Category Archives: Election Maps

More than 360,000 Voters Leave Ballot Blank in Uncontested Alabama Senate Contest

AL 2014 Senate

Alabama 2014 Election Results – U.S. Senate

In the 2014 General Election contest for U.S. Senate in Alabama, more than 360,000 voters left their ballot blank.  The race featured incumbent Senator Jeff Session running for re-election without a named opponent printed on the ballot.  The ballot did include, however, an option to vote for a write-in a candidate.  On November 24, the Alabama Secretary of State certified the 2014 General Election Results, publishing the final tally of the vote as 795,606 for Republican Jeff Sessions (97.25%) and 22,484 write-ins (2.75%). The county-level result, shown at right, is a solid “>90%” in every county, with exception of Macon County, where the write-in tally just cleared 10%.  Full results are available here.

Looking deeper into the data though, its clear that most voters that did not want to vote for the incumbent Senator simply left their ballots blank.

AL 2014 Senate Vote Dropoff

Alabama 2014 US Senate Vote Dropoff

The drop-off vote from Governor to U.S. Senate (the difference in total vote between the two contests) is 362,323 votes (30.6%).  The total Republican Vote for Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate contest is only 5.7% more than Republican Robert Bentley received in the Gubernatorial vote – 795,606 vs. 750,231, a difference of 43,375 – full Gubernatorial results can be seen here. At the county level, the drop-off varies considerably, from the smallest drop-off of 10.4% in Blount County to the largest of 80.5% in Greene County. A map of the results can be seen at right.

Map Key >10% >20% >30% >40% >50% >60% >70% >80%
Dropoff
2014 Governor Republican Vote

Alabama 2014 Gubernatorial  Vote for Republican

In one example, Macon County, Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Parker Griffith received 4,830 votes (85.3%) to Robert Bentley’s 829 (14.6%) and three write-in votes – a total of 5,662 votes.  In the U.S. Senate contest, Jeff Sessions, picked up 1,133 votes to 127 write-ins.  The number of blank votes in the U.S. Senate race relative to the Governor’s race 4,402 votes (77.8%).

Predictably, the drop-off correlates with the percentage of vote for Republican, as shown in the map to the right. The sharpness of the magnitude of this correlation may be, in part, due to the existence of the straight-party option.  As seen in this sample ballot, the voter can choose Alabama Democratic Party, Alabama Independence Party, or Alabama Republican Party at the very top of the ballot under “Straight Party Voting”.  If the voter chooses the “Alabama Democratic Party” option, no vote for US Senate is cast.

Map Key >90% >80% >70% >60% >50% >40% >30% >20%
Republican

Shannon County, SD Votes to Change Name

Shannon County, SD

Shannon County, SD

The residents of Shannon County, SD have voted to change the name of the county to Oglala Lakota County.  The vote tally from the November 4th election is

Yes 2,161 80.4%
No 526 19.6%

The process has several more steps until the name change becomes official, including a joint resolution of the South Dakota Legislature followed by a proclamation from the governor.  The name change then becomes official on the first day of the first month following the proclamation.  South Dakota Statute 7-1-71 and Statute 7-1-72 state:

7-1-71.   Legislative resolution to change name. The Governor at the next convention of the annual session of the State Legislature shall communicate the result of an election held pursuant to § 7-1-69 in such county to the presiding officer of each branch of the Legislature, and thereupon the Legislature shall designate by joint resolution the new name of such county.

7-1-72.   Governor’s proclamation of new county name. Upon the designation made by the Legislature pursuant to § 7-1-71, the Governor shall publicly proclaim the result of the election held pursuant to § 7-1-69 and of the new name of the county. The new name of such county shall be in full force and effect on the first day of the month following such proclamation by the Governor.

Shannon County Name Change Precinct Map

Shannon County Change of County Name Precinct Results Map

The vote for the “Shannon County Change of County Name” took place on the same day as the 2014 General Election, but on a separate paper ballot. A sample ballot with question wording may be seen here.

The map at the right shows the full Shannon County precinct result for the vote.  All precincts voted in favor of the change except for Cuny Table, the precinct with the fewest votes in the northwest corner, where they voted against the change 22 to 19.  Five precincts voted with more than 80% in favor.

Map Key >50% >60% >70% >80%
Yes
No

The map key is shown at the right. The table below show the precinct-level data from the vote.

Shannon County Name Change Precinct Results

Precinct Name
Yes Vote
No Vote
Yes %
No %
Total2,16152680%20%
Batesland694362%38%
Cuny Table192246%54%
Kyle2996981%19%
Manderson1502785%15%
Oglala3369079%21%
Pine Ridge 153811682%18%
Pine Ridge 33757583%17%
Porcupine3226284%16%
Rockyford532271%29%

Shannon County was Barack Obama’s best county in the 2012 General Election (see statistics page), where he won with 93.4% of the vote.  Mitt Romney only managed 6.0%.  Full 2012 Shannon County presidential results are available here.

Nebraska 2014 Republican Gubernatorial Primary

Nebraska 2014 Republican Gubernatorial Primary

Nebraska 2014 Republican Gubernatorial Primary

The Nebraska 2014 Republican Gubernatorial Primary was a competitive six-way contest with a very flat result. No candidate received more than 27% of the vote, four candidates received more than 19%, and every one of the six candidates won in at least one county. Omaha businessman Pete Ricketts came out on top with a preliminary unofficial total of 26.5% (57,922 votes), followed closely by Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning at 25.49% (55,751 votes), State Senator Beau McCoy at 20.94% (45,804 votes), and State Auditor Mike Foley with 19.22% (42,029 votes). Trailing were Tax attorney Bryan Slone with 4.13% and State Senator Tom Carlson with 3.74%. Across the state, only three counties were won with more than 40% of the vote – the top one being Phelps County won by fifth place finisher Carlson with 49.7% (his home town is Holdrege located in Phelps County), Ricketts won Morrill County (in the panhandle) with 42%, and Foley won Lancaster County with 41%. The table below summarizes the results:

Nebraska 2014 Republican Primary Results (Unofficial)

 
Candidate
Total Votes
Percentage
Counties Won
RepPete Ricketts57,92226.48%26
IndJon Bruning55,75125.49%32
DemBeau McCoy45,80420.94%27
OthMike Foley42,02919.22%7
OthTom Carlson9,0344.13%1
OthBryan Slone8,1793.74%1

The Pie chart at right is the statewide breakdown of the vote for the six candidates.  Rickett’s strongest vote margins were in the Omaha area of Douglas and Sarpy Counties, where he had a combined margin advantage of 5,427 votes.  Fourth-place finisher, Foley, had the highest-margin county in Lancaster, where he topped Bruning by 5,986 votes and Ricketts by 6,363 votes.  However, he did not have sufficient state-wide support to achieve victory.  Bruning’s support was more dispersed, winning the most counties, concentrated in the north and west, but not having any high-margin counties.  McCoy is similar to Bruning, with his support concentrated in the central and southern portions of the state. Carlson and Slone both had more than 30% support in only a single county each. Below is a full interactive mouse-over map.

Polk County has the smallest win percentage, where Bruning won with 310 votes (24.12%) to 306 for Foley, 302 for Ricketts, 299 for McCoy, Carlson at 50, and Slone at 18.  An almost even 4-way split!   The full results page on the atlas is located here.

 

Virginia County Map Changes in 2013

Virginia County Map Highlighting Bedford County and Bedford City

Bedford County and City, VA

The 2013 general election map of Virginia includes the first county-equivalent boundary change since the independent city of Clifton Forge, VA reverted to a town in 2001.  On July, 1, 2013, the independent city of Bedford, VA transitioned to town status, removing the boundary separating Bedford City from Bedford County. The number of independent cities in Virginia is now 38, with 95 counties, for a total of 133 county equivalents.

Michigan 2012 President by City & Township

Michigan 2012 Presidential Election Results by City and Township The 2012 Presidential Election Results map for Michigan by county subdivision (City, Township, and Charter Township) is now complete.  Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan won a total of 1,133 cities and townships while Barack Obama and Joe Biden won in 382 (eight were ties).  This is a significant number of pickups for the Republican ticket vs. 2008, where Obama and Biden won in 684 cities and townships vs. the McCain/Palin ticket’s 830.  Similar to many other states, the municipalities with the largest populations voted overwhelmingly Democratic, with Obama/Biden winning nine of the top ten (Detroit, Grand Rapids, Warren, Ann Arbor, Sterling Heights, Clinton, Lansing, Canton, Farmington Hills; Romney won Livonia) with a net margin of 385,875 votes.  In the city of Detroit alone, Obama/Biden won 97.6% to 2.1%, a margin of 275,724 votes.  Full details can be viewed on the Michigan 2012 Town page.

Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Swing Map

Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Swing Map by City and Town

Wisconsin 2012 Swing

Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Election Map by Congressional District

WI 2012 CD Map

An interesting map to have a look at is the Presidential Swing map by city and town for the state of Wisconsin in the 2012 general election. With Congressman Paul Ryan on as the Republican Vice Presidential candidates – a native representing Wisconsin’s first congressional district, does the map reflect a larger vote swing in his home district?  The second map at right shows the 2012 Presidential Election Results by U.S. Congressional District.  The first district is located in the southeast corner of the state – south and west of Milwaukee.  The overall result in the first congressional district was Romney/Ryan 51.6%, Obama/Biden 47.4%, Others 1.1%.  However, the swing map shows that the cities and towns within the first district are about average for the southern half of the state.  Larger swings towards the Romney/Ryan ticket were recorded in the northern portion of the state, especially within the seventh and eighth districts.  More detail on this can be viewed on the 2012 Wisconsin Presidential Election Results by City and Town page.

More Wisconsin County Subdivision Maps

More county subdivision maps have been added to the site for Wisconsin general elections for President and are now complete for 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012.  New county subdivision maps include state-wide and individual county for winning vote percentage, party,  swing, trend (swing and trend are not available for 2000).   All of the new maps include the mouse-over pop-up feature and are clickable to open the results for that city or town.

Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Map by County Subdivision

The complete Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Election Wisconsin 2012 Presidential Map by County Subdivision results map by county subdivision (town, city, village) between Democrat Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney is now complete. The map at right is the thumbnail of the result (click on map for larger version).  Mitt Romney won 1,070 municipalities and Barack Obama won 809 (there were 16 ties). This was a significant improvement over 2008, where Republican John McCain won only 649 municipalities and Barack Obama won 1,232 (with 15 ties). Like in other states, the municipalities with the largest number of votes cast were dominantly won by Barack Obama.  Of the cities with more than 30,000 votes cast, Obama won 10 of 11, accounting for a margin of 325,338 votes. Milwaukee and Madison alone accounted for a vote margin of 258,938 votes. Compared with the overall state-wide margin of 213,019, these population centers secured the victory for Obama in Wisconsin.

2010 Gubernatorial County Subdivision Maps

New County Subdivision maps have been added for New England States (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Connecticut, and Rhode Island) for the 2010 General Election contests for Governor.  At right is the results for the three-way Gubernatorial contest in Maine - a close win by Republican Paul LePage over Independent candidate Eliot Cutler and Democratic candidate Libby Mitchell.  LePage won with 38% of the vote to 36% for Cutler and 19% for Mitchell.  LePage dominated the inland towns, while Cutler won in many of the coastal communities.  Libby won in the far north and Native American townships.

A second three-way race in the 2010 General Election took place in Rhode Island, where Independent Lincoln Chafee won a three way contest against Republican candidate John Robitaille and Democratic candidate Frank Caprio.  Chafee won with only 36% of the vote.  Robitaille had 34% and Caprio received 23%.  Chafee won the Providence area and south coast, Caprio took three communities north and west of Providence, while Robitaille won the North and West of the state.

The contests in both  Connecticut  and  Vermont were very competitive – Democratic candidate Dan Malloy won in the Constitution State over Republican Tom Foley by a mere 6,404 votes (49.5% to 49.0%).  In the Green Mountain State, Democrat Peter Shumlin won over Republican challenger Brian Dubie by 4,331 votes (49.5% to 47.7%).

In Massachusetts, Democratic incumbent Deval Patrick was reelected with a plurality of 48.4%. Republican Charlie Baker was second with 42%, Independent Tim Cahill had 8%, and Green-Rainbow candidate Jill Stein received 1.4%.

The only New England state to have a 2010 Gubernatorial winner with a majority of the vote was New Hampshire, where incumbent Democrat John Lynch won his third reelection bid – this time with a significantly smaller margin against Republican John Stephen (52.6% to 45.0%).  Libertarian John Babiarz received 2.2%.