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« on: August 15, 2007, 01:00:58 am »
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This is (I hope) an interesting What-If, about a United States where, instead of an executive branch, we have a King. Comments, suggestions, etc. are welcome, especially clearing up of historical inaccuracies. The point of departure is the first event, and while it is admittedly a bit of a stretch, the point of departure leads to the eventual adoption of a constitution establishing a monarchy.

----------------------------------------------------

May 1787- Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth, travelling together to Philadelphia to represent the state of Connecticut, die of a fever on the way to Pennsylvania. They are 66 and 42 years old, respectively. 1

September 1787- After a summer of meetings, the Philadelphia Convention is deadlocked. Both Virginia and New Jersey present separate plans for the United States, but a consensus cannot be reached. In a passionate speech, Hamilton proposes his plan for a new constitution, changed slightly from the plan he proposed in June: a hereditary monarchy, a bicameral legislature modeled on that of Great Britain, and a judiciary, appointed by the monarch, with life-long terms. While his earlier speech hadn’t been taken seriously by the delegates, his second speech managed to garner support from a sizable group of onlookers. Ultimately, however, this did nothing more but split the convention three ways between the Virginia, New Jersey and Hamilton plans.

October 1787- As gridlock continues, Hamilton slowly secures the support of an increasing number of state delegations. The convention is still, for all intents and purposes, deadlocked. There are rumors that the convention may end without a decision, and whispers that the Union will no doubt fall apart soon after.

November 1787- The convention adjourns for the winter. In a letter to his wife, James Madison wonders if “this Union of States shall yet persist when next [the convention] meets.”

March 1788- New York militias, hearing rumors from Philadelphia of imminent dissolution of the Union, move across the state’s border into the Republic of Vermont. They are secretly backed financially by wealthy New York landowners.  Sporadic fighting soon breaks out between Vermont and New York militias, though the New York state government denies any support of the militias.

April 1788- The Green Mountains War escalates, as Ethan Allen leads a detachment of Green Mountain boys west into New York, burning farms and villages in retaliation for New York militia attacks. Governor George Clinton, of New York, declares war on Vermont, and summons the New York army and militias.

May 1788- The Second Philadelphia Convention convenes on May 1st. For the past month, a bloody guerrilla conflict has embroiled Vermont and New York, and the specter of civil war hangs over the convention. Noticeably is George Washington, who is trying to broker peace. The convention quickly breaks into three factions again, supporting the Virginia, New Jersey and Hamilton Plan. However, the calls for a strong central government, after the breakout of the Green Mountains War, caused many delegates to throw their support behind Hamilton's plan. Finally, on May 25th, after two weeks of debate, Benjamin Franklin, the oldest delegate at the convention, reluctantly throws his support behind Hamilton's plan. This convinces a majority of delegations, and a compromise plan, using Hamilton's, but also borrowing from other plans, is quickly drafted.

August 1st, 1788- Two months of squabbling had delayed the constitution's signing until the first of August. Two of the three issues fought over all dealt with slavery, while the third dealt with the new monarchy:
1) A "three-fifths compromise" was adopted concerning the population of slaves for representation and tax purposes;
2) Congress was given the power to end the slave trade, but only 20 years after ratification of the constitution; and
3) George Washington was finally convinced to become monarch of the United States, reluctantly agreeing that a strong executive was needed. He refused, however, to take the title of King.

Gouverneur Morris (of Pennsylvania) and Alexander Hamilton wrote the bulk of the constitution, with contributions from James Madison. It would need to be ratified by 9 of 13 states.

November 4th, 1788- Peace is brokered between Vermont and New York. Heavy fighting along the border has caused thousands of deaths, as well as the death of Revolutionary War hero Ethan Allen. Governors Clinton and Chittenden, as well as George Washington sign the Treaty of Castleton.

June 12th, 1789- New York, by a vote or 35 to 22, becomes the 9th state to ratify the constitution, due mostly to the efforts of Governor George Clinton, an ardent supporter of Washington, and thus a reluctant supporter of the constitution. The fight over ratification had seen two sides assemble throughout the country. The first, the Royalists, supported the constitution, and were led by Hamilton, Madison and Morris. They, along with John Jay, wrote the Royalist Papers, a series of essays supporting the constitution. On the other side were the Anti-Royalists, some of whom were against the very principle of a monarch, while others wanted a Bill of Rights added to the constitution. They countered the Royalist papers with the Anti-Royalist Papers, written by Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and Robert Yates. While the constitution was eventually adopted (a need for peace and stability, as well as trust in George Washington by a majority of Americans, were later agreed to be the principle motives behind ratification), the Anti-Royalist papers did popularize the idea of a bill of rights. 2

1In our timeline, Sherman and Ellsworth were largely responsible for the Great Compromise, which merged the New Jersey and Virginia plans. In this timeline, their deaths lead to a lack of compromise at the convention, allowing Hamilton's idea to gain some traction.
2While Americans were initially wary of a return to monarchy, the Green Mountain War did two things to endear citizens to the new constitution: it lead people to believe that more civil wars between states would soon breakout without drastic change, and it further elevated the would-be King's statue as a man of action, the only man able to unite the Union.
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« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2007, 01:43:50 pm »
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Let's start with what I like. The initial invasion of the Vermont Republic by New York had to be done in a manner that could be plausibly denied because under the Articles of Confederation (Article VI Clause 6), war required either the consent of Congress or an actual invasion  (Vermont was recognized as an independent country at that time, and even sent ambassadors to Philadelphia.)  Of course, when the Green Mountain Boys retaliate, New York would have been free to declare war without consulting Congress.

Now for what I don't like:

The problem with selecting George as monarch is that he has no heirs and unless he dumps Martha, will have no heirs.  Am impending succession crisis when he dies is likely to forestall any effort to name him monarch.

Why would Washington have gone up to the Hudson Valley to negotiate? He wasn't a diplomat and he knew his limits in that area.

Solution:
Bring back home a man well respected as both a person dedicated to the rule of law and who had spent close to a decade as a diplomat: John Adams.

House of Adams
1. John I (1789-1824)
2. John II (1824-1848)
3. Charles I (1848-1886)
4. John III (1886-1894)
5. Charles II (1894-1915)
6. Charles III (1915-1954)
7. Charles IV (1954-1999)
8. Charles V (1999- present)
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« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2007, 01:57:27 pm »
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Ernest: Maybe a succession crisis will be part of his timeline.
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« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2007, 03:58:04 pm »
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Could be, just pointing out that the obviousness of it might well cause opinion to be against a onstitutional monarchy if Washington's successor is unknown.
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« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2007, 05:16:59 pm »
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This is kind of interesting.  u know?
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« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2007, 05:37:58 pm »
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Quote
The problem with selecting George as monarch is that he has no heirs and unless he dumps Martha, will have no heirs.  Am impending succession crisis when he dies is likely to forestall any effort to name him monarch.
Well, Washington did adopt John Parke Custis from Martha's previous marriage, and adopted John Parke Custis' son George Washington Parke Custis as his own after John P. Custis' death. George Washington Custis grew up with Washington, and was treated like his son. Plus, if George Custis becomes King, that opens up the possibility of a certain famous Southern general marrying into the royal family in the 1800s.
Quote
This is kind of interesting.  u know?
Thanks, I'll try to post an update tonight.
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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2007, 08:09:51 pm »
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Well, Washington did adopt John Parke Custis from Martha's previous marriage, and adopted John Parke Custis' son George Washington Parke Custis as his own after John P. Custis' death. George Washington Custis grew up with Washington, and was treated like his son. Plus, if George Custis becomes King, that opens up the possibility of a certain famous Southern general marrying into the royal family in the 1800s.

A Swedish solution (ala Charles XIV) to the problem.   Just so long as nothing so hackneyed as the adopted kings forming an alliance to rule the world between them happens.
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2007, 10:42:40 pm »
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The American Monarchy: 1791-1797
January 1791- The first elections are held. The constitution laid out three branches: the legislative, monarchic, and judicial branches. The legislative branch is bicameral: a lower house (the Senate), with senators elected from congressional districts allotted to states by population and elected in popular elections every 4 years, and an upper house (the Royal Council) where each state sent one Councilor, appointed by the monarch. The Senate elects a Prime Minister, who serves as leader of the Senate, working closely with the monarch to form policy. The Senate is in charge of passing laws, while the Council is in charge of advising the President, has the ability to veto non-spending bills, votes to admit states into the Union, and may declare war at the request of the monarch. The monarch signs legislation and may veto legislation, acts as commander-in-chief, and conducts diplomacy.

Alexander Hamilton, in the weeks before the election, made clear his intentions to lead a Royalist party in the Senate. He convinced many like-minded gentlemen to join his party. The Royalist party would first and foremost support the power of the monarch. They supported a strong central government, a strong military, and government policies in support of business. Thomas Jefferson would also run for the Senate, and with him would run a number of like minded anti-royalists. Unlike Hamilton, however, he did not create a formal party.

The results in the Senate were as follows1:
Royalists: 39
Anti-Royalists: 26



Congressional Delegations by State, 1791 (gray denotes a 50-50 split)

March 1st 1791- George Washington is formally inaugurated, with Queen Consort Martha close at hand. While he insists on the title of President, rather than King, later historians, as well as many contemporaries, would label him as King George I. After the morning-long inauguration ceremony, he formally appointed his 13 councilors.


King George I

Later that day, the first session of the Senate was called to order. The first business was electing a Prime Minister.

The results for Prime Minister were as follows:
Alexander Hamilton: 36 votes
Thomas Jefferson: 20 votes
John Adams: 3 votes
Not Voting: 6 votes

Alexander Hamilton was sworn in as the first Prime Minister. He appointed James Madison as Deputy Prime Minister, and John Adams as Secretary of State.


Prime Minister Hamilton

The first Senate’s first year was fairly uneventful, as they were mostly concerned with writing procedural laws. However, in 1791, twelve amendments (comprising what would later be known as the Bill of Rights) were approved in the Senate by a 50-4 vote, with 11 not voting. Prime Minister Hamilton, as well as Thomas Jefferson (who by this point has become the de facto opposition leader) both supported the amendments, seen as a needed compromise, and closure on the constitutional debate2. In 1793, the Royalists, determined to pay off the debt, passed an excise tax on liquor (couple with many other small tax increases and fees), which George Washington signed into law.

Also in 1793, the Presidential Council voted to admit Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. They officially joined later that year. In 1794, the Whiskey Rebellion broke out, in opposition to the Royalist’s liquor tax. King George I, as commander-in-chief, summoned the army and quashed the rebellion. While Hamilton’s party was initially criticized for passing the tax in the first place, the Royalist’s used Washington’s increased popularity to pass a number of acts expanding the size of the military and the navy, “in defense of the country,” and the major damage to Royalist party was prevented.

In 1793, the French Revolution reached a crescendo, as the French King was executed. The Royalists reacted with outrage, while the anti-Royalists largely supported the revolutionary cause. In late 1792, the size of the Senate was increased to 100 seats, but the admission of Vermont, Kentucky and Tennessee (in summer of 1794) increased the size to 105. By January of 1795, Thomas Jefferson had officially established the Whig-Republican party, in opposition to the Royalist party.

The Senate in 1794:
Royalist: 39 seats
Whig-Republican: 26 seats


The Senate in 1795:
Royalist: 60 seats (+21)
Whig-Republican: 45 seats (+25)



Congressional Delegations by State, 1795 (gray denotes a 50-50 split)

Vote for Prime Minister:
Hamilton: 58 votes
Jefferson:  44 votes
Not Voting: 3 votes

With George Washington’s popularity, and Hamilton and the Royalists’ shows of loyalty towards the King/President, the Royalists retained their majority, though it was a slightly slimmer one. Among notable freshman senators are Aaron Burr (WR) and George Clinton (R) both from New York. In his second term, Alexander Hamilton pushed an economic plan through the Senate. The economic plan established a national bank, a national mint, a tariff, subsidies for industry, and a national debt. Hamilton proved to be a stubborn Prime Minister in his second term, forcing many of his proposals through with little regard for the minority party. James Madison, Hamilton’s Deputy Prime Minister, quit the Royalist party and the government in disgust at Hamilton’s tactics (and over disagreement with Hamilton’s economic policy), joining Jefferson’s Whig-Republicans. The Second Senate became all but gridlocked, as a handful of Royalists, following Hamilton’s lead, joined the Whig-Republicans in early 1796. Partisan fighting between the two parties was the norm in 1796 and 1797, as the parties quarreled over economic policy and policy towards the French.  The Royalists, who were still nominally in control of the Senate, passed a number of resolutions applauding the British and condemning the French. The French soon broke off all diplomatic ties with the United States, and by late 1797, French privateers had sunk over 500 American merchant ships.

1"Royalists" refers to members of the Royalist party, as well as independents supporting and voting with the party. "Anti-Royalists" refers to independent Senators opposed to the Royalist party.
2The Bill of Rights is nearly identical to those in our own timeline, and the first two failed to be ratified by ¾ of the states, as in our own timeline.
---------------------
Next, increased tensions concerning France, the election of 1799, and the shocking death of a great American.
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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2007, 02:36:36 am »
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Hamilton as the first PM?  Simply not going to happen, indeed, just as he was not elected to Congress in our time line, he might not even be a Senator.   Even if Hamilton were a Senator, John Adams was too well respected for anyone other than him to have had a serious shot at the position, even if Hamilton formed a formal party earlier than in our time line.  It might even have the curious effect of having Jefferson and Adams unite for a time in opposition to the brash young Hamilton, altho I think Hamilton would be too shrewd as to force Adams into exiling him from the government, at least at first.

Washington's fondness for Hamilton is likely to lead him towards using him as a shadow PM or maybe even working to replace Adams with Hamilton, so I don't discount the idea of Hamilton being PM someday, especially since the time line you've laid out makes it unlikely he will be entrapped by Maria Reynolds.

Also I strongly doubt that even with the lengthy delay of one and a half years (as opposed to half a year in our time line) between the ratification of the Constitution and the first elections that all thirteen states would have ratified by then.  Rhode Island will at the least delay for the same reasons as in our time line, and Vermont with its universal suffrage might well refuse to enter a Kingdom.
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2007, 05:37:54 pm »
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Thank you for your comments Ernest. In my time line, the nation is slightly more polarized, and I think Alexander Hamilton, the charismatic, young, hard-line Royalist, would be able to get elected Prime Minister in a senate dominated by his own party. Don't worry though: John Adams isn't finished, and still holds considerable sway amongst moderate Senators.

As for you second point, I hadn't really thought about Rhode Island, but Vermont did join the Union later in my timeline, at the same time Kentucky did, in 1793.
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« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2007, 05:57:23 pm »
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The American Monarchy: 1798 - 1803
In early 1798, Councilor John Jay (R) of New York, along with five other councilors, petitioned King George I to declare war on France. Washington firmly refused. The next month, in the Senate, Hamilton gave a stirring speech in favor of war with France. He implored his fellow Senators to disregard “Francophile cowardice” and write their own bill declaring war. In the middle of the impassioned speech, a group of Whig-Republicans, lead by Aaron Burr rushed the speaker’s podium, shouting Hamilton down. The chamber exploded in chaos, and Burr and Hamilton had to be separated from each other, as they literally fought on the floor of the Senate. With the 1799 election looming, the Royalists published news of the attack on Hamilton, rousing Americans against the “traitorous, French-lover Whigs.” As such, the Royalists saw a major victory in 1799.

Royalist: 68 seats (+8)
Whig-Republican: 37 seats (-8)




After his party’s defeat, Jefferson stepped down as opposition leader. Much of the chamber was still angry at Prime Minister Hamilton, including many Royalists. John Adams, a moderate Royalist, stepped forward as a compromise candidate for Prime Minister. On the first vote, Hamilton held on to the dedicated Royalists, Aaron Burr captured the votes of the dedicated Whig-Republicans, and John Adams took defectors from both parties. A handful of anti-government, “negative radicals” rallied around Nathaniel Macon (WR-NC). In the end, however, the pro-Hamilton vote is barely able to overcome the anti-Hamilton vote, and many anti-Hamilton Royalists flock back to Hamilton’s government.

Vote for Prime Minister:
Alexander Hamilton (R): 52 votes
John Adams (R): 30 votes
Aaron Burr (WR): 17 votes
Nathaniel Macon (WR): 6 votes
Not Voting: 2 votes

In March of 1799, George Washington fell ill, and was no longer able to carry on his duties as monarch. Sixteen-year-old George Washington Parke Custis, grandson and adopted-son of George Washington, as well as next in line to the throne, unofficially took over the King’s duties. Prince George worked closely with Alexander Hamilton, and the Senate to pass the Defense of King and Country Acts in April 1799.1

Meanwhile, the Coastal War was escalating. French privateers and the small American navy battled throughout the Caribbean and along the Atlantic coast. The British fleet also fought the French along the coast and Caribbean, as Britain sold the United States naval stores and munitions. However, the Royal British Navy and Union Navy were effectively neutral towards each other, fighting the same enemy, but refusing to fight together or share operational plans, throughout 1798 and early 1799, as Washington had refused to ally with the British. But with Washington incapacitated, Hamilton hoped to convince Prince George to seek an agreement with Britain.

Hamilton's plans were stalled on December 14, 1799 however, when King George I passed away. George Washington Curtis took the throne the next day, calling himself King George II. He immediately proposed the building of a royal palace, selecting a plot of land left to him by his adopted father overlooking the Potomac River, near the capital of Washington. He then contacted the young Consul Napoleon of France, and proposed an end to hostilities. Napoleon agreed, and by Summer of 1800, the Treaty of Mortefontaine was signed. During this period, Napoleon and George II became close companions, sending gifts and letters to one another, and sharing ideas on governance.


King George II, 18 years old

The treaty, however, angered Hamilton and the Royalists. Hamilton took to the Senate floor to berate his King, labeling him a "traitor" and "more concerned with the lives of French pirates than American citizens!" King George II, feeling betrayed, responded in kind, arriving in the Senate to call Hamilton a "hot-headed militant craving American bloodshed." In 1802, Hamilton and George II clashed again, as Hamilton refused to approve the purchase of Louisiana from George II's friend Napoleon, outraging the young King. The Whig-Republicans, on the sidelines since 1799, came to George II's side. As the press ran article after article claiming that Hamilton and his party were pushing the United States into European wars, things looked bleak for Hamilton's party. Hamilton announced that if the Royalists kept power, he would not run for a 4th term as Prime Minister. It was, however, no use, and the Whig-Republicans won their first election, ending 12 years of Royalist rule, even defeating Prime Minister Hamilton in his Senatorial re-election bid.

Election of 1803 results 2:
Royalist: 63 seats (-6)
Whig-Republican: 80 seats (+43)
Total: 142 Seats




John Adams declined to run for Prime Minister as a compromise candidate again, instead putting up his own son, recently elected John Quincy Adams (R-MA). However, the Whig-Republicans were in no mood for a compromise candidate, and instead selected James Madison. George Clinton (R-NY), a respected, elder-statesman of the Royalist party, reluctantly became opposition leader.

1803 Prime Minister Election:
James Madison (WR): 73 votes
George Clinton(R): 45 votes
John Quincy Adams (R): 24


Prime Minister James Madison

1 The parallel of our timeline's Alien and Sedition Acts.
2 The number of Senate seats was increased to 142 after the Second Census in 1800. Councilor Isaac Shelby (RW-KY) led the way in admitting the new state, while Councilor Jonathan Trumbull (R-CT) led opposition to the plan, mostly Ohio (like most frontier states) was strongly a Whip-Republican state. The state’s entry into the Union still passed 11-5.
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2007, 07:02:27 pm »
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Great timeline, were the maps created with the EVCalc or did you make them yourself?
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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2007, 07:05:36 pm »
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Awesome timeline!  I'm loving this!
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« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2007, 07:12:10 pm »
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Great timeline, were the maps created with the EVCalc or did you make them yourself?
I took the maps from Dave's results page (since there aren't any maps for pre-1824 or something in EVCalc), then recolored them in Photoshop.
Awesome timeline!  I'm loving this!
Thanks!
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« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2007, 07:13:35 pm »
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Great timeline, were the maps created with the EVCalc or did you make them yourself?
I took the maps from Dave's results page (since there aren't any maps for pre-1824 or something in EVCalc), then recolored them in Photoshop.
Awesome timeline!  I'm loving this!
Thanks!

3 months without Photoshop is hurting me badly!
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« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2007, 08:26:39 pm »
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Well first off this is quite a good timeline I just have one question as of now:

Is the Senate somehow different in this timeline than in reality? In 1800 the Senate was elected by the state legislatures and so Hamilton would have had to have lost the state legislature vote in New York to keep his seat. In Hamilton's Plan that he put before the Convention the Senate was elected for life and could only be thrown out if they were impeached, thus create a Senate in line with the English House of Lords. If Hamilton's Plan was put into place then Hamilton would be in his Senate seat for life unless he did something worthy of impeachment, which you surely would have mentioned.

Also just a little reality check here. Hamilton never supported a hereditary monarchy. What he proposed was the election of a President who would serve a life term "on good behavior", which would be closer to an elective monarch like the Pope then a hereditary one like the Kings of England. While Hamilton was often derided as a monarchist he never proposed something akin to what he is said to here.
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« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2007, 09:12:32 pm »
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The Senate in this timeline is for all intents and purposes a re-named House of Representatives with 4 year terms. The Royal Council (my timeline's upper house) functions like the British House of Lords, with the King appointing one Councilor from each state. Senators are elected by the people, and represent a district (or an at-large district).
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« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2007, 09:15:23 pm »
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Washington adopts Hamilton, perhaps?  The former was always a father-like figure for the latter to the point it was even rumored Washington was Hamilton's true father.
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« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2007, 09:21:03 pm »
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Having a war break out between New York and Vermont seems, indeed, one of the only feasible ways for this to happen as there is absolutely no way New York consents to a monarchy without some motives of self-interest.  Pennsylvannia is somewhat believable with Morris' influence but George Clinton (and Aaron Burr, to a lesser degree) would keep New York against a monarchy unless overwhelmed.
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« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2007, 09:27:03 pm »
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Washington adopts Hamilton, perhaps?  The former was always a father-like figure for the latter to the point it was even rumored Washington was Hamilton's true father.

How did that get started? It's a pretty well documented fact that he was born in the Caribbean, I mean he didn't even come to the North American colonies until he was 18.
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« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2007, 09:33:31 pm »
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Washington adopts Hamilton, perhaps?  The former was always a father-like figure for the latter to the point it was even rumored Washington was Hamilton's true father.

How did that get started? It's a pretty well documented fact that he was born in the Caribbean, I mean he didn't even come to the North American colonies until he was 18.
Indeed, but Washington is recorded as being in the Carribean around the time Hamilton was born.

EDIT: After researching this I've found that Washington visited Barbados whenever Hamilton's mother was there, in fact
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« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2007, 10:23:04 pm »
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I dont see Hamilton being Prime Minister as that far fetched, for a good time he was argueably the most powerful man in the US as leader of the federalist party and had he wanted it (and been born in the country) he could have been president.
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« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2007, 09:15:35 pm »
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The American Monarchy: 1803-1807

In his first month as Prime Minister, James Madison had a formal meeting with King George II. At the top of King George’s list of priorities was the purchase of New Orleans from the French. George II worried that French control of the port, and the anti-French sentiment still at large in the Royalist party and throughout much of the United States, might endanger American access to the valuable trade going in and out of New Orleans. Napoleon had sent French diplomats (and his favorite sister, Pauline, who George II became quite infatuated with) to America, informing the King that Napoleon would be willing to part with the entirety of Louisiana for a sum of about $15 million. Madison was at first skeptical about the treaty, but he agreed to instruct his Whig-Republicans to support the purchase of New Orleans if King George II didn’t veto the repeal of the much despised “Defense of King and Country Acts.” While George II had been a principle participant in the writing and passing of the laws, believing them essential to his effective governance, he grudgingly agreed to Madison’s deal.

In May of 1803, Madison brought up laws repealing the entirety of the Defense of King and Country Acts, and pardoning all Americans imprisoned or made to pay fines because of them. This repeal passed easily, with many Royalists realizing that the laws had hurt them in the 1803 election. The final vote was 93 to 46. Madison brought the purchase of the Louisiana Purchase before the Senate in October of the same year. Though Royalists were ardently against the purchase, spending weeks making speeches against it, the purchase passed rather easily 81 to 51, and was signed into law by George II. Thomas Jefferson, former-opposition leader, proposed an expedition to explore the new Louisiana Territory, and the creation of the Royal Discovery Corps was approved by a vote of 98 to 22.

In 1804, King George II and Prime Minister Madison, along with representatives from France, including Pauline Bonaparte, were in St. Louis for the official transfer of the Louisiana territory. Later that year, in May, King George II saw the Royal Discovery Corps depart from Camp Dubois on their historic journey. George returned to Virginia to oversee the building of Arlington Palace, what would become the official royal palace. In late 1804, George wrote to Napoleon asking to marry his sister Pauline. Napoleon obliged, and sent word that she would come to America after he had been crowned Emperor in December of 1804.

In January of 1805, at Arlington Palace (which was still partially under construction), George II wed twenty-four-year-old Queen Consort Pauline. The wedding was an expensive show of regality, as it marked the American royal family’s union with the royal families of Europe. At the same time, however, the Bonapartes and Washingtons were new, post-Enlightenment royal families, and many Americans saw the marriage as the beginning of a new, enlightened world order. When he returned to Washington City, however, George II was met with a bill passed by the Whig-Republicans drastically cutting the size of the military and navy. George II quickly vetoed the bill, and the veto failed to be overridden, by a vote of 77-64. The Royal Army, George II wrote to the Senate, was “the most important institution in our Kingdom.” Federalist John Q. Adams argued that it was “destined by Divine Providence that the whole continent of North America… be associated in one royal Union”, and that a strong army was the only way to ensure that such a thing came to pass.


Queen Pauline

In March of 1806, the Senate approved the construction of the National Road, a highway that would link the Potomac and Ohio rivers, and eventually stretch to St. Louis on the Mississippi. In April, George II called on the Senate to establish a military academy at Westpoint, a fort his grandfather had been instrumental in building. The Senate passed a bill establishing the United States Royal Military Academy by a close 72-67 vote. Royalists were strongly for the treaty, and managed to convince enough moderate Whig-Republicans to come to their side. The majority of Whig-Republicans however, including Prime Minister Madison, called the act unconstitutional.

With the 1807 election fast approaching, it was clear to the Royalists and Whig-Republicans that the most pressing issue would be military matters, something that had clearly divided the Senate. Many Royalists argued that their pro-military views would be able to secure them the Senate, if not for their support of Britain over France. After George’s marriage to Pauline, and to a lesser extent the Louisiana Purchase, public opinion in much of the United States had turned strongly for France, and thus strongly against the British. The majority of Royalists publicly professed their support of France, but a splinter group, naming themselves the High Royalists, refused to turn against Britain. Their support was confined mostly to the traditional Royalist-strongholds of Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, so the election became principally a contest between the Royalists and High Royalists in New England, and the Royalists and Whig-Republicans everywhere else.

The Senate in later 1806:
Royalist: 38 seats
Whig-Republican: 80 seats
High Royalists: 24
Total: 142 Seats


The Election of 1807:
Royalist: 53 seats (+15)
Whig-Republican: 69 seats (-11) 
High Royalists: 20 seats (-4)
Total: 142 Seats




The Royalists were able to pick up 11 Whig-Republicans seats, and 4 High Royalist seats in Massachusetts. The Whig-Republicans also picked up a seat in MA, but lost a seat in Rhode Island, the High Royalist’s only pickup, and lost 11 seats to the Royalists across the country. Prevailing opinion throughout the country leading up to March was that the High Royalists and Royalists would form a coalition government, but the results of the first Prime Minister vote rebutted common wisdom:

First Prime Minister Ballot:
James Madison (WR): 69 votes
John Quincy Adams (R): 53 votes
Timothy Pickering (HR): 20 votes

The vote was down party lines, and James Madison fell just 2 votes short of becoming Prime Minister for a second term. With the senate deadlocked on electing its leader, the Royalists and Whig-Republicans quickly looked to the High Royalists for extra votes. On the second vote, half of the High Royalist party broke ranks, and James Madison was able to claim a slim majority. Ultimately, a significant number of High Royalists realized that war with Britain would be inevitable under a Royalist administration, but under a Whig-Republican administration, neutrality might eventually be seen as a safer option.

Second Prime Minister Ballot:
James Madison (WR): 75 votes
John Quincy Adams (R): 58 votes
Timothy Pickering (HR): 9 votes

In the next update: Madison's second term, scandal in the Royal Court, and the march towards war.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 12:27:09 am by Lief »Logged



It seems like Lief's posts sometimes have a sexual tint to them. I've definitely seen references to spanking more than once.
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« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2007, 10:12:43 pm »
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I really don't see how, at this point, America could keep itself out of a European war. It has basically allied itself completely with Bonaparte and company, going beyond friendship and into a personal union. This does make sense, both the House of Washington and the House of Bonaparte would see themselves as new Enlightenment monarchs out to destroy the traditional order, however this makes them stronger friends than they were in OTL. They should keep building up that army because the British will come knocking at their door soon, and I hope it's not in 1812 you need a good dose of butterfly effect in their to keep things from getting stale.
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« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2007, 11:30:23 pm »
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I really don't see how, at this point, America could keep itself out of a European war. It has basically allied itself completely with Bonaparte and company, going beyond friendship and into a personal union. This does make sense, both the House of Washington and the House of Bonaparte would see themselves as new Enlightenment monarchs out to destroy the traditional order, however this makes them stronger friends than they were in OTL. They should keep building up that army because the British will come knocking at their door soon, and I hope it's not in 1812 you need a good dose of butterfly effect in their to keep things from getting stale.
No, you're right, America and France are about as close as you can get at this point, and war with Britain will come sooner rather than later.
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It seems like Lief's posts sometimes have a sexual tint to them. I've definitely seen references to spanking more than once.
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