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Author Topic: Ohio 2008 Place Map (City, Town, Village)  (Read 9412 times)
Dave Leip
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« on: July 22, 2009, 07:25:07 am »

Here is the 2008 Place Map for Ohio Cities and Towns - its still preliminary.  Ohio is difficult to map because the individual counties differ in how they report results (some do by every place name, even tiny villages, others include the vote for villages within the townships - a couple even have precincts that include more than one township).  



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« Last Edit: December 07, 2010, 05:52:49 pm by Dave Leip »Logged
Dave Leip
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2009, 07:48:50 am »

Here is the whole upper north and east of the US - from Minnesota to Maine

« Last Edit: October 19, 2009, 11:57:22 am by Dave Leip »Logged
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2009, 03:45:17 pm »
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Beautiful! Thank you Dave!
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2009, 11:17:08 pm »
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Does this mean we might have Ohio by CD soon?
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2009, 08:03:37 am »
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Does this mean we might have Ohio by CD soon?

All CD results are available and I made a map of all CD results a while ago.
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2009, 08:07:03 am »
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I love how blue Pennsylvania is... shows how much people don't live outside of the Philly and Pittsburg metro.
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2009, 11:55:18 am »
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Does this mean we might have Ohio by CD soon?

All CD results are available and I made a map of all CD results a while ago.

Very nicely done.  I was hoping Dave would incorporate these results into the atlas map though.
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2009, 12:53:03 pm »
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Are you possibly going to get Indiana as well?
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2009, 06:24:13 pm »
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Does this mean we might have Ohio by CD soon?

All CD results are available and I made a map of all CD results a while ago.

Very nicely done.  I was hoping Dave would incorporate these results into the atlas map though.

He will eventually, but he's more of a stickler for official data and such.

On that note, hopefully we can eventually get complete data/maps for 2004 by CD. We have 2000, but not 2004 yet....
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« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2009, 09:00:38 pm »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.
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« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2009, 09:31:56 am »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.

Western Wisconsin was LaFolette's old electoral base, it's quite progressive while eastern Wisconsin voted for McCarthy in that (in)famous primary.

Minnesota suburbia is still hard-core Republican, and didn't switch Democrat as much in 2008 as other areas did.
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2009, 03:46:19 pm »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.

Fundies in the Minneapolis suburbs/exurbs. Compare to the area around Milwaukee in eastern Wisconsin. Western Wisconsin is more like the Duluth area in northeastern Minnesota. Rural whites in the Democratic areas of Wisconsin and Minnesota are Scandinavians, mostly, your traditional mainline Protestant progressives. (Capital P Progressives, too, in both the US and Canada historically.)

Also, Obama won New York minus New York City (and Long Island, but it's less Democratic than the remainder of the state as a whole) with about 55% of the vote, so upstate New York is solidly Democratic. You could take out the entire NYC MSA, and it still would be solidly Democratic.

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« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2009, 05:14:44 pm »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.

Fundies in the Minneapolis suburbs/exurbs. Compare to the area around Milwaukee in eastern Wisconsin. Western Wisconsin is more like the Duluth area in northeastern Minnesota. Rural whites in the Democratic areas of Wisconsin and Minnesota are Scandinavians, mostly, your traditional mainline Protestant progressives. (Capital P Progressives, too, in both the US and Canada historically.)

Also, Obama won New York minus New York City (and Long Island, but it's less Democratic than the remainder of the state as a whole) with about 55% of the vote, so upstate New York is solidly Democratic. You could take out the entire NYC MSA, and it still would be solidly Democratic.



It is true Obama won upstate New York, although they were still more counties and municipalities won by McCain than Obama, however Obama did win all the larger ones though.  I would say Upstate New York would be a swing state since the results in the past few elections have generally been not far off the national average.  Kerry I think won by only 2,000 votes.  The strong Obama win this time corresponded with his strong win nationally.
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« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2009, 07:06:55 pm »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.

Fundies in the Minneapolis suburbs/exurbs. Compare to the area around Milwaukee in eastern Wisconsin. Western Wisconsin is more like the Duluth area in northeastern Minnesota. Rural whites in the Democratic areas of Wisconsin and Minnesota are Scandinavians, mostly, your traditional mainline Protestant progressives. (Capital P Progressives, too, in both the US and Canada historically.)

Also, Obama won New York minus New York City (and Long Island, but it's less Democratic than the remainder of the state as a whole) with about 55% of the vote, so upstate New York is solidly Democratic. You could take out the entire NYC MSA, and it still would be solidly Democratic.



The Upper Midwest seems to be the only area where suburbs are more Republican than rural areas. I'm imagining this is only true in Minn., Wisc. and N.H.
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« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2009, 08:05:17 pm »
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Great Map.  My one question is how come there is so much red in Wisconsin while Minnesota seems far more blue.  Western Wisconsin is pretty rural and white so it seems odds it went so strongly for Obama.  New England is also went heavily for Obama, but this region has always been quite liberal compared to elsewhere in the US.  As for Pennsylvania, no surprise, it is quite polarized between the urban and rural areas.  Even New York seems to have a fair bit of blue, although looking at the county by county results it seems most counties that voted for McCain only went for him narrowly, while New York City went massively for Obama, so there was no way McCain was going to overcome Obama's strength in New York City unless he got somewhere in the neighbourhood of 2/3 of the vote in upstate New York.

Fundies in the Minneapolis suburbs/exurbs. Compare to the area around Milwaukee in eastern Wisconsin. Western Wisconsin is more like the Duluth area in northeastern Minnesota. Rural whites in the Democratic areas of Wisconsin and Minnesota are Scandinavians, mostly, your traditional mainline Protestant progressives. (Capital P Progressives, too, in both the US and Canada historically.)

Also, Obama won New York minus New York City (and Long Island, but it's less Democratic than the remainder of the state as a whole) with about 55% of the vote, so upstate New York is solidly Democratic. You could take out the entire NYC MSA, and it still would be solidly Democratic.



The Upper Midwest seems to be the only area where suburbs are more Republican than rural areas. I'm imagining this is only true in Minn., Wisc. and N.H.

Definitely true in Wisconsin.  Partially true in Minnesota, although the more densely populated suburbs went for Obama in Minneapolis-St. Paul.  It was more the exurbs that went for McCain.  Hennepin County - Minneapolis and Ramsay County - St. Paul still would have gone for Obama as well as he won Washington County and Dakota County.  Asides from New England, Upper Midwest seems to be the only area where large chunks of predominately rural and white counties voted for Obama.  There are some states though where suburban areas more Republican than the state as a whole, but usually it is due to other factors.  For example, the Cincinnati Suburbs are far more Republican than Ohio as a whole and even more so than rural Ohio, however the Southwestern part of the state is also the most conservative part.  The Cleveland suburbs however are more Democratic than the state as a whole.  Orange County is also more Republican than even rural California, but the Los Angeles County suburbs and to a lesser extent, Ventura County are more Democratic.
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« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2009, 07:52:00 pm »
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Here is the whole upper north and east of the US - from Minnesota to Maine


I would be interested in seeing Illinois and Indiana.  It would be interesting to see how Obama did in his home state.  I suspect he probably did quite well in the Northern part of the state including many traditional Republican areas, but I suspect less so in the downstate parts.  If anything, I think being from Chicago might have been a liability as this region seems to be ignored quite often by Chicago and many I get the impression don't particularly like the Northern part of the state. 

Indiana would be interesting, although I suspect much like Ohio and Pennsylvania, most of the state went Republican, Obama just won the cities, however he won them by larger margins than the Democrats usually do and he didn't get clobbered in rural Indiana like the Democrats normally do.  Still it would be great to see this.
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« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2009, 08:35:36 pm »
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Well, to figure out that Obama did better in North IL, one doesn't have to see the township map: the county map suffices. Yes, Obama wiped McCain off the map in the North and did relatively poorly in the South. Every single county in IL did swing to Dems this time, but whereas almost all northern counties also trended D, most Southern didn't.

Obama is the first Dem ever (IL is on the Atlas since 1892) to win at the presidential level in such counties as DuPage, Kane, Kendall or McHenry. His margins in DuPage and Kane were over 10% (about 55% of the vote in both) - not a bad performance in a solid Republican territory.  What is it, that a township map can add to this?
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« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2009, 09:25:40 pm »
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Well, to figure out that Obama did better in North IL, one doesn't have to see the township map: the county map suffices. Yes, Obama wiped McCain off the map in the North and did relatively poorly in the South. Every single county in IL did swing to Dems this time, but whereas almost all northern counties also trended D, most Southern didn't.

Obama is the first Dem ever (IL is on the Atlas since 1892) to win at the presidential level in such counties as DuPage, Kane, Kendall or McHenry. His margins in DuPage and Kane were over 10% (about 55% of the vote in both) - not a bad performance in a solid Republican territory.  What is it, that a township map can add to this?

I am aware of Obama's strength by county, however it would still be interesting to see the breakdown as some counties like Kane, Kendall, Will, and McHenry have both built up suburban sections and more rural sections so I would be interested in seeing if it was just the suburban parts Obama won or if he extended his strength into the countryside.  I should note DuPage County was already trending Democrat even before as I think Bush did rather poorly by historical standards.  Like many suburbs, the Collar County Republicans tend to be more your centre-right suburban type voters, not your hard right types you find in the South or more rural areas of the Midwest.  I would also like to see how Obama vs. McCain did in the St. Louis suburbs as those have been trending more Democrat than the surrounding areas.
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« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2009, 12:34:24 pm »
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For what it's worth, I just discovered a tiny nitpicking error on this map. It appears that Union City (right on the Indiana border in Darke County) is not colored in red. I say "appears" as it's left gray due to it's tiny size, but as other similarly tiny villages are colored red when Obama carried them I assume this means it's considered "default" blue like the surrounding area.

Anyhoo, Obama narrowly carried Union City. (# 25 on the list in following link).

http://www.electionsonthe.net/oh/darke/elecres/20081104prec.pdf

I'm sure correcting this will be of foremost importance on Dave's to do list. ;-)
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« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2010, 11:25:52 pm »
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So, why is the link to the map in the first post now off limits? Sad
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« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2010, 07:40:10 pm »
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Why is Marion County Indiana divided into nine townships?  Doesn't Indianapolis cover all of the county?
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« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2010, 12:11:18 am »
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Why is Marion County Indiana divided into nine townships?  Doesn't Indianapolis cover all of the county?

Cities and townships in the Midwest are not necessarily coterminus. When Indy was extended in 1970, a number of communities also in Marion were not incorporated. The unification did not extend to the townships either, and they maintain their status within the incorporated municipality.
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« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2010, 02:44:56 am »
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Why is Marion County Indiana divided into nine townships?  Doesn't Indianapolis cover all of the county?

Cities and townships in the Midwest are not necessarily coterminus. When Indy was extended in 1970, a number of communities also in Marion were not incorporated. The unification did not extend to the townships either, and they maintain their status within the incorporated municipality.

The status of Marion County under Unigov is somewhat anomalous. All areas are to some extent administratively associated with Indianapolis; the extent to which this is the case varies by area.
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« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2010, 02:51:25 am »
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Why is Marion County Indiana divided into nine townships?  Doesn't Indianapolis cover all of the county?

Cities and townships in the Midwest are not necessarily coterminus. When Indy was extended in 1970, a number of communities also in Marion were not incorporated. The unification did not extend to the townships either, and they maintain their status within the incorporated municipality.

Interesting.   What's with the township in central Marion?  Is that downtown Indianapolis I see in McCain colors?
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« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2010, 12:17:55 pm »
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So, why is the link to the map in the first post now off limits? Sad

Bump.
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