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Author Topic: Lieberman working to make McConnell Majority Leader  (Read 4929 times)
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jfern
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« on: May 14, 2007, 05:43:56 pm »
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He's raising money for Senator Collins

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/5/14/172838/568

Those of us who supported Lamont are extremely vindicated.
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Joe Republic
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2007, 06:18:59 pm »

Those of us who supported Lamont are extremely vindicated.

No, vindication would have been if the little nerd had actually won.
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2007, 06:20:00 pm »
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Those of us who supported Lamont are extremely vindicated.

No, vindication would have been if the little nerd had actually won.

I think he means vindication in the form of being proven to be right about Lieberman.
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2007, 06:23:05 pm »
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Why is it that its the Dems that are screaming that Republicans should conpromise, but when one of their own actually takes it into practice, they accuse him of helping the uncompromising Republicans?
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2007, 06:24:24 pm »
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Why is it that its the Dems that are screaming that Republicans should conpromise, but when one of their own actually takes it into practice, they accuse him of helping the uncompromising Republicans?

I don't recall a Democrat saying that Republicans should be raising money for Democrats...
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Joe Republic
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2007, 06:27:22 pm »

Those of us who supported Lamont are extremely vindicated.

No, vindication would have been if the little nerd had actually won.

I think he means vindication in the form of being proven to be right about Lieberman.

Oh I know, but that wouldn't have been as funny.

Anyway, the way I see it, Lieberman was effectively kicked out of the Democratic Party, and yet is doing them a huuuge favor by actually allowing them to form a majority.  I see no problem if he decides he wants to support one of his friends and colleagues; who also happens to be a fellow moderate.

(Cue jfern with something along the lines of, "Collins is a batsh**t insane hard-right fascist, you f**king moron", or similar.)
« Last Edit: May 14, 2007, 06:30:35 pm by Joe Republic »Logged



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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2007, 06:31:58 pm »
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lieberman is great.  my favorite senator.  cantwell is right up there too.
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2007, 06:33:19 pm »
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Those of us who supported Lamont are extremely vindicated.

No, vindication would have been if the little nerd had actually won.

I think he means vindication in the form of being proven to be right about Lieberman.

Oh I know, but that wouldn't have been as funny.

Anyway, the way I see it, Lieberman was effectively kicked out of the Democratic Party, and yet is doing them a huuuge favor by actually allowing them to form a majority.  I see no problem if he decides he wants to support one of his friends and colleagues; who also happens to be a fellow moderate.

(Cue jfern with something along the lines of, "Collins is a batsh**t insane hard-right fascist, you f**king moron", or similar.)

I do agree that probably at least some of it has to do with Lieberman getting kicked out, but then again there's always the chicken and the egg thing.  I don't exactly recall Lieberman doing anything whatsoever in an attempt to reconcile differences between himself and the Democratic Party.  Rather, he seemed to revel in the attention he got from those differences.
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« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2007, 06:37:55 pm »

Well as you say, it's a chicken-and-egg argument.  Whether Lieberman would be raising money for Collins if he had or hadn't been kicked out is something we can only leave to speculation.
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« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2007, 06:48:44 pm »
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Plenty of people lose primaries. They tend to not run in the general election, anyways, let alone start fundraising for the other side. Losing a primary is no excuse. Plenty of people lose primaries, and they don't go crazy. Barack Obama even has the endorsement of the guy he lost a  primary to.

As for Senate incumbents defeated in primaries, I don't recall Bob Smith, Alan Dixon, Jacob Javits, Mike Gravel, or Ralph Yarborough raising money for the other party's candidates. No, Joe Lieberman has a lot of apoligists on this board. They are probabably perfectly happy that Democrats Yarborough and Gravel were defeated, since they were defeated from the right.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2007, 06:54:10 pm by ○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└ »Logged
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« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2007, 06:56:13 pm »
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A Majority Leader McConnell is certainly better than a Majority Leader Reid.  One cannot blame Lieberman (an Independent who unwisely chose to caucus with the radical libdems) for raising money for a liberal colleague who he shares much in common with. 
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« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2007, 07:10:28 pm »

Plenty of people lose primaries. They tend to not run in the general election, anyways, let alone start fundraising for the other side. Losing a primary is no excuse. Plenty of people lose primaries, and they don't go crazy. Barack Obama even has the endorsement of the guy he lost a  primary to.

As for Senate incumbents defeated in primaries, I don't recall Bob Smith, Alan Dixon, Jacob Javits, Mike Gravel, or Ralph Yarborough raising money for the other party's candidates. No, Joe Lieberman has a lot of apolOgists on this board. They are probabably perfectly happy that Democrats Yarborough and Gravel were defeated, since they were defeated from the right.

Who cares what other people have done in other situations in the past?

Lieberman gave up any pretense of trying to be loyal to the Democratic Party after his primary defeat, and good for him.  I can't remember the number of times I've said that parties are pointless... but that's for another time.  And yet even though he lost any reason to remain loyal to his former party, he is still helping them hold power in the Senate.  That's quite a big gesture towards a group of people who formally shunned him.

But my point is: if he wants to help a friend and colleague in her re-election bid, then so be it.  He doesn't have to care what party she's in, because details like that are only important to the very same people who threw him out of their club in the first place.
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« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2007, 07:14:52 pm »
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I will have a party when Susan Collins gets reelected.


OMG AN INVITE I WOULD LIKE!
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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2007, 07:17:12 pm »
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Plenty of people lose primaries. They tend to not run in the general election, anyways, let alone start fundraising for the other side. Losing a primary is no excuse. Plenty of people lose primaries, and they don't go crazy. Barack Obama even has the endorsement of the guy he lost a  primary to.

As for Senate incumbents defeated in primaries, I don't recall Bob Smith, Alan Dixon, Jacob Javits, Mike Gravel, or Ralph Yarborough raising money for the other party's candidates. No, Joe Lieberman has a lot of apolOgists on this board. They are probabably perfectly happy that Democrats Yarborough and Gravel were defeated, since they were defeated from the right.

Who cares what other people have done in other situations in the past?

Lieberman gave up any pretense of trying to be loyal to the Democratic Party after his primary defeat, and good for him.  I can't remember the number of times I've said that parties are pointless... but that's for another time.  And yet even though he lost any reason to remain loyal to his former party, he is still helping them hold power in the Senate.  That's quite a big gesture towards a group of people who formally shunned him.

But my point is: if he wants to help a friend and colleague in her re-election bid, then so be it.  He doesn't have to care what party she's in, because details like that are only important to the very same people who threw him out of their club in the first place.

Lieberman claimed he was an "Independent Democrat" who supported Democrats when he was running in the general election. I see that you support liars. Nice.
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Joe Republic
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« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2007, 07:22:58 pm »

Show me a politician who doesn't tell any lies at all in order to get elected, and I'll show you my pet unicorn.  Don't be so naïve.

Believe it or not, I don't particularly like Lieberman, mainly because I firmly disagree with his stance on the war.  My support for him is limited to his independence and his increasing disdain for the Democratic Party.
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2007, 07:26:13 pm »
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Lieberman is one of the better Senators in the country.  But, sadly, he has put himself in a position where he only has 5 years 8 months left as a Senator.  There is no way, at least right now, that he will win re-election in 2012 should he decide to run.

I hope he doesn't switch parties, but if he does, more power to him.  He would be good in either party.  I personally like Majority Leader Reid, however.  Of course, I'm speaking as a Democrat.  Majority Leader Frist didn't do anything whatsoever, so I'm not too sure Majority Leader McConnell would do anything either.  Remember, McConnell was Frist's Whip and was part of the "do-nothing" Congress.

Technically, Mitch McConnell should be Majority Leader right now, as there are the count is actually 49-49-2.  The 2 independents are just caucusing with the Democrats, but its actually a tie in the Senate and thus should either have McConnell as Majority Leader or a Co-Majority and no-Minority.  Oh Well.

I don't think President Bush has really lost the Senate, as that is a razor thin majority by the Democrats and Vice President Cheney is still a major factor of the Senate and thus can break any ties.
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My earlier comment notwithstanding, I do think that the site would be better off if Inks left his position. (The fact that the village idiot has dropped in to express his support for him only confirms this.)
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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2007, 07:29:44 pm »

I don't think President Bush has really lost the Senate, as that is a razor thin majority by the Democrats and Vice President Cheney is still a major factor of the Senate and thus can break any ties.

Being able to set the legislative agenda and wielding majorities in the committees adds a great deal more to what's at stake than just a simple numbers game.
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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2007, 07:31:37 pm »
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I don't think President Bush has really lost the Senate, as that is a razor thin majority by the Democrats and Vice President Cheney is still a major factor of the Senate and thus can break any ties.

Given that the Senate has gone from supporting everything the president wants pre-2006 to now opposing basically everything the president wants post-2006, I don't think Bush would agree with you.
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« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2007, 08:08:34 pm »
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Lieberman is one of the better Senators in the country.  But, sadly, he has put himself in a position where he only has 5 years 8 months left as a Senator.  There is no way, at least right now, that he will win re-election in 2012 should he decide to run.

He'll be 70 (I think) in 2012 plus I think if a moderate GOP is elected in '08, Lieberman probably will get a cabinet position (ie: Defense).
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« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2007, 09:04:33 pm »
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I say we urge him to switch parties after he pick up more Senate seats in 2008. Lieberman might have the biggest ego in Washington, and is surely one of the slimiest politicans.

No way he would get reelected as a Republican.
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« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2007, 09:56:36 pm »
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We need more politicians like Lieberman who are not afraid to stand up to partisan politics. Though I disagree with his positions, I feel that Liebrman is a good guy, and should be rewarded for being willing to stand up to a primary challenge from the left. I wish Lieberman wouldn't caucus with the Democrats, though, and would instead opt out of caucusing with either party. I hope he seeks reelection as an independent, but I doubt he will. Sad
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« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2007, 10:02:53 pm »
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We need more politicians like Lieberman who are not afraid to stand up to partisan politics. Though I disagree with his positions, I feel that Liebrman is a good guy, and should be rewarded for being willing to stand up to a primary challenge from the left. I wish Lieberman wouldn't caucus with the Democrats, though, and would instead opt out of caucusing with either party. I hope he seeks reelection as an independent, but I doubt he will. Sad

Maybe I'm just cynical, but I really doubt that Lieberman actually cares about partisan politics.  I've always kind of felt that he just knows very well that it will get him orders of magnitude more media coverage to be an independent Democrat who reminds everyone at every opportunity that he can stop supporting the Democrats when he feels like it instead of simply being a largely unnoticed Democratic senator.  Same with Hagel, although he's still a Republican in terms of party affiliation.
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« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2007, 10:11:43 pm »
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Lieberman is an attention-starved egomaniac above all else. 
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« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2007, 11:13:26 pm »
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Lieberman is one of the better Senators in the country.  But, sadly, he has put himself in a position where he only has 5 years 8 months left as a Senator.  There is no way, at least right now, that he will win re-election in 2012 should he decide to run.

He'll be 70 (I think) in 2012 plus I think if a moderate GOP is elected in '08, Lieberman probably will get a cabinet position (ie: Defense).

Agreed, I think he will be in the cabinet of whoever wins in 2008.
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« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2007, 03:35:10 am »
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I wish Lieberman wouldn't caucus with the Democrats, though, and would instead opt out of caucusing with either party.

Connecticut might as well have only one Senator then.  No caucus means no influence.
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