Atlas Forum

Atlas Fantasy Elections => Atlas Fantasy Government => Topic started by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 11, 2011, 04:33:18 pm



Title: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 11, 2011, 04:33:18 pm
Welcome to the Department of External Affairs
ברוכים הבאים ל המחלקה לקשרי חוץ
Bienvenue au ministère des Affaires extérieures
Bienvenido al Departamento de Asuntos Exteriores
Willkommen in der Abteilung für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten
Bem-vindo ao Departamento de Assuntos Externos
Welkom bij het ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken
Zapraszamy do Departamentu Spraw Zagranicznych
مرحبا بكم في وزارة الشؤون الخارجية
Добро пожаловать в министерство иностранных дел*


* The DoEA does not take responsibility for unfortunate errors in translation. Blame Google.  Thank you.

Also, I wish to post this quote, which has been framed and hangs above my doorway:
You have the job I want the most, but I'm sure you will do an excellent job.  Best of luck to you.
I fear for the world's future should you ever get this job ;)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Department of External Affaors
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 11, 2011, 04:33:59 pm
With my resignation, the position of GTO Ambassador has become available.  I recommend Lief to that position, and urge the Senate to confirm him as soon as possible.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Department of External Affaors
Post by: tmthforu94 on March 11, 2011, 04:40:58 pm
With my resignation, the position of GTO Ambassador has become available.  Using my authority, I nominate Lief to that position, and urge the Senate to confirm him as soon as possible.
:o What a surprise!

Nice office, btw.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Department of External Affaors
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 11, 2011, 04:44:58 pm
Nice office, btw.

Thanks :D


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 14, 2011, 10:11:16 pm
Statement on the Japanese Disaster

My heart goes out to all those in Japan who are suffering, who have departed this World, and who have yet to depart.  I have been in contact with the Prime Minister regarding the general situation, and the various nuclear plant problems.

In response, I have sent a number of brigades of Atlasian soldiers and medical personnel to Japan in order to help the relief effort.  I am awaiting word from the Prime Minister on what he desires in regards to the nuclear plant; however, one of my staff members who is an expert on nuclear energy is already on his way to Japan with the relief effort in order to provide whatever assistance he can.

Before I close, I urge every Atlasian to pray for the Japanese people, their friends and loved ones outside of Japan who are still suffering, and those in Japan as well.  Thank you.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Kalwejt on March 15, 2011, 12:53:50 pm
Kudos for a quick reaction to an international event.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on March 15, 2011, 06:21:08 pm
With my resignation, the position of GTO Ambassador has become available.  Using my authority, I nominate Lief to that position, and urge the Senate to confirm him as soon as possible.

I was told a few days ago by an administration official that position didn't need confirmation. I orginally thought it did.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on March 15, 2011, 06:23:41 pm
Quote
4. An Ambassador to the GTO shall serve as Atlasian Representative in GTO and Secretary principal assistant; Ambassador shall be nominated by President on the recommendation of Secretary of External Affairs and be a subject of a Senate confirmation vote.



Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 15, 2011, 06:35:16 pm
Quote
4. An Ambassador to the GTO shall serve as Atlasian Representative in GTO and Secretary principal assistant; Ambassador shall be nominated by President on the recommendation of Secretary of External Affairs and be a subject of a Senate confirmation vote.


I have officially nominated him; I'm kind of waiting on the President here :P


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on March 15, 2011, 07:19:47 pm
The President PMed me demanding the hearings start.


I suggest you change the word nominate to "recommend Lief be nominated".


The bill says you recommend and Prez nominates recommendation.



Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 15, 2011, 08:33:15 pm
Statement on Libya

There comes a time when it becomes apparent that an incumbent government no longer has the support of the people, no longer has the most important thing of all: legitimacy.  The government of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi has lost legitimacy.  Thus, the Atlasian Government officially recognizes the National Transitional Council as the sole Representative of Libya.  I have dispatched an Envoy to Benghazi, and in response to the request made by the Council on March 11, I have ordered the Atlasian military to begin air strikes on strategic Gaddafi strongholds, as well as to help fortify the Council in Benghazi.  I am ordering that supplies be flown in to Zawiya, and anywhere else they are needed.  I will also begin talks with the United Kingdom and France over the implementation of a no-fly zone, although that is not being ordered at this time.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Department of External Affaors
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on March 15, 2011, 09:31:16 pm
With my resignation, the position of GTO Ambassador has become available.  I recommend Lief to that position, and urge the Senate to confirm him as soon as possible.

Perhaps you should change the second half of the last sentence as well. To something like, "I urge the President to nominate and the Senate to.....". :P




Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Lief 🐋 on March 16, 2011, 03:46:17 pm
As long as I continue to receive my Senate pension in the interim, I am okay with the delay. :P


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 16, 2011, 06:32:13 pm
Statement on Libya

Until the President orders it, the bombing of Gaddafi strongholds is called off.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on March 18, 2011, 02:40:49 pm
Statement on Libya

We applaud the decision of the United Nations to vote for a No-Fly Zone over Libya.  Hopefully the Senate will soon approve a resolution allowing Atlasia to contribute forces to maintaining that No-Fly Zone.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on March 18, 2011, 05:49:59 pm
Statement on Libya

We applaud the decision of the United Nations to vote for a No-Fly Zone over Libya.  Hopefully the Senate will soon approve a resolution allowing Atlasia to contribute forces to maintaining that No-Fly Zone.

I would suggest pming a specific Senator directly, if you haven't already with your preferred text to be introduced.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: HappyWarrior on March 20, 2011, 10:18:21 am
Statement on Libya

We applaud the decision of the United Nations to vote for a No-Fly Zone over Libya.  Hopefully the Senate will soon approve a resolution allowing Atlasia to contribute forces to maintaining that No-Fly Zone.

I would suggest pming a specific Senator directly, if you haven't already with your preferred text to be introduced.

Secretary as usual I am happy to help with foreign policy matters.  Simply PM me with your request and I'll get right ot work on it.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Kalwejt on April 01, 2011, 07:23:10 pm
Ben, how are works on Libyan bill with HW going?


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: tmthforu94 on April 01, 2011, 08:53:05 pm
Ben, how are works on Libyan bill with HW going?

On the subject of Libya, just so the Atlasian people don't think we're being lazy, Ben, Badger, and I have been working on a solution to the Libyan crisis, and we'll hopefully present our plan to the public in the coming days. :)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Kalwejt on April 01, 2011, 08:59:36 pm
Ben, how are works on Libyan bill with HW going?

On the subject of Libya, just so the Atlasian people don't think we're being lazy, Ben, Badger, and I have been working on a solution to the Libyan crisis, and we'll hopefully present our plan to the public in the coming days. :)

Just checking on you, guys. That what, I heard, opposition should do.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 01, 2011, 09:42:58 pm
To confirm, we will hopefully have a plan in the next couple of days.  We're almost there.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 02, 2011, 01:50:40 pm
The Keep Japan Afloat and Un-Radiated Act
1.   The government of Atlasia appropriates $400 million for humanitarian relief, aid, and reconstruction for the victims of the recent devastating events in Japan recently.
2.   The Atlasian government pledges full cooperation with and support of efforts of the United Nations and NGO relief agencies in efforts to extend relief and security to the people of Japan.
3.   The government of Atlasia shall also appropriate as much funds as deemed necessary by the GM in order to inspect and shore up all Japanese nuclear facilities deemed to be at any risk by the GM or other appropriate body.  The government of Atlasia shall also send many of our top nuclear specialists from government institution to investigate the nuclear facilities deemed to be at risk.
4.   The Senate hereby asks the Secretary of External Affairs to ask that our allies and other developed countries to send their financial support to the Japanese reconstruction effort.

If a Senator could introduce this and if the PPT could fast track it to debate, that'd be lovely.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Kalwejt on April 02, 2011, 02:08:19 pm
If a Senator could introduce this

My pleasure :)


Title: HABEMUS LIBYA DECISION!!!
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 05, 2011, 07:28:45 pm
HABEMUS LIBYA DECISION!!!

On March 15, 2011, the Atlasian Government officially recognized the National Transitional Council as the sole Representative of Libya.  At that time, a decision was made to begin bombing strongholds of Colonel Gaddafi.  However, due to lack of Presidential authorization, that action was called off in the interim, while the President and his Advisors debated what the best course of action was.

A decision has now been reached.  The President, after weighing all the options presented to him, carefully considering the pros and cons of each decision, and taking into account the full array of views presented by his Advisors, has reached a decision.

The Atlasian Government is officially deploying CIA and other intelligence agents among the rebel forces to train/advise them, plus act as spotters for airstrikes against government forces.  In addition, we will be actively targeting Colonel Gaddafi and other top government/military leaders as legitimate bombing targets.

The Atlasian Government has already begun deploying the necessary personnel, and hopes to have everyone in place in a few days.  The President will be speaking on this decision tomorrow as well; this announcement is, however, an official statement of what Atlasiaís upcoming policy will be.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: bgwah on April 05, 2011, 07:53:15 pm
lolz neocons


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: shua on April 05, 2011, 11:22:02 pm
what assurances do we have that these Mujaheddin we are training will respect human rights? how many "legitimate bombing targets" are involved here?  is the administration still working on a bill for Libya action, or is this policy going to be executed apart from the advice and authorization of the Senate?


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 06, 2011, 04:23:48 pm
The Letís Make This Official Because We All Thought It was Already True and Help a Couple of Other Places Act
1.   The $105 billion dollars currently allotted to military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq shall be removed.
2.   $10 billion shall be allocated to humanitarian missions and aid in Ivory Coast.
3.   $13 billion shall be allocated to humanitarian missions and aid in Libya.
4.   Reconstruction Aid in Afghanistan and Iraq shall increase from $6.85 billion to $9 billion.

Can a Senator introduce this?  Much obliged :)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 18, 2011, 08:18:19 pm
Statement on China

It is with great pleasure that I can confirm reports of a deal with China regarding debt financing.  Having been involved with these negotiations since the start, it is of particular satisfaction to me that this has been achieved.

I urge the Senate to pass the tariff reductions as soon as possible, lest the Chinese think we are not keeping our word.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 27, 2011, 04:47:03 pm
I will be publishing the May 2011 foreign policy review sometime in the coming weeks.  Suggestions, requests, veiled threats, etc. are welcome.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Kalwejt on April 27, 2011, 05:13:09 pm
I will be publishing the May 2011 foreign policy review sometime in the coming weeks.  Suggestions, requests, veiled threats, etc. are welcome.

Hey go die in a fire Ben


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on May 21, 2011, 04:07:26 pm
Department of External Affairs: May 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.


DoEA Policy: Africa

Algeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Angola: Normal
Benin: Normal
Botswana: Normal
Burkina Faso: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and certain political freedoms.
Burundi: Normal, though we are still concerned about ethnic violence, corruption and certain political freedoms.
Cameroon: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Cape Verde: Normal
Central African Republic: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms and certain civil liberties.
Chad: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms, certain civil liberties and the political situation.
Comoros: Normal, though we are concerned by the current political situation
Congo: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the massive corruption and lack of political freedoms.
Cote d’Ivoire: Normal
Democratic Republic of the Congo: Full military and economic restrictions because of serious concerns about the political situation, continued violence, basic rights, corruption and treatment of women.
Djibouti: Full military and partial economic restrictions
Egypt: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  It is the hope of the DoEA that the spirit that overthrew Hosni Mubarak will continue, and that Egypt can transition to a democratic government.
Equatorial Guinea: Full military and economic restrictions
Eritrea: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns about the current situation, civil liberties and illegal weapons trading with Somalia.
Ethiopia: Normal.  We have concerns about political freedoms, internal violence and relations with Somalia (Partial military and no economic restrictions).
Gabon: Partial military and partial economic restrictions until democratic institutions are respected and civil liberties recognized.
Gambia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Ghana: Normal
Guinea: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruptions. We support a return to civilian government.
Guinea-Bissau: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Kenya: Normal
Lesotho: Normal
Liberia: Normal
Libya: Full military and economic restrictions.  As was noted in a previous statement, the Government of Atlasia no longer recognizes Colonel Gaddafi as the leader of Libya.
Madagascar: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and political instability.
Malawi: Normal
Mali: Normal
Mauritania: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: Normal, though we are concerned about certain political freedoms. On the matter of Western Sahara, we demand immediate negotiations concerning the status of Western Sahara, and the failure of Morocco to engage into talks will results in recognition of Sahrawi independence.
Mozambique: Normal
Namibia: Normal
Niger: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms and basic rights.
Nigeria: Normal.  There needs to be serious political reform and we are also worried about violence in the Niger Delta and the situation in the north.
Rwanda: Partial military and no economic restrictions, though we have concerns pertaining to freedom of the press and politics.
Sao Tome and Principe: Normal
Senegal: Normal
Seychelles: Normal
Sierra Leone: Normal
Somalia: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns regarding piracy and continued violence.
Somaliland: Normal.
South Africa: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption and their response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Sudan: Full military and economic restrictions. We strongly condemn the situation in Darfur, and would like to see an end to conflict with South Sudan.
Swaziland: Full military and economic restrictions
Tanzania: Normal
Togo: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Tunisia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Uganda: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the political situation, human rights and corruption.
Zambia: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Zimbabwe: Full military and economic restrictions


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on May 21, 2011, 04:09:58 pm
Department of External Affairs: May 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: The Americas

Antigua and Barbuda: Normal
Argentina: Normal
Bahamas: Normal
Barbados: Normal
Belize: Normal
Bolivia: Normal, though we oppose any secessionist movements in Santa Cruz province and other eastern areas of the country.
Brazil: Normal
Canada: Normal
Chile: Normal.
Colombia: Normal.
Costa Rica: Normal
Cuba: Normal. Atlasian policy regarding Cuba is currently F.L. 18-6, Cuban Relations Act.
Dominica: Normal
Dominican Republic: Normal
Ecuador: Normal
El Salvador: Normal
Grenada: Normal
Guatemala: Normal
Guyana: Normal
Haiti: Normal, though we have concerns regarding corruption and political instability.
Honduras: Normal
Jamaica: Normal
Mexico: Normal, though we have serious concerns about the drug warlords conflict.
Nicaragua: Normal
Panama: Normal
Paraguay: Normal
Peru: Normal
Saint Kitts and Nevis: Normal
Saint Lucia: Normal
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Normal
Suriname: Normal
Trinidad and Tobago: Normal
Uruguay: Normal
Venezuela: Normal

DoEA Policy: Europe

Albania: Normal
Andorra: Normal
Armenia: Normal
Austria: Normal
Azerbaijan: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held, civil liberties respected and transparency is restored.
Belarus: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held and civil liberties respected.
Belgium: Normal
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Normal. Atlasia welcomes the apparent political stability and peaceful ethnic relations.
Bulgaria: Normal
Croatia: Normal
Czech Republic: Normal
Denmark: Normal
Estonia: Normal
Finland: Normal
France: Normal
Georgia: Normal, though we have concerns over civil liberties and notably about the status of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The DoEA reserves the right to military restrictions if we feel that it is needed in view of current events in the country or the Caucasus.
Germany: Normal
Greece: Normal
Hungary: Normal
Iceland: Normal
Ireland: Normal
Italy: Normal, though we have concerns about corruption.
Kosovo: Normal
Latvia: Normal
Liechtenstein: Normal although we call for a complete transition to democracy and full transparency in banking.
Lithuania: Normal
Luxembourg: Normal
Macedonia: Normal, although we have concerns about corruption, ethnic minorities and relations with Greece.
Moldova: Normal. Atlasia is pleased overall with democratic evolution in Moldova, though we have serious concerns about corruption, political instability, drug trafficking and the Transnistria issue.
Monaco: Normal
Montenegro: Normal
Netherlands: Normal
Norway: Normal
Poland: Normal
Portugal: Normal
Romania: Normal
Russia: Partial military and economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about democracy, civil liberties, press freedom and the situation in Chechnya and the Russian Caucasus.
San Marino: Normal
Serbia: Normal, though we should warn Serbia against any attempt to go against the recent UN ruling on Kosovo.
Slovakia: Normal, though we have some concerns about worrying nationalist trends in the country and their negative effect on internal and external ethnic relations.
Slovenia: Normal
Sweden: Normal
Switzerland: Normal
Turkey: Normal, although concerns remain about treatment of Kurds, and increasing trend away from secularism.
Ukraine: Normal, but we have concerns regarding current political stability, corruption, and various other problems
United Kingdom: Normal
Vatican City: Normal


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on May 21, 2011, 04:15:58 pm
Department of External Affairs: May 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, drugs, woman's rights and other issues.
Australia: Normal
Bahrain: Partial military restrictions.  The Atlasian Government strongly condemns the recent measures taken against protesters in Bahrain.
Bangladesh: Normal
Bhutan: Normal
Brunei: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Burma (Myanmar): Full military and economic restrictions. We urge for a full transfer to democracy, and the respect for civil liberties and basic political freedoms.
Cambodia: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and civil liberties.
China: Partial military restrictions and no economic restrictions, though we are very concerned over human rights, and political liberties. We realize that China is a major economic partner and full economic restrictions would be counter-productive to the Atlasian and global economy.
East Timor: Normal
Federated States of Micronesia: Normal
Fiji: Full military and partial economic restrictions.
India: Normal
Indonesia: Normal
Iran: Full military and economic restrictions will remain in place until the Iranian regime makes full, honest and lasting overtures to democracy.
Iraq: Normal, though we have major concerns about corruption and other issues.
Israel: Normal
Japan: Normal
Jordan: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Kazakhstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We want a full transfer to democracy.
Kiribati: Normal
Kuwait: Normal.
Kyrgyzstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Laos: Normal, though we have concerns about human rights and basic freedoms.
Lebanon: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Malaysia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Maldives: Normal
Marshall Islands: Normal
Mongolia: Normal
Nauru: Normal
Nepal: Normal
New Zealand: Normal
North Korea: Full military and economic restrictions
Oman: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Pakistan: Normal, though we are extremely concerned about the apparent role of the ISI in harboring terrorists.
Palau: Normal
Palestine: Normal, though we are gravely concerned by the current political situation. Atlasia supports a two-state solution and would like a democratic and independent state of Palestine in the near future.
Papua New Guinea: Normal
Philippines: Normal
Qatar: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Samoa: Normal
Saudi Arabia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about the human rights situation and urge the government to make major democratic reforms.
Singapore: Normal, though we would like a true democracy.
Solomon Islands: Normal
South Korea: Normal
Sri Lanka: Normal, though we are concerned about a few issues. We urge the government to build a modern, peaceful, democratic and multi-ethnic state with peaceful ethnic relations in the wake of the end of the civil war.
Syria: Full military and economic restrictions.  The regime of Bashar al-Assad has committed significant human rights violations against its people, and it is time for Mr. Assad to accept the will of his people and resign his position and allow Syria to become a democratic state.
Tajikistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Thailand: Normal, though we are keeping a close eye on the political situation and we will re-evalute the Free Trade Act with Thailand if need be.
Tonga: Normal
Turkmenistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Tuvalu: Normal
United Arab Emirates: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about workers rights and political freedoms.
Uzbekistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Vanuatu: Normal
Vietnam: Normal
Yemen: Normal

I present the full FPR to the Senate and ask a Senator to assume sponsorship of this bill and urge the Senate to approve it, as per the terms of F.L. 32-18: Amendment to the SoEA Role Codification Act (http://uselectionatlas.org/AFEWIKI/index.php/Amendment_to_the_SoEA_Role_Codification_Act).

x Ben, Secretary of External Affairs


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - FPR now available!
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on June 27, 2011, 01:04:03 pm
The position of GTO Ambassador is now open.  All interested should PM me.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - FPR now available!
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on July 04, 2011, 01:46:09 pm
The position of GTO Ambassador is now open.  All interested should PM me.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - Job Opening
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on July 04, 2011, 10:10:12 pm
I'm also sort of curious as to how long it'll take before we see Ben, Virginia, RPP. I say 3 months at the very most

I win.  It's now been over 4 months :)

Also, if anyone else is interested in applying for GTO Ambassador, let me know.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - Habemus GTO
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on July 06, 2011, 07:57:08 pm
Ladies and Gentlemen, after a long search, I have found a GTO Ambassador.  He is a longstanding citizen with a distinguished record in public service, and I believe he will represent us well.

I officially recommend Tmthforu94 to the President to be the 3rd GTO Ambassador.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - Job Opening
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on July 14, 2011, 05:21:05 pm
Transcript of SoEA Ben's speech to the French Parliament in Paris, France :: July 14, 2011

Mr. President, Madame First Lady, assembled dignitaries

We live in an increasingly changing world.  For too long, the international community has existed in an order that is no longer practical, no longer representative of the actual world situation.  No organization is more representative of that antiquated status quo than the United Nations – an organization founded to promote world peace; but which now operates on several basic premises which no longer hold true.

I am not here to criticize every little fault of the United Nations; that is ultimately unproductive.  Instead, there are several changes which should be mentioned.  First and foremost is the issue of the UN Security Council.  At present, the UNSC represents the International Order as it was in 1945.  Clearly, this is no longer tenable.  We cannot exist in a world where the most important international body’s most important component represents an outdated picture.  To end that stalemate, I am calling for the expansion of the UN Security Council from its current 5 permanent seats to no fewer than 8 permanent seats.  These new seats should be filled with nations that represent the future, not the past, of international power.  Nations such as India, Brazil, South Africa – just to name a few – must be included in the levers of international power in order for the international order to retain legitimacy.  Otherwise, we run the risk of continued stagnation, and inaction.

Additionally, it is imperative that the sole power Veto in the UNSC be abolished.  I am not calling for a simple majority rules way to working, but rather to move closer towards a Supermajority.  For too long, the Veto has made it possible for one nation on any particular issue to block the clear will of the majority not just of the UNSC but of the UN as a whole.  The time has come to liberalize the way the UNSC approves of missions.  Moving to a Supermajority vote retains the basic premise of the UNSC, but it makes it far easier to move ahead; it cuts down on the gridlock.  It cannot continue to be the case that one nation always does the dirty work of another nation, thwarting the clear will of the rest of the international community.

Now that I have thoroughly attacked the UNSC, I wish to quickly address the UN as an entire organization.  The UN is too often paralyzed by inaction.  This organizational inertia needs to end.  It leads to the UN being a step behind on all the critical issues, responding to crises that have either already passed or ballooned into issues we are no longer equipped to handle.  This harms the ability of the UN to help the world; it damages the trust people have in not only the UN, but the specific member nations as well.  By ending the institutional inertia, we can move ahead, make the UN a stronger and more legitimate organization, and move ahead to confronting the challenges of the 21st Century.

The time has come for us to confront a changing world.  Atlasia will be on the forefront of this change; and it is my sincere hope that France, and all other nationalities assembled here today, will join us in facing the Brave New World we are in.  Thank You, and Dave Bless.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - Job Opening
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on July 23, 2011, 08:15:34 am
Yesterday, our friends in Norway were struck by tragedy.  No nation should ever have to undergo such tragedy.  Atlasia will always be here for the people of Norway; ask, and we will rush to your aid.  Today we are all Norwegians; may Dave protect you, and may Dave aid you in your time of need.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - Job Opening
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on August 21, 2011, 09:23:53 pm
Statement on Libya

First of all, we are thrilled with the apparent taking of Tripoli by the NTC.  We recognize them as the legitimate government of Libya, and their continued success is encouraging.  We fully support the rebels and will be there to assist in the future; currently, they are fighting, and Atlasia is staying out, except for the civilian protection activity already ongoing.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on August 31, 2011, 03:34:58 pm
If a Senator could introduce this for the Administration:

Libyan Aid Bill

The Senate of Atlasia hereby authorizes the following $103.5 million aid package to the NTC Government of Libya:
$32.5 million in infrastructure
$30 million in medicine, clothing, etc.
$27.5 million in food
$8.5 million in refugee assistance
$1.5 million in miscellaneous aid
$3.5 million in military aid


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on August 31, 2011, 04:16:01 pm
And this one:

GTO Expansion Act of 2011
1. The Senate hereby approves the expansion of the Global Treaty Organization (GTO) treaty entered into on July 17, 2006 with the Governments of Somaliland and South Sudan, if the legislatures of these respective nations ratify the offer and if the current members of the GTO ratify the adhesion of these nations as per the rule expressed in in Article 11, Clause 2 of the Global Treaty Organization formation treaty.

2. The President and other officers of the Atlasian Government shall take such actions, and enforce such regulations, as may be necessary to implement the provisions of the treaty with these new member countries.

3. This Act shall have effect only with respect to those countries which have ratified or approved the treaty, and which continue to comply with its provisions.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 01, 2011, 12:52:16 pm
So, if someone could introduce the two above bills, that would be great :)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Fmr. Pres. Duke on September 01, 2011, 04:26:44 pm
All done!


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 03, 2011, 12:54:05 pm
All done!

Thank you Senator.

Yankee, let's get them to the floor ;)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 03, 2011, 08:27:51 pm
Department of External Affairs: September 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.


DoEA Policy: Africa

Algeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Angola: Normal
Benin: Normal
Botswana: Normal
Burkina Faso: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and certain political freedoms.
Burundi: Full military and partial economic restrictions.  We are still concerned about ethnic violence, corruption, certain political freedoms, and the trade of minerals fueling violence in the Congo
Cameroon: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Cape Verde: Normal
Central African Republic: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms and certain civil liberties.
Chad: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms, certain civil liberties and the political situation.
Comoros: Normal, though we are concerned by the current political situation
Congo: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the massive corruption and lack of political freedoms.
Cote d’Ivoire: Normal
Democratic Republic of the Congo: Full military and economic restrictions because of serious concerns about the political situation, continued violence, basic rights, corruption and treatment of women.
Djibouti: Full military and partial economic restrictions
Egypt: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  It is the hope of the DoEA that the spirit that overthrew Hosni Mubarak will continue, and that Egypt can transition to a democratic government.
Equatorial Guinea: Full military and partial economic restrictions
Eritrea: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We have strong concerns about the current situation, civil liberties and illegal weapons trading with Somalia.
Ethiopia: Normal.  We have concerns about political freedoms, internal violence and relations with Somalia (Partial military and no economic restrictions).
Gabon: Partial military and partial economic restrictions until democratic institutions are respected and civil liberties recognized.
Gambia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Ghana: Normal
Guinea: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruptions. We support a return to civilian government.
Guinea-Bissau: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Kenya: Normal
Lesotho: Normal
Liberia: Normal
Libya: Normal.  This applies only to the NTC led government of Libya.
Madagascar: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and political instability.
Malawi: Normal
Mali: Normal
Mauritania: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: Normal, though we are concerned about certain political freedoms. On the matter of Western Sahara, we demand immediate negotiations concerning the status of Western Sahara, and the failure of Morocco to engage into talks will results in recognition of Sahrawi independence.
Mozambique: Normal
Namibia: Normal
Niger: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms and basic rights.
Nigeria: Normal.  There needs to be serious political reform and we are also worried about violence in the Niger Delta and the situation in the north.
Rwanda: Full military and partial economic restrictions; we have concerns pertaining to freedom of the press and politics.
Sao Tome and Principe: Normal
Senegal: Normal
Seychelles: Normal
Sierra Leone: Normal
Somalia: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We have strong concerns regarding piracy and continued violence.
Somaliland: Normal.
South Africa: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption and their response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
North Sudan: Full military and economic restrictions. We strongly condemn the situation in Darfur, and would like to see an end to conflict with South Sudan.
South Sudan: Normal
Swaziland: Full military and economic restrictions
Tanzania: Normal
Togo: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Tunisia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Uganda: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the political situation, human rights and corruption.
Zambia: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Zimbabwe: Full military and economic restrictions


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 03, 2011, 08:28:31 pm
Department of External Affairs: September 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: The Americas

Antigua and Barbuda: Normal
Argentina: Normal
Bahamas: Normal
Barbados: Normal
Belize: Normal
Bolivia: Normal, though we oppose any secessionist movements in Santa Cruz province and other eastern areas of the country.
Brazil: Normal
Canada: Normal
Chile: Normal.
Colombia: Normal.
Costa Rica: Normal
Cuba: Normal. Atlasian policy regarding Cuba is currently F.L. 18-6, Cuban Relations Act.
Dominica: Normal
Dominican Republic: Normal
Ecuador: Normal
El Salvador: Normal
Grenada: Normal
Guatemala: Normal
Guyana: Normal
Haiti: Normal, though we have concerns regarding corruption and political instability.
Honduras: Normal
Jamaica: Normal
Mexico: Normal, though we have serious concerns about the drug warlords conflict.
Nicaragua: Normal
Panama: Normal
Paraguay: Normal
Peru: Normal
Saint Kitts and Nevis: Normal
Saint Lucia: Normal
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Normal
Suriname: Normal
Trinidad and Tobago: Normal
Uruguay: Normal
Venezuela: Normal

DoEA Policy: Europe

Albania: Normal
Andorra: Normal
Armenia: Normal
Austria: Normal
Azerbaijan: Full military and partial economic restrictions until free elections are held, civil liberties respected and transparency is restored.
Belarus: Full military and partial economic restrictions until free elections are held and civil liberties respected.
Belgium: Normal
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Normal. Atlasia welcomes the apparent political stability and peaceful ethnic relations.
Bulgaria: Normal
Croatia: Normal
Czech Republic: Normal
Denmark: Normal
Estonia: Normal
Finland: Normal
France: Normal
Georgia: Normal, though we have concerns over civil liberties and notably about the status of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The DoEA reserves the right to military restrictions if we feel that it is needed in view of current events in the country or the Caucasus.
Germany: Normal
Greece: Normal, although we have concerns about continued economic instability
Hungary: Normal
Iceland: Normal
Ireland: Normal, though we have concerns about continued economic instability
Italy: Normal, though we have concerns about corruption and continued economic instability.
Kosovo: Normal
Latvia: Normal
Liechtenstein: Normal although we call for a complete transition to democracy and full transparency in banking.
Lithuania: Normal
Luxembourg: Normal
Macedonia: Normal, although we have concerns about corruption, ethnic minorities and relations with Greece.
Moldova: Normal. Atlasia is pleased overall with democratic evolution in Moldova, though we have serious concerns about corruption, political instability, drug trafficking and the Transnistria issue.
Monaco: Normal
Montenegro: Normal
Netherlands: Normal
Norway: Normal
Poland: Normal
Portugal: Normal, though we have concerns about continued economic instability.
Romania: Normal
Russia: Partial military and economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about democracy, civil liberties, press freedom and the situation in Chechnya and the Russian Caucasus.
San Marino: Normal
Serbia: Normal, though we should warn Serbia against any attempt to go against the recent UN ruling on Kosovo.
Slovakia: Normal, though we have some concerns about worrying nationalist trends in the country and their negative effect on internal and external ethnic relations.
Slovenia: Normal
Spain: Normal, though we have concerns about continued economic instability
Sweden: Normal
Switzerland: Normal
Turkey: Normal, although concerns remain about treatment of Kurds, and increasing trend away from secularism.
Ukraine: Normal, but we have concerns regarding current political stability, corruption, and various other problems
United Kingdom: Normal
Vatican City: Normal


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 03, 2011, 08:31:51 pm
Department of External Affairs: September 2011 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, drugs, woman's rights and other issues.
Australia: Normal
Bahrain: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  The Atlasian Government strongly condemns the measures taken against protesters in Bahrain.
Bangladesh: Normal
Bhutan: Normal
Brunei: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Burma (Myanmar): Full military and partial economic restrictions. We urge for a full transfer to democracy, and the respect for civil liberties and basic political freedoms.
Cambodia: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and civil liberties.
China: Partial military restrictions and no economic restrictions, though we are very concerned over human rights, and political liberties. We realize that China is a major economic partner and full economic restrictions would be counter-productive to the Atlasian and global economy.
East Timor: Normal
Federated States of Micronesia: Normal
Fiji: Full military and partial economic restrictions.
India: Normal
Indonesia: Normal
Iran: Full military and economic restrictions will remain in place until the Iranian regime makes full, honest and lasting overtures to democracy, as well as fully renouncing any attempt at a nuclear program.
Iraq: Normal, though we have major concerns about corruption and other issues.
Israel: Normal; however, the DoEA urges Israel to end all settlements and work harder towards reaching a settlement to the Palestinian crisis.
Japan: Normal
Jordan: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Kazakhstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We want a full transfer to democracy.
Kiribati: Normal
Kuwait: Normal.
Kyrgyzstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Laos: Normal, though we have concerns about human rights and basic freedoms.
Lebanon: Full military and no economic restrictions.
Malaysia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Maldives: Normal
Marshall Islands: Normal
Mongolia: Normal
Nauru: Normal
Nepal: Normal
New Zealand: Normal
North Korea: Full military and economic restrictions
Oman: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Pakistan: Normal, though we are extremely concerned about the apparent role of the ISI in harboring terrorists.
Palau: Normal
Palestine: Normal, though we are gravely concerned by the current political situation. Atlasia supports a two-state solution and would like a democratic and independent state of Palestine in the near future.
Papua New Guinea: Normal
Philippines: Normal
Qatar: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Samoa: Normal
Saudi Arabia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about the human rights situation and urge the government to make major democratic reforms.
Singapore: Normal, though we would like a true democracy.
Solomon Islands: Normal
South Korea: Normal
Sri Lanka: Normal, though we are concerned about a few issues. We urge the government to build a modern, peaceful, democratic and multi-ethnic state with peaceful ethnic relations in the wake of the end of the civil war.
Syria: Full military and economic restrictions.  The regime of Bashar al-Assad has committed significant human rights violations against its people, and it is time for Mr. Assad to accept the will of his people and resign his position and allow Syria to become a democratic state.
Tajikistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Thailand: Normal, though we are keeping a close eye on the political situation and we will re-evalute the Free Trade Act with Thailand if need be.
Tonga: Normal
Turkmenistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Tuvalu: Normal
United Arab Emirates: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about workers rights and political freedoms.
Uzbekistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Vanuatu: Normal
Vietnam: Normal
Yemen: Normal

I present the full FPR to the Senate and ask a Senator to assume sponsorship of this bill and urge the Senate to approve it, as per the terms of F.L. 32-18: Amendment to the SoEA Role Codification Act (http://uselectionatlas.org/AFEWIKI/index.php/Amendment_to_the_SoEA_Role_Codification_Act).

x Ben, Secretary of External Affairs


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 07, 2011, 06:19:26 pm
Any opinions?  Comments, concerns, anything?


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: shua on September 07, 2011, 11:51:28 pm
Like last time I think there are too many full economic restrictions, but at least Somalia policy is somewhat improved here.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on September 30, 2011, 09:47:09 am
The DoEA is pleased to announce the death of Anwar al-Awlaki.  This represents the death of the last of te three major leaders in Islamic terrorism.  While the war is not won, this is a major step forward.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on November 08, 2011, 04:48:02 pm
I'm still here, baby!  I look forward to presenting myself for a fourth time to the Senate for what will be hearings filled with fun, games, and Napoleon's ranting!


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs - GTO Ambassador
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on November 08, 2011, 05:28:37 pm
The position of GTO Ambassador is an important one - the GTO Ambassador is the chief adviser to the Secretary of External Affairs, and represents Atlasia globally.  Therefore, it is with pride that I request that Yelnoc be the next GTO Ambassador, and that he be confirmed as soon as possible.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 18, 2012, 03:29:22 pm
The DoEA will soon be releasing the April 2012 FPR.  If anyone has particular requests or suggestions, feel free to post here or PM the SoEA.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: CLARENCE 2015! on April 18, 2012, 03:35:48 pm
Can you please detail the admin's position on Isreal?


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 18, 2012, 03:40:31 pm
Can you please detail the admin's position on Isreal?

That will be included in the FPR.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: CLARENCE 2015! on April 18, 2012, 03:44:39 pm
Thanks-


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 18, 2012, 03:47:33 pm
Thanks-

No problem.  If anyone has specific policy suggestions, feel free to make them.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: GM R2D2 on April 18, 2012, 06:38:01 pm
Thanks-

No problem.  If anyone has specific policy suggestions, feel free to make them.

Non-interventionism is cool :)


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 22, 2012, 03:48:28 pm
Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.


DoEA Policy: Africa

Algeria: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruption.
Angola: Normal
Benin: Normal
Botswana: Normal
Burkina Faso: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and certain political freedoms.
Burundi: Normal, though we are still concerned about ethnic violence, corruption and certain political freedoms.
Cameroon: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Cape Verde: Normal
Central African Republic: Partial military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms and certain civil liberties.
Chad: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the lack of political freedoms, certain civil liberties and the political situation.
Comoros: Normal, though we are concerned by the current political situation
Congo: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the massive corruption and lack of political freedoms.
Cote díIvoire: Normal
Democratic Republic of the Congo: Full military and economic restrictions because of serious concerns about the political situation, continued violence, basic rights, corruption and treatment of women.
Djibouti: Full military and partial economic restrictions
Egypt: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We are very concerned about the lack of a full transition to democracy, and hope that Egypt can continue on its path to democratic reform.
Equatorial Guinea: Full military and economic restrictions
Eritrea: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns about the current situation, civil liberties and illegal weapons trading with Somalia.
Ethiopia: Normal.  We have concerns about political freedoms, internal violence and relations with Somalia.
Gabon: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Gambia: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Ghana: Normal
Guinea: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about political freedoms, basic rights, and corruptions. We support a return to civilian government.
Guinea-Bissau: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  We are very concerned about the recent coup and its effects on the people.
Kenya: Normal
Lesotho: Normal
Liberia: Normal
Libya: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  It is the hope of the DoEA that Libya can make the transition to democracy.
Madagascar: Normal, though we are concerned by corruption and political instability.
Malawi: Normal
Mali: Partial economic and no military restrictions.  We are very concerned about the recent coup and its effects on the people.
Mauritania: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Mauritius: Normal
Morocco: Normal, though we are concerned about certain political freedoms. On the matter of Western Sahara, we demand immediate negotiations concerning the status of Western Sahara, and the failure of Morocco to engage into talks will results in recognition of Sahrawi independence.
Mozambique: Normal
Namibia: Normal
Niger: Normal, though we have serious concerns about political freedoms and basic rights.
Nigeria: Normal.  There needs to be serious political reform and we are also worried about violence in the Niger Delta and the situation in the north.
Rwanda: Partial military and no economic restrictions, though we have concerns pertaining to freedom of the press and politics.
Sao Tome and Principe: Normal
Senegal: Normal
Seychelles: Normal
Sierra Leone: Normal
Somalia: Full military and economic restrictions. We have strong concerns regarding piracy and continued violence.
Somaliland: Normal.
South Africa: Normal, though we have concerns over corruption and their response to the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Sudan: Full military and economic restrictions. We strongly condemn the situation in Darfur, and would like to see an end to conflict with South Sudan.
South Sudan: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  While the DoEA wants South Sudan to succeed, it needs to abide by international law and respect its boundary with Sudan.
Swaziland: Full military and economic restrictions
Tanzania: Normal
Togo: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Tunisia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Uganda: Full military and partial economic restrictions. We are concerned by the political situation, human rights and corruption.
Zambia: Normal, though we are concerned by the political situation and corruption.
Zimbabwe: Full military and economic restrictions


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 22, 2012, 03:48:57 pm
 Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: The Americas

Antigua and Barbuda: Normal
Argentina: Normal
Bahamas: Normal
Barbados: Normal
Belize: Normal
Bolivia: Normal
Brazil: Normal
Canada: Normal
Chile: Normal.
Colombia: Normal.
Costa Rica: Normal
Cuba: Normal. Atlasian policy regarding Cuba is currently F.L. 18-6, Cuban Relations Act.
Dominica: Normal
Dominican Republic: Normal
Ecuador: Normal
El Salvador: Normal
Grenada: Normal
Guatemala: Normal
Guyana: Normal
Haiti: Normal, though we have concerns regarding corruption and political instability.
Honduras: Normal
Jamaica: Normal
Mexico: Normal, though we have serious concerns about the drug warlords conflict.
Nicaragua: Normal
Panama: Normal
Paraguay: Normal
Peru: Normal
Saint Kitts and Nevis: Normal
Saint Lucia: Normal
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Normal
Suriname: Normal
Trinidad and Tobago: Normal
Uruguay: Normal
Venezuela: Normal

DoEA Policy: Europe

Albania: Normal
Andorra: Normal
Armenia: Normal
Austria: Normal
Azerbaijan: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held, civil liberties respected and transparency is restored.
Belarus: Full military and economic restrictions until free elections are held and civil liberties respected.
Belgium: Normal
Bosnia & Herzegovina: Normal. Atlasia welcomes the apparent political stability and peaceful ethnic relations.
Bulgaria: Normal
Croatia: Normal
Czech Republic: Normal
Denmark: Normal
Estonia: Normal
Finland: Normal
France: Most Priority
Georgia: Normal, though we have concerns over civil liberties and notably about the status of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. The DoEA reserves the right to military restrictions if we feel that it is needed in view of current events in the country or the Caucasus.
Germany: Most Priority
Greece: Normal
Hungary: Normal, though we have concerns regarding political freedom.
Iceland: Normal
Ireland: Normal
Italy: Normal, though we have concerns about corruption.
Kosovo: Normal
Latvia: Normal
Liechtenstein: Partial economic restrictions; we call for a complete transition to democracy and full transparency in banking.
Lithuania: Normal
Luxembourg: Normal
Macedonia: Normal, although we have concerns about corruption, ethnic minorities and relations with Greece.
Moldova: Normal. Atlasia is pleased overall with democratic evolution in Moldova, though we have serious concerns about corruption, political instability, drug trafficking and the Transnistria issue.
Monaco: Normal
Montenegro: Normal
Netherlands: Normal
Norway: Normal
Poland: Normal
Portugal: Normal
Romania: Normal
Russia: Partial military and economic restrictions. We have serious concerns about democracy, civil liberties, press freedom and the situation in Chechnya and the Russian Caucasus.
San Marino: Normal
Serbia: Normal
Slovakia: Normal, though we have some concerns about worrying nationalist trends in the country and their negative effect on internal and external ethnic relations.
Slovenia: Normal
Sweden: Normal
Switzerland: Normal
Turkey: Normal, although concerns remain about treatment of Kurds, and increasing trend away from secularism.
Ukraine: Normal, but we have concerns regarding current political stability, corruption, and various other problems
United Kingdom: Most Priority
Vatican City: Normal


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 22, 2012, 03:49:27 pm
Department of External Affairs: April 2012 Foreign Policy Review

Definitions of the DoEA's Foreign Policy Review

Economic/Trade Restrictions:

Most Priority: Free exchange of intelligence and trade, as well as top priorities for military and/or economic aid if needed

Normal/None: Atlasian government and corporations are free to due business unhindered by government enforced restrictions.

Partial: Specific restrictions such as selective tariffs or partial embargoes are to be in place to attack the government and not the regime. Foreign aid can be granted if the regime shows signs of progress towards democracy.

Full: Complete embargo and trade is forbidden with the nation in question. Corporations in violation may face fines decided by the Senate.

Military Restrictions:

Normal/None: Any military hardware produced by private firms, or by the government of Atlasia may be sold to the government in question. However, nuclear material, technology and nuclear weapons may not be sold unless the Senate agrees with the sale of atomic technology to the nation in question.

Partial: Personnel weapons may be sold by private corporations or the state to the country in question. Personnel weapons are weapons, which are carried and operated by one man, i.e. assault rifles, mortars, RPGs, etc. No vehicles, armour, aircraft, or ships may be sold.

Full: No military equipment of any nature may be sold privately or by Atlasia, i.e. no uniforms, guns, vehicles, nothing.

DoEA Policy: Asia and Oceania

Afghanistan: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption, drugs, woman's rights (see pending legislation) and other issues.
Australia: Most Priority
Bahrain: Partial military and no economic restrictions.  The Atlasian Government strongly condemns the measures taken against protesters in Bahrain.
Bangladesh: Normal
Bhutan: Normal
Brunei: Partial military and partial economic restrictions
Burma (Myanmar): Partial military and no economic restrictions.  The DoEA applauds the Government for beginning to make the transition towards democracy, and hopes to see such progress continue.
Cambodia: Normal, though we are concerned about corruption and civil liberties.
China: Partial military restrictions and no economic restrictions, though we are very concerned over human rights, and political liberties. We realize that China is a major economic partner and full economic restrictions would be counter-productive to the Atlasian and global economy.
East Timor: Normal
Federated States of Micronesia: Normal
Fiji: Full military and partial economic restrictions.
India: Normal
Indonesia: Normal
Iran: Full military and economic restrictions will remain in place until the Iranian regime makes full, honest and lasting overtures to democracy, as well as fully renouncing any attempt at a nuclear program.
Iraq: Normal, though we have major concerns about corruption and other issues.
Israel: Most Priority; however, the DoEA urges Israel to end all settlements and work harder towards reaching a settlement to the Palestinian crisis.
Japan: Most Priority
Jordan: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Kazakhstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We want a full transfer to democracy.
Kiribati: Normal
Kuwait: Normal.
Kyrgyzstan: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Laos: Normal, though we have concerns about human rights and basic freedoms.
Lebanon: Full military and no economic restrictions.
Malaysia: Partial military and no economic restrictions.
Maldives: Normal
Marshall Islands: Normal
Mongolia: Normal
Nauru: Normal
Nepal: Normal
New Zealand: Normal
North Korea: Full military and economic restrictions
Oman: Partial military and no economic restrictions
Pakistan: Partial military and no economic restrictions; we are extremely concerned about the apparent role of the ISI in harboring terrorists.
Palau: Normal
Palestine: Normal, though we are gravely concerned by the current political situation. Atlasia supports a two-state solution and would like a democratic and independent state of Palestine in the near future.
Papua New Guinea: Normal
Philippines: Normal
Qatar: Normal, though we want a full transfer to democracy.
Samoa: Normal
Saudi Arabia: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about the human rights situation and urge the government to make major democratic reforms.
Singapore: Normal, though we would like a true democracy.
Solomon Islands: Normal
South Korea: Normal
Sri Lanka: Normal, though we are concerned about a few issues. We urge the government to build a modern, peaceful, democratic and multi-ethnic state with peaceful ethnic relations in the wake of the end of the civil war.
Syria: Full military and economic restrictions.  The regime of Bashar al-Assad has committed significant human rights violations against its people, and it is time for Mr. Assad to accept the will of his people and resign his position and allow Syria to become a democratic state.
Tajikistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Thailand: Normal
Tonga: Normal
Turkmenistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Tuvalu: Normal
United Arab Emirates: Partial military and no economic restrictions. We are concerned about workers rights and political freedoms.
Uzbekistan: Full military and economic restrictions
Vanuatu: Normal
Vietnam: Normal
Yemen: Full military and no economic restrictions.

I present the full FPR to the Senate and ask a Senator to assume sponsorship of this bill and urge the Senate to approve it, as per the terms of F.L. 32-18: Amendment to the SoEA Role Codification Act (http://uselectionatlas.org/AFEWIKI/index.php/Amendment_to_the_SoEA_Role_Codification_Act).

x Ben, Secretary of External Affairs


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: CLARENCE 2015! on April 22, 2012, 09:43:35 pm
Very interesting and detailed- I've sponsored this for approval... I am very interested in the Israel Palestine conflict and wonder if it would be better to treat West Bank and Gaza as separate entities in something like this? I know the West Bank should definitely be categorized "Normal" but I am not sure if we should welcome exchange of military hardware with the Hamas in Gaza...


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 22, 2012, 09:47:48 pm
Very interesting and detailed- I've sponsored this for approval... I am very interested in the Israel Palestine conflict and wonder if it would be better to treat West Bank and Gaza as separate entities in something like this? I know the West Bank should definitely be categorized "Normal" but I am not sure if we should welcome exchange of military hardware with the Hamas in Gaza...

For now, neither Gaza or the West Bank are recognized nations separate from Israel; if you wish to push that legislation, you can.  Regarding Gaza, we could put full military restrictions on the nation - it isn't complicated at that point.

And Senator, thanks for the sponsorship and feel free to contact me on other FoPo issues.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: CLARENCE 2015! on April 22, 2012, 09:53:36 pm
My pleasure- that is legislation I will be putting forward soon


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on April 25, 2012, 11:20:03 am
SoEA Ben,

Your presence is immediately insisted upon in the Afghan Women's Bill debate. Please make haste to respond to any and all inquiries still outstanding. Failure to respond my result in dreadfully dire consequences.

Also, does that FPR require a slot to be brought to the floor?


Sen. NC Yankee,
President Pro-Tempore


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: Northam for Governor '17 on April 25, 2012, 05:24:52 pm
Also, does that FPR require a slot to be brought to the floor?

I believe it does; I remember there being a foreign policy slot, although it may be filled/never passed into law.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: People's Speaker North Carolina Yankee on April 25, 2012, 07:46:29 pm
Also, does that FPR require a slot to be brought to the floor?

I believe it does; I remember there being a foreign policy slot, although it may be filled/never passed into law.

The Afghan bill is in that slot currently.


Title: Re: Moshe Dayan Building of the Department of External Affairs
Post by: #IAintAfraidOfNoGoats on June 01, 2012, 11:43:19 pm
What about the concerns regarding the issue of human trafficking/sex slavery particularly in Eastern Europe and South Asia, specifically in Thailand. Why should Israel make more concessions to get peace?

Also what about the status of Spain?