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Atlas Fantasy Elections => Constitutional Convention => Topic started by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 12, 2016, 11:29:33 pm



Title: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 12, 2016, 11:29:33 pm
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Hear ye! Hear ye! Having seen the adoption of a Bill of Rights, this Convention will now turn its attention to such additional and miscellaneous provisions as should be fitting and proper for inclusion in the federal Constitution. Through discussion with the Deputy Presiding Officer and other delegates to the Convention, I have compiled the following list of the questions that remain to be settled before we proceed with a final vote on this document:

                     Process for amending the Constitution
                     Federal "Supremacy Clause"
                     Relations between the Regions
                     Rules for simultaneous officeholding
                     Legislative process, relationship between the Senate and the House

Sometime tomorrow, I will present an amendment addressing most of these topics that will form the basis for our discussion; in the meantime, feel free to offer any ideas, thoughts, or concerns you may have in regards to these Articles.

I now open the floor for debate.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 13, 2016, 01:01:05 am
I prefer a clean two-thirds all the way through for amendments.


2/3rs of the Senate (4), 2/3rds of the House (6) and 2/3rds with the Regions (2) with a 2/3rds Popular vote override on the later.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 13, 2016, 01:05:09 am
I prefer a clean two-thirds all the way through for amendments.

2/3rs of the Senate (4), 2/3rds of the House (6) and 2/3rds with the Regions (2) with a 2/3rds Popular vote override on the later.

I agree with this. Simple, effective, and it gives a say to everyone.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Lincoln Republican on April 13, 2016, 10:49:18 am
I agree that in most matters a 2/3 vote is acceptable.

However, we should institute a 3/4 vote on secession.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 13, 2016, 05:30:15 pm
However, we should institute a 3/4 vote on secession.
This has already been done.

Anyways, I offer the following amendment:

Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Reciprocity)
i. The Citizens of each Region shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several Regions.
ii. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each Region to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other Region. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the Manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.
iii. A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another Region, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the Region from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.

Section 2 (Lands and Territories)
i. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this Union, and apportioned among the several Regions as may be appropriate; but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the Regions concerned as well as of the Congress.
ii. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the Republic of Atlasia.

Section 3 (Protection)
i. The Republic of Atlasia shall guarantee to every Region in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.


ARTICLE [TBD]
Section 1 (Amendment)
i. The Congress, whenever two thirds of the membership of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall have power to propose amendments to this Constitution, which shall take effect following their ratification by three fifths of the eligible voters of this Republic.
ii. The Congress, whenever three fifths of the eligible voters or the legislatures of each of the several Regions shall deem it necessary, shall call for a Convention to revise or replace this Constitution and provide regulations for the organization and administration of that body.


ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Supremacy)
i. This Constitution, and those laws, treaties, and other acts made by the Republic of Atlasia in pursuance thereof, shall be the supreme law of the land, and the executive and judicial officers of this government and of the several Regions shall be bound thereby, any thing in the laws or constitutions of the several Regions notwithstanding.

Section 2 (Qualifications for Officeholders)
i. The officers of the Republic Atlasia, and of the several Regions, shall be bound by Oath of Affirmation to support this Constitution, but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the Republic of Atlasia.
ii. No person shall be elected to multiple offices under this Constitution, nor occupy the office of Justice or Associate Justice simultaneously with any other public office; but members of Congress shall be eligible to serve as the principle officers of such executive departments as may be established by law.

Delegates have 24 hours to object to Truman's amendment; HOWEVER, because it will be much easier to adopt this and then make changes as necessary than it would be to scrap this proposal and start from scratch, I respectfully ask that delegates refrain from objecting to this amendment. Think of this as a foundation rather than a final product: the idea is to erect a basic framework, after which we can consider changes or additions as necessary.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 13, 2016, 06:01:10 pm
Alright, we'll let this "foundation" pass and then we can hold a principle vote on how we ratify amendments.

Also, if anyone thinks we missed anything, I think now would be the time to speak up about it.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Kingpoleon on April 13, 2016, 08:15:56 pm
Shouldn't it be "a majority/three-fifths of voters in two thirds of the regions"?


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 13, 2016, 09:02:50 pm
Shouldn't it be "a majority/three-fifths of voters in two thirds of the regions"?

He is trying to replace the regional ratification process with a natonal popular referendum.

It has been a big push for years, and has usually been pushed for either just before or just after an attempt to curb regional powers came to the forefront. Therefore it usualy draws immense ire from regionalists.

This constitution establishes their powers, and protect's their rights. We have fought so hard to get devolution and other things into this constitution. Removing the regions from this process denies them a say in any future changes to those provisions, including their removal or even abolition of the regions. Such attempts have occured every two years or so since I joined in 2008. 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 13, 2016, 09:11:18 pm
Shouldn't it be "a majority/three-fifths of voters in two thirds of the regions"?
Such is the status quo; however, I believe that amendments to the national Constitution should be ratified by the national electorate. Under the current system, it is not inconceivable that a widely popular amendment could fail because of an uneven distribution of the population. For example:

Region A:   50 Yes, 10 No
Region B:   19 Yes, 21 No
Region C:   18 Yes, 22 No

Under the "Ratification by Region" System, this hypothetical amendment would have failed despite over 60% of voters having supported it at the polls. That strikes me as enormously undemocratic. Under my proposal, the right to amend the Constitution would lay with the body it was created to represent: the national people.

Of course, others will disagree with me, so a vote will be in order once this amendment is adopted; however, I strongly believe that my proposal is the correct one, and I urge my fellow delegates - when the time comes - to vote to sustain it.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 13, 2016, 09:24:31 pm
This constitution establishes their powers, and protect's their rights. We have fought so hard to get devolution and other things into this constitution. Removing the regions from this process denies them a say in any future changes to those provisions, including their removal or even abolition of the regions. Such attempts have occured every two years or so since I joined in 2008. 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015.
I see your point, and I don't discount the danger of eroding Regional authority too greatly (hence my steady support for devolution at this Convention). At the same time, however, I'm wary of denying the national electorate a voice in shaping the national Constitution. The only circumstance in which a vote of the Regions would turn out differently than a vote of the nation as a whole is when the Regions are out of step with public opinion. In that sense, the "Ratification by Region" system is a bit like the RL electoral college: it's perfectly rational and democratic... until it isn't.

I'm cautiously intrigued by your earlier proposal. To clarify: your idea was that the national electorate could overturn the result of the Regional referendum(s) by a 2/3 vote, yes?


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 13, 2016, 10:07:26 pm
Shouldn't it be "a majority/three-fifths of voters in two thirds of the regions"?
Such is the status quo; however, I believe that amendments to the national Constitution should be ratified by the national electorate. Under the current system, it is not inconceivable that a widely popular amendment could fail because of an uneven distribution of the population. For example:

Region A:   50 Yes, 10 No
Region B:   19 Yes, 21 No
Region C:   18 Yes, 22 No

Under the "Ratification by Region" System, this hypothetical amendment would have failed despite over 60% of voters having supported it at the polls. That strikes me as enormously undemocratic. Under my proposal, the right to amend the Constitution would lay with the body it was created to represent: the national people.

Of course, others will disagree with me, so a vote will be in order once this amendment is adopted; however, I strongly believe that my proposal is the correct one, and I urge my fellow delegates - when the time comes - to vote to sustain it.

On the flip side, couldn't that entail that a change is being made that is especially harmful to agriculture for instance and thus harmful to the West and South but is loved by the less agricultural North? Also your example implies a lower turnout in both the other regions but not in the supportive one. Indicating the supportive one has an overwhelming vested interest in it, that those other two don't share.

THe purpose of this process is to ensure that such changes don't come at the detriment of a particular region or another. Especially now that there is a secession mechanism, because if the other two are always outvoted, it runs the risk of the country breaking apart.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 14, 2016, 12:20:16 am
On the flip side, couldn't that entail that a change is being made that is especially harmful to agriculture for instance and thus harmful to the West and South but is loved by the less agricultural North? Also your example implies a lower turnout in both the other regions but not in the supportive one. Indicating the supportive one has an overwhelming vested interest in it, that those other two don't share.
Actually, my model assumed unanimous turnout in every Region: the difference is one of population, with Region A having roughly 20 more citizens than B and C. As for your main point:

1. While the existence of competing Regional Interests (to use your example, the agrarian West versus the industrial North) are real and significant in the world outside Atlas, within Atlasia they have almost no effect on the game. The Regions - if I may break character for a moment - are imaginary constructs of an internet community. People do not stand to loose their homes or jobs if, for example, a particular farm subsidy is reduced, and so those kinds of issues rarely drive how people vote in elections and referendums. In real life, someone living in Wyoming is much more likely to support a pro-agriculture program than someone living in, say, New York City; in Atlasia, however, whether one is registered in the Northeast or the Midwest makes almost no difference as to what policies one supports (quite often, the poster in question does not even live in that state IRL). In short, the idea that policy differences are based on Regional divisions doesn't match up with how the game operates: ideology, not geography, is the deciding factor in most Amendment votes, and therefore it will be quite rare to find someone who supports or opposes an Amendment because of where they are registered.

2. Forgive me, but you seem to be confusing Rights with Interests - that is, you are arguing that a hypothetical Amendment could conceivably turn out better for some parts of the country than others, and that this alone is reason enough to block the National Ratification system. I must respectfully disagree. There are really two reasons that a Region might object to a proposed amendment: either because it infringes upon their Rights, or because it infringes upon their sectional Interests. The former is obviously deplorable and must be avoided; the latter is sometimes unfortunate, but can be appropriate. Consider an amendment that truly violates the Rights of the people of the Regions: say, the right to vote. An attempt to eliminate this right would affect all people equally: in the absence of the cultural or economic differences debunked in (1), support or opposition to this measure is likely to have little to do with Regional boundaries. There is no reason that someone in the Northeast would be more or less inclined to support the proposal than someone in the South, except for arbitrary registration patterns that have little to do with any inherent quality of the Regions themselves. In short, any attempt to infringe upon the rights of the Regions would be debated on the same premises and preconceptions in every Region; geography, in effect, is moot.

Now consider an equally hypothetical amendment that is contrary to one particular Region's Interests. (As I explained in (1), these kinds of considerations rarely play a role in Atlasia, but for the sake of the argument let us set that aside for a moment.) Interests are not like Rights: there is nothing universal or unchangeable about them, nor is one Interest inherently more important or 'correct' than the other. There are millions of examples of conflicts of interest in our politics: trade policy pits the interests of consumers against the interests of producers; mass transit projects benefit urban communities more than rural ones; green energy subsidies are good for solar panel producers but not oil companies. While most of us are likely to find one of these interests more compelling than the other, none is inherently superior or more important to the others. When possible, it is best to balance these interests (after all, government exists to serve the whole people, and not just a fraction), but sometimes we are forced to make a choice. By tradition, Atlasia bases its choices in these cases on the principle of majority rule: that is, whichever policy benefits the greatest number of people is adopted.

When the interests of one Region are pitted against the interests of another (such as in your example of agricultural policy), the will of the majority of citizens must prevail. As such, when a proposed Amendment is supported by a majority of the populace, it is only right that said Amendment should be adopted. The only exception to this rule is when the proposal violates the Rights of the minority- a state of affairs that, as I have just demonstrated, effects all citizens equally regardless of Regional boundaries.


I realize that I've been talking for a while here, so to summarize:

   1. Sectional rivalries (i.e. rural vs. urban, farm vs. industry) don't really play a role in Atlasia. This is because the Regions are (like Atlasia itself) imaginary and many people aren't RL residents of their Region, so ideology - not geography or the local economy - forms the basis for what policies people support or oppose.
   2. Rights are universal - when a Right is taken away, it affects everyone equally. Thus, support or opposition to an Amendment that legitimately violates the rights of the people does not depend on one's Region of residence.
   3. One Region's Interests are not inherently superior to another Region's Interests; in other words, the North is not more important that the South or West (and vice versa). Therefore, when two interests come into conflict, the will of the majority must prevail. Therefore, a system that obstructs the principle of majority rule is illogical and unproductive.

Especially now that there is a secession mechanism, because if the other two are always outvoted, it runs the risk of the country breaking apart.
This is why I voted against secession: what you're describing is a scenario where the Regions are blackmailing the Union into adopting minority rule. In any case, I don't think that this is at all likely: remember that there is a very high threshold for secession votes. As such, in the scenario I described, Regions B and C could not secede unless a sizable portion of "Yes" voters supported doing so.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 14, 2016, 01:03:24 am
The Regions - if I may break character for a moment - are imaginary constructs of an internet community. People do not stand to loose their homes or jobs if, for example, a particular farm subsidy is reduced, and so those kinds of issues rarely drive how people vote in elections and referendums. In real life, someone living in Wyoming is much more likely to support a pro-agriculture program than someone living in, say, New York City; in Atlasia, however, whether one is registered in the Northeast or the Midwest makes almost no difference as to what policies one supports (quite often, the poster in question does not even live in that state IRL).

Truman, this is precisely the argument you do not want to be making. Your first sentence, alone, was the basis for every attempt at reducing Regional power for the last eight years. Be it removing the regional Senate seats and replacing it with an at-large Senate, replacing the ratification process with a referendum or abolishing the region's outright.

I mentioned an issue from real life that has similar characteristics with what I am talking about but it is not quite the same. For instance such policies are legislative matters naturally, and yes majority rules on those things. However, when discussing a change like abolishing the Regional Senate or repealing the devolution provisions, you are talking about a removal of rights. And Historically, the various regions have had distinct views on this matter. The South was always regionalist, the Midwest was always the most hostile to regions. The other regions shifted at times but the Pacific generally sided with the Midwest and the Mideast with the South. Conservatives in the South were almost always more regionalist, those out west voted with the anti-regionalists or took reformists stance (political necessity). So yes, location most certainly did matter.

This was the same motivation that drove the real life founders to make it so difficult to remove the compromises like the Senate (requires all states to approve a change) and to amend the constitution generally. Because those institutions that balanced state majorities with the national majority were deemed vital to keeping the union together. Now we have an approved secession process in this document. Both of us opposed it, but it is there. Whether or not we voted against it matters not because it is there now and thus we have to operate on that basis. The antidote to secession is constitution solidy back in small-f federalist principles. Divisions of power, checks and balances, and an amendment process that shields those structures from the whims of a temporary, tyrannical majority.   

It is fine to let the majority rule on matters of legislation, but the strength of the constitution comes precisely from it denying the dictatorship of the majority when it comes to gov't structure and the bill of rights, from curbing popular excesses on those matters. Without a regional say in amendment ratification and a high enough threshold, this convention will open the door to the next generation of radicals and their inevitable anti-regionalist push (There has been one every two years: 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015).

The 2009 push was prefaced by an attempt to reduce the ratification threshold. The others followed or were followed by pushes for a national referendum.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 14, 2016, 01:23:50 am
Quote from the drafter of our present Constitution in response to an amendment replacing regional ratification with a 3/5ths referendum in 2009:

I strongly oppose this proposal. Atlasia is greater than the sum of its parts, meaning it is not simply about the total number of people. The game is run at both an at-large and a regional level, as reflected in the Senate and the current wording of Article VII, Section 1. In addition, a successful democratic system is not about protecting the voice of the majority, but rather, it should be focused on preventing the abuse of minority rights.

This amendment would betray both of those goals and allow the more populous regions to impose their will on the smaller ones, simply by virtue of their "majority" status. It is for that reason I believe this is detrimental "reform."


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 14, 2016, 02:29:46 am
Alright, my fellow Delegates, I have a crazy idea...so crazy it just might work...

What Senator Truman wants is to make it more proportional to the national vote. What Senator Yankee wants is to retain the ability for regions to have a say in the matter.

I think we can do both.

Before I detail how, I'd like us to take another look at Truman's example:

Region A:   50 Yes, 10 No
Region B:   19 Yes, 21 No
Region C:   18 Yes, 22 No

Should regions B and C have the right to keep the amendment from passing? Yes, I wholeheartedly agree with Yankee in this regard. But in this example, it's basically a tie in those regions, correct? So it's hard to say that that region, as a whole, opposes that amendment as anything close to a consensus, since over 40% of the region actually supports it.

We can retain the ability for the people of (a) certain region(s) to reject an amendment and still have an approach centered on the national popular vote. Without further ado:

The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.

Great, right?

In practice, most votes that achieve #1 (get 60% of the national vote) won't be stopped by #2 (less than 40% of the vote in two regions) or #3 (less than 20% of the vote in one region), but it will still avoid any form of plot to damage regional sovereignty.

I think this plan is a "compromise"--if you can call it that, I mean, both sides get what they want!--that anyone can get behind, and I see no reason why any person in their right mind would oppose it. (Opposition in three...two...one...:P)


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 14, 2016, 06:50:09 pm
The Regions - if I may break character for a moment - are imaginary constructs of an internet community. People do not stand to loose their homes or jobs if, for example, a particular farm subsidy is reduced, and so those kinds of issues rarely drive how people vote in elections and referendums. In real life, someone living in Wyoming is much more likely to support a pro-agriculture program than someone living in, say, New York City; in Atlasia, however, whether one is registered in the Northeast or the Midwest makes almost no difference as to what policies one supports (quite often, the poster in question does not even live in that state IRL).
Truman, this is precisely the argument you do not want to be making. Your first sentence, alone, was the basis for every attempt at reducing Regional power for the last eight years. Be it removing the regional Senate seats and replacing it with an at-large Senate, replacing the ratification process with a referendum or abolishing the region's outright.
Pardon me, I chose my words poorly. The point I was making was not, "The Regions are imaginary, so their Rights don't matter," but rather "The Regions aren't organic communities bonded by geography and a common upbringing, so sectional tensions are less prevalent in Atlasia." Obviously, the latter ought have no bearing on discussions of Regional Rights, which is the main question here. I agree that we need to protect the Regions against assaults on their liberty, but it's also important for the national electorate to have a vote too (lest the Regions themselves become the abusers).

The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.
This just might work. A suggestion to make it simpler: a three-fifths vote in a national referendum will ratify a proposed amendment, but 2 of the 3 Regional legislatures can veto it. That would increase the importance of the Regional governments and Regional elections (one of the goals of devolution), preserve the historical role of the Regions in the ratification process, and give the national electorate a voice in the matter.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 14, 2016, 06:50:48 pm
Anyways, seeing no objection, the Amendment has been adopted.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 15, 2016, 12:53:32 am
The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.
This just might work. A suggestion to make it simpler: a three-fifths vote in a national referendum will ratify a proposed amendment, but 2 of the 3 Regional legislatures can veto it. That would increase the importance of the Regional governments and Regional elections (one of the goals of devolution), preserve the historical role of the Regions in the ratification process, and give the national electorate a voice in the matter.

I suppose you have a point by making regional elections more important, but I don't think it's much simpler than my original plan, and it also doesn't take the will of the people into consideration as much as mine.

I'd love to hear what the other delegates think about all this stuff. I still like my plan best, although I'd probably accept Truman's alteration on my plan. The point is to retain both the role of the regions and the will of the national electorate--two objectively good things that we don't have to be forced to pick from.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 15, 2016, 01:30:59 am
The Regions - if I may break character for a moment - are imaginary constructs of an internet community. People do not stand to loose their homes or jobs if, for example, a particular farm subsidy is reduced, and so those kinds of issues rarely drive how people vote in elections and referendums. In real life, someone living in Wyoming is much more likely to support a pro-agriculture program than someone living in, say, New York City; in Atlasia, however, whether one is registered in the Northeast or the Midwest makes almost no difference as to what policies one supports (quite often, the poster in question does not even live in that state IRL).
Truman, this is precisely the argument you do not want to be making. Your first sentence, alone, was the basis for every attempt at reducing Regional power for the last eight years. Be it removing the regional Senate seats and replacing it with an at-large Senate, replacing the ratification process with a referendum or abolishing the region's outright.
Pardon me, I chose my words poorly. The point I was making was not, "The Regions are imaginary, so their Rights don't matter," but rather "The Regions aren't organic communities bonded by geography and a common upbringing, so sectional tensions are less prevalent in Atlasia." Obviously, the latter ought have no bearing on discussions of Regional Rights, which is the main question here. I agree that we need to protect the Regions against assaults on their liberty, but it's also important for the national electorate to have a vote too (lest the Regions themselves become the abusers).

I disagree, the embedded character of the regions and such creates a similar pehenomenon as a common upbringing or as close to an equivalent of such this game can have and such is a great thing because it allows us to simulate such forces one would be inclined to think are impossible to as you suggest. :P 


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 15, 2016, 01:37:44 am
The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.
This just might work. A suggestion to make it simpler: a three-fifths vote in a national referendum will ratify a proposed amendment, but 2 of the 3 Regional legislatures can veto it. That would increase the importance of the Regional governments and Regional elections (one of the goals of devolution), preserve the historical role of the Regions in the ratification process, and give the national electorate a voice in the matter.

A nifty compromise would be to let the regions decide how to "veto" it, would it not? So, either my plan or yours.

And I also like the idea of a region being able to veto something by themselves if 4/5ths oppose, although I doubt that would happen too often in practice.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Kingpoleon on April 15, 2016, 07:39:25 am
Why not three-fifths nationwide or three-fifths of the voters in a majority of regions?


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 15, 2016, 06:53:07 pm
The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.
This just might work. A suggestion to make it simpler: a three-fifths vote in a national referendum will ratify a proposed amendment, but 2 of the 3 Regional legislatures can veto it. That would increase the importance of the Regional governments and Regional elections (one of the goals of devolution), preserve the historical role of the Regions in the ratification process, and give the national electorate a voice in the matter.

A nifty compromise would be to let the regions decide how to "veto" it, would it not? So, either my plan or yours.
That would definitely be in keeping with the general policy of this Convention to give the Regions as much autonomy as is practicable. Personally, I can't think of any reason not to do it that way - it would give the Regions more leeway (and therefore more things to argue about) and make phrasing the Article much easier to boot.

I'm not a fan of the unilateral veto power, though: conceivably, you could have a scenario where 4/5 of Region X opposes an amendment but the other two Regions support it by similar margins. Allowing Region X to veto the amendment over the objections of the other two would undermine both the Regions and the popular will.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Associate Justice PiT on April 16, 2016, 01:39:48 pm
The Leinad Amendment Ratification Plan:

1. If an amendment has three-fifths of the vote overall, it will pass...

2. ...unless three-fifths of the voters in multiple regions oppose the amendment...

3. ...or four-fifths of a single region oppose the amendment.
This just might work. A suggestion to make it simpler: a three-fifths vote in a national referendum will ratify a proposed amendment, but 2 of the 3 Regional legislatures can veto it. That would increase the importance of the Regional governments and Regional elections (one of the goals of devolution), preserve the historical role of the Regions in the ratification process, and give the national electorate a voice in the matter.

A nifty compromise would be to let the regions decide how to "veto" it, would it not? So, either my plan or yours.
That would definitely be in keeping with the general policy of this Convention to give the Regions as much autonomy as is practicable. Personally, I can't think of any reason not to do it that way - it would give the Regions more leeway (and therefore more things to argue about) and make phrasing the Article much easier to boot.

I'm not a fan of the unilateral veto power, though: conceivably, you could have a scenario where 4/5 of Region X opposes an amendment but the other two Regions support it by similar margins. Allowing Region X to veto the amendment over the objections of the other two would undermine both the Regions and the popular will.

     What if we denied regions the ability to veto if the overall popular vote were above a certain threshold (say, 2/3rds)?


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 17, 2016, 11:46:30 pm
Why not three-fifths nationwide or three-fifths of the voters in a majority of regions?

No, that wouldn't work. It basically combines the worst of both worlds from Truman's plan (the region's can't really stop it) and the status quo (the people as a whole could reject it but it still goes through).

I'm not a fan of the unilateral veto power, though: conceivably, you could have a scenario where 4/5 of Region X opposes an amendment but the other two Regions support it by similar margins. Allowing Region X to veto the amendment over the objections of the other two would undermine both the Regions and the popular will.

But when would that ever happen?

If 3/5ths of the overall population supports something, I highly doubt 80% in one region would oppose it. Unless it was something that would hurt that one region.

But again, it would be rare. I mean, you were the one who said regions aren't all that different, right, so why would they vote that drastically different unless it's something unfair to one of them? :P

Also, as I believe Yankee mentioned earlier, the secession risk is a real factor. If 80% of one region opposes something, this reduces the chances they leave over it.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: President Griffin on April 18, 2016, 01:19:57 am
I'm really unsure why - at least for once in this convention - we need to be pandering to the Regions when it comes to this topic. This entire convention has been nothing but one set of concessions after another to the Regions. The Regions are going to be astronomically more powerful in the new game than in this one, with the only real concession made thus far being that we've sloughed off the dead weight in terms of there being too many of them (i.e.: the original problem and why we're here).

Can anyone explain to me a practical reason why the nominal will of the game at-large shouldn't determine whether or not an amendment passes nationally? Please refrain from saying that a bunch of Star Wars fans hunkering down in one corner of the country counts as "culture"/justification here.

This is being made far too complicated for the sake of fanning the cooches of the Regions. Also, the variable means for ratification should probably be jettisoned as well; this has historically been used only as a way to cause mischief, obstruct or subvert the will of the people (I should know: I've always encouraged its retention for those very reasons).


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 18, 2016, 02:28:33 am
Can anyone explain to me a practical reason why the nominal will of the game at-large shouldn't determine whether or not an amendment passes nationally?

With my plan the will of the game at-large will generally decide what happens. 3/5ths to pass. Boom. The only exceptions being when two of the three regions have 3/5ths opposed (very unlikely to happen if it's getting 3/5ths support nationally) or one region has 4/5ths opposed (which would surely almost never happen if it's getting 3/5ths support nationally).


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 18, 2016, 04:08:56 pm
Leinad, forgive me for being blunt, but what exactly is your argument? Is the unilateral veto a purely decorative ornament that will never be used, or a highly necessary safeguard of the Union? It's not clear to me why the former would be a reason to support this provision, or why the latter makes any sense at all.

If 3/5ths of the overall population supports something, I highly doubt 80% in one region would oppose it. Unless it was something that would hurt that one region.
These two sentences nicely sum up the contradiction at the core of your argument: the idea that the majority cannot be trusted to never abuse its power, but the minority (if given power over the majority) can. If we assume it is likely that the national people will vote to strip a single Region of its rights, we must also assume that that Region would vote to strip the national people of their rights.

Do you really believe that 2/3 of both houses of Congress and 3/5 of the national people would ratify an amendment that is openly hostile to one Region? (That's not a theoretical question - do you really believe there is a chance that this will happen?) If not, why have this provision at all? If so, why should we trust the Regions but not Congress? Again, if it is likely that majorities in two Regions would gang up to sabotage the third, it must be equally likely that the third Region will use its power to sabotage the other two. Human nature does not change at the state line: either people are all backstabbing, untrustworthy tyrants or they are not.

This was the point my previous post (https://uselectionatlas.org/FORUM/index.php?topic=234445.msg5024552#msg5024552) was making: maybe the Regions can be trusted not to abuse this power, but if so, why can't the national people be trusted not to abuse their power?

Also, as I believe Yankee mentioned earlier, the secession risk is a real factor. If 80% of one region opposes something, this reduces the chances they leave over it.
This is the sort of argument that John C. Calhoun made to rationalize his support for Nullification: according to Calhoun, the states must be given the power to destroy the Union, and then - to make sure they never use it - the majority must never do anything that the minority does not like. I'm not by any means putting you in the same class as Calhoun (the South Carolinian was a horrible, racist b*stard; you are very much otherwise), but the logic of your argument is worryingly similar to that of Calhoun's Fort Hill Address. This does not surprise me: I predicted that this would happen when the right to secede was first proposed:

Sooner or later, the national legislature is going to pass a law that a majority of citizens in one Region do not like: if that majority can declare itself out of the Union on a dime, we have a situation where the national government will be paralyzed by threats of separation.

Replace "law" with "Constitutional Amendment" and you basically have the argument for the unilateral veto, only with national paralysis re-imagined as a positive good.

Preserving the the historical method of ratification is one thing; taking the unprecedented, anti-democratic step of allowing a minority of both the Regions and the national population to veto a decision of the majority is another. This goes beyond the mere likelihood that such will ever occur: if this provision is adopted, we will have enshrined in our Constitution that the majority is subservient to the minority. That accomplished, why stop with Constitutional Amendments? Why not allow 4/5 of one Region to veto the results of presidential elections, acts of Congress, or Supreme Court rulings? You have not proposed any of these changes, but is the argument in favor of them really any different from that in favor of your proposal?

A Union that is controlled by a minority of its members is not worth preserving. I am willing to accept the status quo, but the unilateral veto is unacceptable.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 18, 2016, 04:28:35 pm
We will now proceed with a principle vote on the question of Constitutional Amendments



PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[   ] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[   ] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[   ] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain




Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 18, 2016, 04:38:44 pm


PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[ 1 ] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[ 3 ] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[ 4 ] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[ 2 ] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain




Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: / on April 18, 2016, 05:07:16 pm
1. A
2. B
3. D
4. C


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Justice Blair on April 18, 2016, 05:19:42 pm
1. B
2. A
3. C
4. D


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Ted Bessell on April 18, 2016, 06:36:51 pm
1. D
2. B
3. C
4. A


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: NeverAgain on April 18, 2016, 08:47:49 pm
1. B
2. C
3. A
4. D


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Leinad on April 18, 2016, 10:24:23 pm
1. C
2. B
3. D
4. A



Leinad, forgive me for being blunt, but what exactly is your argument? Is the unilateral veto a purely decorative ornament that will never be used, or a highly necessary safeguard of the Union? It's not clear to me why the former would be a reason to support this provision, or why the latter makes any sense at all.

It's a safeguard of the Union that will rarely be used. I'm not even sure if it will ever be used, but in the off chance it needs to, I think it's a very good thing to have.

Me pointing out that it would be rare was just so you and Adam don't have a fit over it. A quest in which I was evidently ineffective. If you must, though, I would be perfectly fine to go without the one-region 4/5ths veto. As long as the gist of my plan (national 3/5ths to pass, with input from the voters by region) is included, I'll be perfectly fine with the amendment process.

Quote
If 3/5ths of the overall population supports something, I highly doubt 80% in one region would oppose it. Unless it was something that would hurt that one region.
These two sentences nicely sum up the contradiction at the core of your argument: the idea that the majority cannot be trusted to never abuse its power, but the minority (if given power over the majority) can. If we assume it is likely that the national people will vote to strip a single Region of its rights, we must also assume that that Region would vote to strip the national people of their rights.

False equivalency. The ability to veto constitutional amendments gives a region no power other than that. A region couldn't unilaterally do anything to alter the Constitution in it's form prior to the vote in question, or impose anything on the other two regions.

Quote
Do you really believe that 2/3 of both houses of Congress and 3/5 of the national people would ratify an amendment that is openly hostile to one Region? (That's not a theoretical question - do you really believe there is a chance that this will happen?) If not, why have this provision at all?

It is very unlikely, but that doesn't mean it isn't a useful provision to have.

Quote
Also, as I believe Yankee mentioned earlier, the secession risk is a real factor. If 80% of one region opposes something, this reduces the chances they leave over it.
This is the sort of argument that John C. Calhoun made to rationalize his support for Nullification: according to Calhoun, the states must be given the power to destroy the Union, and then - to make sure they never use it - the majority must never do anything that the minority does not like. I'm not by any means putting you in the same class as Calhoun (the South Carolinian was a horrible, racist b*stard; you are very much otherwise), but the logic of your argument is worryingly similar to that of Calhoun's Fort Hill Address. This does not surprise me: I predicted that this would happen when the right to secede was first proposed:

Sooner or later, the national legislature is going to pass a law that a majority of citizens in one Region do not like: if that majority can declare itself out of the Union on a dime, we have a situation where the national government will be paralyzed by threats of separation.

Replace "law" with "Constitutional Amendment" and you basically have the argument for the unilateral veto, only with national paralysis re-imagined as a positive good.

Ah, yes, strawmanning with John C. Calhoun and/or the Confederacy. The exact same tactics were used when the Right to Self-Determination was discussed, and it was just as reckless, silly, and pointless then as it is now.

Also, it requires a supermajority to leave the Union, so please avoid fear-mongering about this Convention's recognition of the Right to Self-Determination.

Quote
Preserving the the historical method of ratification is one thing; taking the unprecedented, anti-democratic step of allowing a minority of both the Regions and the national population to veto a decision of the majority is another. This goes beyond the mere likelihood that such will ever occur: if this provision is adopted, we will have enshrined in our Constitution that the majority is subservient to the minority. That accomplished, why stop with Constitutional Amendments? Why not allow 4/5 of one Region to veto the results of presidential elections, acts of Congress, or Supreme Court rulings? You have not proposed any of these changes, but is the argument in favor of them really any different from that in favor of your proposal?

Oh, the infamous Slippery Slope argument. I could make the same case for your argument: if you take the regions out of Constitutional Amendments, why not take them out of other things? Why not abolish regional governments, or let the Federal government redraw regional boundaries unilaterally? Of course, though, I'm not accusing you of that, because that would be silly. You've never said any of those things, so attacking you for positions you don't have would be merely a distraction from the topic at hand, right?



Basically, this comes down to a question: do we want regions or not?

If we want regions to be separate entities, we should include regions in the amendment ratification process. This is what we've always done when this issue has came up, by the way.

If you view regions as imaginary, as nothing more than lines on a map, then by all means vote plan A. But if you view regions as separate entities, the building blocks of this Union, and that the people, together as a region--and yes, that is what regions are, groups of people, I'm sick of this "people vs. region" false choice--should have a say, plans B, C, and D are the better choices. I agree with Truman that the national vote should be of importance, so I think B and C are better (I have no clue why he preferenced D second, by the way).

I think that B and C are the best options, that give both sides what they really want. D is the status quo, while A is the most radical change from what we currently have.

Ultimately, it's the decision of the delegates.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 18, 2016, 10:55:08 pm
I'm really unsure why - at least for once in this convention - we need to be pandering to the Regions when it comes to this topic. This entire convention has been nothing but one set of concessions after another to the Regions. The Regions are going to be astronomically more powerful in the new game than in this one, with the only real concession made thus far being that we've sloughed off the dead weight in terms of there being too many of them (i.e.: the original problem and why we're here).

Because all your anti-regionalist rimjob friends turned on the game, pushed for its dissolution and have since departed from our midst. The people who have always blocked pro-regionalist reforms are gone, the same ones who always supported anti-regionalist reforms. So now regions get to determine not just their Senators, but how they are elected. As I stated in a PM even I am a little shocked at just how regionalist this constitution became in some areas.

Regions were never the problem. Their number relative to the number of participants was.

Can anyone explain to me a practical reason why the nominal will of the game at-large shouldn't determine whether or not an amendment passes nationally? Please refrain from saying that a bunch of Star Wars fans hunkering down in one corner of the country counts as "culture"/justification here.


Because popular sovereignty is a dangerous threat to minority rights. Allowing a temporary majoritarian tyranny free reign over the Bill of Rights and all the checks and balances, is a road to dictatorship. I am not interested in seeing you become a caudillo, as much as those radicals on AAD seem to get off on the thought. :P

And what about Midwest loonyism, which existed for like 10 damn years. Labor had no problem feeding off of the leftist culture there. This is a game, Adam. Everything is fake, jumping out of game to label something as fake to achieve an in game end seems rather hollow in my opinion. It was ridiculous when bgwah did it, and it is likewise here.

This is being made far too complicated for the sake of fanning the cooches of the Regions. Also, the variable means for ratification should probably be jettisoned as well; this has historically been used only as a way to cause mischief, obstruct or subvert the will of the people (I should know: I've always encouraged its retention for those very reasons).

It doesn't have to be complex to be pro-regionalist, it is this is instance on majoritarian tyranny. Majority rules on a water bill, fine. Majority rules on freedom of speech, no thank you. It should be a tough and difficult threshold.  

That is not why MaroDuke passed the 17th Amendment and it was not for that purpose that I voted for it in the Senate. Though it is true that it was criminally abused just a few months later with your complicit involvement. :P


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 18, 2016, 10:57:43 pm

PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[  4 ] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[  3 ] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[  2 ] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[  1 ] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain


[/quote]


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 19, 2016, 12:20:10 am
False equivalency. The ability to veto constitutional amendments gives a region no power other than that. A region couldn't unilaterally do anything to alter the Constitution in it's form prior to the vote in question, or impose anything on the other two regions.
I disagree. Basically, I hold that there are two types of amendments where this power might be invoked: those that legitimately infringe upon the rights of the Regions (for example, abolishing Regional representation in the Senate), and those that do not BUT that are objectionable to one Region for political or ideological reasons (for example, a pro-life amendment to the Bill of Rights would fall under this category). The first would be a threat to every Region's rights: they would therefore likely be opposed by multiple Regions (if not rejected outright by the national electorate), and thus the unilateral veto power would be unnecessary. The second kind is another matter. Because they are not actually threats to Regional sovereignty - opposition to these kinds of proposals is purely ideological - they should by right be submitted to the principle of majority rule. It is not out of the question, however, that one Region might use the unilateral veto to strike down the amendment anyways. This, in my view, would be an abuse of power: while technically legal, it contorts the Constitution and uses it as a partisan weapon to win fights that could not be won at the ballot box. If I were convinced that 2/3 of the Regions would willingly vote to strip themselves of their liberty, I would support this provision, but I do not; therefore, I come to the conclusion that this provision would serve only as a tool to obstruct the will of the majority.

Quote
Ah, yes, strawmanning with John C. Calhoun and/or the Confederacy. The exact same tactics were used when the Right to Self-Determination was discussed, and it was just as reckless, silly, and pointless then as it is now.
This argument, however much you disagree with it, is not a "strawman." When you use a "strawman" in debate, you create an extreme and ludicrous opinion out of thin air and attempt to tie it to the view you are contesting. For example, if I had wanted to use a strawman against your position, I could have argued "Leinad wants to bring back the Articles of Confederation! A vote for Plan C is a vote for dissolving the Union!" That is not what I did. It so happens that I recently read the entirety of Calhoun's Fort Hill Address for a paper I was writing IRL on the American System, and his argument against the tariff reminded me of one argument in favor of the unilateral veto. Essentially, Calhoun argued that the American System - specifically the Tariff of Abominations - had divided the country and alienated his home state. Having previously argued for each state's right to secede, Calhoun then posited his thesis: if the Tariff were not repealed, South Carolina would withdraw from the Union, which would irreparably harm American democracy. Therefore, certain concessions had to be made "for the sake of the Union": among them, granting individual states the right to "nullify" federal laws. This progression (1. We must protect the right to secede; 2. If State X doesn't get its way, it will secede; 3. We must allow State X to nullify the law when it does not get its way) seemed to echo your own. This is a relevant historical reference: you are free to refute it and explain how your argument differs, but it is not a strawman.

I will admit, Leinad, that I feel I am being blackmailed (not by you, but by Janus). I can accept defeat on the Secession Clause (indeed, I had made my peace with it until this came to the fore), but it seems that the threat of disunion is being used to extract further concessions. I don't think you mean it that way, but that's the message the Fates are sending me, and it's very discouraging. It reminds me of the RL Sequester crisis: the argument is that if we don't accept Plan C as the lesser evil, the country is in trouble, but that choice of pot or kettle only exists because we knowingly embraced it earlier. It's a moot point now, of course, but I can't help feeling trapped: I warned that adopting secession would create a choice between minority rule and disunion, and it seems now that I was right.

Quote
Oh, the infamous Slippery Slope argument. I could make the same case for your argument: if you take the regions out of Constitutional Amendments, why not take them out of other things? Why not abolish regional governments, or let the Federal government redraw regional boundaries unilaterally?
I know you meant this as tongue-in-cheek, but this is actual a fair argument to make, so I will address it. Based on my (admittedly limited) knowledge of Atlasian history and my (much more complete) knowledge of the opinions of our current population, I do not believe that the adoption of Plan A will lead to an erosion of Regional liberty, for three reasons. First, as I said earlier, an attack on the Regions effects all voters equally, so it seems to be doubtful that a national vote would turn out differently than a Region-by-Region vote. Second, the historical attempts to alter the Constitutional standing of the Regions that I am aware of have all failed to gain popularity with the national electorate. Whether we're talking about Fix the Regions (a positive reform) or Operation Rimjob (a negative example), it remains that throughout our history, most attempts to change the relationship between the Regions and the people have failed miserably. Third, the current population of Atlasia is remarkably pro-Region: I doubt if an effort to abolish the Regional governments would get even 15% in a national referendum. These facts lead me to believe that there is no reason to assume Plan A is bad for the Regions, especially considering that - as you said - the threat of secession should forestall any serious attempt to dismantle the federal system.

Now, obviously, some people are not convinced by this argument, and that's okay - there's a reason we have a Constitutional Convention, as opposed to a giant rubber stamp shaped like my wildest dreams. :P If people decide that a national referendum is too risky and we want to keep the old system, I'm fine with that (that's why I second preferenced Plan D) - I just don't want us to adopt a plan that, in my view, is logically unsound.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 19, 2016, 12:33:13 am
If I keep seeing Calhoun references, I might feel motivated to quote Burke word for word.


Word for word! :P Just remember, you guys started so it isn't my fault.

goes to dig out Reflections on the French Revolution...


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: President Griffin on April 19, 2016, 12:58:13 am
[1] PLAN A
[2] PLAN B
[3] PLAN D


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: MadmanMotley on April 19, 2016, 10:34:24 am
1. B
2. C
3. D
4. A


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Lincoln Republican on April 19, 2016, 10:38:40 am
1.  A

2.  D

3.  B

4.  C


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Clyde1998 on April 19, 2016, 10:53:02 am
We will now proceed with a principle vote on the question of Constitutional Amendments



PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[ 1 ] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[ 3 ] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[ 4 ] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[ 2 ] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain




Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Fmr. Pres. Duke on April 19, 2016, 01:37:02 pm
1. D
2. A
3. B
4. C

I've always favored letting the regions decide constitutional amendments over a nationwide vote. I haven't changed my position in that regard.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: MyRescueKittehRocks on April 19, 2016, 02:45:26 pm
1. D
2. A
3. C
4. B

I'm with Yankee on this. I'd also put in a clause where the regions themselves can propose amendments equivalent to the Article V Convention of the States that is set in the US Constitution.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Associate Justice PiT on April 19, 2016, 02:50:56 pm
1. D
2. B
3. C
4. A


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: bore on April 19, 2016, 07:01:23 pm
1 A
2 D


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Former Lincoln Assemblyman & Lt. Gov. RGN on April 19, 2016, 09:30:05 pm
PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[4] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[2] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[3] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[1] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain




Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Classic Conservative on April 19, 2016, 09:34:59 pm

PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Please rank the following Plans in order of preference.

[  4 ] PLAN A: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate.

[  3 ] PLAN B: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[  2 ] PLAN C: The Constitution may be amended by a 3/5 vote of the national electorate, BUT amendments may be Vetoed by 3/5 of the voters in two (2) Regions or 4/5 of the voters in one (1) Region.

[  1 ] PLAN D: The Constitution may be amended by a 2/3 vote of the Regions.

[   ] Abstain




Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Senator Cris on April 20, 2016, 07:27:37 am
1. Plan D
2. Plan B
3. Plan A
4. Plan C


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Fmr. Pres. Duke on April 20, 2016, 01:22:10 pm
My two cents is this for anyone trying to decide how to vote here: originally I envisioned the new constitution to be a document that made all areas of Atlasia relevant, especially regions. I wanted regional elections to matter and be contested.

Allowing regional legislatures to ratify the constitution makes sense, if we're to have regions at all. I don't understand what the other two regional plans in this thread mean, and I find them too complicated to understand for most people. We need to keep it simple. Plan D accomplishes all of those things, and I hope we pass it.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 20, 2016, 06:11:52 pm
RESULTS of the PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

First Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   3
Plan C   1
Plan D   8

Second Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   4
Plan D   8

Third Count
Plan A   8
Plan D   10

By a majority of two votes, PLAN D has been ADOPTED.


In retrospect, it's probably for the best that Plan D won out. This way we have a process for amending the Constitution that is time-tested and absolved of the controversy that would have dogged the other three plans.

Alright, moving along! I'll propose an amendment to incorporate the results of this vote shortly; after that, we'll proceed to the legislative process and then (hopefully) a final vote.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Prince of Salem on April 20, 2016, 09:00:33 pm
1. Plan D
2. Plan C
3. Plan B
4. Plan A

FTR


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 20, 2016, 09:33:18 pm
I offer the following amendment:

Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Reciprocity)
i. The Citizens of each Region shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several Regions.
ii. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each Region to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other Region. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the Manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.
iii. A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another Region, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the Region from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.

Section 2 (Lands and Territories)
i. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this Union, and apportioned among the several Regions as may be appropriate; but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the Regions concerned as well as of the Congress.
ii. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the Republic of Atlasia.

Section 3 (Protection)
i. The Republic of Atlasia shall guarantee to every Region in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.


ARTICLE [TBD]
Section 1 (Amendment)
i. The Congress, whenever two thirds of the membership of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall have power to propose amendments to this Constitution, which shall take effect following their ratification by three fifths of the eligible voters of this Republic two thirds of the several Regions.
ii. The Congress, whenever three fifths of the eligible voters or the legislatures of each of the several Regions shall deem it necessary, shall call for a Convention to revise or replace this Constitution and provide regulations for the organization and administration of that body.


ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Supremacy)
i. This Constitution, and those laws, treaties, and other acts made by the Republic of Atlasia in pursuance thereof, shall be the supreme law of the land, and the executive and judicial officers of this government and of the several Regions shall be bound thereby, any thing in the laws or constitutions of the several Regions notwithstanding.

Section 2 (Qualifications for Officeholders)
i. The officers of the Republic Atlasia, and of the several Regions, shall be bound by Oath of Affirmation to support this Constitution, but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the Republic of Atlasia.
ii. No person shall be elected to multiple offices under this Constitution, nor occupy the office of Justice or Associate Justice simultaneously with any other public office; but members of Congress shall be eligible to serve as the principle officers of such executive departments as may be established by law.

As should be evident, this amendment affirms the results of the latest principle vote. Delegates have 24 hours to object.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Fmr. Pres. Duke on April 20, 2016, 10:18:31 pm
RESULTS of the PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

First Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   3
Plan C   1
Plan D   8

Second Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   4
Plan D   8

Third Count
Plan A   8
Plan D   10

By a majority of two votes, PLAN D has been ADOPTED.


In retrospect, it's probably for the best that Plan D won out. This way we have a process for amending the Constitution that is time-tested and absolved of the controversy that would have dogged the other three plans.

Alright, moving along! I'll propose an amendment to incorporate the results of this vote shortly; after that, we'll proceed to the legislative process and then (hopefully) a final vote.

Glorious news!


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 21, 2016, 12:05:38 am
RESULTS of the PRINCIPLE VOTE on CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

First Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   3
Plan C   1
Plan D   8

Second Count
Plan A   6
Plan B   4
Plan D   8

Third Count
Plan A   8
Plan D   10

By a majority of two votes, PLAN D has been ADOPTED.


In retrospect, it's probably for the best that Plan D won out. This way we have a process for amending the Constitution that is time-tested and absolved of the controversy that would have dogged the other three plans.

Alright, moving along! I'll propose an amendment to incorporate the results of this vote shortly; after that, we'll proceed to the legislative process and then (hopefully) a final vote.

Glorious news!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mirPnfe6dAE


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 22, 2016, 06:46:12 pm
Seeing no objection, the amendment has been adopted.

Alright, the last item on the table is the relationship between the Senate and the House. Several delegates raised this as an issue they would like to see debated, so I'm sure we'll have lot's of input.

There are three questions to be answered here:
          1. Who can introduce legislation? The Senate? The House? Both?
          2. Who can amend legislation? The house that introduced the bill? The other? Both?
          3. If a bill is amended by a house other than the one that introduced the bill, does it go
          straight to the president or to a second vote in the original house?

The simplest way to do this is to allow both the Senate and the House to answer 1. Any other plan might lead to one house becoming irrelevant or, worse, kindling animosity between the Regionally-elected Senate and the generally-elected House. On 2, I have a more open mind, but generally think "both" is the right answer here as well. On 3, I think that bills should go straight to the president after they have been passed by both houses, as opposed to heading to a second vote in the original house: otherwise, the legislative process - which is already going to take longer than it does currently - will be much more complicated and thus less transparent.

If we're in broad agreement, I can draw up an amendment detailing how this will work post haste. If you have an opinion on this issue (and you all should), please SAY SO - even if you're just empty quoting what someone else said, it will be much easier to proceed if I can gauge public opinion, and I can't do that if nobody says anything.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Justice Blair on April 22, 2016, 07:34:44 pm
I'd be interested in seeing seeing some differences between the two houses- have we already covered the issue of who approves nominees etc?

I'd also lean towards the traditional role of having budgets voted on in the house only


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 22, 2016, 08:55:27 pm
I'd be interested in seeing seeing some differences between the two houses- have we already covered the issue of who approves nominees etc?
Yes - that would be the Senate.

I'd also lean towards the traditional role of having budgets voted on in the house only
I'm fine with this.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Prince of Salem on April 22, 2016, 11:59:37 pm
I'd too lean towards the traditional roles, given the fact that our bicameral system would be of similar nature of RL US Congress.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 24, 2016, 12:52:41 pm
I offer the following amendment:

Quote
Section 5 (Legislation)
i. Legislation may originate in either House, and both Houses shall reserve the right to propose and concur with amendments; but all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives.
ii. Every bill, order, or resolution which shall have passed the Senate and the House of Representatives shall, before it becomes law, be submitted to the judgement of the President. If he approve of it he should sign it; but if he disapproves he should return the bill to the House in which it originated with his objections. If, after considering the objections of the President, both Houses should by a 2/3 vote agree to pass the same bill, it shall become law regardless of the President's objections.

Basically, this amendment fills the remaining blanks in the legislative process. If anyone sees any other flaws, say so and I will fix them. Clause ii has already been approved during the debate on Congress.

Delegates have 24 hours to object.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: President Griffin on April 25, 2016, 03:02:51 am
It may already be covered here in terms of broad implication, but if one chamber amends a bill, what is the process for it returning to the second chamber? Is there going to be potential for an unlimited back-and-forth with versions of bills being proposed, passed and rejected, or will we have some sort of firm cut-off when it comes to the number of times any one chamber can pass a bill to send to the other? A period of time that legislation can be debated before it dies?  

Also, I echo the concerns for needing some unique elements to each chamber with respect to day-to-day operations. It's no secret that as of late, I've been burned out - I spent so long trying to get the ConCon going, it seems that I've run out of steam near the finish line. What I'm trying to say is that months and years ago, I had a lot of ideas when it came to this specific subject, but for the life of me I cannot think of anything along these lines right now. :(

Additionally, are we going to cover any specifics in the Constitution for how each chamber elects its leaders (it's been so long that I'm forgetting whether or not we already covered this)
?


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 25, 2016, 09:13:56 am
And I thought I had it bad. :P


I actually made a post about a cap on the number of times a bill should be considered, but the post got lost in that 3 AM site freezing crap it appears.

I would say the originating chamber gets 1 vote on whether or not to accept the bill as amended, if Aye, it goes to the President. If no, the VP then sends it back to the other chamber with instructions for an up or down vote on the bill as it originally passed in the originating chamber. If yes, it goes to the President, if nay, it dies. You could even have the VP administer these votes themselves to save time.

With competent VPs, Senate PPTs (Yes I know that technically Senate's leader is undefined :P), and House Speakers that process should take no more then a day or two at the most.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 25, 2016, 11:04:31 pm
Seeing no objection, the amendment has been adopted.



On the question of amendment, I basically agree with what Yankee said. I therefore offer the following amendment:

Quote
Section 5 (Legislation)
i. Legislation may originate in either House, and both Houses shall reserve the right to propose and concur with amendments; but all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives.
ii. Whenever either House shall vote to pass a bill, order, or resolution that shall have originated in the other, having previously made amendment to the same, the President of the Congress shall immediately call the amended bill to a vote in the House in which it originated. If the original House should then vote to pass the amended bill, it shall proceed to the President; otherwise, the President of the Congress shall instruct the other House either to pass the bill as it stood prior to its amendment by that House, or else reject it entirely.
iii. Every bill, order, or resolution which shall have passed the Senate and the House of Representatives shall, before it becomes law, be submitted to the judgement of the President. If he approve of it he should sign it; but if he disapproves he should return the bill to the House in which it originated with his objections. If, after considering the objections of the President, both Houses should by a 2/3 vote agree to pass the same bill, it shall become law regardless of the President's objections.

Delegates have 24 hours to object. Thoughts?

EDIT: Deleted duplicate "otherwise" (grammatical fix)


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: President Griffin on April 26, 2016, 12:13:17 am
Ugh, can somebody do a flow-chart like description for this? I'm having a hard time understanding the process. :P


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 26, 2016, 04:57:46 am
Senate Passes Bill => House Amends Bills => Senate voteds on Amended Bill

Senate passes amended bill => Sent to President
Senate rejects amendment bill => House Votes on Senate bill minus House Amendment

House Passes Original Senate Version => PResident for Signature
House Rejects Original Senate Versions => Bill Dies


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: MyRescueKittehRocks on April 26, 2016, 06:00:26 pm
Senate Passes Bill => House Amends Bills => Senate voteds on Amended Bill

Senate passes amended bill => Sent to President
Senate rejects amendment bill => House Votes on Senate bill minus House Amendment

House Passes Original Senate Version => PResident for Signature
House Rejects Original Senate Versions => Bill Dies


Sounds about right. What about conference committees in the event of house/senate difference on a bill? That would be within our efforts to keep it largely like the American System.


Title: Re: Misc. Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, etc.)
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 27, 2016, 03:16:16 pm
Seeing no objection, the amendment has been adopted.


What about conference committees in the event of house/senate difference on a bill? That would be within our efforts to keep it largely like the American System.
Not a bad idea by any means, but I don't think it belongs in the Constitution. Perhaps we could address this when the new Congress sets about adopting its Rules of Order.



Ladies and Gentlemen: THE TIME HAS COME for you to make any last-minute queries before we move to a final vote. Every topic hitherto proposed has been debated, voted on, and incorporated into the Constitution. If anyone has a last-minute proposal, you have 24 hours to make it known; otherwise, we will move ahead with a grammar-check of the adopted text and then a FINAL final vote.

For reference, here is the text adopted in this thread:
Quote
Section 5 (Legislation)
i. Legislation may originate in either House, and both Houses shall reserve the right to propose and concur with amendments; but all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives.
ii. Whenever either House shall vote to pass a bill, order, or resolution that shall have originated in the other, having previously made amendment to the same, the President of the Congress shall immediately call the amended bill to a vote in the House in which it originated. If the original House should then vote to pass the amended bill, it shall proceed to the President; otherwise, the President of the Congress shall instruct the other House either to pass the bill as it stood prior to its amendment by that House, or else reject it entirely.
iii. Every bill, order, or resolution which shall have passed the Senate and the House of Representatives shall, before it becomes law, be submitted to the judgement of the President. If he approve of it he should sign it; but if he disapproves he should return the bill to the House in which it originated with his objections. If, after considering the objections of the President, both Houses should by a 2/3 vote agree to pass the same bill, it shall become law regardless of the President's objections.

Quote
Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Reciprocity)
i. The Citizens of each Region shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several Regions.
ii. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each Region to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other Region. And the Congress may by general laws prescribe the Manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.
iii. A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another Region, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the Region from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having Jurisdiction of the Crime.

Section 2 (Lands and Territories)
i. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this Union, and apportioned among the several Regions as may be appropriate; but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the Regions concerned as well as of the Congress.
ii. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the Republic of Atlasia.

Section 3 (Protection)
i. The Republic of Atlasia shall guarantee to every Region in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.

Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]
Section 1 (Amendment)
i. The Congress, whenever two thirds of the membership of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall have power to propose amendments to this Constitution, which shall take effect following their ratification by three fifths of the eligible voters of this Republic two thirds of the several Regions.
ii. The Congress, whenever three fifths of the eligible voters or the legislatures of each of the several Regions shall deem it necessary, shall call for a Convention to revise or replace this Constitution and provide regulations for the organization and administration of that body.

Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]

Section 1 (Supremacy)
i. This Constitution, and those laws, treaties, and other acts made by the Republic of Atlasia in pursuance thereof, shall be the supreme law of the land, and the executive and judicial officers of this government and of the several Regions shall be bound thereby, any thing in the laws or constitutions of the several Regions notwithstanding.

Section 2 (Qualifications for Officeholders)
i. The officers of the Republic Atlasia, and of the several Regions, shall be bound by Oath of Affirmation to support this Constitution, but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the Republic of Atlasia.
ii. No person shall be elected to multiple offices under this Constitution, nor occupy the office of Justice or Associate Justice simultaneously with any other public office; but members of Congress shall be eligible to serve as the principle officers of such executive departments as may be established by law.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: President Griffin on April 29, 2016, 12:49:42 am
Since the House's specific method of election is not described in the Constitution, is there any need to specify (like we did with the Judicial Branch) a certain level of continuity in terms of what specific method the temporary Elections Officer must use?

Also...while it may be self-serving, are we really going to have an election for President and Vice President that will have less than two weeks of campaigning? I think we should amend this and just allow Duke and I to finish our terms. :D Besides, there is no inherent need for a fresh election in this regard: it's necessary for the House and the Senate since there are inherent changes in the number of people in the chamber and how they're elected (and also that the House is being freshly created).


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 29, 2016, 12:57:23 am
Why don't we juse insert a clause directing the use of STV until the new gov't can pass its own legislation on the matter. We know it best, and last I knew, it worked better with 9 seats then five anyway. Lower quotas and much more competitive.


We can always change it if it doesn't work when we pass a permenent system with a representation act of some kind.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: President Griffin on April 30, 2016, 01:13:52 am
I also propose the following amendment:

Quote
ARTICLE V

Section 2 (Implementation)
i. Following the ratification of this Constitution, the incumbent President of the Republic of Atlasia shall designate a temporary Elections Officer, who shall administer the election of the new President, Vice President, and House of Representatives. Elections for these offices will be conducted according to the regulations set forth in this Constitution and the existing body of law, and shall commence not more than two weeks following the receipt of the certificates of ratification from the several Regions.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on April 30, 2016, 02:13:21 am
You better not do anything crazy until the Legislature is fully assembled. :P


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on April 30, 2016, 06:58:56 pm
Delegates have 24 hours to object.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 02, 2016, 12:38:37 am
Seeing no objection, Griffin's Amendment has been adopted.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 02, 2016, 10:21:19 pm
I offer the following amendment:

Quote
ARTICLE [TBD]
Section 1 (Game Engine)
i. All powers which the Congress shall deem necessary and proper for simulating either the impact of actions by the Republic of Atlasia, the several Regions, or the citizens thereof; or the actions of non-playable entities, shall be vested in a Game Engine.
ii. The Congress shall have the power to establish the structure and powers of the Game Engine by appropriate legislation.

Delegates have 24 hours to object.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Associate Justice PiT on May 03, 2016, 04:41:04 pm
     When you say Game Engine, what specifically do you mean?


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 03, 2016, 05:42:17 pm
     When you say Game Engine, what specifically do you mean?
The Game Moderator plus any deputy GMs/other officers subservient to the Game Moderator.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Enduro on May 03, 2016, 09:30:58 pm
I don't have any problems with the amendment.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 03, 2016, 11:12:39 pm
Seeing no objection, Truman's amendment has been adopted.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on May 03, 2016, 11:29:02 pm
It seems like an appropriate way to handle the GM powers etc. The exact details and such are left for legislation, including the name of the official.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 05, 2016, 11:32:29 pm
I offer the following amendment:
Quote
Section 3 (The House of Representatives)
...
ii. All elections for the House of Representatives shall be by single transferable vote, unless otherwise specified by law.

[All other clauses are renumbered accordingly.]

Delegates have 24 hours to object.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Southern Senator North Carolina Yankee on May 06, 2016, 11:50:54 am
Well looks like I am not going to get to vote on this as a delegate.


I will still be commenting, regardless. This needs to be ratified.


Title: Re: Misc Articles (Amendment, Supremacy, Officeholding, &c) LAST CALL for new topics
Post by: Unconditional Surrender Truman on May 07, 2016, 05:33:14 pm
Seeing no objection, the amendment has been adopted.