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Author Topic: Homely's UK Maps Thread  (Read 1423 times)
YL
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« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2014, 02:41:00 pm »
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Though some patterns are still interesting: if you look at that map, note that the very low rates are almost all minority-heavy (to a given definition of minority: Catholics very much included). Places with large student populations tend too have high rates. New Towns often have slightly higher rates than surrounding areas. And once you drill down to ward level in some places other things of interest can some up.

Do you know why Ribble Valley and Hambleton (the latter in particular standing out from its North Yorkshire neighbours) have such low figures?

The range of figures among the large English cities is curious.  Here are the "No religion" percentages for the eight Core Cities, plus four more:

Bristol 37.4
Nottingham 35.0
Hull 34.8
Sheffield 31.2
Newcastle 28.3
Leeds 28.2
Manchester 25.3
Coventry 23.0
Leicester 22.8
Bradford 20.7
Birmingham 19.3
Liverpool 17.7

Now, no doubt most of this can be explained by the point you made about minorities, and comparisons also have to be treated carefully because some of these (in particular all of the top three) have tightly drawn boundaries whereas others (especially Leeds and Bradford, which take in a number of separate towns) don't.

(As an experiment, I've just calculated some figures for a more tightly drawn version of Sheffield, excluding the three wards in Penistone & Stocksbridge constituency and also the three wards in the south-east annexed from Derbyshire in the late 1960s.  Muslim goes up from 7.7% to 9.4%, Christian down from 52.5% to 49.7%, and No Religion up from 31.2% to 32.0%.)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 04:04:21 am by YL »Logged

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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2014, 03:50:03 pm »
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Though some patterns are still interesting: if you look at that map, note that the very low rates are almost all minority-heavy (to a given definition of minority: Catholics very much included). Places with large student populations tend too have high rates. New Towns often have slightly higher rates than surrounding areas. And once you drill down to ward level in some places other things of interest can some up.

I've been looking at the low level Datazone counts for Scotland and linking levels of religiousity to the Index of Multiple Deprivation. I've still to pull things together but the results get interesting. Church of Scotland affiliation increases each step the less deprived one gets, as does 'Other Christian' (which is broadly Episcopalian but not easy to manipulate this data), and it does the same for Jewish. With Muslims (where it's closely linked to age) it also increases marginally the less income deprived an area is. For Roman Catholics of course it's the complete opposite with equal levels with Church of Scotland in the most deprived areas. It's worth noting though that while it declines as you get less deprived it does have an uptick at around 8 (if we take 1 as most deprived and 10 as least) before diving down which is the Catholic middle class (I'll need to drill down to Glasgow suburbia to get a more localised view) Indeed all religions seem to take a dive at 10). For those with non belief it's higher with those who are most deprived before dipping in the middle and then rising again with a large uptick at 10.
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2014, 09:28:39 pm »
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Do you know why Ribble Valley and Hambledon (the latter in particular standing out from its North Yorkshire neighbours) have such low figures?

The remnants of recusancy?
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YL
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« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2014, 03:14:14 pm »
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Do you know why Ribble Valley and Hambledon (the latter in particular standing out from its North Yorkshire neighbours) have such low figures?

The remnants of recusancy?

That did occur to me, but was Hambleton a strong area for recusancy compared with its neighbours?
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2014, 07:04:07 pm »

Hambleton's figures are very similar to those in Richmondshire and Ryedale: it's just one of the eternal issues with mapping data at work.
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Richard Hoggart 1918-2014
YL
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« Reply #30 on: January 17, 2014, 02:52:28 am »
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Hambleton's figures are very similar to those in Richmondshire and Ryedale: it's just one of the eternal issues with mapping data at work.

If that's true there's a mistake in the map: the two Rs are in the 20-25% category, but Hambleton is only 10-15%.
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« Reply #31 on: January 22, 2014, 12:33:44 pm »
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I decided to put together a new series of maps based on the Boothroyd/Sibboleth/afleitch UK Westminster Constituencies basemap - but I wanted a white background. And I wanted a proper geographic representation of Orkney and Shetland.

So, I painstakingly modified the original basemaps, built myself a little database of the results from 1983 to 2010 (which took three months by itself), and refilled in the maps constituency-by-constituency. The result is spectacular!



I have similar GIFs almost ready for direct C-LD, C-L and L-LD comparisons over the same time period. After that, maybe I'll do minor parties, swings, who knows.

*I use yellow both for the Liberal Democrats and SDP-Liberal Alliance so as to compare 1983-1987 more clearly with 1992-2010.
 
†When you fill in a 650-constituency map with dozens of colors and then do it 28 more times, mistakes are inevitable. Apologies in advance.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2014, 11:03:31 am by homelycooking »Logged
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« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2014, 05:28:38 pm »
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A work of art! This should be featured in the Australian Centre for the Moving Image.
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« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2014, 11:58:40 am »
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I decided to put together a new series of maps based on the Boothroyd/Sibboleth/afleitch UK Westminster Constituencies basemap - but I wanted a white background. And I wanted a proper geographic representation of Orkney and Shetland.

So, I painstakingly modified the original basemaps, built myself a little database of the results from 1983 to 2010 (which took three months by itself), and refilled in the maps constituency-by-constituency. The result is spectacular!



I have similar GIFs almost ready for direct C-LD, C-L and L-LD comparisons over the same time period. After that, maybe I'll do minor parties, swings, who knows.

*I use yellow both for the Liberal Democrats and SDP-Liberal Alliance so as to compare 1983-1987 more clearly with 1992-2010.
 
†When you fill in a 650-constituency map with dozens of colors and then do it 28 more times, mistakes are inevitable. Apologies in advance.

I'm rather ignorant about such things - how does one make an image like that that flips through each election? I've made similar maps showing party vote & swing, and would like to be able to make something like that out of them.
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homelycooking
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« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2014, 11:07:43 am »
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Here is a direct comparison between Labour and Conservative:



I'm rather ignorant about such things - how does one make an image like that that flips through each election? I've made similar maps showing party vote & swing, and would like to be able to make something like that out of them.

That's a .gif image composite. Try experimenting with one of the many .gif wizards on the Internet - they're more fun than a barrel of Vikings!
« Last Edit: January 24, 2014, 11:14:38 am by homelycooking »Logged
homelycooking
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« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2014, 07:42:41 pm »
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Conservatives vs Liberals:

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