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| | |-+  EC supporters: Do you think any other place should have an "electoral college"?
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Author Topic: EC supporters: Do you think any other place should have an "electoral college"?  (Read 5791 times)
The Mikado
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« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2017, 06:07:28 pm »
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Both Argentina and Brazil used to, though they eventually got rid of theirs.
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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2017, 11:38:19 pm »
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Germany not only uses an electoral college to elect its President, its the same way the EC was initially designed, with the states choosing the electors, not voters directly. Of course the President of Germany is mostly just a ceremonial office.
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« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2017, 12:13:58 pm »
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It really would work in a country as geographically, demographically, politically, and culturally diverse and encompassing as our own. The Electoral College system is a uniquely American brand. I really can't see it being practiced anywhere else successfully in the world at this point.
India? Perhaps China when it becomes more democratic?
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« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2017, 08:39:06 pm »
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The 50 state governments and France (the two places mentioned by OP) are both examples of unitary governments, whereas an electoral college makes sense in a federal system.

In fact, very few democratic countries elect their chief executives directly.  The UK, Germany, Sweden, Japan, India all use parliamentary systems which, I would argue, is far more of an affront to democracy than the electoral college.
Care to explain why you think that?

Voters do not directly vote for their chief executive.  They vote for an MP who then votes for a Prime Minister in parliament.  The electoral college is a more direct election process, and it at least allows voters to illustrate a preference for a split legislative/executive branch.

What is someone to do if they love their local MP but hate that party's leader/candidate for PM?  or vice-versa? 

Same thing you do if you love Gregg Harper (or whoever, I don't know where in MS you are) but hate Paul Ryan?

Also your critique applies to the UK and India. It doesn't really apply to Germany, Sweden, or Japam.
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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2017, 11:56:55 am »
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The 50 state governments and France (the two places mentioned by OP) are both examples of unitary governments, whereas an electoral college makes sense in a federal system.

In fact, very few democratic countries elect their chief executives directly.  The UK, Germany, Sweden, Japan, India all use parliamentary systems which, I would argue, is far more of an affront to democracy than the electoral college.
Care to explain why you think that?

Voters do not directly vote for their chief executive.  They vote for an MP who then votes for a Prime Minister in parliament.  The electoral college is a more direct election process, and it at least allows voters to illustrate a preference for a split legislative/executive branch.

What is someone to do if they love their local MP but hate that party's leader/candidate for PM?  or vice-versa? 

Same thing you do if you love Gregg Harper (or whoever, I don't know where in MS you are) but hate Paul Ryan?

Also your critique applies to the UK and India. It doesn't really apply to Germany, Sweden, or Japam.
The issue is that Paul Ryan isn't the nation's chief executive. The Prime Minister in the Westminster parliamentary system is the chief executive of the nation and isn't elected by the body populace.
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« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2017, 01:42:17 pm »

The 50 state governments and France (the two places mentioned by OP) are both examples of unitary governments, whereas an electoral college makes sense in a federal system.

In fact, very few democratic countries elect their chief executives directly.  The UK, Germany, Sweden, Japan, India all use parliamentary systems which, I would argue, is far more of an affront to democracy than the electoral college.
Care to explain why you think that?

Voters do not directly vote for their chief executive.  They vote for an MP who then votes for a Prime Minister in parliament.  The electoral college is a more direct election process, and it at least allows voters to illustrate a preference for a split legislative/executive branch.

What is someone to do if they love their local MP but hate that party's leader/candidate for PM?  or vice-versa? 

Same thing you do if you love Gregg Harper (or whoever, I don't know where in MS you are) but hate Paul Ryan?

Also your critique applies to the UK and India. It doesn't really apply to Germany, Sweden, or Japam.
The issue is that Paul Ryan isn't the nation's chief executive. The Prime Minister in the Westminster parliamentary system is the chiesf executive of the nation and isn't elected by the body populace.

That's because the drafters of the Constitution didn't want the President to owe anything to the votes of Congress, keeping with the idea of a separation of powers. The result was a body that numbered as many as Congress, but was independent of Congress.
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« Reply #31 on: March 30, 2017, 04:19:39 pm »
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The 50 state governments and France (the two places mentioned by OP) are both examples of unitary governments, whereas an electoral college makes sense in a federal system.

In fact, very few democratic countries elect their chief executives directly.  The UK, Germany, Sweden, Japan, India all use parliamentary systems which, I would argue, is far more of an affront to democracy than the electoral college.
Care to explain why you think that?

Voters do not directly vote for their chief executive.  They vote for an MP who then votes for a Prime Minister in parliament.  The electoral college is a more direct election process, and it at least allows voters to illustrate a preference for a split legislative/executive branch.

What is someone to do if they love their local MP but hate that party's leader/candidate for PM?  or vice-versa? 

Same thing you do if you love Gregg Harper (or whoever, I don't know where in MS you are) but hate Paul Ryan?

Also your critique applies to the UK and India. It doesn't really apply to Germany, Sweden, or Japam.
The issue is that Paul Ryan isn't the nation's chief executive. The Prime Minister in the Westminster parliamentary system is the chief executive of the nation and isn't elected by the body populace.

But that's only a problem in Westminster systems, not in proportional systems.
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Note: I am not actually British.

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« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2017, 10:48:02 pm »
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And for the record I think the Westminster system is just as flawed as the US system if not moreso, even though I like the aesthetic of it.
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