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Author Topic: Swing voters in this election  (Read 682 times)
Less-Progressivism, More Realism
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« on: July 08, 2012, 06:11:11 pm »
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Since no one cares about the votes of committed Democrats and Republicans, who are the swing voters in this election?
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thrillr1111
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2012, 07:13:57 pm »
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Since no one cares about the votes of committed Democrats and Republicans, who are the swing voters in this election?


Independent voters in swing states or voters in general who are still undecided like upset dems and reps. my guess...
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angus
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2012, 10:02:08 pm »
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I swing. 

Seriously, I voted for Obama in 2008.  I will not in 2012. 

Swingers are highly educated, frustrated folks who mostly watch Star Trek reruns and wonder why we haven't yet invented a food replicator.  I voted for Obama in 2008 expecting to be able to say, "Tea, Earl Grey" to my television and get a steaming hot cup of tea withing seconds.  Needless to say, he has not delivered.

Hopefully, and putting aside the fact that Mormons do not take tea, Romney is a better bet.  That's just me.  Problem with swingers is that they're unpredictable.  Some are registered Democrats, some are registered Republicans, and some are unaffiliated.  Probably for every angus there's at least one Joe Republic, know what I mean? 
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thrillr1111
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2012, 10:22:49 pm »
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I swing.  

Seriously, I voted for Obama in 2008.  I will not in 2012.  

Swingers are highly educated, frustrated folks who mostly watch Star Trek reruns and wonder why we haven't yet invented a food replicator.  I voted for Obama in 2008 expecting to be able to say, "Tea, Earl Grey" to my television and get a steaming hot cup of tea withing seconds.  Needless to say, he has not delivered.

Hopefully, and putting aside the fact that Mormons do not take tea, Romney is a better bet.  That's just me.  Problem with swingers is that they're unpredictable.  Some are registered Democrats, some are registered Republicans, and some are unaffiliated.  Probably for every angus there's at least one Joe Republic, know what I mean?  



U really expected obama to deliver on all his promises by himself? Just like the jobs bills that the president  can't sign until the republicans pass it. Lol... looks like you will be swinging back and fourth for a long time unless you in the upper income level.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 10:24:36 pm by thrillr1111 »Logged
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2012, 11:11:53 pm »
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I swing. 

Seriously, I voted for Obama in 2008.  I will not in 2012.

I voted Republican in 2008.  I will not in 2012.  If I thought the GOP had a shot at landsliding the Senate or would have the gumption to eliminate the filibuster, I could hold my nose and vote for Romney to ensure that we get an undivided government that could govern, I would.  But I don't see that happening no matter who wins the White House, so neither Romney nor Obama has much chance of getting their domestic policy enacted.   That mutes the importance of their differences there as far as I am concerned.  Romney has taken positions that would be an absolute disaster for our foreign policy and Obama has proven to be much better on foreign policy these past 3˝ years than I thought he would.  Probably won't vote Obama either unless none of the third party options meet with my approval.  Being better than Romney is not exactly a great reason to vote for Obama, and in any case, no matter who I vote for, South Carolina's 9 electoral votes will be going to Romney.
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2012, 01:12:08 am »
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Uh, I guess I would count as a swing, but I'm not going with either.
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2012, 01:24:43 am »
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My mother and her husband both voted for Obama in 2008, and it was the first time she voted Democratic since her first time voting in 1988.

Now, both of them are undecided, but more-so my mother than her husband. When talking about the election last week, both of them mentioned a few things that "got under their skin" recently.

1. High federal taxes. Both claim they're having to give more to the Government than they did under the Bush years.

2. The gay marriage thing. Even my mother's Democratic husband told me, "I can't believe he just did that" in reaction to President Obama's gay marriage flip.

3. The "We've got your back" advertisement for black people to vote for Obama. My mother and her husband both thought it was from a joke website and I had to show them that it was actually real. Their reactions were both a simultaneous, "Jesus..."

They both said they're waiting for the debates. Their biggest claim for not being entirely behind Romney is that they "haven't heard specifics" from him yet.

I got one for ya that spun me around...I was talking to an acquaintance of a guy I know. He's in his 40s, a union construction worker who votes Democratic everytime. He said, "I've never voted Republican before...but I'm voting for Mitt Romney." I asked why. He said, "Because ever since Obama became President, these blacks all walk around with a little more attitude than they used to and I'm tired of it."

I was taken aback.
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2012, 01:57:05 am »
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I got one for ya that spun me around...I was talking to an acquaintance of a guy I know. He's in his 40s, a union construction worker who votes Democratic everytime. He said, "I've never voted Republican before...but I'm voting for Mitt Romney." I asked why. He said, "Because ever since Obama became President, these blacks all walk around with a little more attitude than they used to and I'm tired of it."

I was taken aback.
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« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2012, 08:06:04 am »
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I swing. 

Seriously, I voted for Obama in 2008.  I will not in 2012.

I voted Republican in 2008.  I will not in 2012.  If I thought the GOP had a shot at landsliding the Senate or would have the gumption to eliminate the filibuster, I could hold my nose and vote for Romney to ensure that we get an undivided government that could govern, I would.  But I don't see that happening no matter who wins the White House, so neither Romney nor Obama has much chance of getting their domestic policy enacted.   That mutes the importance of their differences there as far as I am concerned.  Romney has taken positions that would be an absolute disaster for our foreign policy and Obama has proven to be much better on foreign policy these past 3˝ years than I thought he would.  Probably won't vote Obama either unless none of the third party options meet with my approval.  Being better than Romney is not exactly a great reason to vote for Obama, and in any case, no matter who I vote for, South Carolina's 9 electoral votes will be going to Romney.

I sort of feel the same.  I guess it's no surprise that our political matrix scores are similar.  (Are South Carolinians among those who think that "Texas isn't really the South"?  Virginians seem to be arrogant assholes on this point.) 

I didn't vote for the GOP in 2008 -- though I considered doing so only to "shoot the bird" at the MSM for its hateful and fraudulent attacks on Sarah Palin.  I voted for the Constitution Party.

I have a little different view than you re. the GOP taking the Senate.  I've said that if I were convinced that the GOP would win the Senate, then I'd prefer Obama to Romney.  Since the SCOTUS decision on ObamaCare, I am now convinced they will take the Senate, so I'm hoping for Obama to win (but I doubt it) and for divided government that can't get anything done.
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angus
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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2012, 12:33:13 pm »
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I swing. 

Seriously, I voted for Obama in 2008.  I will not in 2012.

I voted Republican in 2008.  I will not in 2012.  If I thought the GOP had a shot at landsliding the Senate or would have the gumption to eliminate the filibuster, I could hold my nose and vote for Romney to ensure that we get an undivided government that could govern, I would.  But I don't see that happening no matter who wins the White House, so neither Romney nor Obama has much chance of getting their domestic policy enacted.   That mutes the importance of their differences there as far as I am concerned.  Romney has taken positions that would be an absolute disaster for our foreign policy and Obama has proven to be much better on foreign policy these past 3˝ years than I thought he would.  Probably won't vote Obama either unless none of the third party options meet with my approval.  Being better than Romney is not exactly a great reason to vote for Obama, and in any case, no matter who I vote for, South Carolina's 9 electoral votes will be going to Romney.

I normally don't like having the same party control both elected branches of government.  When I vote for a democrat for president I almost always support the GOP for house and senate, and vice-versa.  Best years we ever had, imho, were when Clinton was president with a Republican house.  So normally, if I'm supporting Romney, I'm supporting the democrats in local races. 

This year it's sort of different, mostly because I'd like to see a complete repeal of the PPACA.  The only way that's possible is with Republicans in control of both chambers and the white house.  I'd probably go back to supporting divided government beyond that.  Gridlock is good.  If they're not passing laws, then they aren't screwing anything up.  And that's the best way:  government is best that governs least. 
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ajc0918
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« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2012, 12:38:27 pm »
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I would have voted for McCain in 2008, but now I'm supporting Pres. Obama. Then again, a lot of my views have shifted.
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« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2012, 02:03:43 pm »
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Obama is a dismal president thus far. Need somebody else.
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« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2012, 02:32:09 pm »
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I am a swing voter. I just swing between center-left and far-left. For municipal races and smaller, more obscure statewide gigs, I am a bit more open to the GOP when they have a candidate that doesn't piss me off (either as a standalone or against the Dem). I've supported a few Libertarians in my day, as well...
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« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2012, 03:05:46 pm »
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My mother and her husband both voted for Obama in 2008, and it was the first time she voted Democratic since her first time voting in 1988.

Now, both of them are undecided, but more-so my mother than her husband. When talking about the election last week, both of them mentioned a few things that "got under their skin" recently.

1. High federal taxes. Both claim they're having to give more to the Government than they did under the Bush years.

2. The gay marriage thing. Even my mother's Democratic husband told me, "I can't believe he just did that" in reaction to President Obama's gay marriage flip.

3. The "We've got your back" advertisement for black people to vote for Obama. My mother and her husband both thought it was from a joke website and I had to show them that it was actually real. Their reactions were both a simultaneous, "Jesus..."

They both said they're waiting for the debates. Their biggest claim for not being entirely behind Romney is that they "haven't heard specifics" from him yet.

I got one for ya that spun me around...I was talking to an acquaintance of a guy I know. He's in his 40s, a union construction worker who votes Democratic everytime. He said, "I've never voted Republican before...but I'm voting for Mitt Romney." I asked why. He said, "Because ever since Obama became President, these blacks all walk around with a little more attitude than they used to and I'm tired of it."[/i]

I was taken aback.

If Romney is willing to pick up those kinds of voters then I say let him have 'em.  For every swing voter with a racist attitude, there are probably 2 more who will vote for Obama just as a big F-U to Mr. construction worker.
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