore

Dent was not the only one still having troubles with coming to terms with his new situation. Walter Robertson, the one who, with some difficulty as we remember, broke news to the Senator about his election, had the same problem. He was sitting before his desk at Dent's new office, trying to do some actual work, without much success, of course. Looks like being the first Black staffer to the Southern Senator wasn't much easier than being the Senator.

The two meet in 1961, during a height of the civil right battle. Currently 40-years old Robertson was one of those local Black activist, that needed a safe place to stay ASAP, and, to his suprise, this safe place was provided by no one else than a man named Dent, descendant of the very same Dents Robertson grew up hating. Nevertheless, the two became lifelong friends and, when Dent opened a private law practice in Mobile, started to work together. Robertson had no legal education, but possessed a brilliant legal mind, therefore becoming an unofficial partner in the firm. And now, he landed here, in D.C.

Robertson: Hi, Jeff.
The Senator just entered the room.
Dent: Hey, dude.
Robertson: Congratulations on your maiden speech.
Dent: The chamber was empty, no one cared.
Robertson: Remarks were quite good.
Dent: Nope, it sucked.
Robertson: OK.
Dent: Look, I've been wondering. Do you think, if we played by the book, we'd actually be here?
Robertson: What do you mean "by the book"?
Dent: If we ran to win. You know we never expected to win.
Robertson: Well, Senator...
Dent: Hello, I have a f**king name.
Robertson: I know, Jeff, but you better get used to this.
Dent: A title is the only thing I get used to so far.
Robertson: Well, to answer your question, Jeff, I don't think so. If you were running to win, you'd certainly have to take a conventional path.
Dent: That's pretty funny, isn't it?
Robertson: You'd then become a generic third candidate, no one would really cared about, beside some mountain Republicans that failed to notice how political climate had changes. But you were yourself. You haven't thought about winning, but about making a damn, loud point, so you were at your best, and frankly, you still have to start believing in yourself, mate. Allen and DeGraffenried were locked in a conventional battle for conventional electorate, while you won over those just recently included into system, myself including. With closeness of a three way race, they provided you with needed votes to win. And why? Because you were yourself, not some conventional white asshole politician.
Dent: Pretty weird, isn't it?
Robertson: And that's the whole beauty of the situation.
Dent: Not really, it's kind like bad and bad situation. If I haven't ran the way I did, I wouldn't be here, but, I won.
Robertson: Duh.
Dent: I won never assuming in the wildest dreams I have any shot. You know better than anyone it was to build a position for future and, therefore, I have no plan and no clue what to do?
Robertson: You know what, screw it! For senior Senators you may be some weird anomaly that should be just ignored, but your victory was incredibly important for many people across the United States, Black, liberals, young... You being elected in such a freaking year like 1968, in such a freaking state like Alabama, was a sign of hope for possible change. Even establishment reactionaries do realize that and they are already scared of you, that's why you're getting this treatment. But you have to realize this as well.
Dent: I'm not sure if I can accomplish anything, Walter.
Robertson: They don't play by a freaking book. Play against the book: you just did it and look where it get you!
Dent: (after a longer pause) All right, Walter, I'm a f**king anomaly, an one term wonder with no future, I'm finished before I even started... but before I go, I'll rock the s**t of this place!
Robertson: Now, that's a f**king spirit... Senator.
Dent: F**k you.

And that's how it really started.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2012, 12:35:24 pm »
Ignore

Ted Kennedy had mixed feelings about a man, who just replaced him as the "Baby of the Senate". And no, neither ancestry, geography nor party affiliation were causing it. In fact, the two had seemingly a lot in common: being literally born into politics, having fondness for stronger drinks as well as the ladies.

Also ideologically, Kennedy and Dent were much closer than the Junior Senator from Alabama was to his own caucus or fellow Southerners. Ted was also really impressed with rare political skills Jeff displayed by running a campaign he couldn't possibly win, yet succeeded.

That being said, despite all these differences, Dent did something Ted couldn't do: he rejected his family's traditions and legacy, and started on his own from nothing.

Unknowingly to the most, Kennedy actually considered moving away from under his authoritarian father's wings to the Rocky Mountains states and starting a career there on his own, but, at the end he was unable to even try to disobey old Joe.

That's why since last December, Kennedy barely speak to Dent, feeling a strange combination of being impressed, jealous and glad he's, after all, a "serious politician with serious future". He didn't know he was just months away from forging one of the most enduring friendships in U.S. politics...
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2012, 06:36:28 pm »
Ignore

FORMER FIRST DAUGHTER AND SENATOR DIES
March 30, 1969


Ethel Wilson Dent, the youngest daughter of former President Woodrow Wilson and his first wife, Ellen, died on Saturday at Dent County Medical Center in Eufaula, Alabama. No official cause of death was given yet. She was 78.

Remembered as a strong-willed girl who dreamed to become an archaeologist in her teens, Ethel was a subject of her father's serious concerns, who considered her independence as symptoms of lack of intelligence and even briefly considered, according to the contemporaries, putting her at mental hospital. However, shortly after he was elected President in 1912, Ethel became a subject of an arranged political marriage to then-Congressman Winfield Scott Dent, a heir to the Southern political dynasty, whose patriarch at the time, Preston Barnes Dent, played a key role in Wilson winning the Democratic nomination.

Described by some, due to the circumstances of her marriage, as "Princess Sissi of the Dixie", she retained, like the real Sissi, her rebellious spirit and even escaped from Dent County estate in 1914, before being brought back by the Secret Service agents and personally spanked by Prescott Dent, then DNC Chairman.

She and Winfield remained married until his death in 1953, although she dedicated her time to children as well as other activities, such as financially aiding Negro colleges in the South and being active in movement for improving mental health care all over the United States. In early 1930s she went as far to discreetly financing defense of the famous Scottsboro Boys.

After Hugo Black resigned his Senate seat to become Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in 1937, Alabama Governor Bibb Graves nominated Ethel to replace him, which was described by some as "the most shameless butt-licking ever" toward her husband, the leading Southern Democrat.

The move backfired, as Ethel, the fourth female Senator in U.S. history, did not limit herself to keeping the seat warm. She authored a compressive bill aiming at reform mental health institutions and caused considerable controversy when become the first Senator from the South to vote for an anti-lynching legislation, which caused Senator Ellison D. "Cotton Ed" Smith of South Carolina to say to Winfield Dent: Either divorce or just shot your crazy bitch. She served from August 10, 1937 to January 1938, when Lister Hill was elected.

Appointed by President Roosevelt, who reportedly had a strong crush on her while Assistant Secretary of the Navy, to a committee studying mental health care issues, but her government service ended with Truman coming to power in 1945. Nevertheless, she continued to be active until last days.

Ether Wilson Dent had a strong influence on her grandson, Jefferson, who just had been elected to replace retiring veteran Hill last November.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2012, 08:26:31 am »
Ignore

September 15, 1969

Senator Jefferson Dent of Alabama has been suspended from the Republican Conference and was stripped from all his committee assignments by Minority Leader Everett Dirksen.

His utter lack of respect toward ancient Senate customs and compulsive obstructionism will not be tolerated in the Grand Old Party!, Dirksen said to the press.

Senator Dirksen is a great man who died around the year of 1964, Dent fired back. I have no idea who is this guy telling me I'm suspended, but that's not Senator Dirksen we all knew.

Dent also declined he may caucus with the Democrats. I've been elected as a Republican and no leadership decision can change the fact.

Seven days later, Senator Dirksen agreed with Dent statement and really died.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2012, 12:00:14 pm by Zogby »Logged

Dallasfan65
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5454


Political Matrix
E: 5.68, S: -9.74

View Profile
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2012, 10:52:45 am »
Ignore

Dirksen is awfully picky for the leader of a caucus with 44 members.

Keep up the good work. It'll be interesting to see if Dent flies the coop or slugs it out with the more conservative members of the ALGOP (Hooper, Martin, etc.)
Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2012, 11:02:36 am »
Ignore

Hatin' on Everett like that. Angry

But nonetheless, good stuff so far.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2012, 11:13:28 am »
Ignore

Hatin' on Everett like that. Angry

Hey, he turned out dead after all.
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2012, 09:16:38 am »
Ignore

Alabama Free Soil Party
From wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Alabama Free Soil Party was created in the early 1970, after expulsion of a liberal Senator Jefferson Dent from the Republican conference. Taking it's name from the eighteen century antislavery Free Soil Movement, the Alabama Free Soil united pre-1964 Goldwater landslide Republicans, mostly from the northern counties, with their populist traditions, a predominately African American Alabama National Democratic Party (which endorsed Dent in 1968) as well as liberal dissidents from the regular Alabama Democratic Party.

In 1970 gubernatorial election, the Free Soil voters largely supporter an incumbent Governor Albert Brewer, a racial moderate, in his narrow but successfull bid to win a term on his own, which ended George Wallace's political career. Brewer himself took pages from Dent's, now a Free Soil Party leader, upset 1968 victory, by appealing to the African American voters.

After a lot of negotiations, in early 1971 the Free Soil Party merged with a regular state Democratic Party, now controlled by Brewer supporters and anti-Wallace elements, such as powerful chairman, Robert S. Vance.

The formation of the Alabama Democratic-Free Soil Party, a statewide affiliate of the national Democratic Party (similarly to the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party and North Dakota Democratic-Nonpartisan League Party) stopped a rapid growth of the regular, conservative Republican Party, which nonethelessly accepted the most conservative Democrats.

« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 10:48:50 am by Vice President & SoEA Kalwejt »Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2012, 10:45:23 am »
Ignore

Having done some reading on Republicans in Kentucky and Tennessee for a list of CSA Presidents in the "Collaborative Elections Thread", I now realize that Republicans pretty much were the progressive party in the south for the earlier half of the twentieth century. So yes, I finally get where Dent is coming from in terms of joining the AL GOP, though it seems he just switched. What a shame.
Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2012, 10:46:11 am »
Ignore

Also, is there a county map we could look at for the '68 Senate election that either you or Dallas could cook up?
Logged

Dallasfan65
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 5454


Political Matrix
E: 5.68, S: -9.74

View Profile
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2012, 11:22:58 am »
Ignore



Already done my friend Cheesy
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2012, 01:14:01 pm »
Ignore

Alabama Democratic-Republican Party
From wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Alabama Democratic-Republican Party was formed in the mid-1970s, as a result of establishment of the Alabama Democratic-Free Soil Party, which united state's progressive Democrats and traditional Republicans.

The Democratic-Republican Party largely succeeded the emerging, since the 1964 Barry Goldwater's coattails, modern Alabama Republican Party and became the facto state's branch of a national GOP. However, in order to bring defecting conservative Democrats, who still were influenced by traditions of the "Solid South", a curious name was adopted, as party leaders were strongly emphasizing "Jeffersonian", "state's rights" and "modern conservative" ideas.



If any of you guys have cooler name in mind, please tell.
Logged

Cathcon
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 14818
United States


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2012, 05:48:10 pm »
Ignore

Will we get a DR vs. FS Senate race in '74? Or maybe for the Governorship in 1970?
Logged

Abdul the Damned
Kalwejt
YaBB God
*****
Posts: 37892
Turkey
View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2012, 08:54:28 pm »
Ignore

Thad O'Connor leaned back at his chair and lighted a cigarette. A man with humble attitude, pretty characteristic for stoic people from Upper New England, he was still kind of surprised where he did land. Just a few months ago, he returned from hell of Vietnam, returned earlier than expected due to injury, and had nothing to do. Out of both anger over government military policy, as well as simple boredom, he decided to get involved in a political campaign deep in the South, for an outspoken antiwar liberal Republican candidate, with no chance of winning. It turned out, the candidate did win and what was supposed to be a brief adventure in unfriendly territory, turned out to be a permanent job as a political aide in the new Junior United States Senator from Alabama office.

Good evening, Senator, Thad said, as his boss entered the office.

Senator my ass, he replied. I have a name, you know?

All right, Jeff... there's something that's bugging me.
'
What is that?

Why there is a... um... Woodrow Wilson photo in your office?

It's in the toilet, Thad. Toilet is the only appropriate place in this office where we can keep his memory alive.

Thad collapsed from the chair due to his uncontrolled laugh.
Logged

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Logout

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines