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August 21, 2017, 04:50:32 pm
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| |-+  Political Debate (Moderators: Beet, Apocrypha)
| | |-+  Should the French Monarchy be Restored?
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Poll
Question: ?
No   -50 (61.7%)
Yes, and it should be a Constitutional Monarchy   -15 (18.5%)
Yes, and it should be an Absolute Monarchy   -16 (19.8%)
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Total Voters: 81

Author Topic: Should the French Monarchy be Restored?  (Read 1892 times)
Goldwater
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« Reply #50 on: August 11, 2017, 03:12:02 pm »
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No, and anyone who proposes such a thing is un-American.

I forget, was it the 1st or 2nd French Republic that enabled the American colonies to win their war of independence ?

Enemy of my enemy, lesser of two evils, etc.

?

What's to question?

relevance.

I realize I didn't word that very well. My point was that the United States and the French Monarchy having a common enemy in England doesn't necessarily mean that the French Monarchy stood for the same values as the United States.
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The result of a neocon and libertarian having a baby while drunk, and leaving it to be raised by hippie liberal wolves.
Here is my attempt and explaining my own confusing and contradictory views
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« Reply #51 on: August 11, 2017, 06:13:28 pm »
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No, and anyone who proposes such a thing is un-American.

I forget, was it the 1st or 2nd French Republic that enabled the American colonies to win their war of independence ?

Enemy of my enemy, lesser of two evils, etc.

?

What's to question?

relevance.

I realize I didn't word that very well. My point was that the United States and the French Monarchy having a common enemy in England doesn't necessarily mean that the French Monarchy stood for the same values as the United States.

Faure, Murat, and Fouché were almost certainly the main three who convinced Napoleon to repress certain liberties, as well as the advice of his brother Lucien, and they may have assured him that it was "temporary". Fouché managed to take almost everyone of his enemies out, and generally showed himself to be not too nice.
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"America now is stumbling through the darkness of hatred and divisiveness. Our values, our principles, and our determination to succeed as a free and democratic people will give us a torch to light the way." - Gerald Ford

"Good speech and good looks covers man's every vice. Plain speech and plain looks covers man's every virtue."

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People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee
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« Reply #52 on: August 11, 2017, 08:09:40 pm »
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No, and anyone who proposes such a thing is un-American.

I forget, was it the 1st or 2nd French Republic that enabled the American colonies to win their war of independence ?

Enemy of my enemy, lesser of two evils, etc.

?

What's to question?

relevance.

I realize I didn't word that very well. My point was that the United States and the French Monarchy having a common enemy in England doesn't necessarily mean that the French Monarchy stood for the same values as the United States.

Foreign policy is almost always guided by common "interests", not common values. We were allied with the French Ancien Regime against Britain, we fought the French First Republic in the Quasi War at sea, and The French Second Empire was favorable to the South in the American Civil War. All of these were dictated by the interests of the parties involved, not their values or ideology. 
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shua
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« Reply #53 on: August 11, 2017, 11:41:15 pm »
Ignore

No, and anyone who proposes such a thing is un-American.

I forget, was it the 1st or 2nd French Republic that enabled the American colonies to win their war of independence ?

Enemy of my enemy, lesser of two evils, etc.

?

What's to question?

relevance.

I realize I didn't word that very well. My point was that the United States and the French Monarchy having a common enemy in England doesn't necessarily mean that the French Monarchy stood for the same values as the United States.

True, but one can still be grateful.
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Cath
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« Reply #54 on: August 12, 2017, 07:30:10 am »
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No, and anyone who proposes such a thing is un-American.

I forget, was it the 1st or 2nd French Republic that enabled the American colonies to win their war of independence ?

Enemy of my enemy, lesser of two evils, etc.

?

What's to question?

relevance.

I realize I didn't word that very well. My point was that the United States and the French Monarchy having a common enemy in England doesn't necessarily mean that the French Monarchy stood for the same values as the United States.

True, but one can still be grateful.

What purpose would gratitude serve in a situation such as this? America was in no position to somehow prevent the execution of Citizen Capet.
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