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Presidential Elections - Analysis and Discussion => Election What-ifs? => Topic started by: President Johnson on September 14, 2016, 12:40:20 pm



Title: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 14, 2016, 12:40:20 pm
I'm starting a new what-if timeline in the weeks and months to follow. The idea came to my mind these days. Interstingly during a shopping trip.

All starts on March 31, 1968; the fateful day when LBJ announced that he would not run for president again. Everything to this day remains to same, but then the president makes another decision.

Enjoy reading and feel free to comment.


Chapter 1: The year 1968

March 31, 1968. President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the nation.

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President Johnson during his address to the nation from the Oval Office, March 31, 1968


THE PRESIDENT: "Good evening, my fellow Americans: Tonight I want to speak to you of peace in Vietnam and Southeast Asia. […]

With America's sons in the fields far away, with America's future under challenge right here at home, with our hopes and the world's hopes for peace in the balance every day, I do believe that it is in the vital interest of the nation and our fighting men in Vietnam, the they know that the present leadership is behind them. That they can depend on their president and the entire administration. There should also be no confusion abroad. Our allies should know that we stand to our commitments and our advisories should know that we are going to proceed our policy towards seeking and promoting freedom, while we will continue and intensify our diplomatic efforts – just as I have outlined in this address.

Accordingly, I hereby declare that I will seek the nomination of the Democratic Party and your support for another term as your president. I made this decision with a deep commitment to serve our nation and to continue the polices we have begun. To finish our mission, here at home by building a Great Society and abroad to promote freedom and democracy. This is why I ask for you continued support. Support, that you have given me since I assumed this awesome responsibility four and a half years ago, when our late president John Fitzgerald Kennedy was struck down.

Thank you for listening, good night and god bless all of you."


Statement by the Richard Nixon presidential campaign, April 1, 1968:

Mr. Nixon welcomes the entering of President Lyndon Johnson into the race for the White House. We will continue to reach out to the American people and make the case that we have the better solutions to fix our nation’s problems. The crime rate is too high, disrespect for law and order is devastating and the ongoing war in Vietnam is a stalemate. While thousands of our boys die in battle, the standing of the United States in world has declined. Mr. Nixon offers this country a fresh and new approach the end the war with honor, restore law and order here at home and improve life conditions of every American. The Democrats under the leadership of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson have led to the problems we currently face and therefore we need a new direction. Mr. Nixon is ready to lead this nation towards a more prosperous and peaceful future.


Democratic presidential candidates Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy have not reacted to the president’s announcement as of April 1.


Gallup National Polls, released on April 2, 1968:

Democratic nomination:

Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson: 43%
Sen. Robert F. Kenndy: 37%
Sen. Eugene McCarthy: 15%
Undecided/other: 5%

Republican nomination:

Fmr. Vice-Pres. Richard Nixon: 47%
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller: 23%
Gov. Ronald Reagan: 20%
Undecided/other: 10%


General election, nationwide:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 45%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%



Robert F. Kennedy (D): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Ronald Reagan (R): 44%



Next: The spring primaries and the road towards the National Conventions


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Devout Centrist on September 14, 2016, 12:45:44 pm
Call for a bombing halt on North Vietnam! Imprison Anna Chennault! President Johnson Über Alles!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: NHI on September 14, 2016, 05:46:32 pm
This looks promising!!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Kingpoleon on September 14, 2016, 10:29:43 pm
Of all the liberals from this time period....

In all seriousness, I'm not sure how someone can be a great admirer of Ford and LBJ at the same time, as their personalities and governing styles were near exact opposites. However, good luck to LBJ, and maybe he'll be a better person ITTL.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 15, 2016, 03:46:11 am
I just can tell this: It doesn't end with LBJ ;)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 18, 2016, 05:57:23 am
April 2, The Wisconsin Primary

BREAKING: EUGENE MCCARTHY USPSETS PRESIDENT JOHNSON IN WISCONSIN PRIMARY; NIXON WINS EASILY

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Democratic presidential candidate Eugene McCarthy addressing supporters in Wisconsin

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Republican presidential contender Richard Nixon during his victory celebration after securing an easy win in Wisconsin

As Wisconsin voters were heading to the polls, Republican candidate Richard Nixon, as expected, easily won the primary race of his party. He garnered 77% of the vote. Both governors Nelson Rockefeller of New York, the leader of the party's liberal wing, and Ronald Reagan of California, leader of the conservative wing, failed to gain traction in the midwestern state. However, both governors renewed their pledge to go the convention and attempt to win GOP nomination. "Mr. Nixon's history of losing elections to Democrats is long enough. We need someone who can win and carry forward conservative policies", Reagan commented. Rockefeller denounced both of his competitors as not electable in a national election. "Our campaign is addressing the real issues and offers the same bold leadership for the country as Governor Rockefeller does in New York for nine years".

Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy continued his streak of success. After coming in a strong second in New Hampshire earlier in March, he defeated President Johnson this time 50-40%. This is stunning and can be seen as a massive defeat for a sitting president. Senator Robert Kennedy, who did not campaign in the state, received 7%. "We will continue our cause to be a real alternative", the McCarthy stated. The White House did not comment the outcome officially, but an aide to Mr. Johnson told the New York Times that the president plans to campaign in the remaining primaries. The president is, according to the aide, angered about the lack of loyalty within is party because he thinks that only he can lead Democrats to victory.

Despite Senator McCarthy's shocking win, securing the nomination still remains an uphill battle, since several delegates are selected by local party bosses who back the president's bid for reelection. The best opportunity to unseat Mr. Johnson would be to join forces with Senator Kennedy and unite the anti-Johnson votes during the primaries to put enough pressure on the delegates to dump the incumbent.

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April 20, 1968. President Johnson addresses the nation on Vietnam.

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President Lyndon B. Johnson during his press conference


These have been busy weeks for the president. He made several campaign stumps and continued his diplomatic initiative in Vietnam. On April 20, the president holds a press conference, just three days before the next primary in Pennsylvania.

THE PRESIDENT: "My fellow citizens. Three weeks ago I have ordered to suspend almost all air bombing in Vietnam. Today I want to inform the public on the status of the negotiations. We have spent the last weeks to find a place for peace talks, where all involved parties can agree. The North Vietnamese long insisted on places that were unacceptable for us because all the advantages would theirs. Today, however, I can announce that all involved parties can agree on the city of Paris. I want to thank all negotiators and the government of France for their efforts towards peace. The talks are scheduled to begin next month. I also want to announce that I have selected W. Averell Harriman and Cyrus Vance to lead the American delegation and make our positions clear. Thank you."


Statement by Senator Robert F. Kennedy on Vietnam: I support the diplomatic actions taken by President Johnson. I hope these negotiations will be successfull so that we can have an honorable peace and bring our boys home. However, I also want to make it clear that this move comes very late. The president should have done this earlier and not now that he's fearing a defeat at the polls.


Gallup National Polls, released on April 22, 1968:

Democratic nomination:

Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson: 37%
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Sen. Eugene McCarthy: 20%
Undecided/other: 8%

Republican nomination:

Fmr. Vice-Pres. Richard Nixon: 53%
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller: 20%
Gov. Ronald Reagan: 18%
Undecided/other: 9%


General election, nationwide:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%


Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 45%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Ronald Reagan (R): 42%


Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Ronald Reagan (R): 45%


President Johnson job approval:
Approve: 41%
Disapprove: 50%
Unsure: 9%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 14, 2017, 03:24:56 pm
It has been a while, but I found some time again to keep writing. I’m pleased to continue this timeline. Feel free to comment.


April 23, 1968: The Pennsylvania Primary

BREAKING: PA PRIMARIES WON BY PRESIDENT JOHNSON AND RICHARD NIXON


Just days after announcing the start of the Paris Peace Talks, there is more good news for President Lyndon Johnson: He won the Pennsylvania presidential primary against Senator Eugene McCarthy by carrying 59% of the vote, compared to McCarthy’s 40%. Senator Robert Kennedy did not participate. Write-in votes were not possible. While the president just briefly thanked his voters, his challenger stated he will continue his campaign. He also suggested Robert Kennedy to leave the race since only he had beaten Johnson as of now. Kennedy did not reacted, but stated he would like to participate on the upcoming primaries and make his case to the people.

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On the Republican side, former Vice President Richard Nixon, as expected, decisively defeated Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan. He’s the clear frontrunner for his party’s nomination.

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In the polls, Nixon consolidated his support among GOP primary voters and is at dead-heat with the president and Mr. Kennedy nationally. Eugene McCarthy lost momentum after his defeat, both among Democratic voters as well as nationally. He is now behind all Republican candidates, underperforming both President Johnson and Senator Kennedy.


There are also some new polls out, released by The NY Times after the Pennsylvania primary:

Democratic presidential nomination:

Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson: 47%
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy: 31%
Sen. Eugene McCarthy: 20%


Republican presidential nomination:

Fmr. Vice-Pres. Richard Nixon: 60%
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller: 21%
Gov. Ronald Reagan: 17%


National polls:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Ronald Reagan (R): 44%


Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 43%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Ronald Reagan (R): 42%


Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 40%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Ronald Reagan (R): 47%


President Johnson job approval:
Approve: 43%
Disapprove: 47%


Further developments in late April:

On April 24, 1968, President Johnson hold an ad-hoc press-conference at the White House and announced that General William Westmoreland would be replaced by General Creighton Abrams as commanding general in Vietnam. Although the president publically praised Westmoreland’s military service, it was no secret that the commander-in-chief became increasingly frustrated with Westmoreland and his leadership. Back in March, the president rejected the general’s call for additional 206,000 troops.

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Press Conference with General William Westmoreland outside the White House

On April 25, 1968 President Johnson flew to Hawaii to meet with South Vietnamese President Thieu to discuss the ongoing war and upcoming Paris talks. However, little agreement was reached. The South Vietnamese president did not agree to send an own delegation to Paris, despite President Johnson’s urging. Thieu expressed his opinion that negotiations with the North are useless unless they agree the cease fire entirely and recognize South Vietnam as sovereign country. And aide of Johnson told the press, that the president was privately frustrated with Thieu and his administration, because he [Johnson] now believes, that there is no sole military solution.

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President Johnson during his meeting with President Thieu of South Vietnam

While his Democratic challengers remained surprisingly silent on the meeting, Richard Nixon stated the he supports “any effort for peace”, but that unlike the Johnson Administration he has a “secret plan” to end the war with honor. Nixon also presented former Rockefeller aide Henry Kissinger as foreign policy advisor. This was further setback for the New York Governor. Nixon also accused the Democrats of being weak on crime at a rally, citing the massive violence after Martin Luther King’s death early that month.

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Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon with Henry Kissinger after the announcement that Kissinger would join the campaign as foreign policy advisor

Later the month, the president also hosted a series of state visits with foreign leaders at the White House. His aides and campaign staffers advised him to use his office’s prestige and pose as a man fully in charge of the nation’s business to boost his chances for reelection. Meanwhile, Vice President Hubert Humphrey started a surprise mid-west tour to campaign on the president’s behalf. The press viewed this as clear indication that Humphrey would stay on the ticket should President Johnson be renominated, which seems now more likely than a month before. Humphrey vehemently attacked Nixon’s talk of a “secret plan” on Vietnam, denouncing it as pure campaign rhetoric. Senator Robert Kennedy made a similar statement by criticizing Nixon.


Next: Heading into May and some surprise developments including primary more results… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 15, 2017, 04:47:20 pm
April 30, 1968

BREAKING: KENNEDY AND ROCKEFELLER WIN THEIR FIRST PRIMARY


As primary voters went to the polls in Massachusetts, both Senator Robert Kennedy and Governor Nelson Rockefeller won their first primary. However, both are behind in the delegate count for the nomination of their respective party. Massachusetts was also friendly territory for both contenders. Kennedy had the advantage that he lived most of his life in the state, although he represents the state of New York in the senate. Both of his brothers, Ted as well as late President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, represented the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the upper house of congress. Mr. Kennedy defeated Senator Eugene McCarthy with 45% of the vote, compared to 29% for the latter. President Lyndon Johnson came in third with 25%. This is a poor result for the president, even putting aside the fact that he did not campaign here. However, as White House Officials told the public, he is expected for several campaign stumps in May. The President is still leading in delegate count, as his reelection campaign backed by most state parties and their local bosses.

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On the Republican side, Governor Nelson Rockefeller defeated Richard Nixon by a wide margin. As the state is seen as very liberal, Mr. Rockefeller had an easy path to victory. California Governor Ronald Reagan, the leading figure of the conservative faction, who is not actively campaigning for president, received few votes. Despite his defeat, former Vice President Richard Nixon is still the overall favorite for the Republican nomination. He has also a significant lead in most other states that hold primary elections, as well as nationwide. Mr. Nixon is already using most of his time to prepare for the general election; either against President Johnson or Senator Kennedy. Just the day of the primary, he stressed a strict law and order policy and blaming Democratic leadership for growing disrespect for law.

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Political developments in early May:

Official Peace talks between representatives of the US government and the North Vietnam regime officially began in early in Paris. President Johnson had, against the advice from the State Department, approved the participation of the Viet Cong. The Johnson Administration, however, emphasized that expectations should not be too high. Secretary of State Dean Rusk described the negotiations as “very difficult”. He also expressed his assessment that the North would not be ready for any agreement before the November election. Rusk, however, told the public that the president would give a major speech on Vietnam this summer to outline his plans.


May 11: George Wallace makes big announcement

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Former Alabama Governor George Wallace, the segregationist Democrat and potential third-party presidential candidate for president, gives a statement days after his wife, who succeeded him as the state’s chief-executive in 1967, unexpectedly passed away:

“Ladies and Gentlemen: Thank you very much for all the condolences I have received in these past days on the passing of my dear wife Lurleen. I was deeply moved by the warm words expressed by our fellow countrymen. I have also talked to President Johnson, Mr. Nixon and Mr. Kennedy. I thank them for their condolences […] Today I also want to announce that in the light of this heavy private loss I will not run for president in the upcoming election. I shall also not accept the nomination of any party for that office. I would have liked to be an alternative to the establishment Democratic and Republican candidates, but I believe that any individual seeking the office of president shall be 100% on the job. On the campaign trail and in the White House. Right now, I have chosen that I fall short of that self-set requirement. Therefore I shall not run for president in 1968, but I do not indent to retreat from politics. I will remain engaged, express my views on issues that matter and want to leave the door open for future public service. Both here in the great state of Alabama as well as at the national stage. Thank you very much, God bless you, God bless the United States of America, God bless Alabama.”

With Wallace’s exit of the presidential contest, the 1968 presidential election is expected to be a head-to-head contest between Republican Richard Nixon, who is on his way to the GOP nomination, and the Democratic nominee; likely President Lyndon B. Johnson, possibly Robert F. Kennedy. Eugene McCarthy’s chances are slim, despite his upset victories in some primaries, because virtually the whole party machine is against him. Unlike Kennedy, he has few friends among the party leaders. However, since Wallace refused to endorse any present candidate, there have been some rumors spread that Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, another segregationist, would launch a write-in campaign for president to oppose the three liberal Democratic contenders as well as the Republican ticket.


May Primaries

Democratic:

States won by Lyndon B. Johnson: Ohio, West Virginia, Florida, Oregon

States won by Robert F. Kennedy: Washington DC, Indiana, Nebraska

Eugene McCarthy only came in second in Oregon, where he finished slightly behind Lyndon Johnson. Kennedy was a distant third.

Republican: Richard Nixon won all the states mentioned above. Both Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan stated their campaigns now mainly focus on receiving delegates at the RNC convention floor as well as implementing some of their positions to the party platform.


Other events and state of the campaign, conclusion of the month:

Despite a mixed performance in the May presidential primaries, President Johnson is still comfortably ahead in the delegate count for the Democratic nomination. He is backed by most local party bosses – especially Chicago’s Mayor and host of the nominating convention in August, Richard J. Daley. However, the president faced some backlash in public opinion as the Paris Peace talks quickly stalled. A majority of Americans came to believe that the negotiations won’t end the war soon, although they now favored the talks, what has not been the case before the Tet Offensive back in January. May 1968 also made a sad record in terms of casualties in Vietnam, with over 500 men lost. Per week. On the domestic front, another wave of urban riots shock the nation. Republicans blamed the Johnson Administration and Democratic congress for the growing disrespect for law and order. The recent outbreaks of violence quickly overshadowed President Johnson’s legislative successes from April, were he has been able to sign a landmark housing bill into law. Nevertheless, the president, playing the role of a rustically Texan, seemed determined to fight his way through. During an appearance in New York City, he denounced the Republican policies without mentioning Nixon’s name, criticized the lack of loyalty in general and empathized the need to continue the Great Society. But there are more challenges: In an overheated economy and budget deficits, the White House negotiates with lawmakers for a tax surcharge. Treasury Secretary Henry Fowler stated that the president intends a bill come to his desk before the congressional summer recess. The president also announced that he would present a modified Vietnam strategy by summer for any possible outcome of the Paris talks, should he return to the White House for another four years coming January.

As the Kennedy campaign now fully kicked off, the young New York Senator gained momentum by late May. There have been three national polls for the nomination out in the final week of May. The NYT-poll showed Kennedy leading for the first time with 44% of the vote, compared to Johnson’s 38%. McCarthy stood now at just 14%. A Gallup-poll had Johnson ahead with 42% compared to 36% for Kennedy and 13% for McCarthy. A CBS-Poll showed Johnson at 43%, Kennedy at 40% and McCarthy 15%. McCarthy’s decline of support is an indication that most anti-war Democrats switched to Kennedy. JFK’s younger brother is also performing significantly better than the Minnesota Senator against Nixon. As CBS-Anchor Walter Cronkite noted, it seems “as though Kennedy’s strategy to present himself as the most electable candidate besides the president has fully worked off”. The main test for Kennedy is now the California Primary in early May. He must win here to keep his momentum. President Johnson is also under heavy pressure. If he loses by a large margin in California, as some polls suggest, he would have a hard time to recover politically despite his lead in the delegate count.


Opinion polls, as of May 31, 1968:

National polls:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 46%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Ronald Reagan (R): 46%


Robert F. Kennedy (D): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 45%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Ronald Reagan (R): 45%


Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 41%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Ronald Reagan (R): 46%


President Johnson job approval:
Approve: 40%
Disapprove: 51%


Next: Heading into June and the critical California Primary… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 19, 2017, 04:36:52 am
June 4, 1968: The big day in California

CBS Special report on the California presidential primaries. With Walter Cronkite

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WALTER CRONKITE: "Good evening America and welcome to this CBS special report on the California presidential primary. My name is Walter Cronkite. Today is a highlight in this political year, as voters of the nation’s largest state, a status California has gained in 1962, head to the polls for the primaries […] We have now a first major prediction for the Republican primary: According to our penal, Richard Nixon was defeated Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller by a significant margin. Both Nixon and Reagan are natives of California, although Mr. Nixon’s formal residence is currently New York. I think it is now certain to say that former Vice President Richard Nixon will once again head the Republican ticket this coming election. Yet, we have no confirmation that Mr. Nixon will give a speech tonight.  We keep you up to date.


Now I want to turn over to the Democratic primary. This is a very important contest here, since it is pivotal for each of the three campaigns. Actually, each candidate has to win it. Most recent polls showed Robert Kennedy leading by high single-digits. That’s a fair number, but does not guarantee a victory. President Johnson and Mr. McCarthy were running even at second place. In theory, each candidate could be victorious tonight. Especially McCarthy and Mr. Kennedy made great efforts in California. Both are competing for the anti-war vote. President Johnson left it to Vice President Humphrey to give two speeches. We will see how this plays out now.


And now, we have the first major projection for the Democratic Primary. Here it is:


✓ Robert Kennedy: 40.91%; Lyndon Johnson: 37.51%; Eugene McCarthy: 21.23%


Wow, what a stunning upset! Bobby Kennedy has won the pivotal California primary by a fair margin. This is a huge boost for his campaign, especially when it comes to prove that he’s an electable candidate. It seems like Mr. Kennedy’s message has resounded well in the Golden State, which is a center of the opposition to the Vietnam War. Though that stunning victory is energizing his base and a huge success, Senator Kennedy has still a lot of work to do when it comes to winning at the convention floor. He needs to win a large portion of those delegates not coming from primary states, that are considered to be in Johnson’s camp. Nevertheless, this result is a huge setback for the president. But his defeat in California is not altering the fact, that Mr. Johnson is still ahead in the delegate count. However, he faces the threat some delegates switch into the Kennedy camp because they come to the conclusion that the rising senator is better able to beat Richard Nixon. An even greater setback experienced Eugene McCarthy today. Not just because there are so many delegates at stake in California, but also because he believed to gain more support here with his anti-war stances. It seems that Mr. Kennedy’s massive efforts have heavily paid off now and that he took most of the anti-war vote. The Democratic nomination process will remain exciting. And not just because of the situation we now find ourselves in, also because when we think ahead of the general election campaign. Whoever ends up as the Democratic standard-bearer this summer needs consolidated support from the party to win the White House.

And now we are switching to the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, where Robert Kennedy now gives a speech."

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ROBERT F. KENNEDY: "Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you very very much. I want to thank you all and thank the voters of the great state of California. We made the impossible possible. [...] I want to fight for you every day. Fight for equality and civil rights, for econmomic safety and for better housing. And I want to end the war in Vietnam. We must stop the kinning as soon as possible and develop and new strategy to foreign policy. I want to do this, together with you. You, who you have putten you trust in me. [...] I just received a telegram from the president, where he congretulated us to this victory. I also thank him for being a tough competitor. No, don't boo please. We now take our destiny in our own hands to continue the great campaign for a better future that begun just few months ago. And now, let's go to Chicago!"


Then… Bobby Kennedy walks out of the ball room after he finished his remarks… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on August 20, 2017, 04:55:11 am
Great TL! Curious to see what happens next.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 21, 2017, 01:17:42 pm
June 4/5, 1968

CBS Special report on the Presidential primaries continues. With Walter Cronkite

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WALTER CRONKITE: "And welcome back to this CBS special report on the California presidential primary. My name is Walter Cronkite. We continue our program on this very special night, as Bobby Kennedy won the Democratic primary for president in the nation’s most populous state. Nevertheless, there have been three other primaries, and here are the results:


Illinois: ✓ Lyndon Johnson: 47.21%; Robert Kennedy: 36.74%; Eugene McCarthy: 15.40%

South Dakota: ✓ Robert Kennedy: 43.49%; Lyndon Johnson: 36.27%; Eugene McCarthy: 20.57%

New Jersey: ✓ Lyndon Johnson: 34.77%; Eugene McCarthy: 34.01%; Robert Kennedy: 32.06%


I would like to discuss the outcome with our political penal. We are witnesses of historic events, as only few incumbent presidents had such a rocky path to renomination in our country’s history.

I now want to turn over to our political analysts… I just received word that something happened at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles were RFK delivered his speech. Our reporters and others apparently heard some booms. It sounded like shots or an exploded light bulb. The noise came from a backroom. We are trying to find out more and let you know as soon as we have verified information […]

We have now received word that Senator Bobby Kennedy, who just won the California primary, has been shot at Ambassador Hotel in LA. The incident occurred as the senator walked through the kitchen. One suspect has been arrested by the police. This is a tragedy. We have no reliable information yet on Mr. Kennedy’s condition. We have no confirmation that he is not alive anymore. According to our sources, he was been hit in the back and then fell to the ground. We keep you up to date and take a short break.

Welcome back to our CBS special report on the California presidential primary. We just wanted to analyze Senator Kennedy’s win in California, but tragedy hit again […]. Our reporter at the Ambassador Hotel has now reported that Bobby Kennedy has been taken to a hospital in Los Angeles. He was hit by at least one bullet. Yet we have no confirmed information where exactly he has been hit and what his condition is. But he has not been killed. He is still alive. We inform you as soon as we have further information. As I am speaking now, campaign aides to the senator announced that they will inform the public tonight or tomorrow on Mr. Kennedy’s condition. As I am concluding this report, I may add a few personal words, because it is not the first time I have to make such a sad announcement: No matter where we stand politically, America should reject this kind of violence. Thank you, and may god bless Bobby Kennedy and that he may fully recover.

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Further developments regarding Bobby Kennedy:

At the afternoon of June 5, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson, while at the Oval Office, received word of the shooting. The president reportedly expressed his sympathy to family and friends of Senator Kennedy. He intends to issue a public statement as soon as the public is informed of Mr. Kennedy’s condition.

After intense media coverage and speculation, Kennedy’s spokesman Frank Mankiewicz informed the public on the shooting and the candidate’s condition at the morning of June 6. He is expected to give a statement, but won’t take additional questions from the press:

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FRANK MANKIEWICZ: "Fellow citizens and dear members of the press. First of all, I want to thank you all, in the name of the Kennedys, for the great sympathy we have received. For all the good wishes from across the country. I also want to thank President Johnson and Senator McCarthy for their calls and good wishes. I also would like to mention Mr. Nixon, Governor Reagan and Governor Rockefeller, among others, for their kind words and best wishes. Thank you all very, very much.

Now, I want to inform you on recent developments. Yesterday, after giving his victory speech, Senator Kennedy has been shot at the kitchen of the Ambassador Hotel in LA. Two bullets hit the senator. One in the back and one at his left-hand side shoulder. Both have been removed during a surgery that Mr. Kennedy underwent yesterday evening. Neither bullet hit an organ. The one at his shoulder has been less problematic, as it only caused a bone splinter that is expected to heal within a few months. The second one hit a rip and caused interior bleedings. The surgery took five hours and the senator lost a substantial amount of blood. He has been in a coma but has been taken out of it this morning. He is still in a critical condition and has to rest for several weeks and suffers from pain in his upper body. As his spinal column has not been hit, his future ability to walk won’t be limited. According to the doctors, the odds are good that he will fully recover, although we have to wait and see whether there will be some unexpected complications. That is still possible at the moment. In addition, one aide of Senator Kennedy has also been hit by a bullet. In the arm. He is also at the hospital, but is expected to be released within a week.

As no additional primaries are ahead, we have not made a decision about the campaign. As you are aware, there is still plenty of time to the nominating convention in late August. If possible, Senator Kennedy will continue his campaign, as we have earned a big junk of the delegates awarded through primaries. However, we will carefully review the medical situation. Mr. Kennedy will only seek the presidency, if he is fully able to carry out the awesome duties of the office to serve the American people. Thank you all very much."

In a brief statement, a spokesman of the Los Angeles Police Department announced that a Palestinian named Sirhan Sirhan has been arrested for the alleged shooting. He did not give more specific information as investigations are ongoing.


At 7 p.m. EST, President Lyndon B. Johnson went before the press at the White House to give his remarks:

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THE PRESIDENT: “Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen. Today I have been informed of Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s condition after the tragic shooting that took place yesterday in California. First of all, on behalf of the First Lady, Lady Bird Johnson, and myself I want to express our best wishes to Mr. Kennedy and his family. In this night of tragedy, we ought to stand together as one nation to reject this violence. I want to make it unmistakable clear, that I reject this act of violence which is an attack on all of us. We saw already a level of violence and hatred that cannot be tolerated. […] To prevent incidents like this, at least during the course of the campaign, I have signed an Executive Order to grant Secret Service Protection to all presidential candidates. This includes Senator Kennedy, Senator McCarthy as well as Mr. Nixon, Governor Rockefeller and Governor Reagan. I will also review the option of appointing a special task force to to study the possibilites for additional gun control. My administration is determined, if necessary, to propose and lobby for legislative measures or act by executive action, wherever possible. Thank you for your attention.”

REPORTER: “Mr. President, how do you comment your defeat in California? And the other primaries, that you won in part?”

THE PRESIDENT: “I do not want to comment on the campaign right now. I will express my views at an appropriate moment. Thank you.”


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 21, 2017, 01:44:37 pm
June 8, 1968: Chief Justice Earl Warren announces retirement

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Chief Justice Warren during a dinner at the White House in spring, that President Johnson (front) hosted

After 15 years of service at the United States Supreme Court, Chief Justice Earl Warren today announced that he intended to retire from office. Warren, a liberal Republican and former California Governor, gained a reputation in the landmark 1954 decision Brown v. Board of Education to desegregate schools and several other decisions that marked a streak of liberal court rulings. He also chaired the Warren-Commission, that was appointed to investigate the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy. At the age of 77, Chief Justice Warren now feels that his time has come to depart from the court. He officially informed President Johnson and Congress yesterday evening on his decision. Mr. Warren pledged to stay on until a successor is nominated and confirmed. The White House released a statement that the president intends to put a new Chief Justice on the court before the presidential election in November. According to insiders, Mr. Warren is concerned that Richard Nixon may pick a successor if elected this fall. According to the source, he prefers Mr. Johnson or Mr. Kennedy to appoint his successor. However, Mr. Warren declined any public statement on these rumors.

On June 9, the New York Times reported that a handful of people are on President Johnson’s shortlist to fill the post. According to the report, LBJ considers elevating one of his appointees to be Chief Justice; either Abe Fortas, a personal friend he nominated in 1965, or Thurgood Marshall, the first African American to serve at the nation’s highest court, who was appointed by President Johnson in 1967.


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Possible next Chief Justice of the United States: Abe Fortas and Thurgood Marshall



June 9, 1968: President Johnson to visit Robert Kennedy at hospital

Surprise announcement by the White House today: President Johnson will depart tomorrow for California and tour through the state. Officially the president will visit the area of the proposed Yosemite National Park. The Johnson Administration is pushing for legislation to create the national park. As officials of both Senator Kennedy and the White House confirmed, LBJ will visit RFK at the hospital and talk to each other. It is not yet known who arranged the meeting; only that both sides are interested in a discussion on a broad range of issues. Especially the new situation that arose since the assassination attempt. As stated by the White House and the Kennedy campaign, there will be no reporters allowed and no pictures taken. It was announced, however, that Bobby Kennedy, though physically still in a critical condition, is not handicapped mentally and has a desire to talk to the Chief Executive.

President Johnson will return to Washington on June 12.



Further political developments during June 1968:

During the rest of the June, there was not much move both in domestic and foreign policy. The negotiations in Paris between representatives of United States, North Vietnam and the Vietcong continued, but they already reached a status of stalemate. A decisive negative factor is the fact that South Vietnam, the US ally, is not assembled around the table. President Thieu of South Vietnam refuses to participate as long as the Johnson Administration is not ready to give a 100% guarantee that South Vietnam will remain a sovereign state and that the North is ending all hostile actions immediately. Thieu also rejected a participation of communist elements in the South Vietnamese government. The Johnson Administration is increasingly under pressure to make such concessions to the South from the conservatives in Congress. However, a steady increasing number of lawmakers wants to get out of the conflict, as American casualties are still at a critical high mark. Just recently, the possibility of cutting military spending for Vietnam has been discussed. Even Vice President Hubert Humphrey has allegedly urged to speed up plans to reduce American involvement to focus on domestic problems. According to White House Officials, President Lyndon Johnson will outline his plans for Vietnam after the Democratic Convention, should he win renomination. Secretary of State Dean Rusk and his counterpart at the Pentagon, Clark Clifford, informed the public that the adminstration is working on both a modified political and military strategy. Republican presidential candidate and likely nominee Richard Nixon accused the administration of misleading the public by such announcements and suggested it was pure campaign rhetoric by the Democrats. The Nixon campaign is in its final stage to work out proposals for a platform for the GOP National Convention in early August. Meanwhile, both Governors Rockefeller and Reagan hope that there are enough anti-Nixon delegates to deny the nomination to the former vice president and win the top-spot by themselves. However, these efforts seem not likely to succeed; in part of because they both refuse to join forces since Ronald Reagan is the leader of the conservative Republicans and Nelson Rockefeller the leader of the GOP's liberal wing.

By late June, the administration succeeded with a tax bill to increase taxes. A call, the president has made for months. On June 30, without formal ceremony in the White House Rose Garden, President Johnson signed the measure into law. Due to expected revenue increases and a robust economy, the president’s budget office projects a balanced budget for 1969 despite spending records for social programs and the war.

As surprisingly as LBJ’s visit to Los Angeles came, even more surprising was the fact that no details of their meeting came out except the official statements by RFK’s aides. A Kennedy spokesman told the press that both politicians talked about several issues, including the campaign, and that their meeting took ninety minutes. According to the spokesman, RFK intends to continue his presidential campaign, but wants to review the medical situation later on. An aide to the presidential hopeful said that the Kennedy campaign is not in a hurry – pointing out that Chicago is still over two months away, leaving enough time to evaluate the situation carefully. Nevertheless, a decision on whether and how to continue will probably be announced some time in July. “As of now”, Mr. Mankiewicz said, “Senator Kennedy is still in the race. If anything changes, what might happen due to his condition or other circumstances, we will let you know”. Asked what he meant by “other circumstances”, he answered that the Senator also wants to examine his chances for the nomination. “We believe, we are in a good position, having won several primaries”, he added. However, according to Mr. Mankiewicz, Senator Kennedy is also concerned about the division in the Democratic Party and wants to do everything he can “to keep Richard Nixon out of the Oval Office”.


As of late June, there are also new polling numbers released by Gallup:

National polls:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 43%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%


Robert F. Kennedy (D): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 47%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 45%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 49%
Ronald Reagan (R): 44%


Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 44%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 44%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%


President Johnson job approval:
Approve: 41%
Disapprove: 49%


Next: Developments in July and Bobby Kennedy’s future plans, LBJ’s Supreme Court decisions… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on August 22, 2017, 02:15:22 pm
Interesting timeline. Well written! I'm curious how the 1968 election turns out and what then happens. Maybe no Watergate?


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 26, 2017, 04:16:13 am
July 2, 1968: President Johnson announces his nomination for Chief Justice



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To the Senate of the United States


I nominate   Homer Thornberry, of Texas, to be Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.



Sincerely,


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Lyndon B. Johnson

THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington D.C.
July 2nd, 1968


It is now official that President selected Homer Thornberry of Texas, judge at the Federal Court of Appeals, to be Chief Justice of the United States. Mr. Thornberry has known the president for several years. He had been appointed to important posts as federal judges by both Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, in 1963 and 1965, respectively. The Senate will hold confirmation hearings in the fall session. Some Republican lawmakers announced their opposition to the Texas Democrat. The leading presidential candidate Richard Nixon declined for comment.

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Nominee for Chief Justice: Homer Thornberry



July 4, 1968: Bobby Kennedy released from Hospital

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On Independence Day 1968, Robert Kennedy got released from the Hospital in Los Angeles. The public was long been waiting for news on the senator's condition. His team just barely informed the public about his condition, only stating that it was "getting better by each day". The presidential hopeful will retreat to the Kennedy Family Home Hyannis Port in Massachusetts for a few weeks, where he will continue to recover for a few weeks. However, he will also have meetings with his aides, members of congress and Democratic officials to evaluate the coming strategy for his campaign. Until that day, there was not much news on the Kennedy campaign except that he's still determined to continue. The assassination attempt gave the senator a boost in the polls. Polls conducted over the remaining days of June showed him leading the race for the nomination by a plurality. However, a new survey from July 1 had President Johnson in the lead again, since the chief-executive had permanent publicly.

On July 15, 1968, it was announced that Robert Kennedy would give a public statement about his campaign in early August. Aides told the press that a likely date is shortly after the Republican National Convention, which will take place between August 5 and August 8.


Other political developments in July:

Despite the slow ongoing of the Vietnam peace talks in Paris, the Johnson Administration got some positive news on the world stage. On July 1, the Non-Proliferation Treaty was signed for a large number of nations during a White House ceremony. The treaty’s objective is to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and weapons technology, to promote cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to further the goal of achieving nuclear disarmament and general and complete disarmament. The treaty defines nuclear-weapon states as those that have built and tested a nuclear explosive device before 1 January 1967; these are the United States, Russia, the United Kingdom, France, and China. Four other states are known or believed to possess nuclear weapons: India, Pakistan, and North Korea have openly tested and declared that they possess nuclear weapons, while Israel is deliberately ambiguous regarding its nuclear weapons status. The agreement is largely supported among lawmakers and Republican front-runner Richard Nixon endorsed enactment, too.

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President Lyndon B. Johnson and Secretary of State Dean Rusk signing the treaty on behalf of the United States

As the month neared its end, President Johnson headed to his Texas Ranch on July 21 for about two weeks of summer vacation. Although the president is not in Washington, he will, as his press secretary told the public, still having meetings and calls. During the course of his five years in office now, President Johnson frequently returned to his Texas Ranch, but remained active during that time. He is also expected to host several meetings with lawmakers, campaign strategists and other advisors to discuss his campaign strategy. Vice President Humphrey stated during a speech, that he is very confidant, LBJ would win renomination on the floor and pick him again as his running mate. As of late July, the president did only give few campaign speeches. He more focused on being on executing his daily responsibilities an pose as a president rather than a campaigner. Meanwhile, Richard Nixon made several campaign stumps, especially in the South. As Republican strategists told in backroom talks to reporters, Mr. Nixon is heavily focused on keeping the Deep South in the Republican column. The area had overwhelmingly voted for Barry Goldwater in 1964 as a protest against the pro-civil-rights policy of President Johnson. Although being in favor of civil-rights and desegregation himself, Mr. Nixon is confidant of winning a large share of Southern electoral votes in the fall. Particularly since George Wallace declined a third-party run and some efforts by Georgia Governor Lester Maddox to launch a write-in campaign in South quickly collapsed. Richard Nixon's strategy is obviously winning the election with a coalition of Southern votes in addition to traditional Republican states in the New England, the Rocky Mountains and the West.

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As of late July, there are also new polling numbers released by Gallup:

National polls:

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%


Robert F. Kennedy (D): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 44%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 47%
Ronald Reagan (R): 43%


Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Nelson Rockefeller (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 43%
Ronald Reagan (R): 46%


President Johnson job approval:
Approve: 42%
Disapprove: 48%


Next: The Republican National Convention and (later) Bobby Kennedy's plans... stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 28, 2017, 02:24:28 pm
August 5 – 8, 1968: Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida

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As the 1968 Republican National Convention opened in Miami Beach, Florida, predictions saw Nixon at 656 delegate votes – only 11 short of the number, he needed to win the nomination. His only remaining obstacles were Governors Reagan and Rockefeller, who now discussed a to join forces in a “Stop-Nixon-Movement”. Even the possibility of a Rockefeller/Reagan ticket has been discussed briefly. However, as the balloting began, Nixon, as widely expected, secured the nomination in the first round with 692 votes.

The Vice Presidential choice

A possible shortlist of Nixon’s vice presidential choices has been published by the New York Times the day before the opening of the convention. It included Nixon’s personal friend Robert Finch, Lieutenant Governor of California, Maryland Governor Spiro Agnew, Ohio Governor Jim Rhodes, Representative Gerald Ford, Texas Senator John Tower and New York City Mayor John Lindsay. Governors Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller were also considered as candidates for the second spot.

Just after the nominating ballots for president were cast, Nixon’s officials went out and announced that the brand-new nominee had selected Texas Senator John Tower as his running mate. Senator Tower, 43, became the first Republican senator from Texas and one of the first in the South. He was elected in a 1961 special election to fill LBJ’s old seat and got reelected in 1966. With this move, Nixon seemingly wants to appeal to conservatives and southerners. In the end, it could come down to Texas to decide the election. Especially if RFK is the Democratic candidate. But even LBJ shouldn’t be overconfident to carry his homestate, although he would be the favorite in the Lone-Star-State.

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Nixon's choice for vice president: Senator John Tower (R-TX)
 

Nixon accepts nomination

RICHARD NIXON: “Mr. Chairman, delegates to this convention, my fellow Americans. Sixteen years ago I stood before this Convention to accept your nomination as the running mate of one of the greatest Americans of our time—or of any time—Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eight years ago, I had the highest honor of accepting your nomination for President of the United States. Tonight, I again proudly accept that nomination for President of the United States. But I have news for you. This time there is a difference.

This time we are going to win and beat Lyndon Johnson or Robert Kennedy and the Democrats.

[…]

We have the better solutions for America. We will end the failure of the Democratic Administration, restore law and order in our streets and end the war Vietnam with honor. On November fifth, Americans will stand up and elect a new president, who will bring about the change we urgently need. Thank you all very much.”

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Republican presidential nominee Richard Nixon with V-Sign after his acceptance speech

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The Republican logo for 1968
 


National polling after the Convention

After the RNC, Nixon surged in public opinion polls, which is usual after nominating conventions.

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Robert F. Kennedy (D): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Eugene McCarthy (D): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: RogueBeaver on August 28, 2017, 04:16:04 pm
LBJ would win the nomination but possibly lose the GE. If he wins in November then he will almost certainly die in office given the strain. IRL he had nightmares of being incapacitated like Wilson.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 29, 2017, 02:17:39 am
LBJ would win the nomination but possibly lose the GE. If he wins in November then he will almost certainly die in office given the strain. IRL he had nightmares of being incapacitated like Wilson.

We'll see soon what happens. Probably something unexpected ;)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on August 29, 2017, 03:17:15 am
LBJ would win the nomination but possibly lose the GE. If he wins in November then he will almost certainly die in office given the strain. IRL he had nightmares of being incapacitated like Wilson.

Was Harold Wilson ever incapacitated? I can't find anything looking it up.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 29, 2017, 03:28:21 am
LBJ would win the nomination but possibly lose the GE. If he wins in November then he will almost certainly die in office given the strain. IRL he had nightmares of being incapacitated like Wilson.

Was Harold Wilson ever incapacitated? I can't find anything looking it up.

He meant President Woodrow Wilson from 1919 to 1921. who suffered from a stroke. Nevertheless, LBJ had heart problems. But he changed his lifestyle after leaving office (1969) in real life, like resuming Smoking. I'm not sure he would have died sooner had he been reelected in 1968.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on August 29, 2017, 02:38:09 pm
August 15, 1968: Bobby Kennedy to make major announcement before the press

After spending the past few weeks at his family home in Massachusetts, Bobby Kennedy announced on August 14, that he would address the public the next day on his physical condition and status of the campaign. This came unexpectedly late and led to several rumors why the senator waited so long. It was speculated that Kennedy would either withdraw for health reasons or was plotting a major upset at the convention floor to clinch the nomination.

At 11 a.m., August 15, 1968, Senator Kennedy went before the press in Hyannis Port:

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SENATOR KENNEDY: “Ladies and Gentlemen, members of the press: I came before you today to make a major announcement concerning both my personal and political future. First, I want to thank the American people and my colleagues from across the spectrum for their good wishes. I was deeply moved by all these wishes and all the goodwill I was happy to receive. So, thank you all. I will never forget your support and love. Thanks to also to the doctors, who made it possible that I will be able to recover fully. For two weeks now, I do exercises every day and it gets better by the day.

Now let me switch to the political part of my speech: Last week, the Republican Party once again nominated Richard Nixon for president. I do believe that it must be our mission to make sure Mr. Nixon never enters the White House other than as a guest. And I want to do everything I can to help this cause. And the cause of our party, to promote opportunity and justice for everybody in our land. This is a critical time in history and I do believe very much that the Democratic Party can only win this election as a united force for progress, propriety and peace. Therefore, I want to inform you that will suspend my own campaign for president. [Silence] President Johnson and I have reached an agreement that I will support his renomination and instead seek the nomination for vice president, which he fully supports. This might came as a surprise to you, but both the president and I conclude that our party must be unified to win the election. Despite our differences on Vietnam, I am convinced that it is our obligation to work together, because we cannot bring about change and solutions as a divided party and more important, a divided country. Having spoken with the president, I know that he wants peace in his heart. We only differ on the question how to achieve it. But both he and I have agreed that we want to work together to bring positive results when it comes to Vietnam and any other subject.

Now, let me also add a few personal words. I would have liked to win this nomination, but as I spoke to all sorts of public and party officials, it became evident to me that my actual chances to succeed in Chicago are very slim. Moreover, it became clear that the price for my nomination would have been the total division of our party. Then I asked myself, whether I want to bear the responsibility for that. Be responsible for a crushing defeat in November, because we are so divided. I answered this question with a clear no. Therefore, I have made this decision.  My nomination as vice president gives all those millions of voters a voice, who gave me their support in the primaries.

Last but not least, President Johnson and I have agreed to review and reform the nominating process of the Democratic Party. Our goal for the future is that more primaries are held and that only a candidate who participated in primaries and won most of them can be our standard-bearer. I think this agreement is, as it strengthens our great democracy, an even bigger success than the question who will be on the ballot this November.

Thank you for attention everybody.”

REPORTER I: “Sir, Senator, how did this happen? I am stunned. Did you ask the president for the second spot as a prize to withdrawing? Or did he offer the position?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “The president and I have reached this agreement. We both think that it is in the best interest of the Democratic Party. And, more important, the United States of America, which we both love”.

REPORTER I: “So, you are not telling us who made an offer or a request?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “I am not prepared to disclose my private conversations with President Johnson”.

REPORTER II: “When did you speak to the president? Has that agreement been reached when he visited you at the hospital back in June?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “I have spoken with the president both in person at the hospital, and had several telephone conversations with him. We reached this agreement during our exchanges. I cannot give you a specific date other than we have agreed to make it public today”.

REPORTER III: “How did your conservations with the president go? Did you talk about Vietnam? Is the president ready to change his policies that you criticize?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “My conservations with President Johnson were about a wide range of topics. Domestic and foreign policy and they went well. He was very gracious and wished my family and me all the best after the shooting. And I really mean that. The president has been very nice and offered to help wherever he can.”

REPORTER I: “Did you also speak to Vice President Humphrey? I assume he expected to stay on the ticket. What’s his future going to be like?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “No; I have not spoken to Vice President Humphrey yet. I am sure he has a bright future, because he is a very talented and compassionate man. The president talked to him, so you have to ask him."

REPORTER III: “Are you now running for president in 1972?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “No comment. That’s it, thank you all.”



3 p.m. President Johnson addresses the press from the LBJ Ranch

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The same afternoon, President Lyndon Johnson addressed the press at his LBJ Ranch in Texas:

THE PRESIDENT: “Good afternoon Ladies and Gentlemen. As Senator Kennedy has informed you today in the morning, we have reached an agreement that he will not be a candidate for president any longer. He will instead seek, with my support, the nomination for vice president in Chicago later this month. Senator Kennedy has run a campaign that inspired millions of Americans and we ought to give them a voice, too. Just as I have gained a large share of support in the primaries, I won or came close to winning. But now we have to leave this behind us for the greater good of our nation. That means we have to work together. You are all very aware that our personal relationship has not always been easy, but Senator Kennedy and I agree that we must to everything in our power to reunite the Democratic Party and its progressive forces. I think in the end, it will benefit us all. I also have to note, that this has not been an easy choice for me. Not because of Bobby Kennedy, but because of my old friend Hubert Humphrey. He has been an outstanding partner all these years and served his country with compassion and dignity. Hubert will remain a friend of mine and I will always support him wherever I can.”

REPORTER: “Mr. President, will Vice President Humphrey now assume a cabinet post? And what is your relationship with Senator Kennedy going to be? Are you sure you can work with him as vice president?”

THE PRESIDENT: “I cannot comment on that. I will let you know. Most important, Mr. Humphrey will make his own decision what he is going to do in the future. He has strong convictions and I assume he will remain a political player. I shall support him. To your second question: I expect to have a good relationship with Bobby Kennedy in the future. We spoke several times since the shooting and I believe we will find common ground on many issues. Thank you.”


So, it now looks like the 1968 election will be JOHNSON/KENNEDY versus NIXON/TOWER.


Next: The Democratic National Convention in Chicago… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on August 30, 2017, 12:01:30 am
Humphrey 1972!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 04, 2017, 01:32:38 pm
August 26 – 29, 1968: Democratic National Convention, Chicago

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The Democratic National Convention (DNC) opened its doors on August 26, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois. The first two days went through with regular order. The party adopted a liberal platform, such as calling for expanded social security and health care, civil rights and federal aid to education. The domestic agenda was put under the headline “Let’s fulfill the Great Society”. On foreign policy, the Johnson and Kennedy camps reached some agreement that calls for increased diplomatic efforts to end the war in Vietnam and a modified military policy to reduce American casualties. However, no details were published. Democratic officials confirmed that President Johnson would present more details after the convention.

The first highlight of the convention was the speech of outgoing Vice President Hubert Humphrey on August 28:

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VICE PRESIDENT HUMPHREY: “My fellow Americans and fellow Democrats: I came here before you today to thank all of for the tremendous support you have given me in all these years. I also want to express my deep thanks and graditude to President Johnson and the trust this great man has put in me […] I know that it wasn’t easy for anybody to decide, that I won’t be on the ticket again. And that it may be painful for some. Especially the Minnesota delegation. Let me say, that of course I regret not running for vice president again. But I believe that the Johnson/Kennedy ticket that is put before this convention is the right one for the challenges of our days. I’m talking about the challenge to bring peace with honor to Vietnam and opportunity for every American. This is what Democrats stand for in 1968, and this is how Democrats win as a united party […] Thank you all”.

The vice president concluded his speech with tears in his eyes. He spoke with passion and earned a full five minutes of applause from the delegates. But he couldn’t hide, how hard it was for him to stand down. He had been a loyal supporter of LBJ in these four years, although he privately favored a more dovish Vietnam policy. He hoped the VP spot would be the ultimate stepping stone for his long White House ambitions. Nevertheless: All political analysts expressed their assessment, that Hubert Humphrey, nicknamed the Happy Warrior, would not quit politics. As soon as the Johnson/Kennedy ticket was announced, rumors began to swirl Humphrey may replace Dean Rusk as Secretary of State after the election should the Johnson Administration earn a renewed mandate. Others mentioned the Treasury Department or UN Ambassadorship.


During August 28, a larger number of protesters from all over the country, gathered in Chicago. As a result, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley ordered a drastic increase in police officers, because riots are expected the following day. Some protesters stated they wanted to demonstrate with force against President Johnson’s appearance the next day.

On the morning of the last day, August 29, delegates cast their ballots for president and vice president. As the balloting began, there was some unrest among delegates. 2,607 delegates were able to vote.


Presidential ballot:

✓ Lyndon B. Johnson (incumbent): 1,892
Eugene McCarthy: 505
George McGovern: 130
Robert F. Kennedy: 75
Others: 4


Vice Presidential ballot:

✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 1,950
Not voting: 499
Hubert Humphrey (incumbent): 127
Others: 11


Both LBJ and RFK won their nomination by a substantial margin, respectively. Eugene McCarthy refused to quit the race until the end and massively criticized Bobby Kennedy for the alliance with Lyndon Johnson. “The Kennedys are obsessed with power in this country, even if that means signing on with the man, they criticized for his failed Vietnam policy. It is this lack of courage that my campaign was all about. We offered an alternative and we will continue to do so”, said the Minnesota Senator. He earned some applause, but many boos for his speech and refusal to endorse the Johnson/Kennedy ticket. His delegates mainly stayed with him and did not participate in the vice presidential balloting.


That morning, Air Force One landed in Chicago with President Johnson and Senator Kennedy on board. Both left the plane together with their wives and jumped in the presidential limousine in an effort to show unity. In a last minute decision, the route of the presidential entourage to the Convention site had to be changed due to increasing protests. When arrived, there were thousands of demonstrators near the Convention Center. Many of them were holding signs slamming the president and shouting their slogan “Hey, hey LBJ, how many kids you kill today?”. “LBJ = War Criminal” or “Texans against LBJ’s war” were some sign headlines. Others were also against Bobby Kennedy, labeling him as a “traitor” and “SOB”.

Once arrived, LBJ and RFK were welcomes by almost all delegates with a standing ovation. Later the day, Bobby Kennedy delivered his acceptance speech:

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SENATOR KENNEDY: “My fellow Democrats and my fellow citizens. I hereby accept the nomination for vice president. [Applause]

As your vice president, I want to work for justice, prosperity and safety at home and peace abroad. I want to work with you and with President Johnson in solving the problems. We have made great progress these eight years under the administrations of by beloved brother and Lyndon Johnson. But we need to continue and intensify our efforts towards a better future. Today, we’re closer to fulfilling a New Frontier and a Great Society. We’re close of sending a man to the moon. […] I pledge to you, that I will work tirelessly for peace with honor in Vietnam and around the world. […] Now, let’s move forward as a united party. As a united force for progress, liberty, peace and equality. That’s what we’re standing for each and every day. Let’s fight together to make sure that America is led once again by a Johnson and a Kennedy. Let’s make sure, Richard Nixon is defeated once and for all. That’s why Lyndon Johnson and I need all of you and all the millions of Americans who share our ideas. Let’s make sure their voices will be heard coming November 5! Thank you, god bless you, and god bless the United States of America.”


Bobby Kennedy received ten minutes of applause. Even LBJ stood up and applauded his running mate, what has barely been seen before, given their difficult personal relationship in the past years. After his wife Ethel spoke, Lady Bird Johnson gave her speech, before the president finally went on the state to give his address:

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THE PRESIDENT: “Fellow Americans and my beloved Democrats: I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your confidence and your support. I could not be prouder today or any day to be your standard-bearer. I accept your nomination for president, to serve this nation four more years. I accept the challenge to win this election and I accept the duty of leading this country towards a better future that we all deserve by building a Great Society and promote peace and freedom abroad. I will work with all my energy to reach this goal, just as I know you all are doing so. And my co-worker Bobby Kennedy will do so. […]

As I stand ready tonight to fight for our ideas and to fullfill the work we have begun in 1961. There are millions of poor Americans or Americans of color who need a champion who is fighting for them. I take that call. And I will take the call to bring about a real peace in Vietnam and support our fighting men. Therefore, I ask the American people to give me their confidence. Thank you so much.”


Meanwhile, outside the hall, the convention grew more intense by each hour. Many protesters were switching between their slogan “Hey, hey LBJ, how many kids you kill today?” and “Bobby, you traitor! Traitor! Traitor!”.

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After the speech and the celebration on stage, the Secret Service escorted Johnson and Kennedy secretly through a backdoor out of the hall and into the presidential limousine. There was no chance to greet their supporters outside the hall, of whom some were engaged in fist fights with the violent demonstrators.

All in all, the DNC went through as one of the most tumultuous. The press coverage was intense and protests overshadowed the nominating process. Most political observers concluded, the pictures of civil unrest may be a turning point in the campaign and that Richard Nixon’s chances for victory increased. At least, the typical convention boost in the polls is not expected this time.

The Democratic banner of 1968:

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Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 04, 2017, 01:33:03 pm
By August 31, the first Gallup polls since the nominations are out.

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 42%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 53%
Richard Nixon (R): 42%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%


National polling on Robert Kennedy


Question: Do you support or oppose Robert Kennedy’s nomination for vice president?

Support: 45%
Oppose: 40%
Undecided: 15%

Among Democrats:

Support: 79%
Oppose: 11%
Undecided: 10%


Question: Does Robert Kennedy affect your voting decision?

Yes, more leaning towards voting for Democratic ticket: 10%
Yes, more leaning towards voting against Democratic ticket: 7%
No, not all: 82%


Question: Would Robert Kennedy be a good vice president?

Yes: 56%
No: 39%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 39%
Disapprove: 52%


Next: The fall campaign in September and into October 1968, President Johnson’s speech on the Vietnam policy… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on September 05, 2017, 09:40:46 am
I would actually prefer a Johnson/Kennedy ticket to a Johnson/Humphrey ticket. But would have been difficult because of the LBJ/RFK personal dislike for each other. But may be they team up in this TL.

Where did you get the signs from?


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 10, 2017, 01:09:36 pm
I would actually prefer a Johnson/Kennedy ticket to a Johnson/Humphrey ticket. But would have been difficult because of the LBJ/RFK personal dislike for each other. But may be they team up in this TL.

Where did you get the signs from?

I designed them by myself (and will continue to so so for further elections in this timeline beyond 1968). I'm not an expert on graphic programs, so I used MS Word and made a screenshot. MS Paint is useless for this stuff.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 11, 2017, 02:52:56 pm
The fall campaign

September 15, 1968: President Johnson to address Vietnam policy

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After spending almost a week on the campaign trail, President Johnson presented his plans for a new Vietnam policy during a speech in Cleveland, Ohio.

The president presented the following plan:

- Beginning in 1969, the number of U.S. troops will be reduced by at least 50,000.
- Further reductions in 1970 and 1971. No specific numbers given.
- 90% of the air strikes remain halted as long as the talks continue (the halt was ordered in March).
- US and South Vietnamese Force will start a ground offensive in 1969, should the peace talks not move in the right direction.
- The saved costs (for troop reduction) will be used for additional equipment deliveries and further training missions for South Vietnamese forces.
- The US will use all diplomatic efforts, including USSR and China, to end the war. These efforts will take place behind the scenes. The main goal is to reduce or halt Soviet and Chinese aid the north.

President Johnson also stated that he intends to bring all troops home within his next four years, if reelected. Possibly by 1971. He also made it clear, that the more the North would reduce their military actions and be willing to talk in Paris, the more American troops would leave the country and come back home. He cited directly to North Vietnamese casualties during the war and the heavy losses in the Tet Offensive and directly urged the North Vietnamese leadership to cooperate.

The press largely covered the speech positive and pointed out that this strategy was basically a compromise between Democratic hawks and doves. Some observers expressed their doubts, citing that earlier diplomatic efforts failed. Others concluded that North Vietnam was now willing to negotiate, at least to win some time after their devastating losses during the Tet Offensive.

Richard Nixon immediately responded to the president’s plan. Interestingly he publically agreed to some of the points LBJ made. However, the Republican candidate denounced the seriousness of the proposals. “The Johnson Administration had enough time to implement the steps outlined. They haven’t. Therefore I sincerely conclude that this is nothing but campaign rhetoric. All their efforts for peace have failed and will continue to fail. A Republican government will end the war with honor and make sure that America’s standing in the world won’t be weakened”. Shortly after, Bobby Kennedy attacked back and denounced Nixon’s comments. “It is nice when Mr. Nixon agrees on the policies we have put out. Unlike him, we have made specific proposals, put before the American people, that are reasonable”. His GOP counterpart John Tower criticized that Johnson was putting himself in a weak position, because it looked like “the US wants to leave at any price. All the North has to do, is wait until we’re gone”.

On the domestic front, Republicans again stressed a law and order policy. Nixon stated that the rule of law has been “perverted” under Democratic leadership.

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Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon on the campaign trail in Chicago

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President Johnson campaigns with his running mate, Senator Bobby Kennedy, in Ohio


Gallup Polls released on September 30, 1968:

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

New York:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 52%
Richard Nixon (R): 41%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 42%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 42%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 43%
Disapprove: 49%


The president’s speech did not just halt the downward-spiral after the DNC riots, his numbers were on the rise again as the campaign was heading into October. Nevertheless, the race again turned into Nixon’s favor by mid-October. Public observers cited two main reasons for this trend: First, the Vietnam peace talks seemed stalled. On October 12, a leak in the Democratic campaign exposed that even Bobby Kennedy had grown increasingly skeptical of the North Vietnamese as he had been briefed with the president on the talks. Although the vice-presidential nominee denounced the leak the following day and insisted that he sees no “pure military solution”, the incident did not help the Democrats. Some journalists suggested this would alienate the doves, already lukewarm in their support for a ticket headed by Johnson, even further and causing them to stay home on election day. Second, the Republican camp launched a new series of campaign advertisements on TV and radio. The ads focused on Vietnam and law and order. By mid-October, the Republicans outspent Democrats on ads by about twenty percent. Nevertheless, some Democratic strategists confirmed in backroom talks that their number of ads would increase within the last two weeks. 

Interesting was also the targeting of states. Nixon took some moderate stances on racial issues. He mainly avoided the topic during his speeches in an effort to keep states of the Deep South, that Barry Goldwater carried in 1964. The Republican campaign also made efforts to win Texas, homestate of both President Johnson and Nixon’s running mate, Senator John Tower, after some polls showed a potential vulnerability of the Democratic ticket. Nevertheless, most political analysts rated the Lone-Star-State still as reliably Democratic. The Johnson/Kennedy ticket heavily targeted Nixon’s homestate of California (although the Republican nominee had his formal residence in New York in 1968). Polls from the nation’s largest state showed a close race. Usually leaning Republican in the past decades, Bobby Kennedy proved to be a very popular figure in the state. Aware of the polls, the vice presidential candidate made several campaign stumps in California. He gave 18 speeches in September alone. The president also gave seven; two more were joint appearances of Johnson and Kennedy. Democrats also heavily targeted Ohio, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. The latter came as a surprise, but LBJ decided to increase efforts when polls showed a tight race.


Gallup polls released on October 15, 1968:

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 41%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 46%
Richard Nixon (R): 43%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 41%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 43%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 42%
Disapprove: 50%


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President Johnson shakes hands with supporters in New Jersey

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Richard Nixon with his famous V-Sign


October 17, 1968: Thronberry confirmed

Three months after his nomination, Homer Thornberry is confirmed by the US Senate with 77 votes in favor to be the next Chief Justice of the United States. The Texan was sworn in during a small White House ceremony by Vice President Hubert Humphrey. President Johnson thanked retiring Chief Justice Earl Warren for his long service and his archievements for civil rights and liberties.

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Chief Justice Homer Thornberry


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 13, 2017, 02:19:27 pm
Writers note: I accidently deleted the following two topics; I added them here in short form:

October 19, 1968: President Johnson to announce trip to Moscow in December

Secretary of State Dean Rusk announces that President Johnson will travel to the USSR as first sitting president to discuss the Vietnam War and other world affairs with the Soviet Leadership.

October 31, 1968: President Johnson addresses the Vietnam War

President Johnson announces, in what the press called an October Surprise, the complete bombing halt in Vietnam.



The final days of the 1968 campaign

As we’re now heading into November, the Nixon/Tower campaign began to panic. Tied or ahead in the polls by mid-October, the newly announced Moscow trip, the bombing halt and the increased number of ads seem to pay off for the LBJ/RFK ticket. The tight was slightly turning into the Democrats favor, but Richard Nixon was still anything but beaten. As final polls indicated, he is expected to keep most states of the Deep South that Barry Goldwater flipped Republican four years earlier for the first time in almost a century. As President Johnson himself predicted when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, the pro-civil rights stance hurt national Democrats long term in the Deep South. In addition, a lot of Southern Democrats at the state level, such as Alabama's George Wallace or Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, refused to endorse his campaign. Maddox didn't hesitate to criticize the president publically for many years. He also attacked Bobby Kennedy as an "out of touch elitist, who doesn't give a damn for state rights" and would be "the worst vice president I have ever seen".

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United in their opposition to the Johnson/Kennedy campaign: Governors George Wallace (D-AL) and Lester Maddox (D-GA). However, they didn't endorse Nixon either

Ultimately, the election will come down to the states that seem to be very competitive in most polls. They are: Ohio, New Jersey, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Oregon and California. They are pure toss-up. Especially California will be interesting to watch. It is very close in polls and both campaigns invested a lot of time, effort and money into the Golden State, where 40 electoral votes are up for grabs. The state may decide the election. Although leaning Republican, the Johnson/Kennedy has also a decent chance to win Tennessee, Virginia and Florida. Possibly Oklahoma and New Mexico. On the other hand, the Nixon/Tower ticket has a shot at winning Texas, Washington and Pennsylvania.


Gallup and the New York Times released a map on November 1, that reflects the state of the race.

()

Light red/blue = Lean Democratic/Republican
Standard red/blue = Likely Democratic/Republican
Dark red/blue = Solid Democratic/Republican


Totals:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 181 electoral votes
Richard Nixon (R): 181 electoral votes
Tossup: 176 electoral votes



November 2, 1968: The Bombshell!

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_______________________________________________________
New York City   Saturday, November 2nd, 1968
_______________________________________________________


PARIS PEACE TALKS POTENTIAL SUBJECT TO SABOTAGE ACTS, LINKS TO NIXON CAMPAIGN

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Washington, DC – The New York Times received sensible documents from members of the intelligence community that suggest possible acts of sabotage regarding the Paris peace talks. According to the anonyms sources within the intelligence, intelligence officials are reviewing such possible actions. The documents raise serious questions, whether the Paris Peace negotiations are the target of sabotage acts. This concerns the part of South Vietnam, whose government currently refuses to negotiate with the Communist regime and the Liberation front.

[…]

According to the documents, a Vietnamese woman named Anna Chenault, a confidant of South Vietnamese President Thieu and U.S. resident, was in contact with members of the Richard Nixon presidential campaign at least since July of this year. The document further states that the Nixon campaign offered President Thieu a so-called “better deal” with the North under a Nixon Administration than the conditions of the Johnson Administration. A Nixon Administration would give the guarantees to the South, the Democratic government is currently refusing. The only thing the Nixon campaign would expect from Thieu in return, is making sure that there would be no agreement as long as Lyndon Johnson is in office. Such an agreement would be bad for South Vietnam and likely assure President Johnson’s reelection. Neither is in President Thieu’s interest. The contacts were, according to the source, intensified after Robert Kennedy joined the Johnson campaign. After RFK’s nomination, the South Vietnamese lost any confidence that President Johnson is willing to increase American efforts and stay in the South for a much longer time.

The document also mentions a FBI wire-tapped telephone call between Ms. Chenault an unidentified Nixon confidant from mid-October. The confidant, supposedly Mr. John Haldeman, told Ms. Chenault to “hold on” and that polls “are currently going into the right direction”. Although no further details provided, this can be interpreted as a message to President Thieu to hold on [refusing to participate in the talks] until after the presidential election on November 5, because any positive news on the Paris Peace talks would benefit the Johnson campaign. It is likely that President Johnson has been informed about the phone call by Director J. Edgar Hoover. Yet, we have no reliable information what the president’s response was. He may have pressured Thieu to join the talks, and after the South Vietnamese didn’t answer the call positively, the president ordered the complete bombing halt. This can be interpreted as a message to both North and South Vietnam. The bombing halt puts some pressure on the South at the battlefield and demonstrates to the North, that the U.S. is serious about a permanent solution.

As of this Saturday, neither a member of the Nixon campaign, the South Vietnamese government nor Ms. Chenault’s office was available for a comment to the New York Times.




The same afternoon, the Republican campaign put out a brief statement and vigorously denounced the report and the idea that the Nixon camp played any role in potential sabotage acts. “Although Mr. Nixon favors a different approach, he is not against diplomatic efforts to find a solution for the Vietnamese problem. If there are any attempts to undermine these talks, Mr. Nixon and his campaign denounce such acts. We can assure the American public that our campaign is not involved any actions to undermine the negotiations of the sitting administration. If there were such attempts and Mr. Nixon is elected, he will do everything he can to stop it and hold the responsible people accountable”, the statement reads.

It remains to be seen if and how this late report plays out on election day. When asked for comment at a California rally, President Johnson declined. “We are at a very important point of talks. Any attempts to sabotage acts will not be tolerated and appropriate steps taken against it. These steps will take place in secret. Therefore, I hope you can understand that I’m not prepared to make any additional comments on it. Especially on the question ,whether such attempts took place and if so, by who”, the president told a reporter. Bobby Kennedy took on Nixon by much tougher language: “If this is true, it is treason. Treason! America deserves better”, the vice presidential candidate said during a North Carolina trip. Republican officials, including Senator Tower, suggested that the leak was “no accident” and accused the Johnson Administration of “dirty tricks” in a last-minute effort to swing the election. “It is obvious that the President of the United States himself is responsible for these false reports. We hold him accountable on Tuesday”, said Tower. Surprising was a joint statement released by Governors Rockefeller and Reagan, Nixon’s former rivals, saying that the report is “concerning”. However, both expressed their believe that Nixon himself is not engaged in any sabotage act. Political analysts suggested both are preparing to lead a post-Nixon GOP. Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) joined the two powerful governors in their statement.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 13, 2017, 02:21:10 pm
Writer's note: Once again, I had to split the previos post and the polls listed here (too long for one post). Feel free to comment.


The final Gallup polls, conducted November 1 – 3, 1968 (before NYT-Article)

The polls still show a tight race, but the number of undecides has dropped to an all-time low. For the first time in almost fourteen months, President Johnson's approval rating has recovered to net positive, but still short of a majority.

National polling

Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


State polls (potential battlegrounds)

Arkansas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 46%

California:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Florida:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 44%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Illinois:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Iowa:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 49%

Michigan:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 45%

Missouri:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

New Jersey:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 51%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

North Carolina:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 47%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Ohio:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 48%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Oklahoma:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Oregon:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Pennsylvania:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 51%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%

Texas:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 54%
Richard Nixon (R): 44%

Virginia:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 45%
Richard Nixon (R): 50%

Washington:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 50%
Richard Nixon (R): 48%

Wisconsin:
Lyndon B. Johnson (D, inc.): 49%
Richard Nixon (R): 47%


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 45%


Next: ★★★ CBS News Coverage of Election night, 1968 ★★★


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: El Bayamés on September 13, 2017, 05:34:20 pm
Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on September 13, 2017, 05:36:39 pm
Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on September 14, 2017, 09:42:19 am
Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!

Agreed.

Nixon would probably have been toast with that news out before election day.

Johnson 1968! Kennedy 1972!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 15, 2017, 12:24:41 pm
★★★ United States presidential election –
Tuesday, November 5, 1968 ★★★


CBS News Coverage of Election night 1968. With Walter Cronkite.

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WALTER CRONKITE: “Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen. It is my pleasure to welcome you to our CBS News coverage of the U.S. presidential election of 1968. I’m Walter Cronkite, your moderator for tonight and I thank you very much for choosing our program. Our country seldom saw a campaign like this with so many ups and downs. Today is the big decision. Who will lead America into the 1970s? Incumbent President Lyndon Baines Johnson or former Vice President Richard Milhous Nixon? Which effects will recent developments have on the election? This and more, we’re going to find out today. […]

We’re beginning our program with a short look at the poll closing times in each states:

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I also want to show you the blank electoral map for this election. All the gray will be filled with color tonight. States carried by the Democratic ticket of Lyndon B. Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy will be red, states won by the Republican ticket of Richard Nixon and John Tower will be displayed in blue. States whose polls have closed, but are too close or early to call will be painted in green.”

()

Now, we take a short break before the first results will come in. Stay with us.”


6 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to our coverage of election night, 1968. It is six o’clock Eastern Standard Time, and polls have closed in Kentucky and Indiana. We can project that Richard Nixon has carried the state of Indiana and its 13 electoral votes. Kentucky, as of now, is to early too call. It trended towards the Republican ticket according to our analysts, but we can’t make a reliable projection this early.”

()

Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 13 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 0 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


7 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News and our coverage of the presidential election of 1968 between President Lyndon B. Johnson, the Democratic nominee for reelection to the presidency, and former Vice President Richard Nixon, the Republican nominee for president. Polls have closed in five more states. We’re beginning in the North: CBS projects that Richard Nixon has carried the state of Vermont. We can also surely say that he won South Carolina as well. As it looks like, Mr. Nixon is hitting his expectations in the Deep South. He won this important state by a clear margin. Polls are now also closed in Virginia, Georgia and Florida. These states are too early to call right now. But according to our analysts and reporters down there, we received word that he’s ahead in Georgia as well. We do not have such data for the other states I mentioned. Both are expected to be relatively close, with a slight lean towards Mr. Nixon. Our map now looks as follows:

()

Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 24 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 0 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Mr. Nixon is ahead with 24 electoral votes. The Democratic ticket has not won any state as of now. But it is still a long night and we won’t be able to declare a winner unless someone has won 270 electoral votes. We’re back after a short break.”


7.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News, coverage of election night 1968. I’m your moderator, Walter Cronkite. […] After the polls closed more than one hour ago, we can now declare Richard Nixon the winner in Kentucky. That will add nine electoral votes to his tally.

Now, at half past seven, we have three more states with closed voting stations. Among them the important swing state of Ohio, which is, of course, too early to call. We expect a tight race there. The same in North Carolina, which is highly competitive as well. Not so in West Virginia, which we already call for President Johnson, who wins his first seven electoral votes.”

()

Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 33 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 7 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


8 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “We continue our program of coverage of election night 1968. At eight o’clock we have polls closing in several states, where a combined of more than 100 electoral votes are at stake. […]

I again want to begin in the North, in New England. The state of Maine has been called for Richard Nixon. Not surprising, President Johnson carried Rhode Island and Connecticut and secured these electoral votes. He also won the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the original homestate of his running mate Bobby Kennedy, where 14 electoral votes are available. They will go to the Democratic column. The Democratic ticket won a decisive victory in the state, taking over 60% of the vote. Another New England state has also been reported, and that is New Hampshire. We project, that the Nixon/Tower ticket won the state by a clear margin.

And we have more states to report, among them several big ones in the Northeast, Midwest and the South. These are Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, Michigan, Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. All these states are too early or close to call. We can, however, declare that Alabama and Mississippi are won by the Republican ticket. Richard Nixon worked hard to keep these states in the GOP column and he succeeded. He also defeated Democrats in Tennessee, a state, where Mr. Johnson had some hope to be in a competitive position, similar to North Carolina. But Mr. Nixon is that much ahead, that we project him the winner in Tennessee. We are also certain that he won Kansas and the Dakotas. And as I hear right now, President Johnson has reportedly won Delaware. He is also the clear winner in the District of Columbia. This is our updated map: Richard Nixon is ahead with 84 electoral votes. Lyndon B. Johnson received 39 electoral votes so far. But of course, it’s still early into this night and we are far away from the 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency. We take a short break before polls close in Arkansas at 8.30 p.m..”

()

Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 84 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 39 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on September 15, 2017, 01:10:01 pm
Oh baby!!!! HEAT UP!! I love this TL!

Agreed.

Nixon would probably have been toast with that news out before election day.

Johnson 1968! Kennedy Humphrey 1972!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 16, 2017, 05:49:26 am
★★★ CBS News Coverage of Election night 1968, with Walter Cronkite, continues ★★★

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8.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “It is 8.30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, and you’re on CBS News for coverage of election night 1968. At this time, only polls in Arkansas close. According to our reporters down there, we can’t call the upper southern state yet. It is expected to be relatively close. But we have three major projections to make! And, according to our sources, Richard Nixon carried both, Virginia and Georgia. These are important wins for the Republican hopeful.

And now the major surprise: We have received word that the state of Texas has already been called for Lyndon Johnson. This is stunning. Not surprising that he won his homestate, but that this is so early for the president. Projections indicate that Mr. Johnson will end up with at least 55% of the vote in Texas. This may be a setback for the Nixon campaign. Of course, Texas was not included in most of Mr. Nixon's calculations to the magic 270 electoral votes, but Republicans have reason to be disappointed that the state is not anywhere as close as they hoped. It seems that John Tower at the second spot had no significant effect in the Lone-Star-State. In short: A respectable win for President Johnson. It might be a trend, but we have to see what the night brings. Here you see our updated map”

()

Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 108 electoral votes
President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 64 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


9 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News election night 1968. It is nine o’clock and we have polls closed in several more states. Among them the state with the most electoral votes: New York. We can already call the Empire State for Lyndon B. Johnson and add these 43 electoral votes to his tally. The state currently awards the highest number of electoral votes, although California gained the title of the nation's most populous state in 1962. But as electoral votes are allocated only each ten years after the United States Census, the current composition of the electoral college reflects the resuts of the 1960 census. As the next census is set for 1970, we'll have a new electoral college composition in the next election, which will take place four years from now, in November 1972. California will then have more electoral votes up for grabs than any other state in America. According to our team in New York, President Johnson and Senator Kennedy, who is representing the state in the senate since 1965, are likely to crack 60% mark in the state. This is seriously affecting the national popular vote. While RFK won his senate contest with 53% of the vote in 1964, LBJ received over 68% at the same time and carried every county. This of course won't happen this time, but his showing is certainly encouraging for Democrats. As we hear from our colleagues out in New York City, African American turnout is at a record high. This group has become the most pro-Democratic ones. Both President Johnson and Senator Kennedy have record-high approval ratings among blacks, due to their pro-civil rights policies. Bobby Kennedy earned a great deal of respect for his speech back in April, when Dr. King was shot to death in Memphis, Tennessee. And the president, of course, has become a cheerleader for many African Americans for his leadership to pass civil rights legislation, which many believe, had not been possible without LBJ's political skills to get it done. And probably because he, as a Texan through and through, surprised many to come out as a staunch pro-civil-rights president, maybe to most pro-civil-rights president this country has seen so far.

In Minnesota, a Democratic stronghold, and home of Vice President Humphrey, we also have a clear winner. Ten more votes go to Lyndon Johnson and his running mate Bobby Kennedy. Nevertheless, Richard Nixon is also winning some of these states: Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and Louisiana. Polls also closed in Wisconsin and New Mexico. Both are too early to call.

And I just hear from my studio colleagues, that President Johnson has another very big win: He is the apparent victor in Pennsylvania and is securing all its 29 electoral votes. Very important win for the incumbent. And, wait, I have also just got word about Maryland. According to our correspondents, the state of Maryland has voted for the Democratic ticket. That means, Lyndon Johnson gets another ten electoral votes, that brings him in the lead with 156 votes. Richard Nixon is trailing at 132 electoral votes now.”

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 156 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 132 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 16, 2017, 06:01:19 am
9.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Now, at 9.30 p.m., we have no new states with polls closed. But before we are tunring to them, CBS has two important projections for you: The state of Florida is awarding its 14 electoral votes to Richard Nixon, who won the Sunshine state by at least high single digits. However, the Republican ticket can’t narrow the gap in the overall electoral vote count, because we are sure yet, that the Johnson/Kennedy emerges victorious in Michigan. Another 21 electoral votes. The map now shows the president at 177 electoral votes and Mr. Nixon at 146. We take a short break and be back soon.”

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 177 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 146 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


10 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back, as we continue our program of coverage of election night 1968. Before we are coming to the states where polls are closing, we can project more of the previous states: Richard Nixon reportedly won New Mexico. Meanwhile, President Johnson won another key state: He is the winner in the state of New Jersey. Another important victory, as he clinches these 17 electoral votes.

As we are moving more towards the West, we can already project that Montana, Utah, Nevada and Arizona voted for Richard Nixon. He carries all of these four. However, as these states are barely populated, the wins there only add a modest number of electoral votes to his column. Polls are also closed in Iowa now, but we are unable to call this battleground so soon. As we take a look at our map, oh wait, I hear some news on an important other state. […] It is now official: The state of Wisconsin has been called. The winner there is President Lyndon Johnson. He secured these twelve electoral votes, too. Let’s take a look at the map: LBJ is at this point ahead with 206 electoral votes, to Dick Nixon’s 166”.

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 206 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 166 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


WALTER CRONKITE: “We are still not anywhere close to the 270 electoral votes, but as I look at this map for the moment, Richard Nixon must now start winning important swing states, if he wants to be president. Besides the battlegrounds, he is pretty much maxed out at this point. Johnson and Kennedy, on the other hand, could end this by winning two or three more swing states. I hear that Nixon is leading in North Carolina, Missouri and Oklahoma. Ohio is running about even. LBJ is ahead in Illinois and, surprisingly, in Arkansas. If Nixon manages to win the states he’s currently ahead plus Ohio, he still needs to take his native of California and one of the other West Coast states, Washington and Oregon, or, Iowa, in order be elected 37th president. But if Mr. Nixon loses only Ohio and doesn’t make this up with Illinois, where he is currently trailing, even California alone won’t save him. If LBJ is carrying Ohio in addition to Illinois and Arkansas, where he’s currently ahead, the incumbent is at 268 electoral votes, assuming we add Hawaii to his tally, too, which he is expected to win. But as of now, it’s too early to make any projection who will be sworn in as president on January 20, 1969. Mr. Nixon has still a reasonable path to victory and Democrats at the LBJ Ranch shouldn’t be overconfident. We take a quick break continue our program, as the night now enters its decisive phase. Stay tuned!”


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 17, 2017, 04:29:56 am
10.37 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON WINS ILLINOIS

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According to CBS Studio Chicago, the Johnson/Kennedy ticket wins Illinois and its critical 26 electoral votes. President now leading his challenger 232 to 166 electoral votes (270 needed to win)


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WALTER CRONKITE: “We interrupt the break for a very important call. It has just been reported, that President Lyndon B. Johnson has carried the state of Illinois and its pivotal 26 electoral votes. This victory is very, very important for the LBJ/RFK ticket and will bring some relief to the LBJ Ranch, where the president is assembled with his family and friends, his running mate Robert Kennedy and his family, as well as other high-profile Democratic politicians. Mr. Johnson has won 232 electoral votes so far, Mr. Nixon is at 166. I’m sure there is some panic breaking out at the Nixon headquarters in New York right now. I assume, the GOP analysts will run through various scenarios, how their standard-bearer can still climb to 270. I say this is still possible, but the path just got narrower by losing Illinois. We come back after the break soon for more projections, when the Western states close their polls in roughly 15 minutes. Stay with us.”

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 232 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 166 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


11 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Here we are again for coverage of CBS News, election night 1968. My name is Walter Cronkite. It is now 11 p.m. Eastern Standard Time and we have more projections as polls just closed at the West Coast. First, we have now verified information about Oklahoma, where the voting came to an end three hours ago. And according to all our sources, Richard Nixon has defeated Lyndon Johnson in that state. Democrats had some hope that they could win these eight electoral votes in the northern neighbor state of the president’s native, Texas. We have mixed information on Arkansas, but our colleagues have now called the state for the president, as has the New York Times. Other networks still rate Arkansas as undecided, but we are sure that the Democratic ticket is victorious down there. We add the state’s six electoral votes to LBJ’s tally.


CBS reports: Democrats maintain majority in congress



Now polls are closed in California, where 40 electoral votes are at stake, in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. As of now, we can only declare Richard Nixon the winner in Idaho. However, Senator Frank Church won reelection to his seat there. I can also say right now, that Democrats maintain their majority in both congressional chambers. The three coastal states in West are too early to call. The electoral map now looks like this.”

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 238 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


WALTER CRONKITE: “Slowly but steady, Richard Nixon’s path to 270 electoral votes is getting narrower. They have now every reason become increasingly nervous at the Republican headquarters. Their candidate has, at this point, not much room for error anymore. Mr. Nixon absolutely must win California to hang on. If Mr. Johnson emerges victorious in the Golden State, where his campaign invested plenty of money and efforts, he climbs to 278 electoral votes and will return to the Oval Office for four more years. All signs are also pointing in the direction that the president is well on his way to carry Hawaii, where voting still takes place at this hour, what would give him four additional votes. […] And I just heard that LBJ’s win in Arkansas, although close, has been confirmed, so the incumbent stays at 238 votes in the electoral college. At least for the moment.

I also received some updates for the remaining states: The race in North Carolina is still very close and we are not able to make a projection. Mr. Nixon is still ahead overall, but his lead has declined in the past hour. Reports stated that some ballots had to be recounted after an electricy blackout. So, we might have to wait at least one more hour for a call in North Carolina. In Ohio, there race is very tight. We heard that the Republican ticket is now leading by about 500 votes statewide. However, only 72% of the votes are in as counting moves on slower than expected. So, the outcome is wide open, but we have to point out that the urban areas have reported less than rural ones at the moment, what could benefit the Johnson campaign. In Missouri, Mr. Johnson has taken the lead after St. Louis' votes now came in by larger numbers, but Mr. Nixon has still a 50% chance to secure these 12 important electoral votes. In Iowa, Lyndon Johnson is currently ahead by a healthy margin, but the rural counties have been reporting slower than urban counties. So, we think that the Republican ticket has still a decent shot of winning in that state. In California, we are not able not say who is leading as the counting just begun. Nevertheless, our correspondents report that Mr. Johnson is exceeding expectations in the Bay Area at this moment. Possible that Bobby Kennedy is playing a bigger factor as usual here. The Democratic vice presidential nominee proved to be popular in the Golden State, what caused the president to send his running mate to California for many speeches. That might pay off right now, despite the fact that the Nixon campaign increased their efforts in the past few weeks to play on the defense here. Mr. Johnson’s apparent showing in the Bay Area is not encouraging news for the Nixon camp. We will see how that plays out in the end. Our prediction from Sunday gives the state narrowly to Richard Nixon. On the remaining states, we haven’t enough data to give you serious information. As soon as we have, we let you know. Now, we’re back right after a short break. Thank you for your continued interest in our program.”


11.20 p.m.

11.20 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON TAKES MISSOURI

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Reports: President Johnson declared winner in Missouri and its 12 electoral votes. LBJ now at 250 electoral votes, 20 short of reelection; Nixon stuck at 178 (270 needed to win)


WALTER CRONKITE: “As we continue our program, we have more bad news for the Nixon campaign: President Lyndon Johnson has been declared the winner of the contest in Missouri. The twelve electoral votes of Harry S. Truman’s homestate go to the Democratic column. Our projection now sees the Johnson/Kennedy team at 250 electoral votes, 20 short of victory. If we add Hawaii to the president’s tally and Alaska to Mr. Nixon’s, LBJ only needs to win either California, Ohio or North Carolina alone; or a combination of Iowa, Oregon and Washington state to hit the 270 mark. According to our reporters at the Nixon headquarters, the Republican supporters went silent after Missouri has been called. At the LBJ Ranch, everything is quiet. The president probably wants to wait until he is undeniable reelected before he is coming out at all. We know that he’s assembled in the Ranch’s living room with his family, close friends and Bobby Kennedy, joined by his wife Ethel. It is still possible that Mr. Nixon pulls off an upset, but we find this increasingly doubtful.

And… and.. while we are still waiting for calls in Ohio and North Carolina, I just got word that the state of Iowa has a declared victor. Accordingly, President Johnson has captured this mid-western state as well and adds another nine electoral college votes to his column. He now stands at 259 electoral votes, not far away anymore from the 270 needed to decide the election. We have also received some unconfirmed information that Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirksen of Illinois told a Washington Post reporter just moments ago, that he thinks a Nixon victory is very unlikely. We’ll see. CBS News comes back soon.”

()

President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 259 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 17, 2017, 04:41:39 am
11.47 p.m. – BREAKING: PRESIDENT JOHNSON REELECTED; WINS CRITICAL OHIO CONTEST


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CBS reports: Incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson defeats Republican challenger Richard Nixon and wins reelection to a third (second full) term in office. Johnson/Kennedy ticket declared winner in Ohio, now at 285 electoral votes (270 needed to win)


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WALTER CRONKITE: “Now we have the news the whole world has been waiting for: President Johnson is the winner in Ohio, and with it, the winner of the 1968 presidential election. His victory in Ohio, which is once again the kingmaker, adds 26 more electoral votes to his tally, which stands at 285 now. 15 more than the number he needed to secure the election. All major networks called the state in Mr. Johnson’s favor, who is hitting 50% of the vote there. Therefore, Lyndon Baines Johnson will remain the 36th President of the United States of America. And coming January 20, Robert Francis Kennedy will become the 39th Vice President of the United States. […] While President Johnson will continue to lead our country, I think it’s fair to say that the stunning political career of Richard Milhous Nixon is now over. Having lost the presidency twice, and the California governorship in between, I don’t see him running for office again. But we’ll see, Mr. Nixon is expected to give a speech soon. We will come back in a few minutes for polls closing in Hawaii and Alaska. Stay tuned!”

()

✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 285 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 178 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


12 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to CBS News election night 1968. I’m your moderator Walter Cronkite. […] The last two states just closed their polls and we project, as expected, that Richard Nixon’s wins the state of Alaska and Lyndon Johnson is the winner in Hawaii. We also have two battleground states to call: After a longer than usual ballot counting, President Johnson has also edged out a narrow victory in North Carolina. With 13 more electoral votes, he has now collected 302 electoral votes. Oregon gives its six electoral votes to Richard Nixon, who managed to win relatively close victory here. That means, only California and Washington state aren’t called for a candidate yet, but we expect this to happen within the next 30 minutes. According to our sources, Mr. Nixon is slightly ahead in his original home state, but his lead gets smaller as counting proceeds. However, even if he manages to outperform the Democratic ticket, these 40 electoral votes won’t give him the election anymore. Here is our current map”

()

✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 302 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes
Too early/too close to call


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: West_Midlander on September 17, 2017, 01:26:17 pm
LBJ and RFK!
LBJ and RFK!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 17, 2017, 03:37:56 pm
12.15 a.m. – RICHARD NIXON CONCEDES PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION


WALTER CRONKITE: “My fellow viewers, welcome back to the program. As I just learned, Richard Nixon went out before his supporters to give remarks on the election outcome. Let’s switch to the Nixon headquarters.”

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[Applause]

CROWD: “Nixon! Nixon! We want Nixon!”

RICHARD NIXON: “Thank you all. Thank you. [Crowd applauds, Nixon smiles].

I just called President Lyndon Johnson and congratulated him on his victory. I congratulated the president and his running mate, Robert Kennedy, and wished them all the best. I hope that President Johnson and Vice President-elect Kennedy will be successful in guiding our country through these difficult times, because we face tremendous challenges. I offered them my full cooperation.

I also want to use the opportunity to speak here tonight to thank you all. My wife, Pat, who has been outstanding. My running mate, Senator John Tower, who will continue to be a voice for our visions in the United States Senate. And I want to thank all my supporters and the millions of Americans who put their trust in me. I also want to apologize to all of you. That I let you down, that I could not win this election. You did the best you could, and I'm very proud of you. Being the Republican Party’s standard bearer twice has been the honor of my life […]

Now let us leave all the division behind us and work for the America we all deserve. We have seen enough division, it is time for unity in America. Thank you all. Thank you”.

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Richard Nixon steps off the podium after his concession speech; once again with his V-sign


12.35 a.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: “Good morning America. It is Wednesday, November 6, 1968. We are at the final moments of our election night coverage. Of course, the presidential contest is already decided, but we have two last calls to make. Accordingly, Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy have more reason to celebrate: The Democratic ticket has won both Washington state and California, by close margins, respectively. That means, President Johnson has pulled off a decisive electoral college victory, as he comes in with 351 electoral votes, compared to Richard Nixon’s 187. As ballots are still being counted, we have no final reliable numbers for the national popular vote. At the moment, the president is at approximately 51% of the votes nationally. But this is not the end result.

The final map of the 1968 election looks like this:

()

✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 351 electoral votes
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes


And now, we hear from our correspondent at the LBJ Ranch that Robert Kennedy, now vice president-elect, came out of the house and is giving his remarks, before President Johnson is addressing the nation.”

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Senator Robert F. Kennedy, now vice president-elect, giving his remarks at the victory party at the LBJ Ranch

[Crowd applauds]

CROWD: “Bobby! Bobby! Bobby! We love you, Bobby!”

VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT KENNEDY: “Thank you very much. [Smiles] Thank you all. What a night! We did it! Easily! I cannot tell you how deeply I moved I am for the trust the American people put in us. Serving as the vice president of this wonderful country is a great honor. I will never forget this day, when you placed this confidence in me. And I will do everything I can to benefit our country in the coming four years by working with the president on equal rights, safety, prosperity and peace. That we fulfill the New Frontier and the Great Society, that was begun by my beloved brother eight years ago and that Lyndon Johnson continued with passion and true leadership. Now, let me introduce the man, who served his country with distinction and pride for many years and who will continue to do so. A man, who is compassionate about all of his fellow citizens. Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my pleasure to present to you the President of the United States: Lyndon Baines Johnson.”

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President Lyndon B. Johnson as he comes out of the ranch house to give his remarks, joined by his wife

[Applause]

CROWD: “LBJ! LBJ! Four more years! Four more years! All the way with LBJ!”

THE PRESIDENT: “My dear wife, Lady Bird, my wonderful daughters Lynda and Luci, Mr. Vice President-elect, members of the press, my good friends here in Texas, and my fellow Americans. I want to thank you all for your incredible support. First of all, let me thank the American people, who made this possible. I want to thank all the voters who gave me their support. And I also want to thank the voters who trusted Mr. Nixon. Be assured, that I will work hard to earn your trust, too. I want to be the president of all Americans, blacks and whites alike. Northerners and Southerners alike. […] I also want to express my thank to my family and friends and to my running mate, Bobby Kennedy, who will be, that I am sure, a wonderful vice president for our land. I also want to thank the man who stood at my side the past four years, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. Hubert, you earned a great place in history. Let me also thank Mr. Nixon for his kind words, who just called me to congratulate us to an outstanding victory.

[…]

Today, we celebrate our victory and the victory of democracy. But tomorrow, we will be back at work to fulfill the Great Society and bring about peace in Vietnam. And around the globe. Thank you again, good night, god bless you and god bless the United States of America.”



WALTER CRONKITE: “Welcome back to our studio. These were the remarks by our current and future president and our next vice president. It is a stunning victory these two men won tonight. It was expected to be a closer race than it turned out now. It is likely that the development of recent days, the president's announced trip to Moscow, the bombing halt and the news of potential sabotage acts in Paris played a great role and swung this election to the Democrats. There will be lot to analyze how Richard Nixon not just lost this election, but why he couldn't get beyond these 187 electoral votes. The Johnson/Kennedy ticket clinched 351 electoral votes and has, according to our projections, won over 51% of the popular vote nationwide. The Republican ticket stands at about 47% at the moment. We will know the exact results in a few days.

Today is a new chapter in American history. We are at a crossroads both at home at the domestic front, was well as abroad. In Vietnam and our relations with the communist world. And we will see how President Johnson is managing all these different challenges. And we will also see how his administration will perform with Robert Kennedy as vice president. How RFK's role will be. That mainly depends on his relation with the president. Although the two men teamed up an unprecedented effort to win this election, we should not forget that they have battled each other just a few months ago. And despite the fact that they have much in common politically, their personal relationship in these past years weren't that friendly. But they surprised us all, by forming a ticket and seemingly working well together throughout the campaign. All I can say: The next four years will be an interesting time to watch.

For now, we finish our election coverage. It was a pleasure for me to guide you through this stunning election night. Thank you very much for your attention and confidence and I hope you will continue turn in our CBS program. Good night, and God bless you all.”


Next: The election results in detail, including results by state, post-election polls and political developments... stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Spenstar on September 17, 2017, 05:13:12 pm
This is amazing!!

What's Congress looking like after this election?


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 18, 2017, 02:58:52 pm
★★★ Results of the 1968 elections ★★★

Final results of the presidential election

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✓ President Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX)/Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY): 351 electoral votes (65.2% of the electoral vote); 52.0% of the popular vote
Former Vice President Richard Nixon (R-NY)/Senator John Tower (R-TX): 187 electoral votes (34.8% of the electoral vote); 46.9% of the popular vote


Results by state

Writers note: I didn’t just make these numbers up. I used the real 1968 numbers of total votes cast per state, and multiplied them with the percentage points below. The national result above is the result of the state results and not just a made up number.

Alabama
✓ Nixon: 58.7%
Johnson: 36.5%

Alaska
✓ Nixon: 53.9%
Johnson: 45.7%

Arizona
✓ Nixon: 54.3%
Johnson: 44.9%

Arkansas
✓ Johnson: 50.1%
Nixon: 47.7%

California
✓ Johnson: 50.7%
Nixon: 48.8%

Colorado
✓ Nixon: 53.3%
Johnson: 45.4%

Connecticut
✓ Johnson: 60.8%
Nixon: 38.8%

Delaware
✓ Johnson: 54.5%
Nixon: 45.0%

Florida
✓ Nixon: 52.8%
Johnson: 46.0%

Georgia
✓ Nixon: 53.8%
Johnson 44.2%

Hawaii
✓ Johnson: 68.8%
Nixon: 30.3%

Idaho
✓ Nixon: 56.9%
Johnson: 41.8%

Illinois
✓ Johnson: 52.4%
Nixon: 46.8%

Indiana
✓ Nixon: 53.7%
Johnson: 45.8%

Iowa
✓ Johnson: 50.8%
Nixon: 48.0%

Kansas
✓ Nixon: 59.4%
Johnson: 39.8%

Kentucky
✓ Nixon: 52.0%
Johnson: 47.4%

Louisiana
✓ Nixon: 57.1%
Johnson: 41.9%

Maine
✓ Nixon: 52.0%
Johnson: 47.0%

Maryland
✓ Johnson: 55.1%
Nixon: 44.1%

Massachusetts
✓ Johnson: 65.1%
Nixon: 34.2%

Michigan
✓ Johnson: 54.8%
Nixon: 44.6%

Minnesota
✓ Johnson: 61.1%
Nixon: 38.4%

Mississippi
✓ Nixon: 55.6%
Johnson: 40.6%

Missouri
✓ Johnson: 49.9%
Nixon: 49.1%

Montana
✓ Nixon: 54.6%
Johnson: 44.7%

Nebraska
✓ Nixon: 60.1%
Johnson: 38.7%

Nevada
✓ Nixon: 52.7%
Johnson: 46.4%

New Hampshire
✓ Nixon: 53.5%
Johnson: 45.8%

New Jersey
✓ Johnson: 52.9%
Nixon: 45.8%

New Mexico
✓ Nixon: 52.3%
Johnson: 47.0%

New York
✓ Johnson: 62.0%
Nixon: 36.5%

North Carolina
✓ Johnson: 49.8%
Nixon: 49.6%

North Dakota
✓ Nixon: 56.9%
Johnson: 42.8%

Ohio
✓ Johnson: 50.5%
Nixon: 48.7%

Oklahoma
✓ Nixon: 51.9%
Johnson: 47.6%

Oregon
✓ Nixon: 51.1%
Johnson: 48.1%

Pennsylvania
✓ Johnson: 54.2%
Nixon: 45.1%

Rhode Island
✓ Johnson: 72.2%
Nixon: 27.4%

South Carolina
✓ Nixon: 54.4%
Johnson: 41.8%

South Dakota
✓ Nixon: 53.9%
Johnson: 44.2%

Tennessee
✓ Nixon: 52.4%
Johnson: 46.0%

Texas
✓ Johnson: 56.5%
Nixon: 42.2%

Utah
✓ Nixon: 61.1%
Johnson: 37.8%

Vermont
✓ Nixon: 53.0%
Johnson: 46.1%

Virginia
✓ Nixon: 52.4%
Johnson: 46.4%

Washington
✓ Johnson: 52.8%
Nixon: 46.2%

West Virginia
✓ Johnson: 56.7%
Nixon: 42.5%

Wisconsin
✓ Johnson: 51.8%
Nixon: 47.6%

Wyoming
✓ Nixon: 60.9%
Johnson: 38.7%


Congressional elections

Senate:  60 Democratic, 40 Republican

Republican gains: OR, AZ, OK, FL, PA
Democratic gains: CA, IA

House of Representatives:  253 Democratic, 182 Republican (net change: +5 Democrats)


Congressional Leadership:
Senate President: Hubert Humphrey (D-MN), until January 20, 1969; Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY), starting January 20, 1969
Senate Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield (D-MT)
Senate Minority Leader: Everett Dirksen (R-IL)

Speaker of the House: John McCormack (D-MA)
House Majority Leader: Carl Albert (D-OK)
House Minority Leader: Gerald Ford (R-MI)


Note: The senate composition is as of January 3, 1969, the opening of the 91st congress. The Republicans are expected to pick up, at least temporarily, the seat of Robert F. Kennedy, who will resign from the senate, by January 20 at latest, to assume the office of vice president. Mr. Kennedy's replacement will be appointed by New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, a (liberal) Republican. The new senator is scheduled to serve until the next regular election on November 3, 1970.


Writer’s note: Senate candidates are the same as IRL.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 20, 2017, 05:15:48 am
November 11, 1968: President Johnson returns to Washington

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The president is back at his desk in the Oval Office

On the Monday after the election, President Johnson flew back to Washington D.C. Vice President-elect Kennedy also returned to the nation’s capital. He is expected to participate in all major meetings of the administration and to finish some last minute business at his senate office. However, RFK's aides told the pres that he intends to remain a senator until shortly before the inaugural. The president will hold a series of meetings to discuss various topics, including the setup of his administration. The next day, the chief-executive issued a statement, declaring that he doesn’t intent replace any member of the cabinet for now. Other discussions were held on Vietnam. Already on the day after the election, the North Vietnamese leadership congratulated the president on his reelection and expressed their hope, a “fair solution” can be found for the Vietnamese problem. Aides to Bobby Kennedy said that the administration wants to increase pressure on South Vietnam to bring an agreement about. Meanwhile, the White House is preparing for LBJ’s trip to the USSR, scheduled for early December. Administration officials also announced that the president will make major decisions regarding Vietnam after his return. Possibly even before inauguration day.

As the administration was discussing plans for Vietnam, rumors in Washington began to swirl that the president has instructed the Justice Department to take a closer look at the potential sabotage acts regarding the peace talks. Administration officials such as Attorney General Ramsey Clark denied for comment, but added that involved government agencies may come up with a statement soon.


November 14, 1968: Reagan slams Nixon for election loss

Usually he wanted to talk about California politics at his press conference, but then Governor Ronald Reagan responded in an emotional speech when asked to comment the election outcome and Richard Nixon’s defeat. The leader of the GOP’s conservative wing faulted Nixon for the election loss and found tough words on the former candidate.

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Governor Ronald Reagan hold Richard Nixon personally accoutable for the election defeat, demands new visions and leadership

GOVERNOR REAGAN: “If you ask me, I think that the main responsibility of this election loss bears Mr. Nixon himself. His campaign, which was not appropriately addressing the concerns of many Americans, is the to be blamed for the shameful defeat the Republican Party suffered at the polls. His proposals on Vietnam were not concrete enough, lacked imagination of American power and basically repeated the appeasement course the administration of President Johnson has taken. Under these circumstances, the voters chose to stick with present administration which at least pretends to make progress. We have to see how this progress turns it. I believe it will further lead to American decline on the world stage. If Mr. Kennedy gets his way, we will be out of Vietnam very soon and communism will once again be triumphal over the free world. This would send devastating signals to our allies and around the world. If they can’t depend on American strength, there is nobody else left in the defense of freedom. The same at the domestic front: Mr. Nixon talked about law and order, but he didn’t tell us what he exactly would change. He didn’t address the increasing costs of social welfare programs that are funded on the backs of taxpayers. He didn’t denounce the endless desires of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy to expand the welfare state even further, what will bankrupt our country’s treasury. Because of Mr. Nixon’s failure we have to stick with the liberalism and big government philosophy of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy for another four years, which I believe is hurting our country. We will further depart from ideals of our founding fathers and I urge everybody to oppose this course […]

The Republican Party desperately needs to get its act together. This requires new leadership and new visions. I will do everything I can to bring this about. We have no time to lose. Thank you.”
 

Conservatives applauded Mr. Reagan’s ad-hoc speech. When asked for comment on the harsh remarks, Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York, Reagan’s liberal counterpart within the party, just said: “Let us look into the future with optimism rather than fear and let Mr. Nixon now find his peace and personal luck. I wish him well.” Both Reagan and Rockefeller are considered strong contenders for the 1972 presidential race.

 

November 17, 1968: Vice President Humphrey announces retirement, honored with Medal of Freedom

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During a White House dinner hosted in his honor, Vice President Hubert Humphrey announced his retirement from politics. However, he also added that he wants “to leave the door open” for future political involvement. His remarks shut down rumors that President Johnson planned to appoint him to another office in his administration. During the ceremony, President Johnson awarded his outgoing second-in-command with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Political analysts expressed their assumption that Mr. Humphrey would run for president in 1972. Possibly battling vice president-elect Bobby Kennedy for the nomination.


Gallup polls, released November 30, 1968

After his reelection, President Johnson’s approval ratings soared to two year high. After the election, Gallup asked some more questions (see below).

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's recent actions at the world stage?
Approve: 58%
Disapprove: 31%
Unsure: 11%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 42%
Disapprove: 49%
Unsure: 9%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 60%
Disapprove: 31%
Unsure: 9%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling civil rights?
Approve: 66%
Disapprove: 27%
Unsure: 7%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Vice President Humphrey's tenure in office?
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 38%
Unsure: 6%

Question: How do you regard Robert Kennedy's election as vice president?
Positive: 55%
Negative: 35%
Unsure: 10%


Next: The president’s trip to Moscow, conclusion of the year 1968... stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 21, 2017, 04:52:23 am
President Lyndon B. Johnson's state visit to the USSR; December 2 – 4, 1968

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On the afternoon of December 1, President Johnson, joined by his wife Lady Bird Johnson, Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, National Security Advisor Walt Rostow and other foreign policy experts, went on board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Space outside D.C. and flew to Moscow. After the Soviets agreed to allow American journalists to come, CBS Anchor Walter Cronkite was invited by the president to join. President Johnson is the first sitting American head of state to visit Moscow. This is somewhat surprising for history books, since LBJ is a president who is more focused on domestic than foreign policy. In June 1967, he first hold face-to-face discussions with Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin and Foreign Minister Gromyko. In Moscow, he will also meet Secretary General Leonid Brezhnev.

After the president’s plane landed in Moscow on the afternoon of December 2, Premier Kosygin welcomed his guest and immediately offered him a road trip through the Soviet capital, was LBJ accepted. The pictures of Lyndon Johnson in a coat walking over the Red Square went around the world. Later the day, the Premier hosted a dinner with Soviet officials and the U.S. Ambassador in the Kremlin. Kosygin thanked Johnson for the visit and congratulated him on his reelection the previous month. As it looked like, they enjoyed drinking vodka together.

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President Johnson and Premier Kosygin during their first meeting after the arrival


December 3 was the most important day of the visit. The president and his team met Secretary General Leonid Brezhnev for the first time. While Secretary Clifford had various discussions with Foreign minister Gromyko and Premier Kosygin, the president sat down with the Secretary General. Their translators only joined them. The meeting was scheduled for one hour, but – as American reporters were already waiting – lasted for more than two and a half hours. After leaving their room, both leaders only stated that they made some progress in the talks. When asked for further details, President Johnson answered that a final announcement will be made the next day. In the afternoon, discussions with their respective teams continued. They lasted until the evening. After the discussions, President Johnson, his wife and his team were invited to the Russian opera, which is considered a high honor for any foreign leader.

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Secretary General Brezhnev after his meeting with President Johnson


For the next day, December 4, a joint statement by both sides was announced for noon. Throughout the morning, both sided worked out the text for the statement. At 1 p.m., President Johnson and Premier Kosygin, joined by other leaders of both countries, went before the press and announced the results of the discussions. A handout was also given to reporters that reads as follows:

– One of the most pressuring problems is the war in Vietnam. The United States committed to withdraw 50,000 troops until May 31, 1969. Additional 75,000 troops will leave Vietnam by the end of 1969. In return, the USSR will cut in half its aid in military equipment for North Vietnam within the next ten months.

– The Soviet leadership assured that they would increase diplomatic pressure on North Vietnam and Red China in return for the bombing halt.

– President Johnson proposed a fund for post-war humanitarian aid and reconstruction of destroyed areas. The USSR was open to the idea and ready to pay a portion, but demanded that the lion’s share would go to the North because their casualties and damage were much higher. However, LBJ insisted that both Vietnams would each get 50%. Both sided agreed to continue negotiating on this topic.

– Both sides agreed to start negotiations on arms reduction. No details were discussed other than Foreign Minister Gromyko would soon visit Washington to begin preparation talks with his American counterpart. President Johnson then invited him to his inauguration. The Soviets accepted the invitation.

– Kosygin proposed a troops reduction in Europe, mainly Germany. However, no terms could be agreed on, as President Johnson rejected to withdraw the same number of soldiers from West Germany. The president felt that the Communist side already had a geographical advantage in Europe and that such a move would not be received well in the United States.
 
Overall, some important points were agreed on. Nevertheless, the reduction is Russian military aid for Ho Chi Minh would not be decisive for the war itself. It is already known that the lion’s share of North Vietnamese military equipment comes from China and not the USSR. China is, behind the scenes, even accused by the Soviet Union to steal some equipment on its way through their country.

On his way back to Washington, the president also made a brief visit in West Germany to meet with Chancellor Kurt Georg Kiesinger and other European leaders for informal talks. Abroad Air Force One, the president talked to reporters and told them that was now more optimistic than ever that the war in Vietnam would be ended for America by the middle of his next term.

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President Johnson talks to journalists abroad Air Force One on his way back to the United States


Back at the homefront, the president received mixed reactions, but mainly positive responses. The press largely covered his visit positively. The Washington Post noted that the president has significantly “corrected his course on Vietnam since March 31”. Vice President-elect Robert F. Kennedy issued a statement that he “fully supports President Johnson in his efforts” and that the president has exceeded his own expectations. Other Democratic officeholders applauded LBJ as well. Eugene McCarthy noted that the president was moving in the right direction, by “far too slow”. Moderate support came from Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirksen. Barry Goldwater, who Johnson defeated in a landslide in the 1964 election and who was again elected to senate this year, spoke of an “appeasement policy towards a murder regime”. As did Governor Ronald Reagan of California, who accused the administration of “selling out principals to Russia”.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on September 21, 2017, 05:20:43 pm
This timeline has emerged as one of my favorites, too.

I always wondered why Johnson in real life didn't use the Chennault thing to hurt Nixon in the election. He definitely knew about it before through wiretapping.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 22, 2017, 05:46:54 am
This timeline has emerged as one of my favorites, too.

I always wondered why Johnson in real life didn't use the Chennault thing to hurt Nixon in the election. He definitely knew about it before through wiretapping.

Thanks.

I think that LBJ in the end didn't want Humphrey to win, because he believed that Nixon would better continue his foreign policy with regard to Vietnam. On the other hand, he also knew that Nixon would not dismantle the Great Society (according to Robert Dallek, LBJ actually wanted Rocky as his successor).


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 23, 2017, 06:30:18 am
Key events until the inauguration


December 20, 1968: President Johnson formally orders troop reduction in Vietnam, announces program for homecoming soldiers

Shortly before the Christmas holiday, President Johnson signed an order that the said 50,000 troops will return to America by May 31, 1969, as agreed to in the Memorandum of Moscow. However, still more than 400,000 U.S. soldiers are fighting in Vietnam. Nevertheless, casualties declined substantially since October. The president also issued a statement, calling on the Chinese leadership to “reduce delivery of weaponry and other military aid for North Vietnam”.

The president further announced the implementation of a program for homecoming soldiers, that helps them, if necessary, to master the way back to civilian life. The program is a proposal by vice president-elect Kennedy, who presented the idea to the administration earlier the month. President Johnson endorsed the plan and authorized Mr. Kennedy to work out specific plans and present them to the cabinet and the congress. The president announced that his administration will submit legislation by spring or summer and, were possible, use his executive powers for the matter. Political commentators expressed their surprise that LBJ already approved one of RFK's plans and gave him the responsibility to work details out.

Gallup polls, released December 31, 1968

More good news for President Johnson: Following his Moscow visit his approval rating saw a further increase.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 58%
Disapprove: 36%



January 7, 1969: Justice Department indicts Anna Chenault and Nixon campaign officials

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Attorney General Ramsey Clark during a cabinet meeting

Rumors have been around since November that Justice Department was reviewing allegations of sabotage in the Paris Peace Talks from various sides. According to some sources, the president himself ordered the steps to be taken, but the White House refused to comment any ongoing investigations. As Attorney General Ramsey Clark stated, there is enough evidence that Ms. Anna Chennault, U.S. resident and confidant of South Vietnamese President Thieu, was in direct contact with the Nixon campaign and recommended the South Vietnamese government to "hold on" until after the presidential election. Among the indicted Nixon confidants is Mr. John Haldeman, who was in contact with Chennault. The Attorney General also said that he was currently no evidence that Richard Nixon himself was actively engaged in the matter, but that the investigation is still not finished. First interrogations are set for February.


January 15, 1969: South Vietnamese President Thieu announces review of peace talk efforts

After a telephone conservation with President Johnson, South Vietnamese President Thieu announced his willingness to review the current decision to participate in the Paris Peace talks. He wants to come up with a major decision within six weeks.

American newspapers interpreted this a sign that after the South Vietnamese leadership is now compelled to find the best possible solution with the Johnson Administration after their hope for a Nixon Administration was shattered on November 5, 1968.


January 17, 1969: Robert F. Kennedy resigns from Senate, Governor Rockefeller appoints successor

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Newly appointed senator Charles Goodell (R-NY)

Three days before his inauguration as vice president, Bobby Kennedy officially resigned his seat in the United States Senate, that he won in 1964. With Mr. Kennedy’s departure from the upper congressional chamber, the Democrats lose one seat. However, they still hold a 59-41 majority over the Republicans. As prescribed in the constitution, it was up to New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller to fill the vacancy. Rockefeller appointed fellow liberal Republican Charles Goodell to the senate. Goodell will remain in office until the next regular election in November 1970.


January 19, 1969: Final preparations for the inauguration


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The Inaugural Committee
requests the honor of your presence
to attend and participate in the Inauguration of


Lyndon Baines Johnson
as President of the United States of America

and


Robert Francis Kennedy
as Vice President of the United States of America

on Monday, the twentieth of January
one thousand nine hundred and sixty nine
in the City of Washington

Michael J. Mansfield,
Chairman


Next: The Inaugurtion and following events... stay tuned and feel free to comment!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: NHI on September 23, 2017, 06:31:42 am
Great updates! I'm really enjoying this TL!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on September 23, 2017, 08:32:53 am
Just caught up to it, awesome TL! I loved election night, and the recent events.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: ReaganClinton on September 26, 2017, 02:16:33 pm
uuhhhhhhhhhh bump


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on September 30, 2017, 05:59:00 am
Chapter 2: All the way with LBJ – four more years

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Inauguration Day – Monday, January 20, 1969

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Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th President of the United States




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Robert Francis Kennedy, 39th Vice President of the United States

More than one million people assembled before the Capitol to witness the swearing-in. It was a sunny but cold day in Washington. At 11.30 a.m., President Lyndon B. Johnson with his family were escorted to the Capitol. In a second limousine, Vice President-elect Robert F. Kennedy with his family, joined by outgoing Vice President Hubert Humphrey and his wife Muriel, followed the president. After a brief welcome ceremony inside the Capitol by congressional leaders, the president and both the incoming and outgoing vice presidents walked down the steps from the capitol to the inaugural platform. Among the special guests were many congressional leaders of both parties, civil rights activists, Hollywood actors and some foreign representatives including Foreign Minister Gromyko of the USSR. Losing presidential candidate Richard Nixon also took a seat next to his wife Pat and New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller.

The first speaker was Senator and Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT), who formally presided over the ceremony. At 11.55 a.m. Robert Kennedy stood up and went before Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. The incoming vice president requested to be sworn in by the first African American judge,who was appointed by President Johnson in 1967.

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Senator Kennedy, are you prepared to be sworn in as vice president?”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “I am”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Please raise your right and repeat after me. I, Robert Francis Kennedy, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic”

SENATOR KENNEDY:” I, Robert Francis Kennedy, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “That I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion”

SENATOR KENNEDY: “Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion”

JUDGE MARSHALL: “And that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God”.

SENATOR KENNEDY: “And that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God”.

JUDGE MARSHALL: “I congratulate you, Mr. Vice President”.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: “Thank you very much, Sir”.


[Huge applause at the podium and among the crowd]
 

SENATOR MANSFIELD: “Now, the Chief Justice of the United States, Homer Thornberry, will administer the oath of office to the President of the United States of America”.

President Johnson stands up and takes his position before Chief Justice Thornberry.

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CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Mr. President, are you prepared to the take the oath of office?”

THE PRESIDENT: “Yes, Sir”.

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Please raise your right and repeat after me. I, Lyndon Baines Johnson, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States”

THE PRESIDENT: “I, Lyndon Baines Johnson, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States”
 
CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “And that I will to the best of my ability”

THE PRESIDENT: “And that I will to the best of my ability”

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States”

THE PRESIDENT: “Preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States”

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “So help me God”

THE PRESIDENT: “So help me God”.

CHIEF JUSTICE THORNBERRY: “Congratulations, Mr. President”

THE PRESIDENT: “Thank you”.

[Salute shots]

[Hail to the Chief plays]

[Crowd applauds]

The president turns to the podium for his speech.

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THE PRESIDENT: “Chief Justice Thornberry, Vice President Humphrey, Vice President Kennedy, Vice President Nixon, Chairman Mansfield, members of congress and the cabinet, my fellow countrymen:

I thank you all for the great support you have expressed to me. Today we are gathered here not to celebrate victory of a person or a party, but we are here to celebrate to triumph of democracy. The triumph of the American system, which is bound together by all Americans. Americans from the North, the South, the West and the East. Americans of every race and color, who are striving towards a better future. A future in freedom, democracy, equality and social justice. It is these goals that my administration was pursuing since I assumed this office five years ago, and these goals will continue to be the guide of the American government. […]

My administration, meaning the president, the vice president and all others, will tirelessly work to bring opportunity to every citizen of this great nation. Our first and most important goal is and will always be to ensure that no American must live poverty, that every American has access to affordable healthcare, that every girl and boy can fulfill her or his potential and can get all the education possible, that every senior in this country can age in decency, that every American has the same chance for a good life. Black, White, Old, Young, Northern and Southern alike. Let us together work towards this future. Much has been achieved in the past eight years, but much more remains to be done. I can assure everyone that I will do everything I can to make the Great Society a reality. And I will not rest until discrimination, social injustice and crime are defeated.

And while we are still at a bloody war in South East Asia, recent months showed that the toil and suffering can soon be ended. It will be ended. I am now more confidant than ever that we can bring this peace about. As we have taken steps to make the world a more peaceful one. It means not selling out our values of democracy, freedom and justice out to our advisories. America is and remains the greatest power in the world and stands ready to defend these values and our allies, but at the same time we have to make clear, that we do not seek war. We seek a peaceful world, where free people can find their own way of life.

Now, let us stand together to fight for the future we all deserve. Today, we once again celebrate the celebration of democracy. And tomorrow, we will back at work to bring these changes about. I thank you from the bottom of my heart and I’m deeply honored to serve as your president for the next four years. Eight years ago, President John F. Kennedy told his fellow citizens: Let us begin! Now I say: Let us continue!”

[Massive applause]

After his speech, the president and his new second-in-command went back to the White House. He then signed some ceremonial proclamations. This evening, the traditional inaugural ball was hosted in the Capitol.

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Newly inaugurated president and vice president at the inaugural party on January 20, 1969


This January 20 was celebration day. The next day, the Johnson Administration is back at work. Stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 03, 2017, 04:40:58 am
Events following the inauguration

January 22, 1969: Rusk and Gromyko announce start of disarmament talks

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U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk (l) and Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko (r)

As agreed during President Johnson’s Moscow visit in December, Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Soviet foreign minister Andrei Gromyko concluded their three-day meetings with a formal agreement, that both sides are ready to start serious disarmament talks. The negotiations are scheduled to begin by June 1, 1969. The USSR agreed to Rusk proposal to choose Geneva as location for the talks. Nuclear weapons are currently not part of the discussions, but may be included later. The first round of negotiations mainly contain a reduction or freeze of strategic missiles. As Secretary Rusk pointed out, the negotiations are not planned to take longer than two years.

Conservative members of congress expressed their skepticism. Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), who reentered the political arena this January after his defeat by Johnson in 1964, accused the Johnson/Kennedy Administration of selling out American values and a strategic advantage.


January 26, 1969: South Vietnamese President Thieu agrees to send delegation to Paris

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South Vietnamese President Thieu announced that he is ready to appoint a delegation to join the Paris peace talks. According to his office, the representatives will join the negotiations by the end of February at latest. He reportedly held various telephone conservations with President Johnson the days before the announcement. The White House and State Department welcomed the decision.


Gallup polls, released January 31, 1969

President Johnson's approval rating climbed to a three-year high in late January.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 60%
Disapprove: 35%


February 2, 1969: First interrogations in Chennault case, Humphrey demands congressional investigation

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Former Nixon Aide H.R. Haldeman is accused of obstructing Paris Peace Talks by offering better condidations to the South Vietnamese government if Richard Nixon is elected president

First members of the Nixon campaign appeared before the FBI for hearings. Among them is H.R.  Haldeman, an aide to the defeated Republican nominee. Ms. Chennault is expected to be interviewed later that month.

Meanwhile, former Vice President Hubert Humphrey made some news by demanding a congressional investigation. However, neither members of congress nor the administration endorsed such a plan so far. But Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT) said he may change his mind if certain circumstances arrive. Meanwhile, Richard Nixon himself issued a statement that he supports the FBI efforts and that he’s willing to be available for any interview by authorities or the congress. As of early February, the former vice president is not invited to testify. A similar statement has been released by former Nixon aide Henry Kissinger. Kissinger claims he never knew of such actions, but didn't rule out anymore, that some members of the campaign took "unlawful actions".


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 05, 2017, 03:01:41 pm
February 19, 1969

BREAKING: NLF LAUNCHES NEW TET OFFENSIVE - Setback for Peace talks


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One year after the original Tet Offensive, the communist National Liberation Front (NFL), launched a series of attacks at South Vietnamese targets. Most attacks centered on military targets near Saigon and Da Nang and were quickly beaten off by US and allied forces. The offensive is not nearly as large as the one in 1968, but considered a serious backlash for the peace efforts underway in Paris. The attacks also came as a surprise to the allied forces. Foreign policy analysts in the media speculated the new offensive is mounted to test the will of the Johnson Administration, which now consists a hawk faction (Secretary Rusk) and a dove faction (Vice President Kennedy).


Further developments regarding Tet Offensive, February 1969

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President Johnson meets with his cabinet to discuss the new Tet Offensive, February 22, 1969

As increased fighting activity went on during the rest of February, President Johnson seemed solicitous to present his administration as united. Following the attacks, the president issued a statement that the Vietcong is “threatening the peace process” and that the US Air Force may resume air strikes if necessary. The Politburo in Moscow denounced the offensive and called upon all sides to cease fire as soon as possible.

On February 21, South Vietnamese President Thieu officially postponed the participation of his delegation in Paris Peace talks. “The current hostile behavior by the North makes it impossible for my administration to take part at the conference table. The NLF must stop its act of violence against the people of South Vietnam before any negotiating can take place. We will counter the attacks with relentless force”, Thieu commented. U.S. Chief negotiator Cyrus Vance criticized the decision by Thieu, but also accused the Vietcong of hypocrisy.

After a cabinet meeting on Vietnam on February 22, a leak at the White House revealed that Secretary of State Dean Rusk urged President Johnson to resume air bombardment and halt the withdrawal of 50,000 troops, scheduled to be completed by late May. As the NY Times reported, he clashed with Vice President Robert Kennedy, who was strongly in favor of the bombing halt and the withdrawal.

The next day, President Johnson ordered partial air bombardments against NLF forces. These are the first since October 1968. Nevertheless, the commander-in-chief rejected calls from hawks in congress and the military such as Scoop Jackson (D-WA) to expand the bombing to Laos and Cambodia, where the communist forces operate as well. The White House stated that the temporary and limited air strikes are only aimed at pushing back the Tet Offensive.

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February 27, 1969: Anna Chennault arrested; indictment looming

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Anna Chennault, a Vietnamese woman and US resident who was been accused of sabotaging peace talks in Paris, was arrested by the FBI. According to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, the investigation will be completed within the next few months. She will be indicted and likely has to leave the country afterwards.


Gallup polls, released February 28, 1969

President Johnson's approval rating declined by the end of February, but still at a healthy level. Gallup also polled some other questions in February.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 39%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 38%
Unsure: 8%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 40%
Disapprove: 50%
Unsure: 10%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 59%
Disapprove: 32%
Unsure: 9%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling civil rights?
Approve: 68%
Disapprove: 26%
Unsure: 6%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 36%
Unsure: 8%


March 3, 1969: President Johnson announces new healthcare initiative

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Senator Ted Kennedy (l) during a meeting with President Johnson in the Oval Office

After a six-hour meeting with Vice President Kennedy, congressional leaders and cabinet members at the White House, President Johnson announced a new health-care initiative advanced by his administration. “We want high-quality and affordable health-care coverage for every one of our fellow citizens. We made much progress since the Social Security Amendments of 1965, but more remains to be done. Especially children need to be covered”, the president said. A major role in the initiative plays Senator Edward M. “Ted” Kennedy (D-MA), younger brother of Bobby Kennedy the late President Kennedy. The initiative’s goal is mainly to expand healthcare coverage for children of poor families. Senator Ted Kennedy first proposed a Medicare for all program, but the administration prefers to start with Medicare for children program. However, President Johnson left the door wide open to such a proposal, but regards a children’s program more realistic to pass congress than a Medicare for all bill. “ChildCare”, as the program is called, is endorsed by Republican Senator Jacob Javits of New York, who also participated in the meeting. Senators Kennedy and Javits announced that they will work out a bill and present legislation to the senate before summer. The plan is also largely endorsed by New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller, a Republican, who offered his advice in the process. Conservatives like Governor Ronald Reagan (R-CA) oppose the program and denounced it as “socialism”.

The initiative is the first major reform legislation proposal of the Johnson/Kennedy Administration.


Early March 1969: Tet Offensive comes to an end, allied military victory

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The newly launched Tet Offensive by the NLF is mainly over. The Vietcong suffered over 3,500 casualties within the past few months. According the U.S. military officials, the losses further weakened the communists. President Johnson ordered the suspension of the air strikes temporary resumed in February.


March 7, 1969: President Johnson announces decision regarding Tet 1969 and Vietnam policy

During a White House press conference, President Johnson announced that he does not question the withdrawal of 50,000 U.S. troops by May 31. “As agreed to in Moscow, and as I have outlined during the campaign, 50,000 troops will be home by the end of May. We have already begun with this process. But we leave most of our equipment in Vietnam for our allies in the South. This also saves cost because of the enormous logistic challenges such a delivery would create”, said the chief-executive.

Media observers described the decision as a defeat of the hawk faction around Secretary of State Dean Rusk, who openly questioned the plans after Tet 1969 and a victory for Vice President Kennedy and Defense Secretary Clark Clifford, who want less American military involvement in Vietnam.


March 10, 1969: Secretary of State Dean Rusk resigns

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He has been the longest serving Secretary of State in American history. In office since President John F. Kennedy appointed him in January 1961, Secretary Rusk today announced his resignation from office. It is no secret that the secretary found himself more and more isolated within the administration, after President Johnson decided to stay the course on Vietnam he begun in March 1968, despite the recent 1969 Tet Offensive. Rusk has always been a hawk regarding the conflict, and he now decided to step down after recent developments.

After Rusk’s formal resignation that afternoon, Under Secretary Nicholas Katzenbach has been appointed as interim successor. President Johnson expressed good wishes for his “personal friend” in a brief statement. The president also said that he wants to nominate a successor as soon as possible. Press reports list Cyrus Vance as the favorite for the important cabinet position. The chief-executive also assured the public that the disarmament talks with the USSR won’t be affected by the change at the State Department leadership.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on October 06, 2017, 03:58:14 am
I enjoy reading this awesome TL! Keep it up.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on October 06, 2017, 04:21:06 am
I enjoy reading this awesome TL! Keep it up.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 08, 2017, 05:08:52 am
March 24, 1969: President Johnson signs Consumer Protection Bill

The first major legislation bill of the 91st Congress was signed into law by the president on March 24. The law is designed to improve some consumer protection standards, especially with regard to smoking. The act requires a stronger health warning on cigarette packages. The Johnson Administration actively supported the legislation.


March 31, 1969: More signature legislation signed into law

At a White House Rose Garden ceremony, President signed some other signature legislation: An extention of the original 1963 Clean Air Act, Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act and the Washington DC Delegate Act, which  authorized voters in the District of Columbia to elect one non-voting delegate to represent them in the United States House of Representatives. The president commented, that he intends to give the District full members of congress. His administration will ask for specific legislation in the months to come.


Gallup polls, released March 31, 1969

One year after his remarkable speech to the nation, President Johnson's popularity has significaltly risen, although he lost one point compared to February. Disapproval, however, remains at the same level.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%


April 2, 1969: Nicholas Katzenbach nominated for Secretary of State

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While President Johnson signs the Veteran's Bill into law, Vice President Kennedy smiles

After Vice President Kennedy, together with lawmakers, worked out legislation for homecoming Vietnam Veterans, President Johnson today signed a signature bill into law that passed both houses of congress within a very short period of time. The law provides additional health-care benefices for soldiers and their families, increased psychological accompaniment for those in need as well as a program that is designed to help former soldiers to find a job in civilian life.

The president thanked his vice president at the signing ceremony for his efforts. Political observers were surprised that President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy obviously found a way to work very well together. In his remarks, Bobby Kennedy himself thanked the president for his help in the legislative process. The vice president also announced the extension of the Veteran’s program. As he said, his office will work out legislation for a Housing Bill for homecoming members of the armed forces. The housing section was left out of the bill President Johnson just signed. Vice President Kennedy told the public, that he intends to pass this legislation by the year’s end at latest.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 11, 2017, 01:15:30 pm
May 10, 1969: First battalions from Vietnam come home, Johnson Administration to review military draft

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President Johnson welcomes troops from Vietnam home

First aircrafts with battalions from Vietnam today landed in various Air Bases around the United States. At Andrews Air Force Base outside of Washington D.C., President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy welcomed 2,500 soldiers with a military ceremony. The president thanked the homecoming men in his remarks for their service and sacrifice. He also reassured them, that his administration will do everything possible to bring about peace without weakening America’s position the world.

In addition, what came as surprise, the commander-in-chief announced to review the military draft. Vice President Kennedy became an advocate of ending the draft and replace through a volunteer army. Richard Nixon briefly raised the issue during the campaign and promised to submit a plan for ending the draft, but President Johnson himself didn’t address the matter. With the American involvement in the Vietnam War now being reduced and after many years of complaint about the draft, the president seemed convinced to begin a reform process. “We must do far more to ensure that the burden of military service is shared equally. We have to take care that not only young men of poor families and young blacks are fighting for our country. Therefore, I will review the entire draft and submit legislation within an appropriate span of time”, President Johnson remarked in his address to young soldiers.


May 14, 1969: Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas resigns amidst scandal

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Abe Fortas, who resigned from the court over a scandal

A setback for President Johnson: Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas, a personal friend of the president who was appointed in 1965, resigned from the nation’s highest court.

Mr. Fortas had accepted a US$20,000 retainer from the family foundation of Wall Street financier Louis Wolfson, a friend and former client, in January 1966. Mr. Fortas had signed a contract with Mr. Wolfson's foundation. In return for unspecified advice, it was to pay Mr. Fortas $20,000 a year for the rest of Mr. Fortas's life (and then pay his widow for the rest of her life).

In a public statement, President Johnson expressed his disappointment and announced he will nominate a successor as soon as possible.


May 29, 1969: Trials in Chennault case begin

At a federal court in Virginia the trial against Anna Chennault and Nixon aides, mainly H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, begun. They are indicted for acts of sabotage in the Paris Peace talks. The FBI continues to investigate the role of Richard Nixon himself and his top advisor Henry Kissinger. As the Washington Post reported on May 30, Kissinger has been invited for an informal FBI interview within the next weeks.


May 31, 1969: 50,000 troops from Vietnam home

The US Armed forces confirmed in a public statement, the withdrawal of 50,000 troops from Vietnam has been completed successfully. The White House issued a statement, that President Johnson will soon make a decision how and when the next step of troop reduction will be implemented.

Despite the ongoing talks in Paris, the ground war is still moving on. However, American deaths declined in the first months of 1969 by a significant margin.


Gallup polls, released May 31, 1969

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 40%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 39%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Nicholas Katzenbach's performance as Secretary of State?
Approve: 65%
Disapprove: 28%


June 1, 1969: Formal arms reduction negotiations between U.S. and USSR begin

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Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach and Foreign Minister Andrej Gromyko in Geneva

As agreed in January, formal arms reduction talks in Geneva between the United States and the Soviet Union started this June 1st. Both sides selected a handful of representatives. At the opening ceremony, Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko for the first time met his new American counterpart, Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach. It was the second time the new secretary visited Europe since taking office in April. According to recent Gallup poll, two-thirds of the American people approve Mr. Katzenbach’s performance as the nation’s top-diplomat.


June 6, 1969: President Johnson and Senator Ted Kennedy present ChildCare Legislation

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President Johnson during the press conference on healthcare

At a White House ceremony, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) presented the so-called ChildCare Act of 1969. The legislation expands Medicare for under 18-year olds. According to the president, the program is designed to give kids of poor families access to affordable healthcare. After the implementation of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965, this initiative would be the third major piece of legislation in healthcare policy for the Johnson Administration. Senator Ted Kennedy will introduce the bill together with his co-sponsor, Senator Jacob Javits (R-NY).

During the ceremony, President Johnson reaffirmed his support of a constitutional amendment to lower the majority age from 21 to 18.


June 15, 1969: Henry Kissinger rumored to take role in U.S. diplomacy

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Henry Kissinger... soon an advisor to the Johnson Administration?

This June 15th, a New York Times article claimed that former Nixon advisor Henry Kissinger, a foreign policy expert, has been tapped by the White House as foreign policy advisor. The newspaper names a White House leak as source. Accordingly, Kissinger may open a direct line of communication between the American government and Red China. Mr. Kissinger allegedly suggested to involve China in the peace talks to President Johnson and offered him to take a role in such a process. Mr. Kissinger seemingly believes that communist regime of Mao may help resolve the Vietnam conflict, as China is an important ally of Ho Chi Minh. The president allegedly responded positive to the proposal, but demanded a clarification of any charges in the Chennault case against Mr. Kissinger, if he wants to play any role in diplomacy under Johnson. As the source claimed, Mr. Kissinger’s “secret” FBI interview on June 12 went positive and Director J. Edgar Hoover, who is personally close to LBJ, reported to the president that Henry Kissinger is de facto cleared of any charges. At least that there is no proof that Mr. Kissinger was involved in the sabotage attempts.

The White House didn’t react to the report, but an aide to President Johnson informally said that Mr. Kissinger’s opinions are highly regarded in the administration. However, he denied that Mr. Kissinger is under consideration for an official post within the administration such as National Security Advisor.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on October 12, 2017, 09:28:26 am
I doubt Kissinger would have worked for the Johnson White House. But great to see that there is more happening on healthcare.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on October 13, 2017, 08:05:35 am
Awesome updates! This is really realistic and well-written.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 14, 2017, 03:56:03 am
I doubt Kissinger would have worked for the Johnson White House. But great to see that there is more happening on healthcare.

Well, Kissinger was an opportunist. He originally worked for Nelson Rockefeller, but joined Team Nixon after the latter won the Republican nomination. He also considered working for Humphrey after he spoke to LBJ a few times in 1967 and 1968. Kissinger was not personally devoted to Nixon; he even (privately) didn't have a very high opinion of Tricky Dick. Kissinger was personally much closer to Rocky.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 14, 2017, 04:35:14 am
July 1, 1969: President Johnson nominates Pat Brown for Supreme Court

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Nominee for the Supreme Court: Edmund G. "Pat" Brown, former Governor of California

Several candidates were under consideration to fill the vacancy at the Supreme Court after Abe Fortas resigned following a financial scandal. Among them former Justice Arthur Goldberg, who was forced out of the court in 1965 by President Johnson to assume the role of U.N. Ambassador, which he resigned over disputes on Vietnam in 1968. The nomination of Edmund G. "Pat" Brown came as a surprise to many. The 64 year old California attorney served as Attorney General of his state and was governor from 1959 to 1967. A pragmatic progressive, Mr. Brown was defeated for a third term as governor by Ronald Reagan in 1966. Afterwards, he returned to private law practice. Now, he’s back on the stage, though in a very different role.


July 3, 1969: Paris Peace talks temporary suspended

A setback for the Paris Peace talks: The National Liberation Front announced that it will suspend its participation in the Paris peace talks, after the USSR reduced military aid, as agreed to in December 1968. Subsequently, the North Vietnamese government also walked off the negotiations, but left the door open to return to the table.

President Johnson found harsh words on the North Vietnamese regime and the NLF. “These are serious matters. And we can’t have it, that one side decides on daily basis whether they want to talk or not”, said the president. He also threatened to resume air strikes and increase U.S. military activity if the North doesn’t return to the conference table within a short period of time. White House insiders told the press, that the suspension is only a PR stunt by the communist regime against the USSR, whose leadership also condemned the move. Premier Kosygin urged North Vietnam to return to the table, but also demanded that Saigon joins the talks. He also called upon President Johnson to increase pressure on Thieu.

A July 15 congressional report, however, confirmed that the NLF has not significantly increased military efforts since leaving the talks.


July 16 – 20, 1969: A small step for man, one giant step for mankind

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President Johnson witnesses the start of Apollo 11 at Cape Canaveral, Florida

President Lyndon Johnson has long been involved in space policy and the efforts to land a man on the moon since his predecessor, President John F. Kennedy, challenged his nation to reach this historic goal. On July 16, 1969, the Apollo 11 mission started at Cape Kennedy (known as Cape Canaveral). The president himself as well as Vice President Kennedy traveled to Florida to witness the historic occasion.

After a nearly decade-long national effort, the United States won the race to land astronauts on the Moon on July 20, 1969, with the flight of Apollo 11. On that day, President Johnson received the first call from Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, who spoke the famous words: “That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind”.

After their return, President Johnson invited the three astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin to the White House and awared them with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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Neil Armstrong on the moon


July 29, 1969: Pat Brown confirmed as Supreme Court justice

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President Johnson shakes hands with Pat Brown, after the latter was sworn in as Supreme Court Justice

With 85 to 14 votes, former California Governor and Attorney General Edmund G. “Pat” Brown was confirmed by the Senate as Justice. He was sworn in by Chief Justice Homer Thornberry the same day.


Gallup polls, released July 31, 1969

Despite the setback in Paris, President Johnson's approval rating was on the rise again. Polling experts suggest that this is because of the successful Apollo 11 mission, that the president took great credit for.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 38%


August 4, 1969: South Vietnamese President Thieu agrees to join peace talks after meeting with Secretary Katzenbach

After Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach delayed his planned visit in Saigon for logistical reasons, he arrived in the South Vietnamese capital on August 3 for consultations with the allied government. Right before his departure back to America, Secretary Katzenbach together with President Thieu announced at a joint press conference, that South Vietnam will send a delegation to Paris as soon as the negotiations resume. Thieu already agreed to such a move back in January, but withdrew after the North launched a new Tet Offensive and did not publically change his mind for months. In their final communique, Thieu and Katzenbach once again called upon the communist regime and NLF to reenter the Paris talks. The North Vietnamese government responded that they are ready to come back to the table as soon as the NLF will do so.


August 21 – 25, 1969: Nationwide anti-war protests, Vice President Kennedy speaks to demonstrators

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After the first half of 1969 was relatively quiet with regard to the anti-war protests, a new wave of demonstrations shock the nation. Hundreds of thousands of students, hippies and yuppies demonstrated against the ongoing war in Vietnam. Some unrest also broke out in various African American communities. In Washington, more than 50,000 people gathered to express their dissatisfaction with the conflict and the American role in it. They demanded an immediate suspension of all hostile actions by the U.S. Many also directly spoke to President Johnson, shouting “LBJ, end the war!”

On Sunday, August 24, Vice President Robert Kennedy surprisingly went outside the Capitol and spoke to the protesters. The vice president enjoyed high support among anti-war activists, but his stance with that group declined after he became President Johnson’s running mate in the 1968 presidential election in an effort to unite the party. Now, with this demonstration going on right before his door, the vice president spontaneously decided to speak directly to the demonstrators. According to the White House, Vice President Kennedy phoned President Johnson at his Texas Ranch and told him we wanted to give the speech and LBJ was not against it.

Some parts of the vice president’s remarks:

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: “My fellow citizens. I am here to tell you that I understand your concerns. If I were one of you, if I were a student, I would do the exact same thing. I am also here to assure you that the entire administration is against the war and that we are doing everything to end it as soon as possible. And we have made great progress [Interruption after boos]
But it is not easy. Things are more than black and white. I want you to understand this, because it is very important. […]

However, I would like to remind you all, that what you are doing here is possible, because we live in a free country. We are enjoying these blessings of freedom that millions of people around the world are seeking. You can fill these streets and protest your concerns. And nobody has the right the restrict this right. Not the president, not the congress, not me. The reason is, because we have a constitution, we have the rule of law. That is our way. And we will never abandon these values. And we ought to help those, who seek freedom for their own country. At the same time, we must do everything we can to promote peace. I can tell you as representative of this government, that this is what we’re going. The road to this peace in Vietnam is rocky and not easy. But we won’t fail.

Last but not least, I want to urge everybody not tolerate violence. Demonstrations must be peaceful. This is your, this is our obligation.

Thank you all. God bless you. God bless America.”


The reaction of the stunned crowd was mixed. Some applauded Bobby Kennedy and praised him loudly. Some female students even cried “Bobby, I love you”. Others were booing at the vice president and shouted “Bobby, you traitor! Go home!”


Gallup polls, released August 31, 1969

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 41%


September 2, 1969: North Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh dies

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North Vietnamese President and leader of the Communist Party of North Vietnam Ho Chi Minh died this September 2. "Uncle Ho", as he is known in Vietnam, was the leader of the communist movement in North Vietnam and played a key role in the first Indochina War against France in the 1950s. However, he remained largely in the background during the Vietnem War.

Administration officials, who privately talked to journalists, expressed their hope that this might help the stalled peace negotiations. The White House did not respond to Ho's death, but the State Department issued a formal note of condolence.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on October 14, 2017, 04:53:50 am
I wonder if LBJ is gonna die before his term is up.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 14, 2017, 04:58:46 am
I wonder if LBJ is gonna die before his term is up.

We'll see. Interesting what-if question though. Some say yes because of the stress. But you also have to keep in mind that he lived healthier as president than after 1969. He resumed smoking after he left office and ate more unhealthy things.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 15, 2017, 04:52:29 am
September 7, 1969: Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirksen dies of cancer

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Late senator and Republican leader Everett Dirksen, who sadly passed away, and his successor Hugh Scott

Mourning at Capitol Hill: At the age of 73 and after a very short battle with cancer, Senator and Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) passed away. President Johnson ordered all flags to be lowered for one week. Although of opposite parties, Senator Dirksen was personally close to the president for many years. Senator Dirksen also played an important role in passing civil rights legislation, which he supported. He was also a close advisor on Vietnam policy, where favored a hawkish course. Mr. Dirksen will be remembered.

The next day, the Republican Caucus elected Senator Hugh Scott (R-PA) as its new leader.


September 17, 1969: Landmark ChildCare Act of 1969 passed and signed to into law

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President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ChildCare Act of 1969 at the White House, as others look on

Following the passage of the ChildCare Act of 1969, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the landmark legislation into law during a White House ceremony. The senate approved the bill with 60 votes in late July, few weeks after co-sponsors Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and Jacob Javits (R-NY) introduced the bill. Seven Republicans voted for it, while six southern Democrats opposed the bill. The U.S. House approved the act in early September with some minor amendments by a 242 to 179 vote, with some Republicans supportive and some Democrats, mainly from the South, against it. After the senate finally voted in favor with 59 votes, the legislation was sent to the president’s desk. It will go into effect on June 30, 1970.

The president thanked Senators Kennedy and Javits in his remarks and spoke of a milestone in healthcare. The new law expands Medicare to children under 18 and is designed to cover kids of poor families with affordable healthcare. President Johnson also announced that he will propose legislation that expands access to Medicaid; a program adopted under his watch in 1965 to help low-income Americans to get medical care.


Gallup polls, released September 30, 1969

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%


October 1, 1969: Vietnam Peace Talks in Paris continue, South Vietnam participates

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The conference table in Paris

Although U.S. air strikes were not resumed after February, American fighting activity had slightly increased after the North Vietnamese parties (regime and NLF) withdrew from the Paris talks, what led to heavy losses on the communist side. Training of South Vietnamese forces also speeded up during the past three months. Now the regime and NLF announced that they will come back to the table in Paris to resume negotiations. Although they denied the move has something to do with their casualties, the Johnson Administration and Thieu government stated it was due to the developments on the battlefield. However, U.S. Chief Negotiator Cyrus Vance described the path to a full agreement as “rocky”. Some newspaper wrote that the (unofficial) goal to leave Vietnam by January 1971 was unrealistic. Defense Secretary Clifford denied the existence of any specific date.


October 8, 1969: Richard Nixon will not be indicted

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While the Chennault trials are going on relatively quiet, the FBI released a statement on Richard Nixon: Accordingly, the bureau will not indict the former Republican nominee, because there is no evidence that he himself was involved in the sabotage attempts. “Innocent until proven guilty”, reads the report. A FBI spokesperson said there is simply no crystal-clear proof of Nixon’s guilt and therefore an indictment would not be successful under the rule of law. The spokesperson also confirmed that the FBI interviewed Nixon secretly for over eight hours.

The report finally concludes that Nixon knew of contacts between campaign aides and Vietnamese officials, but described such consultations as “normal”. In all protocols of calls and telegrams, the bureau could only find that Nixon confirmed, “that he will give the South a better deal”. But these were the same statements that he gave in public over the course of his campaign. Neither he nor Kissinger asked Thieu to “hold on” or made a statement that could be interpreted as such a request.

Richard Nixon himself welcomed the decision in an interview he gave the Los Angeles Times the next day. He also apologized for Haldeman and Ehrlichman and expressed his disappointment over the situation, but added that they are “fine and hardworking man”. During the interview, Nixon said he would not run for president again.

Nevertheless, some public doubts remain.


October 28, 1969: First agreement in Paris reached: Prisoners of war will be exchanged

The first breakthrough in Paris has come: North and South Vietnam as well the United States agreed to exchange prisoners of war by the year’s end. Public observers saw this a positive sign.

The option of such an exchange was discussed for months, but the U.S. side long insisted that North Vietnamese prisoners may decide (before their release) whether they want to return to the North or not. If not, this would have been a propaganda victory for the Western alliance. In return for the concession, the North agreed to release all American pilots that were shot down and imprisoned since the war began.

Conservatives in congress like Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) criticized that NLF soldiers who wanted to escape from the north had not the choice to so after their release from prison.


Gallup polls, released October 31, 1969

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 40%


November 5, 1969: President Johnson orders withdrawal of additional 100,000 troops by April 1970

Shortly after the agreement on the exchange of war prisoners, President Johnson issued a directive to withdraw another 100,000 U.S. troops from Vietnam. The withdrawal is scheduled to begin by January and be completed by April 1970. “I have made the decision as a result of the progress in Paris”, the commander-in-chief noted at a press conference. Nevertheless, he warned that any new offensive by the north would lead to a “strong American response” including air strikes.


November 20, 1969: Henry Kissinger joins White House as foreign policy advisor

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Left to right: National Security Advisor Walt Rostow, new foreign policy advisor Henry Kissinger and President Lyndon B. Johnson meet at the Oval Office after Mr. Kissinger's hiring was announced

It has been rumored for months, now it is official: Henry Kissinger will join the Johnson Administration as a foreign policy advisor. This is more of an informal role; he will not be in an official position and directly report to President Johnson. Mr. Kissinger noted he is “deeply honored” by the president’s decision. He also expressed his willingness to cooperate closely with Secretary Katzenbach. Public observers regarded the hiring of the former Rockefeller and Nixon aide as an attempt to involve Red China in the Paris the peace talks. Accordingly, President Johnson was very open to the idea of talking to China but preferred such dialogues in private; what is the reason that Secretary Katzenbach will not lead such talks. At least for now. However, the White House confirmed that Mr. Katzenbach would be heavily involved in Mr. Kissinger’s work. According to White House interns in backroom conversations, Vice President Kennedy was against Mr. Kissinger’s hiring.


November 27, 1969: Congress rejects additional aid for South Vietnam

In a special message to congress from early October, President Lyndon Johnson requested for additional military and economic aid for South Vietnam. However, today the U.S. House of Representatives rejected the measure by a narrow 225 – 203 vote. Although Majority Leader Carl Albert (D-OK) and Minority Leader Gerald Ford (R-MI) largely supported the measure, the majority felt that no increase in aid is necessary. The decision is the first important defeat of the Johnson Administration at Capitol Hill this year.


Gallup polls, released November 30, 1969

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 41%


Next: An exclusive interview with Vice President Robert Kennedy as well as joint interview of the president and the vice president… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on October 15, 2017, 11:35:21 am
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Why is Johnson watching the launch with a lowly Governor of Maryland? :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 16, 2017, 12:57:07 pm
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Why is Johnson watching the launch with a lowly Governor of Maryland? :P

A little bipartisanship during a historic event. :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 16, 2017, 01:10:12 pm
December 9, 1969: Vice President Robert F. Kennedy gives exclusive interview

As the year 1969 and with it the 1960s neared its/their end, CBS News Anchor Walter Cronkite was granted an exclusive interview with Vice President Robert Kennedy in his office at the White House. The two men talked about several issues, reflected on the vice president’s first year in office and the future. A second interview, where Mr. Cronkite will sit down with President Johnson first and then with Vice President Kennedy joining the conservation is scheduled for December 11.

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WALTER CRONKITE: Mr. Vice President, thank you very much for sitting down with me.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thanks, Walter. My pleasure. Welcome to the White House.

WALTER CRONKITE: Mr. Vice President, let me start with a simple question: You’re vice president for almost a year now. How is it? Do you like the job or do still thank what might have been, had you been elected president last year?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Well, I am not living in the past, thinking about what might have been, though I often think about my beloved brother. Life seldom goes exactly how we want it. What I said to myself, when I took the vice presidential nomination as well as when it became evident that our ticket won the election, that I want to make the best out of it. And I strongly believe that I have done so. I really do believe that my voice had an impact on the course of this administration. To me, this is about serving the American people.

WALTER CRONKITE: So, in other words, you like the role of vice president?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Yes. I like to be a servant of the people. In whatever position I can make a difference to improve lives of our fellow citizens as well as promote peace and freedom around the world. That’s what I like.

WALTER CRONKITE: You’re touching an important subject, Mr. Vice President, peace and freedom. You have been a vocal critic of President Johnson’s Vietnam policy over the course of the primary campaign last year. Are now satisfied with the direction of the administration?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: It is not about my personal satisfaction with anything. Last year, I said that there must be change in foreign policy with respect to Vietnam. So far, there have been major changes since March 1968. And I am pleased with the steps the president and the entire administration have taken. We are at a much better situation now than 24 months ago when there was no end in sight.

WALTER CRONKITE: But we are still in battle. The number of deaths declined, but we are still in combat and it is doubtful how the negotiations are playing out. And in the end, we still might lose Vietnam to the communists after he leave.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I never proposed to leave Vietnam at once. The policy of U.S. government is now to withdraw step by step and put the South Vietnamese in charge of defending their country. I’m optimistic that we will be successful with that goal while we negotiate a ceasefire. As you can see, we make progress in Paris, too. South Vietnam, in the end, can only be defended by the South Vietnamese themselves. We can help them with military aid and economic development. The latter is very important, too, if we want to make sure that the Vietnamese people reject communism and develop a normal way of live into the free world. That’s what we have done in western Europe twenty years ago. With great success.

WALTER CRONKITE: How long should the U.S. stay in Vietnam? Did you urge President Johnson to set a specific date?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: It is not about a specific date. We leave step by step as South Vietnam develops the capabilities to manage their defense. All while negotiations in Paris are going on. These are the decisive factors how fast we leave. This is the formula President Johnson has outlined and I support this policy one hundred percent.

WALTER CRONKITE: Will American forces be out by the end of this administration?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Almost certainly, yes. We will be engaged in one form or another. But U.S. troops won’t be in combat.

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WALTER CRONKITE: Mr. Vice President, I’d like to switch topics. Talk about the campaign last year, the assassination attempt, your relationship with President Johnson and your future. And I may start with a personal question: Did June 5, 1968 change you?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Absolutely. I believe such an experience changes everybody. I take nothing for granted anymore and got a deep awareness that everything might come to an end from one day to another. Although I had developed such a sense of awareness after my brother was killed. Therefore, I try to be a better person every day.

WALTER CRONKITE: A question that is probably still on the mind of many Americans: Why did you join the ticket with President Johnson? How did that happen? That is something nobody expected, given your previous … let’s say… ahmm… difficult [smiles] … relationship with him?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: You just asked how the assassination attempt has changed me. After the incident, I thought about a lot of things. Including leaving the race. I mean, I didn’t know for sure whether I could continue physically. However, I felt an obligation to the millions of voters who expressed their support for my campaign. On the other hand, I was carefully reviewing the state of race. As I went through these calculations, politically as well as the delegate count, I concluded that the only way to clinch the nomination was a major upset at the convention floor. That would have led to a massive and unrepairable division of the party. I didn’t want that. As I talked to President Johnson, we agreed that the formation of a Johnson/Kennedy ticket would be the best solution. For the country and the party. I knew that he wanted to keep Vice President Humphrey on the ticket. That was understandable from his viewpoint.

WALTER CRONKITE: He didn’t want as second-in-command in 1964. Do you think he only agreed this time to save his presidency?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Circumstances in 1964 were different. Just as in 1960 and the years before. Each election is different.

WALTER CRONKITE: What’s your relationship with the president now?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: It’s fine. Actually better than I expected. He gave some responsibilities and I think the record proves that the LBJ-RFK team can deliver.

WALTER CRONKITE: How often to you talk to him?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: It depends. But almost daily. We have breakfast together each Thursday.
WALTER CRONKITE: We get another chance to talk about your relationship in our second interview with the president. Now a question on everybody’s mind: Are you going to run for president in 1972?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: [laughs] I am not going to speculate what's happening more than two years from now. Right now I am focused on the issues of the day.

WALTER CRONKITE: If you run, who do you expect to face from the Republicans?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: These are not thoughts I have at the moment. I believe that the Republican Party consists several talented politicians and potential candidates.

WALTER CRONKITE: Who would rate as such? Ronald Reagan? Nelson Rockefeller? George Romney?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: For example.

WALTER CRONKITE: I thank you very much and we see each other in two days together with the president.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thank you very much.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on October 17, 2017, 08:51:21 am
Terrific updates! I wonder when the Vietnam War is over.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 21, 2017, 04:15:30 am
December 11, 1969: President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy give exclusive interview

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That December evening, President Lyndon B. Johnson sat down with Walter Cronkite to discuss various topics in the White House. Later, Vice President Robert F. Kennedy joined the conversation.


WALTER CRONKITE: Thank you very much for hosting me, Mr. President.
 
PRESIDENT JOHNSON: My pleasure. You are always welcome, Walter.

WALTER CRONKITE: Mr. President, one year has passed since your reelection. We’re still in Vietnam. How long does the fighting continue?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Walter, that largely depends on the progress in Paris. What we’ve seen over the last months was very encouraging, what lead me to the decision to withdraw 100,000 more troops. But I want to emphasize that we could have been at that point sooner. The 1969 Tet Offensive and the temporary suspension of the talks over the summer was not helpful. I can’t make projection when all U.S. combat troops will be out of Vietnam, but assure you and the viewers that I do everything in my power to end the war.

WALTER CRONKITE: Vice President Kennedy said, we will be out by the end of your term.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: That is three years from now. I do not intend and, quite frankly, expect to stay that long.

WALTER CRONKITE: What led you to change your Vietnam policy? The Tet Offensive of 1968, the looming election and your desire another term, Robert Kennedy or the demonstrations?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: I don’t agree with the term “changed”. It has always been the policy of my administration to seek a diplomatic solution. But we had no choice to fight back, when the communists repeatedly violated the Treaty of 1954 and international law. We tried many times since 1965. Including many others, like the pope, were engaged in an effort for peace. I believe that the 1968 Tet Offensive, which caused massive losses for the other side led them to seek another salutation. They just don’t want to admit it.

WALTER CRONKITE: But wasn’t the election an issue in your thoughts?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: The election was an issue. I had to make clear what my policies are, so that the American people can take a vote on it. And they have done so.

WALTER CRONKITE: What’s your relation with the vice president? Do you miss Hubert Humphrey?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: I have good relationship with the vice president. He has been very helpful on several issues, like the Veteran’s bill. I frequently talk to him. Of course, I miss my old friend, Hubert. But I think his career isn’t over. You will hear of him soon I guess.

WALTER CRONKITE: Does he run for president in ’72? And if so, would you endorse him?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: You have to ask him whether he runs. It’s not up to me to comment on his plans. I shall support the person the Democratic Party choses as its nominee.

WALTER CRONKITE: Mr. President, some people say that the Chennault report that leaked three days before the 1968 election was your work. And that you didn’t want Nixon in prison. That’s why the investigation now dropped and you opposed a congressional investigation. You just wanted him to lose. What’s your reaction?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: [laughs] The leak isn’t my work. But I won’t have the opportunity to prove it isn’t. Those who believe in this theory will continue to do so, no matter what I do or don’t do.

[…]

[The vice president enters the Oval Office]

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WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome to our interview, Mr. Vice President.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thanks. Hello, Mr. President, hello Walter.

WALTER CRONKITE: Now, as we are assembled here with you two gentlemen, I’d like to talk about your relationship as well as the future. You both said that your relationship is good. How did this relationship develop? It is being said that your previous relationship was poor, if not hostile, before the 1968 general election campaign. What changed?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Walter, Bobby and I have are very different personality and background. That’s nothing new. What I believe what changed are the circumstances. By spring and summer of last year, it became evident that we have to find a way to work together. We had to reconsider, whether we wanted to risk a defeat in November or not. Not just for us, but for the party. Remember that our clear victory was everything but certain into October. You might say that 351 electoral votes and 52% of the popular vote is a convincing victory, and it indeed is, but we could have lost this race quite easily.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: If I might add, what also played a role is the assassination attempt. Just move the bullet a few inches – I would be dead right now. When the president spontaneously visited me at the hospital and later phoned me a couple of times, we talked about being close to death. The president shared with me his own very personal experience, when he suffered a heart attack in 1956. We also talked about the death of my brother. We asked ourselves what he might have wanted. We believe he didn’t want us to fight all the time.

WALTER CRONKITE: Did you feel the president was serious when you were recovering? I mean, some said President Johnson playing the caretaker was only a political move.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Yes, I thought – and still think – he was sincere. At least he continued to reach out. As you know, I have been very much involved in policy making in this administration. More than most previous vice presidents.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: [laughs] More than I have been involved in JFK’s administration, although I was given some important duties like overseeing the space program which ultimately lead to success this year.

WALTER CRONKITE: How do you handle situations, when you two don’t agree?

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Well, I have to point out that we agree on most issues. Especially in domestic policy. When we have a disagreement, we discuss it. Just like I discuss with any other member of the cabinet. However, in the end, it is the president who makes the final decision. And he bears the responsibilty for it.
 
VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: That’s right. But we seldom disagree in a fundamental issue.

WALTER CRONKITE: You wouldn’t consider Vietnam as such, Mr. Vice President?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: We agreed that we wanted – and still do – peace. There were only different approaches how to get there. I fully support the formula that we now laid out for peace and withdrawal.

WALTER CRONKITE: So, I usually wanted to talk about 1972, but I guess you two won’t discuss this topic.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: You are right, Walter. This is pure speculation. All I can say is that will support the Democratic nominee. And whether Bobby runs or not, is his personal decision.

WALTER CRONKITE: Thank you very much. I look forward for further discussions on various occasions with you in the future. Thank you.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Thank you.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thank you very much.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Southern Speaker Punxsutawney Phil on October 21, 2017, 04:43:05 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 21, 2017, 04:59:22 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P

What's Kennedy? The guy on the second picture? That's RFK. ;)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Southern Speaker Punxsutawney Phil on October 21, 2017, 05:01:26 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P

What's Kennedy? The guy on the second picture? That's RFK. ;)
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/rfk-if-he-wasnt-killed.340352/ reference comes from here.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on October 21, 2017, 09:25:53 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P
What's Kennedy? The guy on the second picture? That's RFK. ;)
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/rfk-if-he-wasnt-killed.340352/ reference comes from here.
The best timeline of all time. The first time I read that, I nearly passed out from laughing so hard.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 21, 2017, 09:33:14 am
A lot of new polling as 1970 begins!


Gallup polls, released December 31, 1969

As the year came to an end, President Johnson's approval rating remains stable, as it has been throughout the first year of his third administration. The progress in Vietnam paied off: For the first time in over two years, the numbers of those who approved and disapproved his handling of the war were tied.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 40%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 37%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 46%
Disapprove: 46%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 35%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling civil rights?
Approve: 68%
Disapprove: 26%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 38%


January 6, 1970: First polls for the 1972 presidential race!

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 32%
Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey: 23%
Former Governor George Wallace: 21%
Senator Eugene McCarthy: 6%
Senator George McGovern: 5%
Undecided/others: 13%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 23%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 21%
Governor George Romney: 16%
Senator John Tower: 15%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 9%
Undecided/Others: 16%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Ronald Reagan: 43%

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
George Romney: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
John Tower: 42%


Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
George Romney: 46%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
John Tower: 42%


George Wallace: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

George Wallace: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%

George Wallace: 42%
George Romney: 47%

George Wallace: 45%
John Tower: 43%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Kingpoleon on October 21, 2017, 10:57:18 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P
What's Kennedy? The guy on the second picture? That's RFK. ;)
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/rfk-if-he-wasnt-killed.340352/ reference comes from here.
The best timeline of all time. The first time I read that, I nearly passed out from laughing so hard.

"All the bad things in the world needs to be stopped"


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 22, 2017, 03:43:11 am
January 13, 1970: President Lyndon B. Johnson’s State of the Union Address

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President Johnson enters the House chamber for his State of the Union Address and shakes hands with members of congress


CLERK: Mr. Speaker, the President of the United States!

[Hail to the chief plays, President Johnson enters chamber]

SPEAKER McCORMACK: Mr. Vice President, Members of the House and Senate, it is my high privilege and distinguished honor to present to you the President of the United States.

[Applause]


PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, members of the House and Senate, members of the cabinet and judiciary, distinguished guests, my fellow Americans:

I come before you today to report, as the constitution requires, on the state of union. Two years ago I stood here in this chamber and spoke of that the will of America is being tested. Last year, in my inaugural address, I spoke of the unfinished tasks ahead of us. In the past year, we have made more progress towards the future I described in my inauguration. Both here at home as well as abroad. We passed major legislation to expand healthcare, landmark veteran’s bill and consumer protection measures. […] Therefore I strongly urge the congress to enact further legislation not only to expand healthcare to all of our fellow citizens, I also want to emphasize the need to lower healthcare costs. In addition, I strongly recommend to take steps for a liberalization of other social issues. Plain and simple: I urge you to pass the constitutional amendment to lower the majority age to 18 years. We can’t ask these young people to serve in the military, risking their lives and at the same time not allowing them to vote. […] Further measures I want to recommend are a Housing Bill for both Veterans and Students, stronger environmental protection and legislation to deal with crime.

At the international front, I can report that we in midst of a process of disbarment negotiations. With the USSR. The goal is to reduce or eliminate the risk of a nuclear war. But at the same time, we have to make sure that the United States remains the strongest military power in earth. We expect the first rounds of talks to be completed next year. That may help you, as you don’t have to vote on anything in an election year such as this […] In Vietnam, we have made more progress in the past fifteen months than in the four years prior to this.  Nevertheless, I cannot hide my disappointment over the rejection of additional aid to South Vietnam in November last year. I want to urge you to reconsider this decision. But I also want to let you know that I stand ready to negotiate on the issue. […] I can report that my administration will review the military draft as soon as the current troop reduction is completed. […]

We have made great progress in the 1960s. We ended racial segregation, protected and expanded voting rights, implemented measures to deal with healthcare, education, the environment, poverty and housing. We landed a man on the moon. Now let us make sure that the 1970s will likewise be remembered as a decade of progress. Let us also work to make this a decade of peace. I’m ready to work with you. Thank you for your attention and God bless America.



The Republican response

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Governor Paul Laxalt (R-NV), who responded to the President Johnson's 1970 State of the Union Address

The Republican rebuttal came from Nevada Governor Paul Laxalt, who is an ally of Governor Ronald Reagan. The selection of Governor Laxalt was a defeat of the party’s liberal wing. Leading liberals like Governors Rockefeller and Romney proposed former Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton as GOP speaker. In his remarks, Governor Laxalt warned of an economic downturn in the next years and accused the Johnson Administration of ignoring the realities. “Instead of implementing to ensure growth on a long term basis, the Johnson/Kennedy Administration is committed to expand the size of government and enact one expensive program after another, whose results are doubtful. Only economic growth is responsible for the reduction in poverty the last few years”, he said. He added: “But we could be doing much better. That’s a reality”. On foreign policy, Governor Laxalt said his party was in favor of peace talks, but expressed concern the agreement would be “surrender in rates”. He spoke of ongoing NLF military activity and urged the administration to come up with pragmatic solutions. “Air strikes must be on the table if the communists try to take advantage of the situation. This can not be ruled out only because Vice President Kennedy doesn’t want to anger left-wing activists on the streets”, the Nevada governor stated. In the end, he again turned to domestic issues and accused President Johnson on being “weak on crime”.
 

January 30, 1970: Updates on Chennault case: Trial set to end by April, President Johnson expels Ambassador Bui Diem

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South Vietnamese Ambassador to the U.S. Bui Diem, who has been expeled from American soil for his role in the Chennault case

In late January, the responsible federal court announced the intention to complete the Chennault trial by April. Shortly after, on January 30, President Johnson decided to expel South Vietnamese Ambassador to the United States, Bui Diem, from the country. At the president’s order, the State Department issued a directive the next day that requires the representative of South Vietnam to exit the U.S. within seven days. International diplomatic rules make it almost impossible for Mr. Bui Diem to be indicted in the United States. For that reason, President Johnson declared him a persona non grata. According to recent publications on the case, the ambassador played a key role in the sabotage attempts as the man between Anna Chennault and President Thieu. President Johnson’s decision received approval from Democrats and Republicans alike.

The next day, South Vietnamese President Thieu sent a protest note. However, he didn’t change his course in the Peace talks as some journalists previously suggested.


Gallup poll, released January 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on October 23, 2017, 03:39:39 am
By the way this is Kennedy. :P
What's Kennedy? The guy on the second picture? That's RFK. ;)
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/rfk-if-he-wasnt-killed.340352/ reference comes from here.
The best timeline of all time. The first time I read that, I nearly passed out from laughing so hard.

"All the bad things in the world needs to be stopped"

LOL at that TL. No comparison with that one here.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 28, 2017, 04:21:21 am
February 1, 1970: Paul Nitze appointed White House Chief of Staff

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After James Robert Jones served for more than a year as informal – de facto – Chief of Staff, Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Nitze has officially been appointed to the position by President Johnson. According to the president, Mr. Nitze is not only overseeing domestic affairs, he will also continue to be heavily involved in foreign and defense policy. Henry Kissinger will directly report to him as well.


February 14 – 17, 1970: Henry Kissinger secretly travels to Beijing

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Henry Kissinger has been seen on his way to Bejing

The administration tried to keep it secret, but Henry Kissinger, who joined the White House as an informal advisor for foreign policy, has been witnessed to enter a government plane to Beijing. The former Nixon aide will directly talk to the Chinese leadership in order to resolve tensions in the Vietnam War. The Johnson Administration hopes for China to cooperate by reducing military aid to the North Vietnamese in exchange for diplomatic relations.

After Mr. Kissinger’s return, the administration remained silent on the visit. Mr. Kissinger’s office denied any comment.


Gallup poll, released February 28, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 42%


March 3, 1970: President Johnson signs Second Veteran’s Bill into law

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President Johnson hands Vice President Kennedy the pen he signed to Veteran's bill that the vice president introduced

After the congressional process took a little longer than expected, President Johnson was now able to sign a Second Veteran’s Bill into law. The measure was originally proposed by Vice President Kennedy the previous year and expands federal housing programs for Vietnam veterans.


March 18, 1970: Congress approves aid for South Vietnam

Following congress’ rejection for additional funds for South Vietnam in November 1969, congress now approved a 1.5 billion dollar package, designed for economic aid for South Vietnam. The Johnson Administration agreed to reduce the proposed sum for military aid.


Gallup poll, released March 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 40%
 

April 6, 1970: Trials end: Chennault, Haldeman and Ehrlichman go to jail

The long awaited verdict for the Chennault case came this April 6. Anna Chenault, H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman as well as a group of other Nixon campaign aides were convicted for the attempt of “sabotaging diplomatic efforts by the United States government”. Ms. Chennault received a five year felony, Haldeman and Ehrlichman, as initiators, were sentenced to six years in federal prison. Haldeman and Ehrlichman were expected to serve a longer time, but benefited from their cooperation with the FBI. Ms. Chennault is expected to be expelled after release from prison, possibly before the conclusion of her sentence.


Late April 1970: Red China reportedly reduces military aid for North Vietnam as result of Kissinger’s talks

As U.S. and international newspapers, claiming American intelligence services, Red China reportedly cut its amount of military aid to North Vietnam, particularly weaponry systems and fuel. Military experts expect that this move might soon affect the battlefield, but not in a decisive way. Some political analysts saw this as an informal exchange between China and the United States, after President Johnson approved a smaller sum of military aid to the South than requested from congress.


April 30, 1970: Step 2 of troop reduction complete

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President Johnson as he welcomes U.S. troops at Norfolk sea port

By the end of April, the White House officially confirmed that the 100,000 troops President Johnson ordered to withdraw last year were returned home. It was also announced, that the president would soon make a decision how to proceed with withdrawal process.
 
As Vice President Kennedy expressed his confidence during an interview, that at least a temporary peace agreement is near the horizon. However, White House Chief of Staff Paul Nitze said that the road ahead is still rocky.


Gallup poll, released April 30, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 41%


May 15/16, 1970: Eugene McCarthy does not run for reelection to the Senate, Hubert Humphrey is in!

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Rumors on his future were around for quite a while, but on May 15, 1970, Senator Eugene McCarthy (D-MN) announced his intention not to seek reelection to the senate this fall. Senator McCarthy unsuccessfully challenged President Johnson for the 1968 Democratic nomination. The anti-war candidate did better than expected, but the anti-war support split when then-Senator Robert Kennedy entered the race. After LBJ and RFK formed a ticket, Senator McCarthy’s hopes for the nomination were ended. The senator remained a critic of the administration’s policy even after the election, when President Johnson begun to withdraw American troops from Vietnam and suspended the air bombardments.  However, the senator from Minnesota angered many in the Democratic leadership with his outspoken criticism. Obviously, he now saw only slim chances to retain his seat and announced not to run again.

The next day, former vice president Hubert Humphrey, who already served in the senate before 1964, declared a run. Although critical of the 1965-68 Vietnam policy in private, Mr. Humphrey has been a loyal supporter of the president’s agenda. The outspoken liberal now plans to reenter the political arena after he had to step down from the vice presidency in 1968 in RFK’s favor. Immediately after his announcement, Humphrey received the endorsement of President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy. Many Democrats in congress also expressed their support for their former colleague.

According to unofficial White House sources, President Johnson played a major role in dumping McCarthy and putting Humphrey back in office. An anonymous source in the White House quoted the president with the words “it’s now payback time for that S.O.B.” [meaning McCarthy]


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on October 28, 2017, 05:22:42 am
Hubert Humphrey 1972!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Kingpoleon on October 28, 2017, 04:03:27 pm
We want Nelson!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 29, 2017, 06:51:06 am
We want Nelson!

Yeah, we want to feel the Rock :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 29, 2017, 06:58:10 am
May 20 – 25, 1970: National anti-war protests, Reports of secret Cambodia operation

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Reports that the government of Cambodia has secretly agreed for U.S. and South Vietnamese forces to operate on their territory to fight NLF forces caused another wave of nationwide anti-war demonstrations. It was long known that the Vietcong violated territorial integrity of neighboring states for military operations. Throughout Operation Rolling Thunder (air bombing campaign between 1965 and 1968) President Johnson repeatedly refused calls from generals and hawks in Washington to expand the air campaign to these countries, mainly because of international law. According to most sources, intelligence services suspect a large ammunition camp in the region. Neither the White House nor the Pentagon commented on the reports. Reports from late May concluded, that the ground operation was mainly a failure and that no such camp could be found or it was vacated before the arrival of allied troops.


Gallup poll, released May 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 42%


June 2, 1970: George Wallace loses Alabama gubernatorial primary to Gov. Albert Brewer

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Governor Albert Brewer (l) defeats former Governor George Wallace (r) in a heated primary for Alabama's governorship

A gubernatorial primary the whole nation was watching to: George Wallace, the leading segregationist Democrat, was running for governor again. He held the position of governor already from 1963 to 1967 but was prohibited from seeking reelection in 1966 due to term limits. Instead, his wife Lurleen run for office and won. But after she died in May 1968, Lieutenant Governor Albert Brewer assumed the governorship. As governor, Brewer changed policies towards the African American community. The outspoken liberal openly sought black support and angered many White segregationists. Although Wallace moderated his views, he challenged Governor Brewer in the Democratic primary. In the first voting round of the primary, the incumbent (narrowly) emerged victorious but fell short of a majority, what led to this run-off contest. Governor Brewer now defeated Wallace by a close margin again, winning 51.1% of the vote, compared to Wallace’s 48.9%. The result is considered a huge win for liberal faction of the Democratic Party, proving that this wing is able to win elections in the South as well. Leading national Democrats like President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy supported Brewer’s candidacy behind the scenes, but didn’t actively campaign at governor’s own request.

Because the Democratic Party is still the dominant force in the state, Governor Brewer is expected to win an easy reelection over a Republican challenger. Although George Wallace conceded the race and declined to question the close result, he didn’t rule out to run as a third-party candidate, leading to some speculation he mighto do so. Nevertheless, Wallace's defeat may doom a potential 1972 campaign for president.


Early June 1970: Reports of economic slowdown, inflation and unemployment on the rise

After the publication of various data and statistics, the state of the economy in America emerged as a topic. Throughout most of the 1960s, the economy was growing faster than in most previous decades. The U.S. experienced the creation of millions of jobs, inflation was low and much new wealth was created. Even minorities such as African Americans and low-income families benefited from the boom. By 1967/68, the economy was that much “overheated”, that President Johnson demanded a tax increase, that he got in an election year. After the numbers of May 1970 dramatically continued the trend underway since the fall of last year, the economic condition and situation at job market became a major topic. For the first time in years, the unemployment rate hit 5%. Growth in May 1970 slowed down more than half compared to May of 1969. Inflation was now on the rise as well, though still at a stable rate.

Many Republicans in congress renewed their calls for spending cuts and urged for tax reductions. The White House announced that the president would soon meet with business and labor leaders as well as members of congress to discuss the situation.
 

June 15, 1970: President Johnson orders suspension of U.S. military activity in North Vietnam, delays next troop reduction

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“As a result of recent developments, I order the suspension of all U.S. military activity on North Vietnamese territory”, the president announced at a press statement this June 15. The commander-in-chief also added: “However, I will not order a further reduction of U.S. troops today. But be assured that further such steps will be undertaken as soon as we are at this point in Paris. That may be very soon. We hope that the decision will demonstrate our good will and cause the other side to speed up the process that we can come to a final agreement.”

The next day, South Vietnamese President Thieu ordered his forces to likewise. As press reports suggest, Thieu demanded to delay Step 3 of the American withdrawal in return for the LBJ’s decision on North Vietnam. Sources from inside the White House suggest, President Johnson wants a final agreement as soon as possible to focus on domestic policy and the negotiations with the USSR. Accordingly, he fears that the economic downward trend prevents him from implementing further Great Society measures.
 

June 24, 1970: President Johnson sends congress economic message as GOP heats up for midterms

After various consultations, President Johnson sent a special message to congress on the economy. In his letter, the president offered a reduction in military spending following the withdrawal from Vietnam. He rejected calls to cut spending for domestic programs concerning healthcare, education and the environment (he even urged for further action on healthcare). On tax policy, LBJ proposed to increase the tax allowance for low-income families to stimulate the purchase power.

Especially Republicans, but also a group of (mainly Southern) Democrats criticized the president’s rejection of spending cuts across the board. But congressional leaders such as House Minority Leader Gerald Ford (R-MI) seemed open minded for an increase of the tax allowance.

With the economy emerging as an important issue, Republicans now found a topic to focus on for the upcoming midterm elections in November. By June, various Republican groups begun to launch campaign ads for economic growth. It seemed as the economy and law and order were their main issues heading into the fall elections. White House interns confirmed that the Johnson/Kennedy Administration became increasingly nervous that the new congress would prevent the passage of any further progressive legislation and might doom a Robert Kennedy presidential campaign.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 29, 2017, 07:00:17 am
June 30, 1970: A lot of new polling in the year’s middle!

Gallup polls, released June 30, 1970

By the middle of 1970, President Johnson's approval rating dropped compared to the year's beginning. However, it remained above the 1967/68 lows. Democrats overall lost some ground, as other polling numbers including the administration's standing on various issues indicates.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 43%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 42%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 47%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 48%
Disapprove: 45%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling civil rights?
Approve: 67%
Disapprove: 26%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 42%


1970 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 47%
Republican: 45%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 30%
Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey: 26%
Former Governor George Wallace: 17%
Senator George McGovern: 8%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson1: 6%
Undecided/others: 13%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 24%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 21%
Governor George Romney: 14%
Senator John Tower: 12%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 11%
Governor Paul Laxalt1: 5%
Undecided/Others: 13%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
George Romney: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
John Tower: 44%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
George Romney: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
John Tower: 43%


George Wallace: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 47%

George Wallace: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%

George Wallace: 41%
George Romney: 47%

George Wallace: 43%
John Tower: 46%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on October 29, 2017, 02:04:20 pm
Reagan 1972


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 30, 2017, 05:25:10 am
July 5, 1970: Congress passes repeal of Tonkin Resolution, President Johnson vetoes bill

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An investigation by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee revealed that the U.S. ship Maddox, who was supposedly attacked by North Vietnamese forces in August 1964, had been on an electronic intelligence collection mission off the North Vietnamese coast. It also learned that the U.S. Naval Communication Center in the Philippine Islands, in reviewing ships' messages, had questioned whether any second attack had actually occurred. The so-called “Tonkin Incident” led to the passage of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that authorized President Johnson to use military force against communist forces. Several voices in congress, demanding the repeal of the resolution, got steam after the war became more and more unpopular. Now with American withdrawal underway, on July 3, congress passed a law repealing the 1964 resolution. The Johnson Administration was opposed to the move; President Johnson subsequently vetoed the bill on July 5. The president, in his veto message, warned about “consequences for Southeast Asia that go beyond the war in Vietnam.”

An attempt to override the veto failed in the senate the next day. Politicians and journalists alike were surprised that even Vice President Bobby Kennedy was opposed to the repeal, labeling the move as “not very helpful”.
 

July 20, 1970: Congress fails to pass economic bill, Republicans and Southern Democrats demand more spending cuts

After the veto override, a second measure that congress failed to pass: A piece of legislation endorsed by the Johnson Administration was defeated in the senate after the House narrowly voted in favor with 220 to 209. The Economic Stabilization Act of 1970 provided spending cuts at the Pentagon and a minor reform of tax deduction. However, Southern Democrats and Republican criticized the proposal as not far-reaching enough and demanded to cut expenditures on some domestic programs.

Following the defeat, the White House invited congressional leaders for further discussions.


Gallup poll, released July 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 44%


August 1, 1970: North Vietnam reportedly agrees to end infiltration of South Vietnam

It is not official, but observers of the Paris Peace talks stated in private conservations that North Vietnam agreed to halt infiltration by their soldiers of South Vietnam. This would be a substantial success for the peace efforts. However, according to CIA estimates, more than 100,000 communist troops are still operating on South Vietnamese soil. They are not part of any agreement so far.
 

August 16, 1970: President Johnson calls congress back into session for economic legislation, angers GOP

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House Minority Leader Gerald Ford (R-MI) criticized President Johnson's move to call congress back into session

Despite careful negotiations between the administration and congressional leaders, no significant legislation on the economy was passed until the summer recess. President Johnson, in wake of declining poll numbers nothing to do with Vietnam, saw himself compelled to call congress back into sessions. “We have urgent work to do. Now is not the time for vacation. And time for campaigning is enough there”, the president commented to a reporter.

Leading Republicans in congress criticized the move and denouncing it as campaign maneuver. House Minority Leader Gerald Ford said: “This is campaign tactic. The president has nothing new to offer, but calls congress into session to vote on the same measure that already failed. It is time for more spending cuts. If the president has another proposal how to fix the problems, we’re on board. But he hasn’t presented anything new.”


Gallup polls, released August 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 45%


1970 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 44%
Republican: 46%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 30, 2017, 05:28:10 am
September 2, 1970: Compromise for economic bill reached, Vice President Kennedy secures senate passage through tie-breaking vote

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After Vice President Kennedy broke a tie in the senate for the passage of the  Economic Stabilization Act of 1970, President Johnson signed to measure into law

After weeks of negotiations, the administration and congress reached a compromise. It included spending cuts at the Pentagon and a de-facto freeze of additional domestic spending for one year. After a year, there has to be review of the situation. The new proposal also includes a review of current spending of all departments. President Johnson announced to appoint a special commission to review expenditures and make suggestions for “meaningful elimination of unnecessary spending”. Despite most Republicans still opposed, the president hopes to pass the proposed legislation with enough votes of Southern Democrats. After the House voted 227 to 204 for the new version of the Economic Stabilization Act of 1970, the senate vote, on September 1, ended up with a 50-50 tie. Aware of the closeness, Vice President Kennedy stepped in and broke the tie in favor of the bill. It was the first time that the vice president, in his role as Senate President, broke a tie since taking office in January 1969. On September 2, 1970, President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill into law at his desk in the Oval Office. Although an agreement on any tax issue couldn’t be reached, President Johnson announced to resume discussions after the midterm elections.


September 1970: Unemployment and inflation continue to rise; economy emerges as key issue in midterm elections

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Governor Ronald Reagan (R-CA) and former Republican nominee Richard Nixon on the campaign trail for the upcoming midterm elections

With the effects of the Economic Stabilization Act of 1970 still unclear, unemployment and inflation continued to rise over the fall. The first now reached 5.8%. Although Vietnam and civil unrest were still issues, the slow economic downturn emerged as the main issue in the midterm elections campaign. Republicans blamed the Johnson Administration and “out of control spending for social programs”. President Johnson and his allies defended the expansion of the welfare and urged to implement further programs such as healthcare for all. Over the course of the campaign, the president renewed his support of a constitutional amendment to lower the voting age to 18 and expressed his willingness to review the draft. Vice President Kennedy emphasized the need to reform the presidential primaries.


Gallup polls, released September 30, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 44%


1970 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 45%
Republican: 44%
 

October 1970: High-profile Democrats and Republicans stump the campaign trail

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President Johnson at a Democratic campaign rally in October 1970

As the campaign is heating up, several high-profile Democrats and Republicans went out on the campaign trail, including those not up for election. Richard Nixon for the first time went back campaigning for his fellow Republicans, but denied to run for office again. Most notable races on the Republican side were these of governors Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller. The Gipper was well positioned to win a second term as California’s chief-executive, though the race was expected to end up closer than in 1966. Governor Rockefeller’s opponent, former Supreme Court Justice and U.N. Ambassador Arthur Goldberg, originally polled well for the New York gubernatorial contest, but now it looked like Rocky would beat both Goldberg and a candidate of the NY Conservative Party, who opposed the governor due to his liberal policies. Both Reagan and Rockefeller are seen as favorites for the 1972 GOP presidential nomination. Nevertheless, others such as Michigan Governor George Romney, another liberal Republican as well as his conservative colleague Spiro Agnew of Maryland, are polling well. In congress, Republicans are poised to win seats in both chambers. Some political observers even suggested, they could win a majority or come close to it. This would be a setback for President Johnson’s domestic agenda in the last two years of his presidency.


October 29, 1970: U.S. Chief Negotiator Cyrus Vance: “Peace Treaty is in sight”

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Cyrus Vance: "Agreement is in sight"

Some labeled it as an October Surprise when U.S. Chief Negotiator in Paris, Cyrus Vance, announced on October 29, that a “Peace Treaty is near”. He didn’t outline specific points agreed to. Informal sources say that the South Vietnamese are more problematic than the North. A White House leak revealed, President Johnson is “going mad over Thieu’s endless demands for assurances” after Secretary of State Katzenbach twice flew to Saigon within three months. According to reports, Henry Kissinger again secretly visited Beijing for consultations. It remains to be seen how soon an agreement will be signed and what it contains as well as the effects of Vance’s statement on the elections.


Gallup polls, released October 31, 1970

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 43%


1970 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 45%
Republican: 45%


Next: Midterm election results and further developments... stay tuned and feel free to comment


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on October 31, 2017, 06:48:28 am
★★★ United States Midterm elections, November 3, 1970 ★★★

On November 3, 1970 voters accross the country went to the polls to elect a third of the senate, the entire House of Representatives and 35 governors. The elections took place in the middle of President Lyndon B. Johnson's third (or second full) and last term.


Senate results

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Dark red/blue = Democratic/Republican hold
Light red/blue = Democratic/Republican gain
Light Green = Independent Democratic gain
Very light blue = Conservative (NY) gain
Grey = No senate election in 1970


Senate composition: 53 Democratic  (net change (
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Democratic gains: IL
Republican gains: CT, DE, MD, IN, OH, TN
Independent Democratic gain: VA1
Conservative gain: NY

1 = Senator Harry F. Byrd was a Democrat before, but ran as an Independent (Virginia)


Notable races:

California:
✓ George Murphy (R, inc.): 49.2%
John V. Tunney (D): 48.6%

Minnesota:
✓ Hubert Humphrey (D): 56.8%
Clark MacGregor (R): 42.5%

New York:
✓ James L. Buckley (Con): 39.4%
Richard Ottinger (D): 35.4%
Charles Godell (R, inc.): 25.8%

Virginia:
✓ Harry F. Byrd (I, inc.): 51.4%
George Rawlings (D): 31.2%
Ray Garland (R): 22.4%


House of Representatives

233 Democratic (net change (
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Congressional Leadership:
Senate President: Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)
Senate Majority Leader: Mike Mansfield (D-MT)
Senate Minority Leader: Hugh Scott (R-PA)

Speaker of the House: Carl Albert (D-OK)
House Majority Leader: Hale Boggs (D-LA)
House Minority Leader: Gerald Ford (R-MI)


Natable gubernatorial races:

Alabama:
✓ Albert Brewer (D, inc.): 66.4%
John L. Cashin Jr (R): 21.4%%
A. C. Walker (I): 12.2%

California:
✓ Ronald Reagan (R, inc.): 53.8%
Jesse M. Unruh (D): 44.7%

Georgia:
✓ James E. "Jimmy" Carter: 58.0%
Hal Suit (R): 41.1%%

Nevada:
✓ Paul Laxalt (R, inc.): 52.3%
Frank O. Callaghan (D): 46.4%

New York:
✓ Nelson A. Rockefeller (R, inc.): 53.1%
Arthur Goldberg (D): 40.0%
Paul Adams (Con): 6.6%


Summary

Republican momentum, Rockefeller and Reagan strenghtened

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Governors Nelson Rockefeller (R-NY) and Ronald Reagan (R-CA)

The election resulted in major gains for the Republican opposition. They not only picked up four seats in the senate, the GOP also managed to pick up 20 seats in the House (net gain), giving them 202 of the 435 seat chamber. Democrats lost the same number of mandates but maintained a relatively stable majority at 233 seats. Although the Republican gains are not half of the number they gained in the 1966 midterm elections (47 pick-ups), they came closer to a majority (218) than any other time in the 1960s. It seemed that the Republican economic message and ten years of Democratic presidents paid off at the voting booth. As newly elected Senator James Buckley, a conservative from New York who defeated both a Democratic and (liberal) Republican candidate in his race, noted on election night: “The voters have enough of the New Frontier and Great Society. America wants a different direction. We must cut taxes and spending”.

Although his Democrats still control congress, President Lyndon B. Johnson now heavily depends on more conservative Southern Democrats unless he wants to cooperate more closely with the Republicans. The next morning, the president offered newly elected senators and representatives his full cooperation. Shortly after, he invited all newly elected members of congress to a state dinner at the White House with him and Vice President Kennedy to discuss the agenda. It remains to be seen what policies the Johnson Administration is still able to implement. On top of the agenda is now a review of the draft and a constitutional amendment to lower the majority age to 18. These measures are not too difficult to enact, but when it comes to spending for social programs, the president is now expected to face more opposition than ever before throughout his seven year presidency. Political analysts wrote that in times when Ronald Reagan is emerging as national figure with presidential ambitions, LBJ’s main goal must now be to make sure, either Bobby Kennedy or Hubert Humphrey, who would protect and expand the Great Society, succeed him.

However, Republicans shouldn’t be overconfident, as they are divided between a liberal and conservative wing. Both of their leaders strengthened their position on election night. Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan won a comfortable reelection as governor. Rockefeller is now going into his fourth term as New York's governor while Reagan is beginning his second administration coming January.


A new generation of Southern Democrats?

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Governor Albert Brewer (D-AL), Governor-elect Jimmy Carter (D-GA), Senators-elect Lawton Chiles (D-FL) and Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX)

Despite the triumphes of Rockefeller and Reagan, Democrats gained a handful of governorships and won some important races, especially in the South. Notably are the elections of Albert Brewer, who received a mandate in his own right as governor of Alabama. Governor Brewer, a liberal, defeated conservative Democrat and former governor George Wallace in the primary. Another notable new governor is Jimmy Carter of Georgia, who ran as a moderate southerner. However, after his election, Governor-elect Carter declared the "times of racial segregation are once for all over", angering many segregationists in the South, including his predecessor Lester Maddox, who was elected lieutenant governor after being barred from seeking reelection due to term limits. Both Brewer and Carter, along with newly elected senators Lawton Chiles of Florida and Llyod Bentsen of Texas, are considered a "new generation" of moderate-to-liberal Southern Democrats. President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy invited the four to lunch at the White House a few days after the election.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on November 02, 2017, 09:45:50 am
Terrific updates! Is George Romney still governor of MI then?


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 04, 2017, 06:54:28 am
November 9, 1970: Thieu publically demands U.S. strikes against NLF, President Johnson declines

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A move that rarely has been seen before: South Vietnamese President Thieu publically urged President Johnson to order air strikes against the NLF near the demilitarized zone and on Cambodian territory. According to various reports, the peace talks in Paris are at a decisive stage, but the South Vietnam leadership is extremely worried the U.S. might not stand ready to defend the South after a treaty and withdrawal. However, President Johnson rejected calls to resume air bombardments. Meanwhile, more reports spoke of “substantial progress” in Paris and a nearing agreement.


November 12 – 14, 1970: Vice President Kennedy tours South East Asia, visits Saigon

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Vice President Kennedy shakes hands with people of Saigon

As White House and State Department interns confirmed, the administration is concerned about President Thieu and his government. President Johnson and members of his cabinet fear Saigon may block a possible peace agreement with the North because Thieu believes the U.S. will abandon them. Vice President Kennedy proposed to meet with the South Vietnamese leadership and discuss on the ongoing conflict and negotiations.

On November 12, the vice president went abroad Air Force Two and flew to Saigon. Before landing in the South Vietnamese capital, RFK briefly visited Japan, Thailand and South Korea for political consultations. The next afternoon, he arrived in Saigon and had a four hour meeting with President Thieu and Prime Minister Ky. There was no press conference hosted, but a final “communique” was released. The paper didn’t give any details, but members of the vice president’s staff told reporters that RFK made clear, that the U.S. is committed to withdraw most American troops from combat and focus more on training South Vietnamese forces. Accordingly, the vice president complained South Vietnamese efforts for self-defense are “moving on too slow”. After their meeting, the vice president visited an American military base outside Saigon and greeted troops.

Vice President Kennedy returned to Washington late at the 14th, after a brief stop in Hawaii.


Gallup poll, released November 30, 1970

Following the Democratic losses in the midterms and struggling economy, President Johnson's approval rating went below the disapproval for the first time since summer 1968.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 48%


December 3, 1970: Governor Reagan says GOP should have done better in midterms, signals presidential run

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One month after the midterm elections, newly reelected Governor of California Ronald Reagan made some news at a luncheon in Los Angeles. The Republican governor complained that the GOP should have won the House of Representatives. “In today’s political climate, that is turning against the tax and spend, big government philosophy of Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy, when we see American weakness at the world stage, the Republican message for change was not clear enough in some cases. I believe, that the Republican Party could have won at least one house of congress this fall”, he noted.  When asked for his own ambitions, the Gipper said: “Well, I’m not ruling out anything. But it is obvious that the country needs and wants another direction. I believe, I can play a role in this process.”


December 18, 1970

BREAKING: President Johnson heads off for official China visit


After the midterms and as Christmas is nearing, almost nobody expected something important to happen at the political stage. Obviously, President Johnson wants to use the remaining days of the year for increased diplomatic efforts. As the White House announced, the president will tour around world, starting tomorrow. His first destination is the People’s Republic of China. The United States has no formal diplomatic relations with the country since 1949, when the Chinese Civil War ended and non-communist forces went to Taiwan, the only China the U.S. currently recognizes. According to various sources, the visit is a direct result of Henry Kissinger’s talks. Mr. Kissinger will join the president on his trip.


President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Around the World Tour; December 19 – 23, 1970

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On December 19, 1970, President Johnson headed off to China. Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach, Special Foreign Policy Advisor Henry Kissinger and members of his team including Chief of Staff Paul Nitze, joined him. The president was welcomed at an airport in Beijing by high-ranking Chinese delegation. The images of President Johnson stepping down the gateway and shaking hands went around the world. After a Chinese dinner, the actual talks begun the next day when the chief-executive first meet Secretary General Mao. The two men spoke for a combined of over five hours. Secretary Katzenbach and Mr. Kissinger were also present. As members of the president’s staff stated, Mao demanded an official relation with the United States. President Johnson responded that he will make decision once back in the United States. However, he insisted, the Republic of China (Taiwan) would remain an ally of the United States and that their sovereignty was not up for discussions. The president also requested for help in the Vietnam conflict. Mao reportedly agreed to urge North Vietnam to accept a final peace treaty. But he declined to end military aid. An official statement at the end was not given. Only an informal “agreement” that “discussions on various issues would continue”. On December 21, President Johnson was invited to take a walk on the Chinese wall. These photos went around the world.

After leaving China on December 21, the president made stops for less significant political consultations in India, Pakistan, Turkey, Germany, France and finally the United Kingdom. On December 23, the flew from directly from London to Texas to spend the Christmas holiday at the LBJ Ranch.
 
Most U.S. media agreed the visit was a success in the end. Former vice president and Senator-elect Hubert Humphrey commented, LBJ would go down in history as the president “for civil rights, social justice and the president who opened the door to China and the USSR”.


December 30, 1970: A lot of new polling in the year’s end!

Gallup polls, released December 30, 1970

By the end of 1970, President Johnson's approval rating's somewhat improved after his China trip, but the Republican gains in the midterm elections gave them some momentum at the polls for 1972.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 42%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 40%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 44%
Disapprove: 45%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 44%
Disapprove: 49%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 41%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 31%
Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey: 27%
Former Governor George Wallace: 13%
Senator George McGovern: 9%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Former Governor Lester Maddox1: 5%%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 23%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 23%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 15%
Governor George Romney: 12%
Senator John Tower: 8%
Governor Paul Laxalt: 5%
Undecided/Others: 14%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
George Romney: 47%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
John Tower: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 45%


Hubert Humphrey: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
George Romney: 47%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
John Tower: 47%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 47%


George Wallace: 40%
Ronald Reagan: 47%

George Wallace: 39%
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%

George Wallace: 38%
George Romney: 47%

George Wallace: 41%
John Tower: 48%

George Wallace: 40%
Spiro Agnew: 48%


George McGovern: 40%
Ronald Reagan: 48%

George McGovern: 40%
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%

George McGovern: 40%
George Romney: 47%

George McGovern: 41%
John Tower: 46%

George McGovern: 40%
Spiro Agnew: 47%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 05, 2017, 07:19:18 am
January 3, 1971: 92nd Congress convenes

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Newly elected House Speaker Carl Albert (D-OK)

Two months after the election, the 92nd Congress convened at Capitol Hill. Democrats elected Majority Leader Carl Albert (D-OK) as new speaker, after John McCormack (D-MA) retired from office. Among the newly sworn in senators was former vice president Hubert Humphrey (D-MN).


President Lyndon B. Johnson’s State of the Union Address; January 20, 1971

Exactly two years before his term is set to expire, President Johnson appeared before congress again to deliver his 1971 State of the Union Address.

CLERK: Mr. Speaker, the President of the United States!

[Hail to the chief plays, President Johnson enters chamber]

SPEAKER ALBERT: Mr. Vice President, Members of the House and Senate, it is my high privilege and distinguished honor to present to you the President of the United States.

[Applause]


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PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, members of Congress, distinguished guests and my fellow Americans:

First, let me congratulate all newly sworn-in members of this body. I look forward to work with each and everyone of you in a spirit of understanding and respect. Let me also congratulate our new House Speaker, Carl Albert.

Today I come before you in a time of transformation. As a new decade has arrived, a new era in the history of our country has begun. We witness a time of transformation at home and abroad. We have not only begun to seek new diplomatic relations to ease tensions and seek peace, we are also at a turning point in our involvement in Vietnam. We have made tremendous progress in the past two and a half years. Tonight, I can proudly report that a final agreement in Paris nears. Now, of course, that doesn’t mean all difficulties are resolved. Nor does it mean, that the path to a final agreement is without any obstacles. But we can proclaim, we have never been so close to a lasting solution than today. I’m confidant, the conflict can and will be ended in a short period of time. At least, when it comes to America. […]

At home, we still have a lot of homework to do. But let me first use this opportunity to thank everybody for the progress we have made. Now we must focus on the challenges ahead. First of all, we have to take action to regain the economic strength of the last decade. That means, we have to spend wisely, tax wisely, but without hurting those in need. Therefore, I reject cuts for programs, millions of Americans depend on. Let us instead work to eliminate waste and restructure our tax system. […] Today I also want to use this opportunity to recommend the passage of constitutional amendment to lower the majority age to 18. […] I will also soon introduce a bill for a reform of the draft. I believe we can suspend the draft over the next years. And I urge you to join me in that effort, while making our armed forces an attractive employer. […]

Thank you for listening, good night, God bless you and the United States of America.



The Republican response

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Senator Richard Schweiker (R-PA) gave the Republican response to President Johnson's 1971 State of Union Address

In 1971, Senator Richard Schweiker (R-PA) gave the Republican response to President Johnson’s State of the Union Address. Schweiker is considered are moderate-to-liberal Republican. The Pennsylvania senator welcomed the president’s proposal for a constitutional amendment to lower the voting age. He also signaled readiness to discuss the draft situation. However, he didn’t hesitate to criticize the administration in various issues: “The president spoke about a lot of things. But he also didn’t speak about many pressing issues in the minds of millions of Americans. There is the problem of law and order. The administration has taken a weak stance on this matter. President Johnson and his cabinet obviously believe it is a matter for cities and states, not for the federal government. I can tell you: He is wrong. The issue needs to addressed. The president and the vice president now refuse this debate for over two years. We have to hold them accountable for this. The ever growing problem of drug abuse is a prime example of this. We need to take bold action to fight drugs. Especially drug abuse in our armed forces has taken an abnormal extension”. Senator Schweiker also spoke of needs for spending cuts to fight inflation and demanded a more far reaching tax relief for most Americans and business. “We have to address the economic slowdown in a much different fashion. The bill passed last year was a minimal census, that doesn’t move us forward”, he commented.


January 26, 1971

BREAKING: Final Paris agreement reached; set for signature on January 31


News in Paris today broke, that a final peace agreement has been reached. The White House confirmed the news later that day. Although Hanoi didn’t comment officially, Radio Moscow also reported that an agreement is scheduled to be signed on January 31. Details of its content will be presented soon. The next day, the Pentagon confirmed, that Secretary Clifford is working on a plan for a complete withdrawal.


White House: President Johnson to address the nation on television on January 30, 1971

A day after the news of a Paris Peace Agreement broke, the White House informed the public, that President Lyndon B. Johnson will address the nation on television on the treaty on January 30 and give some details.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: WilliamStone1776 on November 08, 2017, 11:20:05 am
Enjoying the TL


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 09, 2017, 03:44:07 pm
Terrific updates! Is George Romney still governor of MI then?

Enjoying the TL

Thanks...

No, Romney retired after two terms from 1963 to 1971. But at that time, there wasn't term limit in Michigan.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 11, 2017, 06:05:33 am
January 30/31, 1971: President Johnson addresses the nation / peace accords signed

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President Johnson during his television address

Representatives of the United States, North and South Vietnam gathered together in Paris to sign the Peace Accords. After more than two years of negotiating, the an agreement has finally been reached. President Johnson addressed the nation the day before directly from the Oval Office.

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Paris negotiating table during the signing ceremony; January 31, 1971


The following terms were negotiated:

- All U.S. combat troops will be withdrawn by January 31, 1972

- North Vietnamese forces, including the NLF, immediately stop infiltration of the South. This does not include troops already on Southern territory.

- North Vietnamese forces will not tackle U.S. military bases anymore. The U.S. in return will continue the suspension of all air strikes.

- 15,000 U.S. forces to train South Vietnamese forces are permitted to stay on Southern territory, but are not involved in combat.

- All prisoners of war will be exchanged. All releases will completed by September 30, 1971 at latest. North Vietnamese soldiers must return to the north. All prisoners get improved treatment immediately. Torture will be prohibited and they are entitle of frequent meals.


Negotiations between the parties continue on the following questions:

- A possible process for reunification. Continued talks about a possible reunification of a neutral Vietnam should continue. President Johnson himself pushed this issue, but this is the most unlikely to get resolved. Political expectVietnam to turn out similar to Korea with a permanent two-state solution.

- President Johnson offered North Vietnam to assist the country with their rebuilding, especially removing damages of war. This aid would only include civilian assistance such as building homes, schools or hospitals. The precondition is that the North stops all hostile actions against the United States and its allies for the next years. If such aid would be granted, it would have to be carried out by the next administration. It is very likely that Robert Kennedy would continue this policy if he becomes the next president.

- There will be reviewing process in the in three years of U.S.-North Vietnamese relations. The North asked for this provision to leave to door for normalization of diplomatic relations with the U.S. Possibly that is aimed at China and the USSR, to show North Vietnamese independence.

The accords were welcomed by governments around the world. President Johnson praised Chief Negotiator Cyrus Vance for his efforts and thanked Henry Kissinger, who will stay on as advisor, for his service. He also mentioned North Vietnam’s leading diplomat Le Toc Tho and expressed his thanks for the cooperation. Although he publically supported the agreement, South Vietnamese president Thieu, according to insiders, remains skeptical of the American commitment. A handful of leading conservatives in the United States also criticized the accords. Governor Reagan described it as a “capitulation on rates”. Senator Barry Goldwater even labeled the treaty as “useless, because it only reinstates the status-quo”. He added “we’re now at the same point than in 1963/64, but 30,000 American soldiers are dead.”


Gallup poll, released January 31, 1971

Although released after the Paris signing, the January poll was conducted before the ceremony

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 43%


February 10, 1971: President Johnson signs repeal of Tonkin Resolution

After the president vetoed a bill repealing the Tonkin Resolution last year, he now signed an authorization bill for military withdrawal in Vietnam that includes a repeal of the 1964 resolution. Shortly after, President Johnson proposed a 20% cut in military spending for fiscal year 1972.
 

February 23, 1971: Congress passes 26th Amendment to lower voting age to 18

This February 23, Congress passed the 26th Amendment to lower voting age to 18 years with the necessary two-thirds majorities. The Johnson Administration actively supported the measure. Vice President Kennedy, who presided over the historic senate session, urged the states to ratify the amendment as fast as possible.


Gallup poll, released February 28, 1971

Following the Paris Accords, President Johnson's approval rating experienced a jump.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 38%


March 1, 1971: Bipartisan commission to reform presidential primaries appointed

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Commission co-chairs: Vice President Kennedy and Governor Laxalt


It has been a priority of Vice President Robert Kennedy since his 1968 presidential run. A decent number of high-profile politicians including President Johnson of both parties agreed for the need to reform the presidential nomination process. This March 1, a bipartisan commission to implement a new nomination process in both parties was appointed. The Commission, headed by Vice President Robert Kennedy (for the Democrats) and Nevada Governor Paul Laxalt (for the Republicans) as co-chairmen, will make specific suggestions and oversee their implementation. At a joint press conference, Governor Laxalt stated the process is scheduled to be finished by the fall of that year. Vice President Kennedy added that there “should be a voting process in each state of the union”.

Members of the Commission are:

- Vice President Robert F. Kennedy, co-chairman (D-NY)
- Governor Paul Laxalt, co-chairman (R-NV)
- Senator Llyod Bentsen (D-TX)
- Governor Reubin Askew (D-FL)
- Governor Albert Brewer (D-AL)
- Senator Walter Mondale (D-MN)
- Representative Tip O'Neill (D-MA)
- Secretary Orville Freeman (D-ME)
- Governor Ronald Reagan (R-CA)
- Lieutenant Governor Malcolm Wilson (R-NY) (as personal representative of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller)
- Senator and Minority Leader Hugh Scott (R-PA)
- Senator John Tower (R-TX)
- Representative Donald Rumseld (R-IL)
- Former Governor William Scranton (R-PA)
 

March 20, 1971: President Johnson vetoes Republican tax proposal

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By March 1971, unemployment rose to 6.2% and inflation to 6.9%. Republicans, encouraged by their gains in last year’s midterms, formed a collation with moderate Democrats to pass an across-the-board tax reduction and spending cuts in both the military and social programs. When presented to the president, LBJ vetoed the measure on March 20. In his veto message, he outlined his opposition to deeper cuts in domestic programs and demanded tax cuts “only for hard working people”.

Several Republicans including more liberal ones criticized the president. Governor Ronald Reagan, a potential 1972 presidential contender, spoke of “irresponsibility and recklessness at the highest level”. He demanded even deeper tax and spending cuts. “America can’t take this tax and spend policy much longer”, he added.


Gallup poll, released March 31, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 41%


April 14, 1971: Senator John Tower won’t run for president

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He’s out before he’s in: Senator John Tower (R-TX), Richard Nixon’s 1968 running mate, publically declined to run for president in 1972. “I will fully be focused on winning reelection to the senate next year”, he said. When asked, Senator Tower declined to name any preferred candidate of his party but said he would fully support the eventual Republican nominee.


April 21, 1971: White House supported tax bill fails in House

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A tax bill pushed forward by the Johnson Administration failed to pass the house by a 225 to 213 vote. The measure would have cut taxes for low and middle-income Americans and contained minor cuts to social programs. However, enough Republicans and moderate Democrats regarded the proposal as not far reaching enough and voted it down on the floor of the house. Several GOP senators and Harry F. Byrd (I-VA) announced, they would filibuster the bill in the senate if passed by the house.


Gallup poll, released April 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 43%


May 1, 1971: Number of U.S. troops in Vietnam drops below 100,000

For the first time since 1965, less than 100,000 U.S. combat troops remain in Vietnam. As of May 1, 1971, there were 97,000 men left. According to the Pentagon, the withdrawal moves on swiftly. Immediately after the signing of Paris, President Johnson ordered appropriate steps to be taken.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 12, 2017, 06:29:49 am
May 4, 1971 – 8.35 a.m. BREAKING: President Johnson suffers massive heart attack – hospitalized and in very serious condition


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Breaking News from the White House: President Lyndon B. Johnson reportedly suffered a massive heart attack this morning after having breakfast in his bedroom. The attack occurred between 8 a.m. when Lady Bird Johnson left the room and 8.15 a.m. According to White House insiders, the chief executive was found lying on the floor of his bedroom by a Secret Service agent. The agent immediately made an emergency call. Just minutes later, the 62 year old president was moved to Bethesda Naval Hospital in Washington. Details are not made public to this moment, but President Johnson’s condition is very serious. It is not the first time that LBJ suffered a heart attack; the first was in 1955 while serving in the senate. Back then, he just barely escaped from death. Afterwards, he improved his lifestyle, like quitting smoking cigarettes. He didn't resume smoking to this day, but it Mr. Johnson is known as a workaholic, often being busy for more than 16 hours a day. And even though he spends a lot of his time at the LBJ Ranch in Texas, the president is at work there as well.

Just within minutes, Vice President Robert Kennedy at a meeting in New York City was informed of the situation. According to his staff, the vice president will immediately return to Washington and evaluate the situation. Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach received a phone call while a visit in London. His return to the United States is also considered. Meanwhile, Chief of Staff Paul Nitze assembled with Attorney General Ramsey Clark, Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, Secretary of the Interior Steward Udall and Treasury Secretary Joseph Barr for discussions. The rest of the cabinet is not in Washington at the moment. It is expected that Vice President Kennedy informs the public after his return to the capital.

More details in short.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Jaguar4life on November 12, 2017, 10:03:49 am
LBJ's pass health problems have come back to bite him.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 12, 2017, 11:05:46 am
LBJ's pass health problems have come back to bite him.

Yeah, he had two surgerys in 1965 and 1966. And in his memoirs, he wrote that he was always afraid of being alone in a room because of his heart.

Interesting is also that he joked when signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was the ninth anniversity of his heart attack. Almost exactly nine years later, he would be dead.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on November 13, 2017, 03:59:14 am
Oh no. This is exciting, can't wait for it to continue!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 13, 2017, 02:12:53 pm
May 4, 1971 - 10.50 a.m. BREAKING: 25th amendment invoked: Robert Kennedy is acting president


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As the 25th Amendment has been invoked, Vice President Kennedy has formaly assumed presidential powers and duties


After Vice President Robert Kennedy returned to Washington at around 10.05 a.m. EST, he immediately meet with White House Chief of Staff Paul Nitze, Attorney General Clark, Secretaries Clifford, Barr, Freeman and Udall. He also briefly spoke to the First Lady and invited House Speaker Carl Albert, Senate president pro tempore Allen Ellender, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford and Senate Leaders Mike Mansfield and Hugh Scott to the cabinet meeting for discussions. After receiving word from the hospital about President Johnson’s condition, the cabinet decided to invoke the 25th amendment of United States constitution. All members of the administration agreed to the move, including those outside Washington, after being informed by phone. Secretary Katzenbach is already on his way back to Washington.

Accordingly, President Johnson’s condition is so serious, that he is unable to function as president and commander-in-chief. With the invocation, presidential authority is temporally transferred to Vice President Kennedy. RFK was also put in charge to take control over the nuclear codes. The White House announced, the vice president will give a press statement this afternoon after consultations with all important department heads and the military.


Vice President Robert Kennedy addresses the nation

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Vice President Kennedy during his address at the White House


At 2.45 p.m., Vice President Robert Francis Kennedy, as acting president, invited the press to the White House East Room to give a statement on the current situation.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen, my fellow Americans:

Today is sad day for our nation. This morning, while in New York City, I was informed that President Johnson suffered a severe heart attack in his bedroom shortly after breakfast. The president fell into a state of unconsciousness. After being found by a Secret Service Agent, he was rushed to Bethesda Naval hospital for immediate treatment. As I have been told, his condition has been stabilized, but is still very critical. Furthermore, President Johnson must undergo a complicated heart surgery this afternoon. This surgery is risky, but necessary to reduce to make another heart attack with unknown consequences far less likely.

Following my return, I have consulted, in person and via phone, with all members of the cabinet and congressional leaders of both parties about the next steps taken. Our discussions were guided by the question, how we could guarantee a full functioning of the federal government. Accordingly, we have concluded that the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office at this moment. In light of these developments, we agreed that it is absolutely necessary for someone to be in charge, so that potential incidents of any kind can be managed quickly and effectively. We also regarded it as necessary to ensure the American public, that the executive branch fully functions. In addition, we say to potential advisories: Don’t test us. As prescribed in the 25th Amendment of the United States constitution, I have recommended to the cabinet to declare the president as incapable of executing his powers and duties and dissolve the same upon the vice president until such a state has concluded by President Johnson’s own declaration. The suggestion was agreed to unanimously. Therefore, as vice president, I have taken formal control of presidential powers and duties. Immediately after, I received important briefings on national security matters. As long as President Johnson is in this critical condition, I will stay in the White House, consult with members of the cabinet, the military and congressional leaders. To the public I can say: There is no reason to worry with regard the government’s business.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is a situation unprecedented in our almost 200 year history. The 25th Amendment has not been adopted in 1955, when President Eisenhower suffered a heart attack and Vice President Nixon took informal control of the White House. However, the Johnson/Kennedy Administration is not unprepared. In the weeks before the inauguration in 1969, President Johnson invited me to a private conversation and spoke of steps to be taken in such a potential situation. He was well aware of the treat of a heart attack and wanted to prevent any situation in which the presidential powers and duties hang in the balance. The president, who had the same secret agreement with Vice President Humphrey, was determined to take care in advance for such a scenario and urged me to invoke the amendment with approval of the cabinet whenever I feel necessary. Our nation can be proud of this president, who, in such a tragic personal situation, was most concerned about the well-being of our country. In any case, we owe President Johnson a deep gratitude. We hope and pray for his fast and full recovery. I personally will not forget when President Johnson stood here, at the White House and at my bed and prayed for me. That was three years ago. Now I believe, it is my obligation to do the same for him and his family.

Thank you, good afternoon, and god bless the United States of America.

 

Afternoon: President Johnson undergoes surgery

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The White House published this photograph of President Johnson after the surgery while his wife Lady Bird stands by


As Bethesda Naval Hospital confirmed, President Johnson will undergo a complicated heart surgery that is scheduled for several hours. The treatment isn’t without a risk, but doing nothing would, as the doctors said, almost lead to another – possibly fatal – heart attack, possibly even before LBJ’s term is up in January 1973. Although the press was excluded from the hospital building, some photographs were published by the White House.

At 8.45 p.m., the public was informed that the surgery went without complications and the president was put in a coma for 24 hours to recover. It was also reported, the president would fully recover from today’s heart attack thanks to the quick response of the Secret Service Agent. For the moment, though, his condition remains critical and the main focus afterwards must be to prevent further heart attacks, because he “won’t survive another one” (as a doctor was informally quoted).


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 18, 2017, 06:06:02 am
May 5, 1971 – BREAKING: U.S. passenger ship taken hostage by North Korea in international waters, major test for Kennedy as acting president


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Acting president Kennedy on the phone to discuss the hostage crisis

Has it something to do with President Johnson’s temporary incapacity? It will never be known for sure, but it is possible, if not likely. The U.S. civilian passenger ship “Pacific Special” has been taken hostage in international waters on its route between South Korea and the Philippines. 257 people are on board, including the crew. 220 of them are Americans, 21 Canadians, 5 Mexicans and eleven others from various countries in Europe including France, the U.K. and West Germany. Shortly after, North Korea claimed the ship violated its territorial integrity and accused the U.S. of a secret espionage operation.

Vice President Kennedy, who acts as president and has not left the White House since assuming the role, was immediately informed. With President Johnson unable to function, it is up to RFK to take care of the situation.


May 6, 1971: Vice President Kennedy reportedly orders special forces to free hostages

“I will not allow this regime to humiliate the United States during these few days I’m at helm”, the vice president was quoted upon giving the order to free the hostages through force. Nothing was made public about the decision, but informal information was spread this morning. The White House confirmed that “all options are on the table” and that RFK met with members of the cabinet, National Security Advisor Walt Rostow as well as military leaders to discuss the situation. The vice president was also presented the option of setting an ultimatum for the communist regime, but he instead decided to intervene immediately as long as the hostages are still all on board the ship.


“Am I dead or what?”

“Am I dead or what?”, these were President Johnson’s first words when he wake up this afternoon. After a complicated surgery, the president awoke this afternoon. His wife and daughters were on his side. Later Secretary of State Katzenbach visited the hospital and assured President Johnson that RFK would be in charge of governing. It is not know whether the Secretary informed LBJ about the hostage crisis. But it seemed as they agreed the 25th amendment would remain invoked for few more days until the president was in better condition.

Later that day, Bobby Kennedy reportedly phoned the president. But nothing about their conversation was made public.


May 6, 1971; 6.30 a.m. – BREAKING: Hostage crisis ended, Robert Kennedy praised


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This photo of the U.S. marines was published after the liberation of the ship

Early in the morning, the vice president who looked tired after he supposedly got very sleep this night, informed about the public about the hostage crisis. According to the acting president, all hostages were freed. 19 North Korean soldiers were killed, another 15 were captured by American forces. In addition, three U.S. marines were injured, one seriously, and five hostages were also wounded. They are expected to return to the United States within the next few days. RFK also warned the regime that further such actions would lead to “severe consequences” and that President Johnson would decide whether additional consequences such as sanctions are considered.

Meanwhile, Vice President Kennedy received bi-partisan praise for his role in the hostage crisis. “He took care of this situation with a clear mind and resolve and made a wise decision”, said Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT). Even Senator Goldwater (R-AZ), a vocal critic of the administration, expressed his respect for Bobby Kennedy. “Well done”, said Governor Reagan (R-CA). And freshman Senator Lawton Chiles (D-FL) already came out with a statement, that he would support a Kennedy 1972 presidential campaign, as did former Governor Terry Sanford (D-NC).
 

May 8, 1971: President Johnson back in charge, returns to White House within one week

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President Johnson after he took back control of his powers and duties in his hospital room

After consultations with his doctors and the cabinet, President Johnson today signed a formal letter that he is capable of governing again. With this formal declaration, presidential powers and duties were returned to LBJ. He decided to stay a few more days in hospital. Later the day, he met with the vice president, cabinet members and congressional leaders in his room to discuss foreign and domestic affairs. In a public statement, he praised RFK’s role during the hostage crisis.
 

May 15, 1971: President Johnson returns to White House, awards Secret Service Agent with Medal of Freedom, urges passage of tax bill

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President Lyndon B. Johnson awards the Secret Service Agent, who found him after the heart attack, with the Medal of Freedom

Eleven days after the near fatal heart attack, President Lyndon B. Johnson returned to the White House. It seemed as the chief executive has almost fully recovered. The president was welcomed back to the White House with a huge applause from members of his administration and staff as well White House employees. During a reception given that afternoon, the president awarded James Coburn with the Medal of Freedom. Coburn was the Secret Service Agent who found the president on the ground after suffering the attack. Thanks to his quick response, LBJ received immediate treatment and was able to survive without lasting consequences. This is the second time, President Johnson awarded a Secret Service Agent for saving him. He already awarded Rufus Youngblood in 1963, who pushed then-vice president Johnson to the floor of his car while President Kennedy was shot in Dallas.
 
During his address, the president once again urged congress to pass his tax reform proposal to battle inflation and a down-turning economy. It looked as the president is determined to use the current momentum following the heart attack for his political purposes.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 19, 2017, 05:09:12 am
Gallup polls, released May 31, 1971

As we're moving closer to election year 1972, polling intervalls become shorter. By late May 1971, President Johnson seemingly benefits from his heart attack at the polls. Meanwhile, Vice President Kennedy's numbers reached new heights due to his performance as acting president.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 38%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 57%
Disapprove: 37%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the Vietnam War?
Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 42%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 48%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 58%
Disapprove: 36%


1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 49%
Republican: 44%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey: 23%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 7%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 27%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 24%
Governor George Romney: 16%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 13%
Governor Paul Laxalt: 6%
Undecided/Others: 14%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Justice Blair on November 19, 2017, 05:30:14 am
Fascinating and Brilliant TL. I always wondered what would have happened if Kennedy had joined LBJ in 1964 (rather than '68 as in this) and it gives a good portrayal.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 19, 2017, 05:59:41 am
Fascinating and Brilliant TL. I always wondered what would have happened if Kennedy had joined LBJ in 1964 (rather than '68 as in this) and it gives a good portrayal.

That's a fascinating question. I would have prefered RFK as VP in 1964, although Humphrey was also a great guy. They didn't like each other on a personal level because they were different and RFK opposed his borther's 1960 decision to pick Johnson for the VP spot, but they had much in common politically. Especially on civil rights, where Bobby had likely more in common with LBJ than his brother (according to Nicholas Katzenbach).


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 19, 2017, 06:44:29 am
June 8, 1971: Revenue Act of 1971 signed into law

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On June 8, 1971, President Johnson signs the tax bill into law


It may sound obscure, but President Johnson’s heart attack and momentum resulting from it obviously helped him in passing a tax bill. Although inflation and unemployment’s raise slowed down over the last two months, the president vigorously pushed for a tax bill without major cuts to social programs. Under the Revenue Act of 1971, lower and middle incomes received a 20% tax break. On the other hand, spending cuts for the military were possible due the ongoing withdrawal in Vietnam. Funds for space exploration were also cut. The legislation passed the house 230 – 202 and the senate 55 – 45.


June 29, 1971: 26th Amendment enacted

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After more than 38 states ratified the 26th Amendment of the U.S. constitution, it could be enacted during a White House ceremony given by Vice President Kennedy. The amendment lowers the majority age from 21 to 18 in the United States and therefore making it possible for 18 year olds to vote. It remains to be seen how that plays out in the 1972 election.

According to a Gallup poll, the amendment is supported by 83% of Americans. The numbers also show virtually no difference between Democrats and Republicans. Both sides support the measure by a wide margin.


Gallup poll, released June 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 39%


July 4, 1971: Pentagon Papers leaked!

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The United States is already withdrawing from the Vietnam, but the issue became a big headline in the news again, and in a fashion, the administration won't like. The New York Times began publishing excerpts on this Independence Day 1971. The July 4 article is named "Vietnam Archive: Pentagon Study Traces Three Decades of Growing US Involvement”. The so-called Pentagon Papers are a Department of Defense history of the United States' political-military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. After the release, Street protests followed. One media observer wrote that  “the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations systematically lied, not only to the public but also to Congress”.

It was quickly revealed that a former employee of the Pentagon named Daniel Ellsberg was behind the publications. President Johnson declined for any public comment, but was, according to White House insiders, furious about the leak. He is quoted with the words "I want that SOB on a silver tablet and throw the traitor in jail". Members of the administration including Attorney General Ramsey Clark argued Ellsberg and his friend Russo were guilty of a felony under the Espionage Act of 1917, because they had no authority to publish classified documents. White House Chief of Staff Paul Nitze threatened the New York Times with a lawsuit if they continue to publish content of the secret papers.


Further developments regarding the Pentagon Papers during July 1971:

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President Johnson, visibly angry, during a press statement: "Publication of top-secret material is illegal and will be punished"


After the Times continued to publish material in the following days, the mood in the White House became increasingly exasperated. Nevertheless, no significant statements were made public. The president’s press team only commented that “appropriate steps will be taken”. Even Vice President Kennedy remained silent on the issue. Some anti-war protesters hoped the vice president would come out and criticize the previous administration of President Johnson, but also the administration of his brother. When asked by a reporter, RFK only commented that “leaking restricted material is dangerous”.

After failing to persuade the Times to voluntarily cease publication on July 15, Attorney General Ramsey Clark obtained a federal court injunction forcing the Times to cease publication after three articles. The newspaper appealed the injunction, and the case New York Times Co. v. United States quickly rose through the U.S. legal system to the Supreme Court. On July 21, 1971, the Washington Post began publishing its own series of articles based upon the Pentagon Papers; Ellsberg had given portions to the D.C. based newspaper. The next day, President Johnson himself demanded publically the suspension of material. “There is a reason these papers are classified as top secret. Any publication violates existing law and will be punished under the law”, he stated.

On July 31, the Supreme Court rejected the administration’s lawsuit in a five – four decision. The court argued that that the government failed to meet the heavy burden of proof required for prior restraint injunction. As White House interns told, the president was furious and demanded FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, his personal friend, to take action against Ellsberg and other leakers. "I'm sick and tired of this crap", he reportely said to Hoover, who agreed.


July 31, 1971: A lot of new polling!

The Pentagon Papers obviously put an end to the president's rise in the polls. Although he's a member of the administration and didn't distance himself from the Pentogan Papers, RFK continues lead the Democratic field for 1972. He also maintains a fair approval rating.

Gallup polls, released July 31, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 48%
Disapprove: 45%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of foreign policy?
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 43%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove President Johnson's handling of the economy?
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 47%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Robert Kennedy's performance as vice president?
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 41%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 25%
Former Governor George Wallace: 14%
Senator George McGovern: 7%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Undecided/others: 11%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 26%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 25%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 14%
Governor George Romney: 11%
Senator Richard Schweiker1: 6%
Undecided/Others: 13%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

This time, only Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey were polled among Democrats.

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
George Romney: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
George Romney: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 47%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on November 20, 2017, 09:45:02 am
Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on November 21, 2017, 07:27:33 am
Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Representative LouisvilleThunder on November 22, 2017, 10:18:56 am
This is one of the best timelines I ever read. Keep it up!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Kingpoleon on November 22, 2017, 05:40:55 pm
Run, Rocky, Run!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 24, 2017, 01:01:41 pm
Great updates! I liked how RFK handled his brief acting presidency. Pentagon Papers are also interesting.

This is one of the best timelines I ever read. Keep it up!

Thanks guys!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 24, 2017, 01:10:10 pm
August 1971: Further publications of Pentagon Papers, Ellsberg on the run

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After all legal options to halt the publications of the Pentagon Papers failed, the major newspapers continued to make them public. Meanwhile, Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the material, has disappeared. Administration- and FBI officials urged him to report to legal authorities. The administration remained largely silent on the material itsself. National Security Advisor Walt Rostow pointed out that the motive for intervention in Vietnam has always been to promote peace and resist aggresion by the communist regime in North Vietnam. When asked why he backs off from this discussion, President Johnson said he would be open to debate the issue after emotions "cool down" and an objective discussion is possible. "So far, I have nothing to say what I didn't already say", he added.


August 9, 1971: Secretary Katzenbach: Negotiations with USSR will last to February 1972; President Johnson to invite Soviet leadership

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In 1969, the United States and Soviet Union begun arms limitation negotiations in Geneva as a direct result of President Johnson’s Moscow visit in December 1968. The talks were originally scheduled for completion this summer. Now, both sides agreed to prolong the talks until February 1972. As Secretary of State Katzenbach and Foreign Minister Gromyko confirmed, “substantial progress to limit conventional weapon systems were made”. However, a few more months are needed to work out the details. The Soviet Leadership reassured the Johnson Administration their willingness to complete the treaty before the 1972 presidential campaign goes into its decisive phase.

The next day, President Johnson officially invited Secretary General Brezhnev to the United States for the signing ceremony early next year. The Soviet leader accepted the offer, after the signing ceremony was originally planned for Geneva.

Some media observers called the announcement as a move by the administration, to distract from the Pentagon Papers.


August 31, 1971: Number of U.S. troops in Vietnam sinks below 50,000; plans for draft ending legislation in the making

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U.S. troops leaving Vietnam


47,150 American soldiers were left in Vietnam by late August 1971. As the Pentagon confirmed, the withdrawal plans are ahead of schedule. July and August 1971 had the fewest U.S. casualties in Vietnam since late 1964. Secretary Clifford also confirmed that the cease fire is largely effective.

The administration is also reportedly in the final stages on working out legislation for a suspension of the draft. President Johnson intends to renew structures in the army, so that a voluntary army becomes an attractive employer.


Gallup polls, released August 31, 1971

For the first time in three years, President Johnson's net approval rating went negative. The main reason is obviously the publication of the Pentagon Papers, which hurts public confidence in government.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 46%
Disapprove: 48%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only candidates listed with at least 5% support)


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 27%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 8%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 6%
Undecided/others: 8%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 28%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 24%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 15%
Former Governor George Romney: 12%
Senator Richard Schweiker: 5%
Undecided/Others: 16%


General election match-ups


Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
George Romney: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Hubert Humphrey: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
George Romney: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


September 3, 1971: Governor Spiro Agnew runs for president!

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“I am running for president to seek new policies. To strengthen and improve the American standing at home and abroad. To fight crime, to make government more efficient and the servant of the people, to promote growth and prosperity”, said Governor Spiro Agnew (R-MD) upon announcing his run for the presidency. Governor Agnew served since 1967 as the chief executive of Maryland and governed as a pragmatist. As a pro-civil-rights Republican with a conservative leaning economic philosophy, he may appeal to both major factions of his party. In his speech, he also found harsh words for government leakers and called Daniel Ellsberg a traitor.

However, it remains to be seen how he will perform between the two overwhelming favorites, his colleagues Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller. Both have not officially announced their campaigns so far, but are expected to do so in the closing months of this year (anything else would be a huge surprise). In 1968, Governor Agnew first endorsed Rockefeller and then switched to Nixon, who seriously considered him for the second spot on the GOP ticket until picking John Tower in the end. As of now it is unclear from which side – the Gipper or Rocky – the man from Maryland will take more support. Before his announcement, Agnew polled in low double digits, but at third place. He could be the kingmaker in the end, or, what would be a great upset, beat Rockefeller and Reagan from the middle.

As insiders reported, the bipartisan commission on reforming the presidential primaries will soon present its results. It's almost certain at this point that each state will hold a primary or caucus in one form or another.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 25, 2017, 06:41:31 am
September 8, 1971: Congress passes and President Johnsons signs first post-Vietnam budget

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President Johnson signs the budget into law

At the end of one month long negotiations, congress adopted the first post-Vietnam budget, that President Johnson approved with his signature on September 8, 1971. The president and his chief of staff formed a broad coalition of the center to enact the budget. Some left-leaning members of congress like Senator George McGovern (D-SD) voted against the budget because they opposed the freeze in domestic spending and demanded more budget cuts for the military. The Pentagon’s funds were cut by 15% for fiscal year 1972. Conservatives like James L. Buckley (Con-NY) or Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) also voted against the bill since they called for more cuts in social programs. Nevertheless, the budget is expected not to exceed 4.5 billion dollars in the red.


September 9 – 13, 1971: Attica Prison Riot in New York State – challenge for Governor Rockefeller

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller: Did he go too far with his tough stance in Attica?

Attica State Prison, New York: On September 9, 1971, about 1,000 of the Attica prison's approximately 2,200 inmates rioted and took control of the prison, taking 42 staff hostage. The involved prisoners demanded better treatment and more rights after a series of incidents in other state prisons that resulted in the killing of other prisoners. Negotiations between the authorities and involved men first seemed to move through successfully, as some of their demands were agreed to. Nevertheless, legal authorities and Governor Nelson Rockefeller rejected calls for a complete amnesty from criminal prosecution for the prison takeover. On September 13, Governor Rockefeller ordered the state police took back control of the prison by the use violence. When the uprising was over, at least 43 people were dead, including 10 correctional officers and civilian employees, and 33 inmates.

With his tough stance, Governor Rockefeller, reportedly preparing for a 1972 presidential run, alienated many liberals in the country. However, President Johnson publically supported the governor’s decision, as did most conservatives of his party, like rival Ronald Reagan. Vice President Kennedy said some demands of the prisoners were justified, but rejected their use of violence. Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey denounced Rocky’s decision and criticized that the governor refused to go to Attica in person.

Whether the incident will have an effect on Mr. Rockefeller’s presidential ambitions has to be seen.


September 20, 1971: Bipartisan commission to reform presidential primaries finishes work successfully

The bipartisan commission to reform the nominating process during presidential primaries under the leadership of Vice President Kennedy and Nevada Governor Laxalt presented their results this September 20, shorty before the 1972 presidential campaign will take steam. The two chairmen, joined by other high-profile Democrats and Republicans across the spectrum, introduced the following plan to the American public:

- Both major parties will hold primaries and caucuses in all U.S. states including the District of Columbia.

- During primaries and caucuses delegates for the nominating conventions will be awared.

- The method of allocating will be determined by each state under state law. The same is applying to the dates of the primaries. However, the time frame is from February to June.

- The commission held various meetings with all 50 state governors and members of the state legislature to ensure a fast and swift implementation. Some states already worked out legislation that is ready for passage. Vice President Kennedy urged states to enact such laws not later than December this year.

- The National Party Committees support the plan and lobby for passage.

The public overwhelmingly supports the reformed process. A Gallup poll from late September found that 85% of the American electorate supports the plan. 83% of Democrats and 86% of Republicans are in favor. The media also reported favorably about the results and praised the commission members for their bipartisanship, knowing that some members might soon battle each other for the nomination and later the White House.

President Johnson publically praised his vice president for his role in the process. When asked whether this is an endorsement for Bobby, he said “no”, but added “Bobby would make a great president”.

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Governor Reagan and Vice President Kennedy joke about their presidential ambitions at the press conference

"When will you announce to run for president?" a reporter promptly asked the vice president before the press conference came to an end. "This is not the time to talk about personal ambitions", the vice president responded with a smile. "Why aren't you asking me the same question?", Governor Reagan joked. A laughter was going through the room. Kennedy looked at Reagan "You are going to run, governor?". The Gipper smiled and just said "You will find out November 7, 1972". Again, a laughter was going through the room at Capitol Hill. "Let's come back to the subject", commented a laughing Governor Laxalt...


Gallup polls, released September 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 49%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Polls showed little move on the Democratic side. Vice President Kennedy is still the favorite for the nomination and possibly the presidency, with Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey in a strong second place. On the Republican side, Governor Rockefeller lost support and Governor Ronald Reagan surged to first place again. After his announcement, Governor Spiro Agnew received extensive media attention and gained in the polls, where is now just a few points behind Rocky. Possibly his support among the liberal wing surged after Rocky's setback in Attica. Senator Richard Schweiker, a liberal, could not benefit from this trend, though it is not certain that he will even run for office. Senator Schweiker has largely avoided any comments about potential presidential ambitions. Nevertheless, he may become relevant for the vice presidential spot once the nominee is determined. Especially if a conservative is heading the ticket.

(Only candidates listed with at least 5% support)


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 24%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 10%
Senator Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson: 5%
Undecided/others: 8%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 29%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 24%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 21%
Former Governor George Romney: 13%
Undecided/Others: 13%

No general election match-ups were polled this month.


October 1, 1971: General William Westmoreland runs for the Republican nomination!

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General Westmoreland on television: "I'm running to rebuild America's strenght"

This came as surprise to almost the entire political and media elite: General William Westmoreland announced on this first day in October that will seek the Republican nomination for president. Mr. Westmoreland was commanding general in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. He was dismissed by President Johnson in 1968 and became Chief of Staff of the Army until his resignation last year. Obvouisly, he wants to become Eisenhower 2.0 by running, though Ike was much more popular at the time of his election to the White House in 1952. Westmoreland, who critics label as “General Waste-more-men”, was the architect of the failed military strategy in Vietnam until 1968. In his announcement speech, the general sharply criticized the moderated policies towards the USSR and Red China and advocated a strong defense policy, opposing budget cuts for the Pentagon by the Johnson Administration. Domestically, General Westmoreland called for budget cuts across the board, except defense, and tax reliefs for businesses.

It remains to be seen how his low-budget campaign with a small staff will perform against the GOP favorites. A New York Times journalist described the campaign as “PR-Stunt” and suggested the general has actually an eye on the vice presidency or the Pentagon under a Ronald Reagan administration. Westmoreland was not included in any poll so far.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Jaguar4life on November 25, 2017, 11:44:39 am
Westmoreland 72!!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on November 25, 2017, 11:52:17 am
This is amazing. Go Bobby or Rocky!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 26, 2017, 07:08:00 am
Autumn is heating up!


October 5, 1971: All the way with HHH – Senator Hubert Humphrey launches presidential campaign!

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Compassion and equal rights were the premises by Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey upon launching his 1972 presidential campaign

“Today, my fellow Americans, I announce my candidacy for the presidency of the United States”, were his first words. Nobody was really surprised when Senator and former vice president Hubert Humphrey announced his candidacy for president at a rally in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he once served as mayor before entering the U.S. senate. In his address, joined by a crowd of over 5,000 enthusiastic supporters, the former vice president spoke about his record in the senate and as President Johnson’s second-in-command between 1965 and 1969. He mentioned civil rights, education and social safety. Senator Humphrey presented himself as a true liberal from Minnesota, driven by “compassion and a joy for politics”, who wants to continue LBJ’s agenda. “Let us fight for an all-inclusive America”, Senator Humphrey told his supporters. His speech was mainly positive, as he didn’t mention the Republicans at all. He also praised his fellow Democrats and emphasized the need to go through a “fair nominating process” and “a united force in the general election”.

After sitting Vice President Robert Kennedy, Senator Humphrey is the second most likely nominee of his party and Bobby’s most formidable opponent. RFK hasn’t declared his candidacy and avoided comments on the subject, but he is expected to throw his hat in the ring within the next weeks or months.

Right after his announcement, Senator Humphrey received the endorsement of several notable unions accross the country.


October 15, 1971: President Johnson signs landmark Armed Forces Modernization Act

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A suspension of the draft and a modernization of the armed forces is the main content of the act, President Johnson signs into law on October 15, 1971

Finally, with a 274 – 145 vote in the House and a 64 – 35 vote in the Senate, congress approved the Armed Forces Modernization Act of 1971. The passed version is almost the same than proposed by the Johnson Administration. The law, going into effect on January 1, 1972, sets the framework the end the military draft that exists since 1940. The law requires to suspend the military draft between December 31, 1973 and December 31, 1976. The president is authorized to determine the exact date through executive action. The bill also includes provisions for a reform process within the armed forces to make them an attractive employer. That includes a higher number of vacation days and certain other privileges for servants and their direct relatives.

President Johnson signed the landmark legislation on October 15, 1971 at a White House ceremony. The president noted that he intends to issue a decree within the next few months to determine the formal date after discussions with the Pentagon. He also thanked congress in particular and praised Vice President Kennedy, who was a staunch advocate for his step ever since 1968, for his role in the process.  


October 25, 1971: Senator George McGovern enters presidential contest!

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Senator George McGovern (D-SC) at his campaign kick-off rally

Senator George McGovern (D-SD) was well known for his critics of President Johnson’s Vietnam pre-1969 policy and a staunch liberal. Not surprising to political observers, he declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination next year this October 25. In his speech, the senator emphasized the need to increase efforts in the war on poverty and a greater access to health care. Senator McGovern also positioned himself as a dove on foreign policy. He praised President Johnson’s post-1969 foreign policy, but also said “the U.S. sent confusing signals around the world these past ten years”. He added: “I stand for a policy that intends to work for peace by bold action”. However, he didn’t outline specific policy proposals in his speech. Senator McGovern is an outsider for the nomination and appeals to a similar voter group than Eugene McCarthy did four years ago.


October 26, 1971: The Gipper is in! Governor Reagan to seek presidency

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A new direction demands Governor Ronald Reagan (R-CA) at his first campaign event

“My fellow Americans: With a deep awareness of the trust millions of you put in me in one form or another, I announce my intention to seek the Republican nomination for President of the United States”, told Governor Ronald Reagan to a crowd by launching his campaign at an event in San Diego, California. Surrounded by at least 7,000 cheering supporters, Governor Reagan focused on his criticism of the Johnson Administration. “Today, America has taken a direction, that was neither intended by our founders, nor does it solve our true problems. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy tell us that government programs, funded by the working men and women and business, are the solution to everything. The actual result is an unpreceded bureaucracy, taxes that go through the roof and a rising unemployment and inflation. I offer a different path. A path of prosperity, self determination and freedom […]”. On foreign policy: “What Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy have done on the world stage is dangerous. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Kennedy bear the responsibility for weakened defense, a selling out of American values to forces of evil that hold their people in slavery. In return, we get nothing but empty words and a so-called peace treaty in Paris, that won’t be lasting for half a decade […]”. The Gipper finished his speech: “Ladies and Gentlemen: It is time to take the responsibility in our own hands and return the true national greatness, so that America can be that shining city upon a hill.”

Political observers around the country, including liberal ones, described Governor Reagan’s campaign announcement as a “pure success”. The Gipper hold an authentic speech and his supporters were fired up by his words. He’s definitely the greatest favorite for the nomination, along with New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller. Rocky is, as unofficial sources claim, announcing his candidacy in the final weeks of this year after the New York State Legislature has adjourned the current session. Once Rocky is in, the stage is set for the battle for the future of the Republican Party. And it won’t be an easy fight for either side. With an unforeseeable outcome.


October 31, 1971: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

The recent legislative success to end the draft obviously benefits President Johnson. With regard to the upcoming presidential campaign, Hubert Humphrey experiences a surge in the polls after his announcement. On the Republican side, Ronald Reagan widens his previous lead and polls best among Republicans for general election now.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 49%
Disapprove: 45%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only declared candidates or potential contenders with at least 5% support listed)

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 31%
Former Governor George Wallace: 11%
Senator George McGovern: 11%
Undecided/others: 12%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 33%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 25%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 22%
Governor George Romney: 7%
General William Westmoreland1: 6%
Undecided/Others: 7%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
William Westmoreland: 39%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%

Hubert Humphrey: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
William Westmoreland: 39%


George McGovern: 41%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

George McGovern: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

George McGovern: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 40%
William Westmoreland: 40%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on November 27, 2017, 10:46:12 am
Terrific updates! Having watched some Reagan speeches, his announcement reads very authentic. Now go RFK!

LOL at General Wastemoremen :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 29, 2017, 02:13:25 pm
BREAKING: October 31, 1971 – Daniel Ellsberg surrenders to legal authorities


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Pentagon Papers leader Daniel Ellsberg talking to reports after his surrender to legal authorities; October 31, 1971

Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg surrendered to legal authorities in Boston, Massachusetts. Upon his appearance before the district attorney, he said: "I felt that as an American citizen, as a responsible citizen, I could no longer cooperate in concealing this information from the American public. I did this clearly at my own jeopardy and I am prepared to answer to all the consequences of this decision."

The White House formally declined to comment. Only the Jutsice Department put out a brief statement, saying Mr. Ellsberg will face a fair trial under the rule of law. So far, President Johnson successfully avoided public questions on the issue, though his approval ratings dropped significantly after the leak.


November 9, 1971: Governor Paul Laxalt not to run for president – endorses Reagan

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Governor Paul Laxalt and candidate Ronald Reagan at a fundraiser of the Reagan campaign; November 9, 1971

Governor Paul Laxalt (R-NV) was considered a potential contender for the Republican nomination, as he had been a very visible figure for a few years now. He was praised as co-chair of the commission for reforming the nomination process and is considered a moderate to conservative Republican. But he has also become personal friends with Ronald Reagan. In fact, the two worked together to protect Lake Tahoe at the California-Nevada border. Now, Governor Laxalt publically endorsed his friend at a Las Vegas fundraising dinner for the Gipper. If elected, Governor Laxalt would certainly play a role in a possible Reagan Administration.


November 22, 1971: Lyndon Johnson becomes second-longest serving president in history

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Eight years passed since LBJ first took the presidential oath (l) abroad Air Force One on November 22, 1963, after President Kennedy was shot. On November 22, 1971 President Johnson (r) remembered his predecessor during a speech.

November 22, 1971 is the 2,922nd day of Lyndon Johnson's presidency. He's now in office for exactly eight years, a normal two-term tenure. By crossing this mark, only Franklin D. Roosevelt has been president for a longer time (1933-1945). And LBJ, if he completes his term, is likely to remain in second place as long as the 22nd amendment isn't repealed: Only a vice president ascending to office - as he did - after half of the ongoing term is up but before November 22 of the year prior to the next election could exceed President Johnson's time in office. And that only if he or she manages to win the next two elections.

Eight years have passed since President John F. Kennedy was shot in Dallas, Texas. On this day, President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy attended a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetry, where JFK rests, and remembered the fallen leader, whose name still insprires Americans and foreigners likewise.


November 30, 1971: Economy bounces back

Good news for the Democrats? Over the summer and fall 1971 a mild recession occurred in the United States that now apparently ended. November proved to the third consecutive month with economic growth. Unemployment peaked at 7% in September 1971, but dropped to 6.5% in October and further to 6.2% in November. President Johnson claimed measures enacted by his administration are responsible for the improving numbers. Governor Reagan responded that the recovery was “not of significance” and that he would soon put out a specific economic plan for his presidential campaign. Vice President Kennedy, who reportedly prepares for his own White House bid, contradicted the governor’s statement.


Gallup poll, November 30, 1971

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 46%
Disapprove: 47%


December 2, 1971: President Johnson orders all U.S. troops to end hostage actions in Vietnam

With the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam going into its final stage, President Lyndon Johnson issued a directive that all (American) hostile actions shall cease. Although the number of troops has been reduced step by step since 1969, American forces remained active in battle along with the South Vietnamese allies. The latter have now taken the main burden of the war and will now take over entirely. However, hostile actions by the North dropped significantly.


December 12, 1971: George Wallace: I will decide presidential run in January

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Former Governor George Wallace: Will he or won't he?

George Wallace long planned a presidential run in 1972, but after his return to the Governor’s Mansion in Alabama was prevented by Governor Albert Brewer in 1970 it seemed as his appeal would not go far enough to launch a national campaign. The populist Democrat, who moderated his views on segregation, now said, he wants to decide by January whether to join the race. Former Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, who has similar views, actively pushes Wallace to join the race. "Reagan is bad, Rockefeller and Humphrey are even worse and Kennedy is the worst of possible presidents. Make no mistake about it", said the Georgia politician, "therefore, we need Wallace in ’72."


Writer's note: I added the event of the eight anniversity of Lyndon Johnson's first swearing in belated.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on November 29, 2017, 03:03:23 pm
December 28, 1971: Rocky throws his hat into the ring!

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller at his announcement speech rally

“We want Rocky! We want Rocky!” screamed an enthusiastic crowd of over 5,000 in New York as Governor Nelson Rockefeller walked on the podium. “My fellow Americans: Next year’s election will determine the president who will preside over the bicentennial of our great nation. It will determine, who will lead this greatest country on the face of the earth into the third century of its proud national history. The next election will determine in what kind of future our children and grandchildren will live. I want this future to be one of peace, prosperity and freedom. These three words are the cornerstone of our campaign. […] I believe that I can carry out this vision for America. As I have done in 13 years of service to the great state of New York as its governor. Now, therefore, I hereby declare my candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination. I am running to offer this positive vision of optimism and compassion to our citizens. I will seek the support of each and every one of you, to serve for you and the public good”, said the governor upon entering the presidential contest.

This is Governor Rockefeller's third serious run for the presidency and, according to observers and insiders, his best chance to finally capture the Republican nomination. A feat he hasn't accomplished before for various reasons (in 1964, the brief remarriage with his wife Happy hurt him, in 1968 his campaign was poorly organized as he entered the race too late - similar to Reagan). His effort this time is also more professional than in 1964 and 1968. Like Reagan, the Rockefeller campaign is organized in every state and able to manage a serious groundgame in order to compete in the primaries. Prediction markets give both Rocky and the Gipper each a 45% chance for the nomination, with another 10% going to other candidates (Governor Spiro Agnew takes the lion's share here).


George Romney: Rockefeller for president!

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Former Governor George Romney: "I will support Nelson Rockefeller for president"

Just hours after Rocky’s announcement, former Governor George Romney (R-MI) endorsed his fellow liberal Republican during a radio interview. That, of course, eliminates himself from the contest. “Governor Rockefeller is the right man at the right time. I’m proud to call myself a Rockefeller Republican”, he said. Journalists wrote that the former governor of Michigan is very likely to join a possible Rockefeller Administration in an important position.


State of the presidential race by the year’s end

By the end of 1971, all major candidates who were expected to run, officially entered the presidential contest. Only Vice President Robert Kennedy, the Democratic frontrunner, hasn’t formally announced his candidacy. According to members of his team, he’ll start campaigning by sometime in January. His toughest rival will he his predecessor in the vice presidency, Senator Hubert Humphrey. Both are representatives of the party’s liberal wing. Humphrey has rallied most unions behind him, while RFK is expected to take the lion’s share of black support. Political observers expect one of these two to be the nominee, though the possibility of a deadlocked convention has been raised after former Governor George Wallace publically flirted with a run. This could be the case, should RFK and HHH as well as Senator McGovern, the clear underdog, split the liberal vote and Wallace picks up enough support to prevent an outright majority at the convention floor. Interesting will also be, what President Johnson is going to do. So far, he didn’t address the campaign and gave no endorsement. It is unlikely that he will do so before the candidate is nominated, but he may play a role behind the scenes or hint his preferences in public speeches. After his reelection in 1968, political observers expected him to support Humphrey in 1972, but he worked surprisingly well with Vice President Kennedy over the course of the last three years. RFK, without a doubt, played a much bigger role in the vice presidency than Humphrey did under LBJ. Therefore, it seems possible that the president would be comfortable with either of these two. Nevertheless, he is also known for his high regard of Governor Rockefeller.

On the Republican side, the long awaited battle between governors Reagan and Rockefeller has begun. Unlike the Democrats, the two frontrunners already took aim at each other: “I welcome the challenge by Governor Rockefeller”, said Reagan the day after the Rockefeller announcement, “I believe the economic policies my worthy New York colleague has pursued so far are not significantly different from the policies that existed too long in this country and led to a gigantic bureaucracy and out of control taxation”. Rocky promptly responded by criticizing Reagan’s previous statements on taxes. “Fellows like me don’t need a tax break. The average worker needs one”, the New York governor stated. Meanwhile, Governor Agnew, polling in a strong third place, focused his message on “law and order on our streets” and more deregulation. He also empathized the need for a tougher stance against the communist block and accused the Johnson Administration on being “weak on communism”. A similar tone was set by General Westmoreland who vehemently rejected the Paris Peace Accords, labeling them as “a capitulation in the making, that is to be blamed on President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy”. Westmoreland, whose campaign was only barely mentioned in the news so far, also tried to get attention by personally attacking Nelson Rockefeller as a “secret Democrat”. The New York Governor, on new year’s eve, responded by calling the general “classless”. Rockefeller also denounced Westmoreland’s proposal to increase defense spending by 40% as a joke. Rocky promised to release a plan how to balance the budget by 1976 in the coming months. The Gipper also expressed his determination to balance the federal budget by 1976, largely through spending cuts and economic growth.

The race overall seems, at this early stage, wide open and is expected to be a toss-up in any case. That can be interpreted as good news for both parties: Democrats could very well win a fourth consecutive term in office. And Republicans have a decent shot at winning back the presidency after twelve years of JFK and LBJ.


December 31, 1971: A ton of new polls at new year's eve! Released by Gallup

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 46%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

(only declared candidates or potential contenders with at least 5% support listed)

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 28%
Former Governor George Wallace: 14%
Senator George McGovern: 9%
Undecided/others: 13%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 31%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 28%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 19%
General William Westmoreland: 8%
Undecided/Others: 14%

1 = not included in previous polls


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Spiro Agnew: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
William Westmoreland: 38%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Spiro Agnew: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
William Westmoreland: 39%


George McGovern: 40%
Ronald Reagan: 45%

George McGovern: 39%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%

George McGovern: 40%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 41%
William Westmoreland: 40%


Next: Heading into 1972 and the upcoming election cycle, President Johnson’s final year in office… stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on November 30, 2017, 04:39:07 am
This is amazing. Can't wait to see how it goes!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 03, 2017, 06:40:41 am
January 3, 1972: Richard Nixon endorses Rockefeller and joins the campaign trail!



Senator Robert Taft Jr. (R-OH) gave the 1972 response to President Johnson’s State of the Union Address

Senator Robert Taft (R-OH) was selected to for a rebuttal to the president’s address. Taft’s selection was a victory of the conservative wing, since the liberals and moderates wanted Edward Brooke (R-MA), the first popularly elected black senator, to give the speech.

“No word about the ongoing drug crisis on our streets and the military. Instead, the president praised the end of the draft and proposed a new expensive social program such as socialized healthcare. This bad news for America. The good news is, that we are going to have an election this year that gives us the chance to replace King Johnson with a Republican”, said Taft, the son of legendary senator and conservative icon Robert Taft and grandson of former president William Howard Taft. In his remarks, the Ohio senator, who is in office since 1971, also sharply criticized the Johnson Administration for being too weak on the Soviets. Although he welcomed negotiations, he emphasized to be more aggressive at Moscow. “The president seeks an equal balance”, said Taft, “but there can’t be a balance. America must stand tall against the forces of communism in order to liberate all nations dominated by the Soviets.”


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 03, 2017, 11:59:40 am
January 17, 1972: Vice President Bobby Kennedy kicks off presidential campaign!

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Vice President Kennedy, the Democratic frontrunner, is now officially in the race. "I want to continue the JFK/LBJ agenda and be a voice for progress", he said upon entering the contest.

He already filled in for all primaries and caucuses last month, but now it is finally official: Bobby Kennedy runs for president this year. He kicked off his campaign at rally in New York City joined by an enthusiastic crowd of approximately 10,000 people. “My fellow Americans: Grateful for all the support you have given to me in over a decade of public service, I once more ask for your support to change world”, the vice president said, “in 11 years now, under the leadership of my beloved brother, President John Kennedy, and President Lyndon Johnson, we have come so far as a nation. At home and abroad, we made unimagined progress that will be remembered for generations. But renewing our nation is not a mission that is completed one day, it is a lasting process that goes on, far beyond a single presidency. We must constantly work for reforms: implanting new ones as well as improving those existing. This is and has always been the American way of life. To continue this work, America needs a champion who will take the burning torch of this great nation and move forward. I want to be your champion.”

Bobby Kennedy enters the presidential contest as the clear frontrunner for the Democratic nomination. He has been an active vice president under a president he had a difficult relationship before. Bobby also has experience in congress and at the Justice Department. The name Kennedy is still somewhat of a myth, what certainly helps RFK. In his speech, he praised the achievements of the Kennedy/Johnson years. He expressed his staunch support for universal healthcare and urged early passage of a bill. “I tell the Republicans: If they don’t pass it during this year, I’ll try again as president.”

Just shortly after his announcement, RFK picked up many notable endorsements from Democrats across the nation. He also received support from dozens of black leaders and civil rights activists.


January 22, 1972: Wallace ’72 – former Governor George Wallace enters Democratic primary

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Former Governor George Wallace at his first rally: The colorful Southerner runs as a populist and representative of the old conservative wing

“Can you find a true voice for the average American in this field of Democratic candidates?”, asked former Governor George Wallace his supporters at a rally in Montgomery, Alabama. “No! We need Wallace! We want Wallace! Wallace! Wallace!” answered a cheering crowd. Wallace continued: “I can't either! And that is why I, today and here in wonderful Montgomery, declare my candidacy for President of the United States!” [Massive applause]. “It is time to reclaim the power in our country. For all too long we had some bureaucrats telling us what to do. For all too long we have seen an erosion in public confidence and an erosion in states rights. For all too long, we have seen the lawlessness of hippies and other demonstrators! I seek a new approach to governing and be a voice for everyday citizens in this country. This is our land, and we will take it back from DC!”, the former governor added.

After forgoing a candidacy in 1968, George Wallace seeks the presidency in 1972 and challenges Vice President Kennedy and Senator Humphrey from the right. The colorful populist, who moderated his stances on segregation, has still a lot of fans across America, especially in the South. The voices who wrote him off following the narrow defeat in the 1970 gubernatorial primary are now proven wrong, although it is unclear how much support he will get in the primaries. But a certain appeal to his Anti-Washington and pro state’s rights message is certainly there. The nomination of Wallace is unlikely at this point, though he may garner enough votes in the new primary system to prevent the favorites Kennedy and Humphrey, whom he labeled as “out of touch elitists”, from an outright majority.


January 29, 1972: President Johnson: Kennedy or Humphrey should be the nominee

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When he briefly sat down with a female journalist, President Johnson said he prefered either Robert Kennedy or Hubert Humphrey as the Democratic nominee and next president.

The press called it “unexpected and surprising” right after President Johnson expressed his thoughts on the presidential campaign. If there is something like a “non endorsement”, he gave one for Wallace and McGovern. When asked by a female journalist at the White House who his choice for president would be, President Johnson answered that he heavily favors Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey. “Both of these men are excellent candidates. I think either of them should be the nominee and I have no doubt each would make an outstanding president. Voters who want my policies to continue beyond January 1973 should cast their vote for Robert Kennedy or Hubert Humphrey”, said the chief executive. When asked about the Republicans, LBJ declined. 

The New York Times commented that LBJ obviously isn't willing just to "sit out" his remaining time in office. After surprising the public with this comment, he also left many stunned by pushing for universal healthcare. "Johnson is still a power hungry man. He wants to lead as long he is president", the article reads.


January 30, 1972: Last Vietnam soldiers return home

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President Lyndon B. Johnson greets homecoming U.S. soldiers from Vietnam; January 30, 1972

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Upon his arrival, a G.I. is welcomed by his girlfriend at Andrews Air Force Base

A year after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, the last American soldiers returned home to the United States. They were welcomed home at Andrews Air Force Base by President Lyndon Johnson. The commander-in-chief thanked the young men for their service and sacrifice and promised his administration will do everything possible to help veterans. “America’s brightest finally returned home and we owe you deep respect”, he said. Images of the last troops welcomed home by parents, spouses, girlfriends and other relatives went through the entire media and sparked deep emotions on many sides. Some also felt abandoned, as this was not a “hero’s welcome” like in World War II.

Nevertheless, about 10,000 U.S. military advisors remain in South Vietnam to train South Vietnamese forces and assist them. Their role, however, is limited to assistance and training, as agreed to in the Paris treaty. They also won’t take action in battle and stay on South Vietnamese territory.


January 31, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

President Johnson's State of the Union Address made surpringly positive news that led to an improvement of his numbers. After Vice President Kennedy announced his presidential campaign, his numbers also surged for both the primary and the general election. George Wallace also imoproves his standing. Meanwhile, Hubert Humphrey's numbers dropped nationally, but his campaign heavily focuses on Iowa, where the first caucus will be held in February 1st. On the Republican side, Governor Reagan and Rockefeller lead the field and are at dead heat nationally as well as in Iowa.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 50%
Disapprove: 44%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race


Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 26%
Former Governor George Wallace: 18%
Senator George McGovern: 9%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 32%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 31%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 18%
General William Westmoreland: 8%
Undecided/Others: 12%


Iowa Democratic caucus

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 33%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 30%
Former Governor George Wallace: 15%
Senator George McGovern: 13%
Undecided/others: 9%


Iowa Republican Caucus

Governor Ronald Reagan: 35%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 20%
General William Westmoreland: 5%
Undecided/Others: 5%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
William Westmoreland: 38%


Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Ronald Reagan: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 42%

Hubert Humphrey: 46%
William Westmoreland: 37%


George McGovern: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 46%

George McGovern: 40%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

George McGovern: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 45%

George McGovern: 43%
William Westmoreland: 40%


Next: The Iowa Caucus on February 1, 1972!

Writer’s note: The primary calendar is the same as in our days. In the TL, the states implemented caucus and primary rules right after the Kennedy/Laxalt Commission finished its work.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on December 03, 2017, 01:49:23 pm
I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: AustralianSwingVoter on December 03, 2017, 02:12:54 pm
I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 03, 2017, 02:40:38 pm
I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.

Thanks for the note. I thought he was the first overall. But he was the first popularly elected African American senator, according to Wikipedia. Corrected that now. :)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: AustralianSwingVoter on December 03, 2017, 03:32:05 pm
I don't believe Brooke was the first black Senator--the South had some during Reconstruction as I recall, no?
He was the third African-American senator, during Reconstruction there were 2 from Mississippi. Though, even today he is still the longest serving African-American senator.

Thanks for the note. I thought he was the first overall. But he was the first popularly elected African American senator, according to Wikipedia. Corrected that now. :)
Yes, first popularly elected as the other two were elected long before the 17th Amendment


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 04, 2017, 02:44:41 pm
February 1, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Humphrey and Reagan emerge victorious in Iowa; Agnew strong third in Republican Caucus ★★★


The primary session for election 1972 has begun. These are the popular vote results:

Democratic Caucus
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 33.3%
Robert F. Kennedy: 31.4%
George Wallace: 18.4%
George McGovern: 15.8%

A mid-westerner wins in the Mid-West: Hubert Humphrey beats Robert Kennedy by roughly two percent in Iowa. Not too surprising, since the former vice president’s campaign heavily focused on the neighboring state of his native Minnesota to gain early momentum. Iowa was a must-win for Humphrey, who celebrated his victory. The Kennedy campaign downplayed the defeat and pointed out how close RFK came. Both George Wallace and McGovern exceeded expectations. Especially Wallace garnered over 18% of the vote, proving that his appeal goes beyond the South.

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Senator Hubert Humphrey talks to the press after defeating Vice President Kennedy in the Iowa Democratic Caucus: "I am stunned and thankful for Democrats' support"


Republican Caucus
✓ Ronald Reagan: 35.8%
Nelson Rockefeller: 26.1%
Spiro Agnew: 25.7%
William Westmoreland: 9.5%

The Republican Caucus produced two winners: The first is Ronald Wilson Reagan, who not just won Iowa, but also managed to secure a near ten point win over his rival Nelson Rockefeller. Rocky’s support in the state was obviously overestimated in the polls. The second winner is Spiro Theodore Agnew, who almost came in second with over a fourth of the total vote. He exceeded expectations by a significant margin and enjoys some momentum after his performance. William Westmoreland got almost ten percent of the vote and did better than expected. However, it is highly unlikely that he comes anywhere close to the nomination.

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Governor Reagan with supporters after winning the Republican Iowa Caucus, February 1, 1972


Gallup Polls for the New Hampshire Primary on February 8, 1972

The first primary of the 1972 election will take place one week after the Iowa Caucus and is expected to be more in Kennedy’s and Rockefeller’s favor.


Democratic Primary Poll

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 34%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 29%
Senator George McGovern: 18%
Former Governor George Wallace: 9%
Undecided/others: 10%


Republican Primary Poll

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 54%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 21%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 17%
General William Westmoreland: 1%
Undecided/others: 7%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on December 04, 2017, 02:49:46 pm
Go Agnew!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on December 04, 2017, 06:10:30 pm
Go Reagan!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on December 05, 2017, 09:37:09 am
Love this TL! Go RFK!

Curious to see what happens with Wallace and General Wastemoremen... Edward Brooke would be an interesting VP for either candidate on the GOP side.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 09, 2017, 05:38:32 am
February 8, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: New Hampshire Primary: Humphrey upsets Kennedy; Rockefeller wins decisively ★★★


Democratic Primary
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 39.5%
Robert F. Kennedy: 37.0%
George McGovern: 15.1%
George Wallace: 7.3%

A huge upset in New Hampshire on the Democratic side: Hubert Humphrey wins! And the polling error is much wider than in Iowa. Obviously, the senator has picked up a lot of undecided support during the final days of the campaign. Interestingly, HHH went in just the week before the polls opened with a strong ground operation (his supporters knocked on thousands of doors). RFK’s start into the primary season turns out more troubling than both political pundits and the vice president himself expected. A spokesperson of the Kennedy campaign told the press the next day, that some organizational changes will be made before the next round of voting later that month. Both Wallace and McGovern just received little support in the Granite State.

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Senator Hubert Humphrey unexpectetly triumphes in New Hampshire. "I thank you very much, my beloved Democrats", he commented.


Republican Primary
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 62.8%
Spiro Agnew: 20.0%
Ronald Reagan: 15.9%
William Westmoreland: 1.1%

On the Republican side, there is no upset: As expected, Nelson Rockefeller wins overwhelmingly. Ronald Reagan suffers a big defeat. Although he never had illusions to beat Rockefeller here, the California governor certainly expected to come in second. But Spiro Agnew received more votes and continues to perform better than expected. However, the Reagan campaign virtually wrote the state off, as Nelson Rockefeller is very popular in this region. New England, the home of the liberal Republicans, is just the perfect fit for Rocky.

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No surprise at all: Governor Nelson Rockefeller wins in New Hampshire, home of the liberal Republicans


February 9, 1972 – BREAKING: Senator George McGovern quits presidential campaign


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"I have done my best but fell short", Senator George McGovern said upon dropping out of the Democratic primaries

He called it a “brief and intensive experience”, when Senator George McGovern announced the end of his campaign. “We put out a good message for progress, peace and justice, but despite our efforts, we fell short. I fell short. Therefore, I end my candidacy for president”, Senator McGovern told his supports, who expected him to stay longer in the race. Afterwards, he declined an endorsement for the primary, but took a clear position against George Wallace (“if it isn’t Wallace, I will support the Democratic candidate”).


Secretary General Leonid Brezhnev’s visit to the United States and signing of SALT I Treaty; February 12 – 13, 1972

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At the end of over two years of negotiations, Soviet Leader Leonid Brezhnev for the first time visits the United States. At Camp David, he met President Lyndon Johnson for the signing of the SALT I Treaty. President Johnson, upon the signing ceremony, described the agreement as follows: “The agreement freezes the number of strategic ballistic missile launchers at existing levels and provided for the addition of new submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) launchers only after the same number of older intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and SLBM launchers had been dismantled. SALT I also limits land-based ICBMs that were in range from the northeastern border of the continental United States to the northwestern border of the continental USSR. In addition to that, SALT I limited the number of SLBM capable submarines that NATO and the United States could operate to 50 with a maximum of 800 SLBM launchers between them. If the United States or NATO were to increase that number, the USSR could respond with increasing their arsenal by the same amount. I want to thank my Soviet partners and the negotiators, who spent many hours working this piece of paper out.”[1]

During the entire event, the U.S. press had almost unlimited access to the president and his guest. At night, a typical Texas barbecue after LBJ’s taste was served. Both leaders spoke of “very productive talks” and expressed their willingness, to stay engaged in negotiations for further arms reduction. Just after the final communique was made public, Vice President Robert Kennedy made it clear, a Kennedy Administration would continue Johnson’s foreign policy in that regard. The vice president was originally scheduled to be on the campaign trail, but he and Senator Humphrey were invited to the ceremony. Both meet with Secretary Brezhnev, who agreed to talk to the two men, who have a decent shot to assume the presidency coming next year.

The agreement was opposed by many conservatives. Ronald Reagan described the participation of Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey as a “PR stunt by the president to boost these gentlemen’s polling numbers.”
 

February 20, 1972: Westmoreland: I’ll drop out if I don’t win South Carolina

Two days before voters heading to the polls in Nevada and South Carolina, General Westmoreland stated that he will suspend his campaign if he doesn’t win the South Carolina Republican primary. “If I can’t win my homestate, I have no path to the nod”, the general is quoted. The state was not polled in the days before the election.



Note [1]: The original quote is largely from Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategic_Arms_Limitation_Talks#SALT_I_Treaty)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 10, 2017, 06:24:57 am
February 22, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Kennedy wins in Nevada, Wallace in South Carolina; Reagan victorious in both; Westmoreland drops out, endorses Reagan ★★★


South Carolina Democratic Primary
✓ George Wallace: 58.5%
Robert F. Kennedy: 22.7%
Hubert Humphrey: 17.2%
 

Nevada Democratic Caucus
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 48.8%
Hubert Humphrey: 40.2%
George Wallace: 10.5%

In South Carolina and Nevada, Hubert Humphrey’s streak of two consecutive successes was broken. In South Carolina, George Wallace won over Hubert Humphrey and Robert Kennedy pretty easily. In Nevada, Vice President Kennedy could celebrate his first primary triumph. He defeated Senator Humphrey by over eight points. George Wallace just barely made it to double digits.


South Carolina Republican Primary
✓ Ronald Reagan: 41.0%
William Westmoreland: 24.3%
Spiro Agnew: 17.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 16.2%


Nevada Republican Caucus
✓ Ronald Reagan: 36.9%
Nelson Rockefeller: 34.3%
Spiro Agnew: 21.5%
William Westmoreland: 5.6%

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Governor Reagan won both contests of February 22, 1972

The Gipper has every reason to smile again: He won both contests on the GOP side this February 22. “I am deeply honored to receive that many endorsements. But we don’t get ahead of ourselves”, the California governor commented his victories. Nevertheless, both states were expected to vote in his favor. Spiro Agnew continues to exceed expectations, as he seems to appeal to these Republicans who regard Reagan as too conservative and Rockefeller as too liberal. For Rocky, this day is overall a disappointment, although he overperformed polls in Nevada and managed to come in a close second. More concern for the Rockefeller campaign is the poor result in South Carolina, where he came in dead last despite an intense campaign effort (some political observers suggested the New York governor may have won Nevada, had he spent the time and money there rather than S.C.). The result is an indicator that Rockefeller, a liberal New York Republican, is not appealing to many Southerners.

After General William Westmoreland came in second in his homestate of South Carolina, he officially suspended his campaign. “I made a promise. And I will keep it. As I was not successful to convince enough Republican voters that I can lead this nation, I end my campaign for president”, the general told supporters and the media. He closed his remarks by endorsing Ronald Reagan: “Looking at the remaining contenders in this race, I will support Governor Reagan for president. He is the right kind of leader in the times we live […]” With Westmoreland’s exit, the Republican field is now also narrowed down to three candidates.

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General Westmoreland's campaign comes to an end, as he missed to gain enough support. No surpirse: He endorsed Ronald Reagan after leaving the race.


February 29, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 40%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 33%
Former Governor George Wallace: 20%
Undecided: 10%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 40%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Governor Spiro Agnew: 21%
Undecided: 4%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 47%

Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Spiro Agnew: 45%


Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
Spiro Agnew: 42%


George Wallace: 42%
Ronald Reagan: 47%

George Wallace: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

George Wallace: 42%
Spiro Agnew: 44%


March 3, 1972: Reagan campaign releases economic program; Kennedy, Humphrey and Rockefeller respond

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If elected president, Governor Reagan wants to cut taxes and spending at the same time. The size of government is also a problem in the Gipper's eyes. Days before Super Tuesday, he presented his plans to the public

Just days before Super Tuesday, as the media called the date where over dozen of states hold their primaries, Ronald Reagan presented his economic plan to the public. The plan consists a 35% cut in corporate taxes and a 25% across-the-board tax break for all incomes. The California governor also promised to “strip apart as many regulations as possible”. He also emphasized to decrease the size of the federal government and spoke of an “out of control bureaucracy owned by the Johnson/Kennedy Administration”. Like at most of his rallies, the Gipper directly attacks the Johnson Administration and Vice President Kennedy on policy rather than his primary opponents. Only Governor Rockefeller is frequently mentioned, criticizing his record in New York: “Governor Rockefeller talks about making government more efficient, but his record tells otherwise. Let the voters determine this question.” Reagan further outlined that his plan would lead to over six percent economic growth and compensate the revenue losses through the massive tax cuts.

Only hours later, Vice President Robert Kennedy slammed the governor's plans at one of his rallies. "Mr. Reagan seeks to make polcies for his rich crownies and not the average American. I reject his plans", the Democratic frontrunner said. His rival Senator Humphrey dennounced the plan as well, calling it "complete nonsense". And Republican hopeful Nelson Rockefeller, Reagan's top competitator, responded to the plan: "With all due respect, I do not believe this package solves our problems. I support spending cuts where possible, but Governor Reagan's proposals are unbalanced and not realistic".


Next: Super Tuesday on March 7, 1972... stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on December 10, 2017, 03:14:23 pm
Go Reagan


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 11, 2017, 02:35:58 pm
March 7, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Super Tuesday! All three Democratic candidates win key races; Reagan carries most contests, Rockefeller second, Agnew wins no states ★★★


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Democratic Contests

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Alabama
✓ George Wallace: 80.6%
Hubert Humphrey: 10.2%
Robert F. Kennedy: 7.8%

Alaska
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 47.8%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42.3%
George Wallace: 7.0%

Arkansas
✓ George Wallace: 51.0%
Robert F. Kennedy: 30.1%
Hubert Humphrey: 18.3%

Colorado
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 50.1%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41.3%
George Wallace: 7.7%

Georgia
✓ George Wallace: 45.6%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38.7%
Hubert Humphrey: 16.6%

Kansas
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 45.1%
Robert F. Kennedy: 34.7%
George Wallace: 19.9%

Kentucky
✓ George Wallace: 36.8%
Robert F. Kennedy: 33.3%
Hubert Humphrey: 29.3%

Louisiana
✓ George Wallace: 60.4%
Robert F. Kennedy: 22.6%
Hubert Humphrey: 17.0%

Maine
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 47.2%
Hubert Humphrey: 43.4%
George Wallace: 8.1%

Massachusetts
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 85.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 8.9%
George Wallace: 2.8%

Minnesota
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 61.3%
Robert F. Kennedy: 31.9%
George Wallace: 6.0%

North Dakota
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 49.3%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42.7%
George Wallace: 6.5%

Oklahoma
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 37.5%
George Wallace: 33.8%
Hubert Humphrey: 27.9%

Tennessee
✓ George Wallace: 46.4%
Robert F. Kennedy: 32.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 21.1%

Texas
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 38.8%
George Wallace: 31.0%
Hubert Humphrey: 29.6%

Vermont
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 53.3%
Hubert Humphrey: 40.2%
George Wallace: 5,3%

Virginia
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 33.0%
George Wallace: 32.4%
Hubert Humphrey: 31.6%

Wyoming
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 42.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 38.3%
George Wallace: 19.0%

All three remaining Democratic candidates manage to win states, mostly those they were expected to be ahead. After underperforming in Iowa and New Hampshire, Vice President Kennedy picks up the most delegates on this Super Tuesday. In an upset, he won in Texas and Virginia. The latter went extremely close into RFK’s column, with each contender winning roughly a third of the vote. Senator Humphrey did well in the Midwest and the Great Plains, as he enjoys high support among farmers in these regions. He also pulled it off in Alaska, though that states awards just few delegates. George Wallace mostly keeps his southern base also won states in the Upper South such as Kentucky. He received some fair numbers in rural states as well, but struggles in New England to win substantial support.

As of March 7, 1972, the Democratic primary map looks as follows:

()

Robert F. Kennedy: ~ 15% of delegates
Hubert Humphrey: ~ 13% of delegates
George Wallace: ~ 9% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)
 

Republican Contests

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Alabama
✓ Ronald Reagan: 60.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 28.8%
Spiro Agnew: 11.1%

Alaska
✓ Ronald Reagan: 45.0%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40.8%
Spiro Agnew: 11.1%

Arkansas
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 43.3%
Ronald Reagan: 42.8%
Spiro Agnew: 12.4%

Colorado
✓ Ronald Reagan: 48.0%
Nelson Rockefeller: 36.9%
Spiro Agnew: 14.6%

Georgia
✓ Ronald Reagan: 54.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 34.3%
Spiro Agnew: 13.1%

Kansas
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 40.7%
Ronald Reagan: 38.5%
Spiro Agnew: 20.4%

Kentucky
✓ Ronald Reagan: 37.2%
Spiro Agnew: 32.8%
Nelson Rockefeller: 29.6%

Louisiana
✓ Ronald Reagan: 52.1%
Nelson Rockefeller: 38.0%
Spiro Agnew: 10.4%

Maine
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 62.0%
Ronald Reagan: 25.9%
Spiro Agnew: 11.8%

Massachusetts
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 70.8%
Spiro Agnew: 15.8%
Ronald Reagan: 13.0%

Minnesota
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 41.2%
Ronald Reagan: 41.0%
Spiro Agnew: 17.6%

North Dakota
✓ Ronald Reagan: 39.3%
Nelson Rockefeller: 37.0%
Spiro Agnew: 23.3%

Oklahoma
✓ Ronald Reagan: 43.5%
Nelson Rockefeller: 35.8%
Spiro Agnew: 20.9%

Tennessee
✓ Ronald Reagan: 45.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27.0%
Spiro Agnew: 26.3%

Texas
✓ Ronald Reagan: 40.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 33.8%
Spiro Agnew: 24.2%

Vermont
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 65.1%
Ronald Reagan: 20.6%
Spiro Agnew: 13.8%

Virginia
✓ Ronald Reagan: 36.7%
Spiro Agnew: 31.9%
Nelson Rockefeller: 31.1%

Wyoming
✓ Ronald Reagan: 44.0%
Nelson Rockefeller: 34.8%
Spiro Agnew: 20.8%

Ronald Reagan sweeps the South and most of the Great Plains! The Gipper is the victor of the day, as he carries most states that voted. As the Reagan campaign gains momentum, Governor Paul Laxalt, a supporter, told the press: “Let me conclude one thing: The results show Governor Reagan’s broad appeal across the country. He’s the most competitive GOP candidate for November.” Meanwhile, the Rockefeller campaign downplayed the results and pointed out that Rocky won all states he was supposed to take plus Kansas, Minnesota and Arkansas, where his brother Winthrop is governor. The candidate’s supporter George Romney said at a television appearance: “As the primaries soon move to the large industrial states, I believe Nelson Rockefeller will win a large junk of the delegates. He has definitely a path to at least 50% of the pledged delegates”. For Spiro Agnew, the day was a disappointment. So far, he exceeded expectations by winning larger portions of the vote than expected before voting began. Nevertheless, the Maryland governor wasn’t able win any state so far, what puts him under increasing pressure. But he confirmed, he will continue his campaign. Some journalists and Maryland Republicans suggested Agnew may become the nominee if the convention ends up in a deadlock between Reagan and Rockefeller. Both Reagan and Rockefeller rejected this analysis. “It is either Governor Rockefeller or myself”, the Gipper remarked.

As of March 7, 1972, the Republican primary map looks as follows:

()

Ronald Reagan: ~ 24% of delegates
Nelson Rockefeller: ~ 11% of delegates
Spiro Agnew: ~ 2% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 16, 2017, 06:53:31 am
March 14, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: RFK wins three more states, Wallace one; Reagan ahead in three contests, Rockefeller wins important Michigan primary ★★★


Voters on both sides headed to the polls in Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan and Mississippi. The results are as follows:

Democratic contests

Hawaii
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 54.2%
Hubert Humphrey: 41.8%
George Wallace: 3.9%

Idaho
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 44.1%
Hubert Humphrey: 39.6%
George Wallace: 15.8%

Michigan
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 47.9%
Hubert Humphrey: 47.5%
George Wallace: 4.4%

Mississippi
✓ George Wallace: 60.1%
Robert F. Kennedy: 24.7%
Hubert Humphrey: 14.3%

Vice President Kennedy emerges victorious in three out of four contests on this day. Most important is his win in Michigan, where he received strong African American support around Detroit, that pulled him ahead of Senator Humphrey, who received many votes from blue collar workers. George Wallace was not able to gain much support in northern states, though he won Mississippi by wide margin. RFK now expanded his delegate lead over Humphrey.


Republican contests

Hawaii
✓ Ronald Reagan: 40.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40.0%
Spiro Agnew: 19.7%

Idaho
✓ Ronald Reagan: 49.7%
Nelson Rockefeller: 36.7%
Spiro Agnew: 13.0%

Michigan
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 59.8%
Ronald Reagan: 24.6%
Spiro Agnew: 15.5%

Mississippi
✓ Ronald Reagan: 57.1%
Nelson Rockefeller: 30.8%
Spiro Agnew: 10.7%

Ronald Reagan once more proved his electability in the South as well as in rural states where he won pretty easily. Surprisingly, he was also able to edge out a narrow victory in Hawaii. The biggest prize of the day, however, was Michigan, where Nelson Rockefeller could celebrate a decisive win. He was largely supported by urban voters (he won 90% in Detroit), blue collar workers as well as blacks. The endorsement of popular former governor George Romney, who campaigned for Rocky, also played a role in the New York Governor's victory. Spiro Agnew came in third in all four races, raising speculation that he soon might leave the race.


March 15, 1972: Spiro Agnew is out! Now it's REAGAN vs. ROCKEFELLER

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"We worked hard, but it wasn't enough after all", said Maryland Governor Spiro Agnew upon leaving the race for the GOP presidential nomination, leaving Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller as the only remaining contenders

"We ran a decent campaign from the middle", Governor Agnew told his supports back in Maryland, "but it is now clear, that Republican voters are heavily divided between my distinguished colleagues Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan. One of these two will be the nominee. [...] I shall be neutral for the rest of the primary season and I urge each of my supporters to take a look at these two men and make their own judgement. In the end, it comes down to beat Kennedy and Humphrey. Thank you very much". Agnew hoped to position himself as the man acceptable for both wings of the party by running on a pro-civil rights, law and order and "lean government without leaving the needy behind" platform. Obviously, despite winning decent voter shares in some states, he was overshadowed by Reagan and Rockefeller. Despite dropping out now, Agnew made his name well known across the country and political pundits wrote he might be a good vice presidential pick for either of the two remaining competitors or may also take an important cabinet post in a future Republican administration.

Now that he is out, it remains to be seen where is voters and more importantly, his delegates, will go in the end. A brief poll made the next day by Gallup among Agnew supporters showed that exactly 40% each support Rockefeller and Reagan. Now, with two candidates remaining, it seems like the Republican primaries are a true nail biter between Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller. And this battle may define the party for years if not decades to come.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 17, 2017, 06:58:39 am
March 21, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Super Tuesday II: Humphrey wins key races, Wallace ahead in the South; Rockefeller gains ground in industrial Mid-West and upsets Reagan in Florida ★★★


The press spoke of a "Second Super Tuesday", as voters headed to the polls to cast their ballots for a party candidate in several more states.

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Democratic contests

Arizona
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 46.8%
Hubert Humphrey: 39.1%
George Wallace: 14.0%

District of Columbia
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 81.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 17.5%
George Wallace: 0.9%

Florida
✓ George Wallace: 36.4%
Robert F. Kennedy: 33.3%
Hubert Humphrey: 30.0%

Illinois
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 46.5%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43.2%
George Wallace: 10.2%

Missouri
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 38.1%
Hubert Humphrey: 34.8%
George Wallace: 27.0%

North Carolina
✓ George Wallace:34.7%
Hubert Humphrey: 34.1%
Robert F. Kennedy: 30.9%

Ohio
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 48.0%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43.5%
George Wallace: 8.3%

Utah
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 52.2%
Robert F. Kennedy: 35.9%
George Wallace: 11.7%

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Senator Hubert Humphrey talks to the press after winning important primaries. "We have a decent shot at the nomination", he remarked

The winner of the day on the Democratic side is Hubert Humphrey. After setbacks in the last few races the senator and former vice president managed to win important primaries in the Mid-West and the West. Members of the Kennedy campaign already hoped they could lock up the nomination for the vice president, but Humphrey's popularity among blue collar workers in the mid-west and the strong backing of unions gave him the newest streak of wins. Although RFK received strong support from African American communities, it was not enough to stop HHH, whose campaign now also begun to reach out to blacks, pointing out his strong support for civil rights. Surprisingly, Humphrey came in a close second in North Carolina, where he missed just a few hundred votes to come within a half percentage point to demand a recount. In addition to North Carolina, George Wallace also won in Florida, a state, where Vice President Kennedy hoped to pull off a similar victory like in Virginia, where he narrowly won with each contender getting a third of the vote.

As of late March, the nomination is still undecided, though Governor Wallace has de facto no chance anymore to win at the convention floor. The only thing he can do is preventing RFK and HHH from winning the necessary 50% of delegates and play the kingmaker (assuming neither of the two frontrunners quits before).

The state of the Democratic race so far looks like this:

()

Robert F. Kennedy: ~ 23% of delegates
Hubert Humphrey: ~ 19% of delegates
George Wallace: ~ 16% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


Republican contests

Arizona
✓ Ronald Reagan: 60.4%
Nelson Rockefeller: 37.7%

District of Columbia
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 86.8%
Ronald Reagan: 12.7%

Florida
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 51.5%
Ronald Reagan: 48.2%

Illinois
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 59.5%
Ronald Reagan: 40.1%

Missouri
✓ Ronald Reagan: 51.3%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48.5%

North Carolina
✓ Ronald Reagan: 53.5%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45.3%

Ohio
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 58.6%
Ronald Reagan: 41.4%

Utah
✓ Ronald Reagan: 63.2%
Nelson Rockefeller: 36.6%

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A smiling Nelson Rockefeller in the midst of a crowd of supporters, celebrating his upset win in Florida and the victories in other key states

Anybody who wrote off Nelson Rockefeller after a series of defeat proofed to be wrong on this day. As the primaries moved to the Mid-West, Rocky secured relatively easy wins over Ronald Reagan due to his staunch support from most unions as well as African Americans (those voting in the Republican primaries). The biggest upset, however, came in Florida, where Rockefeller defeated Reagan by a close margin. All polls had him trailing in the Sunshine State by at least six or seven points, but as the results came in, it became evident, that the New York Governor would emerge victorious. Rockefeller campaign aides claimed the results demonstrates, that their hopeful was very well able to win elections in the South. Ronald Reagan congratulated his opponent and said he still believes, he's going to be the nominee. The Gipper also got three less significant triumphs this day: He won Missouri, Utah and North Carolina.


As of March 21, the Republican map looks like this:

()

Ronald Reagan: ~ 33% of delegates
Nelson Rockefeller: ~ 27% of delegates
Spiro Agnew: ~ 3% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


March 27, 1972: Henry Kissinger leaves White House and joins Rockefeller campaign

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Henry Kissinger delivers a brief speech before leaving the White House... he now wants to help Nelson Rockefeller winning the presidency

"It was a great honor to serve President Johnson in the past two and a half years", remarked Henry Kisinger upon leaving government, "now it is time for me to focus on a new task. I want to help my old mentor and friend, Governor Rockefeller, winning the presidency. Therefore, I will depart from the White House. At least for now."

After serving President Lyndon Johnson for over two years, Henry Kissinger left his post as foreign policy advisor and returns to his old mentor Nelson Rockefeller. He joins the campaign as foreign policy advisor. Should Rocky win the Oval Office, it is certain that Mr. Kissinger will be part of the team. The New York Times listed him as the most likely Secretary of State under a President Rockefeller. It is not certain whether he would play a role in a Reagan Administration, though the liberal GOP wing could demand a Kissinger appointment as concession from the Reagan camp should Rockefeller not be the nominee. Even more unlikely is a position under another Democratic president. Especially Robert Kennedy originally opposed his appointment in 1969. But President Johnson's high regard for the former Nixon aide brought him a job in the LBJ White House. Richard Nixon himself has already endorsed Rockefeller for president in January.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 19, 2017, 04:44:05 am
March 30, 1972: President Johnson presents Universal Healthcare proposal

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President Johnson talking to the press after presenting the healthcare proposal

Political observers were stunned when President Lyndon Johnson in his January 1972 State of the Union Address urged congress to enact universal healthcare legislation as soon as possible. Now that he's come forward with a specific proposal that would cover all Americans with basic healthcare, he underlined the importance of this initiative. Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA), who was heavily involved in the process, said he will introduce a bill within a few weeks to the senate health committee. "We can pass this by summer", RFK's younger brother said. Ted Kennedy already pushed for such a bill in 1969, but LBJ decided to go with the ChildCare Legislation first.

Bobby Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey both endorsed the initiative and promised to continue work on the issue in any case. "If reactionary forces think they have defeated this, if it doesn't pass this year, they are wrong. I will put on top of my agenda as your president", Vice President remarked at a Wisconsin rally. George Wallace said he's open to "more benefits for the needy", but said he wants to see the entire bill before taking a final stance.

On the Republican side, Governor Rockefeller said he thinks passage this year is unlikely, but added: "Healthcare for all is a wonderful idea. As president, I will come up with a plan that covers everyone but is economically and fiscally sound. And I will get it done in a bipartisan way." Governor Reagan denounced the initiative as "another step towards socialized medicine". He promised that he will make changes to the tax code that would allow every citizen coverage.


March 31, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

While President Johnson's approval rating remains stable at over 50%, Hubert Humphrey narrows the gap to Bobby Kennedy's top position. Almost a fourth of Democrats want George Wallace as their candidate. On the Republican side, both Governor Reagan and Rockefeller poll almost even at 46% and 44%, respectively, but short of a majority. One in ten GOP voters remain undecided. In the general election polls, there is a shift towards the Democratic candidates. Even George Wallace now polls even with the remaining Republican contenders. However, with several more primaries to go, the race is still wide open.


President Johnson job approval
Approve: 52%
Disapprove: 43%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 34%
Former Governor George Wallace: 23%
Undecided: 5%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Ronald Reagan: 46%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Undecided: 10%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Ronald Reagan: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%


Hubert Humphrey: 47%
Ronald Reagan: 43%

Hubert Humphrey: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%


George Wallace: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

George Wallace: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%


April 4, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Humphrey and Rockefeller come in first in Wisconsin ★★★



Wisconsin Democratic Primary
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 52.0%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40.3%
George Wallace: 7.5%

A state in Mid-West where the electorate consists a lot of blue collar workers and unions are strong is just the perfect fit for Senator Humphrey, who wins with a clear majority in Wisconsin.


Wisconsin Republican Primary
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 55.2%
Ronald Reagan: 43.6%
Spiro Agnew: 1.0%

As several unions endorsed Nelson Rockefeller, a lot of blue collar workers voted for the New York governor. The Gipper hoped for a close race due to strong turnout in rural areas, but countryside turnout was below expectations due to harsh weather. A clear and important win for Team Rockefeller.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on December 19, 2017, 04:53:11 am
Well, there goes my prediction of Agnew coming from the center to become the nominee, and then proceed to get his scandal revealed in the general election and absolutely collapse :P
This is awesome, keep it up!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 20, 2017, 05:13:27 am
Well, there goes my prediction of Agnew coming from the center to become the nominee, and then proceed to get his scandal revealed in the general election and absolutely collapse :P
This is awesome, keep it up!

Thanks! I don't want to tell too much in advance, but this isn't Agnew's last appearance :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 20, 2017, 07:33:14 am
April 18, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Kennedy and Rockefeller sweep to landslide victories in New York ★★★


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The nation's second largest state in terms of population hold its primary this April 18. Two major candidates on both sides are from New York (though RFK is originally from Massachusetts). No surprise at all is their performance in the Empire State:

New York Democratic Primary
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 72.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 24.2%
George Wallace: 3.1%


New York Republican Primary
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 77.8%
Ronald Reagan: 21.3%

Both RFK and Rocky win overwhelmingly, capturing all delegates at stake in New York.


April 26, 1972: George Wallace says he'll "fight to the end" and refuses to rule out third-party presidential bid

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Former Governor George Wallace seemingly wants to continue fighting for his cause

"I have to disappoint you, Ladies and Gentlemen", responded former Alabama governor George Wallace with a smile to a reporter, when asked whether he would drop out of the race soon. "My campaign has given voice to millions of people across this nation. I won't let them down and just turn over the entire party to Mr. Kennedy and his buddies", he added, "I will fight this through to the end. I have always been a fighter." When the reporter pointed out that his chances to capture the nomination are "slim at best", the former governor responded: "if I don't win, it will be the will of most Democratic voters, despite millions endorsed my campaign. Even though my friends at the press elite don't like it and continue to write against me."

Another journalist wanted to know whether he rules out a third party candidacy since former Governor Lester Maddox of Georgia openly floated the idea. "At the moment, my focus is on the Democratic primary voters", Mr. Wallace answered. Reporter: "That's not a No, right?" "You're going to write what you want anyway, my friend", the former governor replied with a smile.

So, a Dixiecrat general election challenge is not completely off the table. Journalists wrote that the nomination of Nelson Rockefeller would increase chances for a Dixiecrat ticket in November.


April 30, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

Late April 1972 polling continues to find Democrats in a strong position. The president's approval rating is robust over 50%. Political observers cite the lack of foreign crises, negotiations with the Soviets and an economic recovery, although moving on slowly, as the main reasons. Vice President Kennedy also enjoys momentum after his recent New York victory and more appearances on television. He also polls ahead of Humphrey and Wallace for the general election.

For the first time in months, Nelson Rockefeller surpassed Ronald Reagan in the national Republican nomination polls again.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 39%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Democratic Party presidential nomination

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Senator Hubert Humphrey: 32%
Former Governor George Wallace: 19%
Undecided: 9%


Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 44%
Undecided: 8%


1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 48%
Republican: 42%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Ronald Reagan: 41%

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%


Hubert Humphrey: 45%
Ronald Reagan: 41%

Hubert Humphrey: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%


George Wallace: 45%
Ronald Reagan: 44%

George Wallace: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%


May 2, 1972: FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover is dead

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FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover (1895 – 1972)

For a never ending 48 years J. Edgar Hoover headed the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He was admired and feared by many Americans. His secret files about private matters of several politicians are legendary, yet many politicians were afraid of the director. This May 2, 1972, news broke that he passed away at the age of 77.

President Johnson, who was personally close to Hoover, praised his record and spoke of a "tragic loss" at the White House. The president further stated he intends to nominate a successor within a few days and send the nomination to the senate for confirmation. His statement de facto eliminates Deputy Director Clyde Tolson to be the new FBI head. Tolson was very close to Hoover, and the two unmarried men even shared a home together, raising to rumors of homosexuality.

White House insiders spread claims LBJ intends to name Attorney General Ramsey Clark as new director. However, a Clark nomination was officially debunked for now.


May 2, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Indiana primary voters give Humphrey and Reagan the edge ★★★


Indiana Democratic Primary
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 45.8%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41.6%
George Wallace: 11.8%

Hubert Humphrey is back! The senator from Minnesota continues to perform well with his Mid-Western base and edges out RFK in Indiana. As some campaign staffers told the press in backroom conversations, the Kennedy team gets increasingly agonized over Humphrey and want him to drop out to focus on a general election strategy. "The vice president will capture the nomination and it is time for Senator Humphrey to leave the race", an aide said. However, RFK himself denounced the comment the next day, saying the primary season is "invigorating for our democracy."

The state of the Democratic race as of May 2, 1972 looks like this:

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Robert F. Kennedy: ~ 31% of delegates
Hubert Humphrey: ~ 24% of delegates
George Wallace: ~ 16% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


Indiana Republican Primary
✓ Ronald Reagan: 54.9%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45.0%

Indiana has always been one of the more conservative states in the Mid-West and therefore Ronald Reagan comes in first with almost 55% of the vote despite a last-minute effort by the Rockefeller campaign to make this a close one.

After the Indiana primary, the delegate count is now exactly tied between Reagan and Rockefeller. The New York governor briefly took the lead following his homestate win after he trailed badly on Super Tuesday. The Republican race, truely a dead heat, now looks as follows:

()

Nelson Rockefeller: ~ 35% of delegates
Ronald Reagan: ~ 35% of delegates
Spiro Agnew: ~ 3% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


BREAKING: May 4, 1972 – ROCKEFELLER and REAGAN will DEBATE on TV!


BREAKING NEWS FROM CBS: The television age doesn’t stop at presidential politics! The Rockefeller and Reagan campaigns confirmed to CBS News that their candidates agreed to debate each other live on the air. Sponsored by the League of Women voters, the debate will be the first live televised contest for a primary. It will consist questions about all political topics. Neither candidate will know the questions in advance.

As the Republican primaries developed into a dead heat between the Rockefeller and Reagan camp, the debate is expected to take place on Wednesday, May 10, the week before Nebraska and Oregon will hold their elections.

On the Democratic side, Vice President Kennedy and Senator Humphrey also agreed to debate, but George Wallace declined. After Wallace declined, RFK also took himself out, what Humphrey criticized. He urged both to debate, and Wallace later said he would reconsider.

The Republican debate makes it likely that there will be at least one debate between the Democratic and Republican nominee in the fall. Stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 26, 2017, 06:31:39 am
May 10, 1972

★★★ THE GREAT REPUBLICAN DEBATE: Rockefeller vs. Reagan ★★★



HOWARD K. SMITH: Alright, we have to leave it there and switch topics. I want to come to foreign policy. The Vietnam War has formally ended, yet there are reports, Hanoi might break the peace accords of Paris. Possibly within the first weeks and months of your administration. How would deal with such a crisis as president? Governor Rockefeller, you begin.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: While I believe there are serious flaws in the Paris treaty, I don’t intend to leave it. If communists violate the accords and diplomacy fails, I will order a military response. Make no mistake about it. I won’t allow Ho’s successors to humiliate the United States at the world stage.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: We have already been humiliated, Governor Rockefeller. By the Johnson government, which begged in Moscow and Beijing for assistance to settle the Vietnam issue for us. Mr. Johnson and his administration, including your friend Dr. Kissinger, has sold out American values and weakened our position because they allowed Moscow greater influence. Like Mr. Rockefeller, I wouldn’t break the Paris Peace Accords, but would respond with relentless force if the communists seek to challenge us again. That’s for sure. And I won’t allow them to take over an additional inch from free nations.

HOWARD K. SMITH: The Johnson Administration has been engaged in various negotiations with the Soviets about a weapons reduction. Just a few days ago, Richard Nixon called for a continuation of these talks after the elections. What would each of you do? Governor Rockefeller?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: I fully support Richard Nixon’s statement. I will continue to be engaged in various talks to promote peace across the globe. This will be my first priority as president. However, I won’t pay any price Moscow wants us to pay. I offer them fair talks. Not more and not less. I can promise, though, that I won’t do anything that weakens our defense.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: First, I will let the Kremlin know that a new president has been elected who won’t allow them to spread communism, lawlessness and tyranny over the world. While I would open for discussions with them, I don’t believe in the theory of equal partners, when there can be no balance of power, when one of these powers is imposing its system of oppression and tyranny upon several other nations in Europe, Asia and Africa.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Thank you both. We will be back after a short break. Stay with us.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on December 26, 2017, 06:57:03 am
Go Reagan !!!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 26, 2017, 07:10:15 am
Civil and individual rights

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HOWARD K. SMITH: And we are back at the Republican debate for the nomination 1972. The subject of abortion has become a topic of great public awareness. What’s your take on that? Various states have implemented an abortion ban or intend to do so, what could end up before the Supreme Court. If given the opportunity, what kind of judges would you nominate?

GOVERNOR REAGAN: I fully support the right to life and don’t believe abortions should be permitted. I would a favor a national ban, though a judge has to be selected by several criteria and not by the question on his or her stance on a single issue.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: I disagree. I don’t believe the government should interfere in such private matters of people. The government has no business to do this. I don’t like abortions, but I the politicians have to right to completely restrict it. There should be ban for late-term abortions. I believe 20 weeks are appropriate. That’s what we’ve done in New York. However, I would like to point out that Governor Reagan signed an abortion bill in 1967 shortly after taking office, that permits abortions.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: That is correct. And I sincerely regret signing this bill. But let us not distract from the difference between Governor Rockefeller and myself on this topic.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: It is important though when it comes leadership qualities. You said, you were inexperienced when the bill came to your desk. Sir, I just like remind you that we are running for the biggest job in the world. You have to be prepared from Day 1 after you come in. There is no room for error. I believe that I can provide that kind of leadership with my broad experience in government and business.

[…]

Individual topics and closing statements

HOWARD K. SMITH: Now, looking at the nomination battle, it is obvious that there is a great division within your party. Both of you are receiving an almost equal level of support. Doesn’t this underline the necessity that the ultimate nominee choses the other one as his running mate?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: [Laughs] I have always said that I don’t want to be vice president of anything. I also don’t believe in talking about this in advance. It will be up the nominee to determine is question upon his selection by the delegates. If I win the nomination, I will carefully look at several talented politicians for the second spot. That is likely to include Governor Reagan, though there is no automatism.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: I strongly agree with Governor Rockefeller’s remarks. The only thing I want to add is that he or she must be prepared to take over if necessary and work well together with the president. Whether Governor Rockefeller is considered for the vice president's office has to be seen if I get the nomination.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Thank you. Let’s come to the closing statements. Governor Reagan, you begin. Then Governor Rockefeller.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: Ladies and Gentlemen: Over the past few years, we have seen a dramatic increase in the federal government’s size, taxes that go through the roof, a weakened national defense and a declining U.S. stance in the world. Today, I came before you to offer a different path that will allow us to regain true national greatness. By getting government out of your lives and limit it to these functions the founding fathers intended to. Despite his good intentions, I believe the proposals by Governor Rockefeller will not reverse this course that is so necessary in order to prosper again and stand tall at the world stage. I have specific plans for America to be that shining city upon a hill again. Together, let’s move forward and work for this America. Thank you very much, god bless you and god bless America.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: My fellow Americans and dear Republicans: The next election will determine who will be the president leading us into the third century of our great American experience. I want this future to be one of prosperity, peace and freedom. I believe that I can provide this kind of leadership we need to achieve these goals, by finding pragmatic solutions that leaves nobody behind. Government ought to be servant of the people. To promote economic growth, provide safe homes and streets, protecting individual rights, and being engaged in the world through spreading democracy and our values. Thank you for your interest. God bless you and god bless and America.


HOWARD K. SMITH: That was our debate for the Republican nomination battle. I hope we could bring you the candidates a bit closer and make it easier for you to make decision at the ballot boy, if you haven’t already. Thank you for your interest in our program and good night.


May 12, 1972

Polling Special: Post-debate Gallup-Polls

Gallup took a few post-debate polls, to interview Republican voters upon the two governors performances.


Republican presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 46%
Undecided: 5%


Questions

Question: Who you think won the debate over all?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 40%
Undecided or tie: 18%


Question: Who won the argument abou the economy and taxes?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 38%
Undecided or tie: 17%


Question: Who do you think won the argument over healthcare?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 35%
Undecided or tie: 30%


Question: Who you think won the debate over foreign policy?
Governor Ronald Reagan: 50%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Undecided or tie: 8%


Question: Who do you think won the argument over individual rights?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 40%
Undecided or tie: 13%


Question: Who do you think brings more experience to table and has the better administrative skills?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 59%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 33%
Undecided or tie: 8%


Question: Who did you find more authentic and likeable?
Governor Ronald Reagan: 51%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Undecided or tie: 9%


Question: Who you think is better able to win the general election?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 40%
Undecided or tie: 14%


Question to Rockefeller supports only: Do you think Nelson Rockefeller should offer Ronald Reagan the vice presidential nomination if nominated?
Yes: 43%
No: 40%
Unsure: 17%


Question to Reagan supports only: Do you think Ronald Reagan should offer Nelson Rockefeller the vice presidential nomination if nominated?
Yes: 40%
No: 35%
Unsure: 25%


Question to Rockefeller supports only: Would you support Ronald Reagan if he is nominated?
Yes, definitely: 32%
Lean yes: 28%
Lean no: 24%
Definitely not: 16%


Question to Reagan supports only: Would you support Nelson Rockefeller if he is nominated?
Yes, definitely: 29%
Lean yes: 34%
Lean no: 25%
Definitely not: 12%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 27, 2017, 07:00:06 am
May 16, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Humphrey and Reagan secure victories in Nebraska and Oregon, Rocky wins West Virginia ★★★


May 16, 1972 saw three smaller states holding their primaries.


Democratic contests

Nebraska
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 55.3%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38.5%
George Wallace: 6.1%

Oregon
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 48.1%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44.6%
George Wallace: 7.0%

West Virginia
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 53.7%
Robert F. Kennedy: 23.4%
George Wallace: 22.8%

Another three important wins for Hubert Humphrey. Had he lost both of these states, it would have been almost impossible to stop RFK anymore, but as he won, the RFK camp is still not over the top. Especially the vice president's performance in West Virginia was disappointing for his team, though RFK hopes to lock up the nomination after the primaries next week.


Republican contests

Nebraska
✓ Ronald Reagan: 57.3%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42.5%

Oregon
✓ Ronald Reagan: 52.8%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47.0%

West Virginia
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 66.8%
Ronald Reagan: 32.6%

Reagan's wins in Nebraska and Oregon came not a surprise, though he underperformed most polls. The results give him a narrow edge over Nelson Rockefeller, who handily won in West Virginia, in the total delegate count again, but he's still not near the nomination.


May 19, 1972: Senate confirms President Johnson's nomination of Mark Felt to be FBI Director

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Mark Felt, the new FBI Director

Already on May 4, President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated FBI Associate Director Mark Felt to be the next director after long-time incumbent J. Edgar Hoover passed away earlier this month. Felt has been named Associate Director in 1971 by the president and now won his trust to lead the bureau for the next years. On May 19, 1972, the senate confirmed the nomination with 91 to 8 votes in favor. The nomination was also supported by Vice President Kennedy and Senator Humphrey.


May 23, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: North Atlantic primaries: Kennedy close to nomination; Rockefeller gains in light of big triumphs ★★★


Five more states voted today as the primary season nears its decisive phase.


Democratic contests

Connecticut
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 57.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 40.4%
George Wallace: 2.1%

Delaware
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 50.3%
Hubert Humphrey: 40.3%
George Wallace: 9.0%

Maryland
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 44.5%
Hubert Humphrey: 35.2%
George Wallace: 20.1%

Pennsylvania
✓ Hubert Humphrey: 51.9%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44.7%
George Wallace: 3.1%

Rhode Island
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 61.1%
Hubert Humphrey: 38.9%
George Wallace: not on ballot

Despite Hubert Humphrey won the biggest prize of the day, Pennsylvania, Robert Kennedy managed to carry all other states on this May 23. Including his uncommitted delegates, he is now the only candidate who has still a direct path to win at least 50% of the delegate count. Although only 4% of the delegate count separate him from Humphrey, the senator from Minnesota has almost no path left to a direct convention majority. In addition, Vice President Kennedy is also expected to win in California and New Jersey, the only two remaining large states.

The state of the Democratic race:

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Robert F. Kennedy: ~ 35% of delegates
Hubert Humphrey: ~ 31% of delegates
George Wallace: ~ 16% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


Republican contests

Connecticut
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 75.8%
Ronald Reagan: 23.9%

Delaware
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 53.9%
Ronald Reagan: 45.8%

Maryland
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 50.8%
Ronald Reagan: 40.1%
Spiro Agnew: 8.8%

Pennsylvania
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 58.0%
Ronald Reagan: 41.7%

Rhode Island
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 80.7%
Ronald Reagan: 19.0%

The North Atlantic States are good fit for Nelson Rockefeller, where he secures easy victories over Ronald Reagan, giving him a sizeable lead in the total delegate count again. However, the battle is still not won. Especially looking ahead: California, the nation's largest state, still didn't vote. The Gipper is expected to win his homestate, what could still - together with Washington state and smaller Mountain states - give him the nomination. However, Rockefeller polls close in Washington and is also expected to take New Jersey. Political observers now write, the chances for a brokered Republican Convention increased dramatically.

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller and his wife Happy celebrate upon winning all five primaries of the day

The Republican map and delegate count:

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Nelson Rockefeller: ~ 44% of delegates
Ronald Reagan: ~ 38% of delegates
Spiro Agnew: ~ 3% of delegates

(delegates won so far out of all delegates; majority needed)


BREAKING: May 24, 1972 – Humphrey drops out and leaves Kennedy as presumptive Democratic nominee


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Senator Humphrey, addressing a crowd of supporters, upon his announcement to suspend his campaign. He endorsed Vice President Kennedy for the general election

Rumors already spread last night after Hubert Humphrey immediately returned home to Minnesota. Having lost most of the important primaries that day, he sat together with his senior staff and discussed the situation. He reportedly also phoned with President Johnson at the White House. At 11 a.m. in the morning, Senator Humphrey went before the press and gave the following statement:

SENATOR HUMPHREY: My fellow citizens, my fellow Democrats and members of the press: Today I want to inform you that I decided to drop out of the presidential race. Having evaluated the situation, I came to the conclusion that there is no realistic path left for me to become the Democratic nominee for president. I congratulate Vice President Kennedy on his victories and a spirited campaign. He will be the nominee for president in 1972, and I will do everything I can to help him succeeding Lyndon Johnson in the White House. Now let me also thank the thousands of volunteers who helped me over the last months, the millions of voters who endorsed me and my family in particular. I will remain a senator and continue to represent the people of Minnesota in the best way possible. I will be engaged in any political debate and fight for the causes I believed in for many years. Thank you all very, very much. God bless you.


Barely an hour later, Vice President Robert Kennedy gave remarks upon Humphrey’s exit of the race.

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Vice President Bobby Kennedy, although still short of a delegate majority, is now the presumptive Democratic nominee for president

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Today, I want to thank Senator Hubert Humphrey for his courage. I also want to congratulate him  on running a fine campaign that focused on important issues rather than on personal attacks. Senator Humphrey has served his party, and more importantly his country, well over many years. We ought be thankful for his service and passion. I personally will fight hard to earn the trust and confidence of the voters who endorsed his candidacy.

Being the nominee of the Democratic Party is a great honor and I will do everything I can to earn your support in November. Now let us march forward as a force for progress, peace and liberty. Thank you!



Republican candidates Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan congratulated RFK on winning the nomination for president and promised “a tough but fair fight over the fall”. The same day, President Johnson reportedly invited Kennedy and Humphrey to the White House to discuss the Democratic strategy for November. He also publically expressed his congratulations to the vice president and said he would support him.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on December 27, 2017, 10:13:18 am
I'd support RFK, but would probably also become kind of a swing voter if Rocky is the Republican nominee.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cold War Liberal on December 27, 2017, 03:13:19 pm
I'd support RFK, but would probably also become kind of a swing voter if Rocky is the Republican nominee.

Me too. RFK v. Reagan would be instant RFK for me, but I'd only be lean RFK if Rocky was the Republican nominee.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on December 27, 2017, 11:22:18 pm
I’m pretty surprised you gave Rocky a win on Economics but Reagan a win on Foreign Policy , because Reagan biggest support usually came from people who valued economic policy while he lost on foreign policy .



In 1980 the Economic/Buisness Establishment supported Reagan from day 1 while the Foregin Policy establishment was more reluctant to support him


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 28, 2017, 05:06:20 am
I’m pretty surprised you gave Rocky a win on Economics but Reagan a win on Foreign Policy , because Reagan biggest support usually came from people who valued economic policy while he lost on foreign policy .



In 1980 the Economic/Buisness Establishment supported Reagan from day 1 while the Foregin Policy establishment was more reluctant to support him

Keep in mind that this is 1972: The economy is doing a lot better in (real life) 1980 and Rocky's middle-of-the-road approach, not too far from Nixon's, would have been more popular than Reagan's call for a return to the 1920s economic policy (that was still blamed for the Great Depression). On foreign policy, Reagan sounds tougher than Rockefeller in a time when Vietnam was maybe not lost yet, but not won either. The foreign policy establishment would still largely support Rockefeller (he also had foreign policy experience), but that doesn't have to be the opinion of the Republican base (or at least a decent part of it).


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 29, 2017, 05:46:01 am
May 28, 1972: George Wallace leaves Democratic race and raises speculation over third-party campaign, alarming President Johnson over RFK's southern support

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George Wallace speaking to supporters and the press upon dropping out of the Democratic race. However, he is not supporting RFK

That former Alabama Governor George Wallace can't win the nomination first hand already became evident several weeks ago, but with Hubert Humphrey's formal exit, there isn't even a chance to play the kingmaker in a deadlocked convention (or at least attempting to do so). Wallace now publically came to this conclusion as well and officially dropped out of the race for the Democratic nomination.

"Congratulations to the Kennedy clan, for once more taking over our party from the ordinary man", Wallace noted upon addressing the press and supporters in Montgomery, Alabama. And he added: "Mr. Kennedy and his buddies may have won this fight, but I'll be back soon." When asked what exactly he meant, he declined. Aides to Wallace already indicated that he will attempt to win the governorship of his state again as the 1974 election is an open one (Governor Brewer, who defeated Wallace in the 1970 primary, will be term-limited).

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President Johnson is reportedly alarmed of a potential Dixiecrat campaign for president this fall that would likely hurt Vice President Kennedy's chances

Almost immediately after Wallace's drop-out, rumors began to spread that he planned a third-party challenge in the fall election. Especially former Georgia governor Lester Maddox is reportedly pushing for such a campaign. As unconfirmed reports indicated, Maddox himself would run for vice president should Wallace launch a third-party presidential bid. A possible Rockefeller nomination would increase the chance for Dixiecrat ticket, a Washington Post report said. The article further stated, that President Lyndon Johnson is actively working behind the scenes to get southern Democrats behind the Democratic ticket. Governor Brewer and senators Llyod Bentsen (D-TX) and Lawton Chiles (D-FL) are also actively engaged in this effort. Although not confirmed, the president strongly recommended Bobby Kennedy to pick a southern running mate, as did his brother twelve years before. The president is afraid that a Dixiecrat candidacy in November could hand the White House to the Republicans, especially if Ronald Reagan is the nominee (who would, unlike Nelson Rockefeller, dismantle his legacy).


May 30, 1972

★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Rockefeller takes Washington State over Reagan; RFK unopposed winner ★★★


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Washington State Democratic Primary
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 85.8%
Hubert Humphrey: 7.2%
George Wallace: 5.5%

Nothing more to see here at the Democratic side: RFK is now unopposed for the Democratic nomination.


Washington State Republican Primary
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 52.5%
Ronald Reagan: 47.4%

Rocky's first - and probably only - win in the West comes from Washington State. His campaign heavily targeted the state in the closing days of this primary. That's an important victory to expand his delegate lead over the California governor, who is the favorite to win his homestate early next month. In order to win the nomination, Rockefeller must win at least one more state in addition to New Jersey, where he is already expected to win by huge margin.


May 31, 1972: A ton of new polls! Released by Gallup

Despite President Johnson's concerns over a Dixiecrat ticket, RFK's win over Humphrey gave him and the Democrats new momentum at the end of May. LBJ's numbers are also pretty strong for a president in his final year. He obviously benefits from the recovering economy, the detente policies and the lack of a major crisis abroad an riots at home. On the Republican side, Nelson Rockefeller now polls at 51% for his party's nomination, though Ronald Reagan still takes almost half of GOP supporters. Rocky also polls slightly better against Bobby Kennedy. The vice president also leads in a hypothetical three-way match-up with George Wallace.

Gallup this time also polled the favorbility of leading politicans.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 55%
Disapprove: 39%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 51%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 46%
Undecided: 3%


1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 48%
Republican: 41%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Ronald Reagan: 42%

Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%


Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Ronald Reagan: 37%
George Wallace: 13%

Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
George Wallace: 13%


Opinion of leading politicans

President Lyndon B. Johnson
Favorable: 55%
Unfavorable: 40%
No opinion/never heard of: 5%

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy
Favorable: 54%
Unfavorable: 38%
No opinion/never heard of: 8%

Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach
Favorable: 61%
Unfavorable: 33%
No opinion/never heard of: 6%

Senator Hubert Humphrey
Favorable: 57%
Unfavorable: 37%
No opinion/never heard of: 7%

Former Governor George Wallace
Favorable: 45%
Unfavorable: 46%
No opinion/never heard of: 9%

Former Governor Lester Maddox
Favorable: 31%
Unfavorable: 40%
No opinion/never heard of: 29%

Governor Nelson Rockefeller
Favorable: 48%
Unfavorable: 43%
No opinion/never heard of: 9%

Governor Ronald Reagan
Favorable: 47%
Unfavorable: 43%
No opinion/never heard of: 10%

Governor Spiro Agnew
Favorable: 50%
Unfavorable: 37%
No opinion/never heard of: 13%

Former Vice President Richard Nixon
Favorable: 44%
Unfavorable: 51%
No opinion/never heard of: 5%

Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield
Favorable: 37%
Unfavorable: 28%
No opinion/never heard of: 35%

Senate Minority Hugh Scott
Favorable: 33%
Unfavorable: 24%
No opinion/never heard of: 43%

House Speaker Carl Albert
Favorable: 39%
Unfavorable: 27%
No opinion/never heard of: 34%

House Minority Leader Gerald Ford
Favorable: 36%
Unfavorable: 22%
No opinion/never heard of: 42%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Chad Ralph Northam on December 29, 2017, 09:42:17 am
>Not having Hubert Humphrey win the Democratic Nomination
You monster!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 30, 2017, 06:53:50 am
June 2, 1972: HealthCare bill fails in committee

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Senator Ted Kennedy was the main force behind the healthcare bill

The so-called Universal Coverage Act, sponsored by Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and supported by the Johnson Administration, was voted down in the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare by Republicans and Southern Democrats. Although not surprising, this is a setback for the administration as well as Senator Kennedy.

However, Ted Kennedy already said he would try again this year. His brother, presumptive Democratic nominee Bobby Kennedy, promised to continue work an a healthcare-for-all legislation if elected to the Oval Office in November. According to insiders, President Johnson tries to force another liberal Democrat into the committee to ensure passage.


★★★ DECISION ’72 – Election Special: Last primaries show little surprise, RFK locks up nomination ★★★


Democratic contests

On the Democratic side, Vice President Robert Kennedy, who is unopposed in the race now, wins all remaining primaries (California, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota) with each over 90% of the vote.

The final Democratic map and delegate count:

()

✓ Robert F. Kennedy: ~ 53% of delegates
Hubert Humphrey: ~ 31% of delegates
George Wallace: ~ 16% of delegates

Note: The delegate count only includes pledged delegates won. As Hubert Humphrey and George Wallace both released their delegates, RFK is expected to win the nomination with a much higher number (though Wallace's delegation, which consists many conservative members, will likely not vote for Mr. Kennedy anyway).

The Democratic National Convention will take place from July 10 to July 13, 1972 in Madison Square Garden, New York City.

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The final primaries put Vice President Bobby Kennedy, here on campaign trail again, over the top in the delegate count: The 1972 Democratic presidential nomination is his


Republican contests

California
✓ Ronald Reagan: 65.0%
Nelson Rockefeller: 34.7%

Montana
✓ Ronald Reagan: 55.5%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44.3%

New Jersey
✓ Nelson Rockefeller: 63.0%
Ronald Reagan: 36.8%

New Mexico
✓ Ronald Reagan: 51.4%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48.5%

South Dakota
✓ Ronald Reagan: 53.6%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46.2%


The Republican race:

()

Nelson Rockefeller: ~ 48% of delegates
Ronald Reagan: ~ 48% of delegates
Spiro Agnew or unpledged: ~ 4% of delegates


★★★ BREAKING: It's official  – REPUBLICAN NOMINATION will go to BROKERED CONVENTION! ROCKEFELLER vs. REAGAN! ★★★


First Republican nomination in history following a 50-state primary season will be decided by a brokered convention, with neither candidate having received the necessary 50% of delegates. Is this Spiro Agnew's hour?

What a Republican primary season! Even the final contests could not bring the long-awaited decision. Both candidates won about the same number of pledged delegates: Rockefeller has a small lead with 1,115 delegates behind him. Reagan won 1,106, each about 48%. The remaining 80 are uncommitted. Most of them were pledged to Spiro Agnew, who dropped out of the race and has not endorsed either of the two remaining contenders. The New York Times reported, that Agnew's released delegates are almost 50/50 divided between The Gipper and Rocky. Rockefeller has also a small lead of 0.7% in the total popular vote.

Until the convention opens in August, both campaigns have time to win over the unpledged delegates. Both campaigns are expected to reorganize their senior staff now in order to clinch the decisive delegates. Nevada Governor Paul Laxalt is reported to be Reagan's "right-handed man", while George Romney is rumored to coordinate the Rockefeller campaign's efforts. However, if neither candidate wins a majority on the first ballot, all delegates are released and can vote for whoever they want. That could be the time of Spiro Agnew! Although the Maryland governor strongly denied in an interview, he could then change his mind and attempt to win the nomination by presenting himself as an alternative acceptable to both party wings. But even if Agnew is not returning to the race, he will play an important role in the nominating process anyway. Political observers expect that Rockefeller and Reagan will reach out him and offer him a role in their campaign and administration. The Washington Post listed him as the most likely Republican vice presidential nominee. The Post also wrote, Agnew is about to meet with Senator Barry Goldwater, a Reagan backer, as well as Richard Nixon in the days to come (Nixon strongly supports Rockefeller).

The Republican National Convention will take place from August 21 to August 23, 1972 in Miami Beach, Florida.


June 24, 1972: George Wallace rules out third-party White House bid; speculation over Dixiecrat ticket remain

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George Wallace on television

In a television interview, George Wallace ruled out running for president on a third-party ticket. "I do not intend to run for president on a third-party platform", he said, "but won't endorse and vote for Mr. Kennedy. One Kennedy in a century is enough".

However, some doubts remain, as several Southern Democrats from the Old Guard are very unhappy with Bobby Kennedy's nomination. But Wallace's elimination from the contest is at least somewhat good news for the Kennedy campaign since Governor Wallace is the most famous and most popular Dixiecrat in the nation.



June 30, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

The ongoing nomination battle on the Republican side obviously benefits Democrats and the Kennedy campaign. RFK has now solid lead over both Republican candidates as well as Spiro Agnew (who was polled again, given the possibility of his nomination). Agnew also slightly performs better against Kennedy in the survey, possibly because he is not actively involved in the nomination battle anymore.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 41%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 48%
Undecided: 3%


1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 49%
Republican: 42%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Ronald Reagan: 41%

Robert F. Kennedy: 51%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%

Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Spiro Agnew: 42%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on December 30, 2017, 08:07:30 am
Will Reagan choose a vp before the convention again



I would say these would be good candidates :

Howard Baker
George Romney
George HW Bush


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on December 30, 2017, 09:21:21 am
Will Reagan choose a vp before the convention again



I would say these would be good candidates :

Howard Baker
George Romney
George HW Bush


Well, Romney had to be picked after the nomination since he's actively engaged in the Rockefeller campaign. Poppy would be a two-term congressman who twice lost the Texas Senate race (1964 and 1970). With a Democrat in the White House, he wouldn't have been anything else except maybe RNC Chair. Nixon saved his career by naming him UN Ambassador after his second defeat in 1971. Howard Baker, however, seems to be decent choice for Reagan. Even Schweiker, though that may be a little early for him.

I'll do a list of potential running mates (with pros and cons) of both parties soon. Similar to Parrotguy's 2016 TL.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 01, 2018, 04:45:39 am
BONUS: The Democratic vice presidential selection

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As various reports confirmed, the Kennedy campaign considers, ahead of the Democratic National Convention, the following individuals for the vice presidential nomination.


Albert Brewer

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Age: 43
Homestate: Alabama
Experience: Governor of Alabama since 1968, Lieutenant Governor 1967–1968, Speaker of the Alabama House of Representatives 1962–1966, Alabama State Representative 1954–1966
Why he is considered: A southerner with liberal stances, Governor Brewer seems a good geographical balance to Bobby Kennedy. Brewer's selection would certainly boost Kennedy's chances in the south. Whether that is enough to win states, is hard to predict this early, although he is popular in his homestate for passing reforms. Especially the African American community staunchly backs Brewer's pro-civil-rights policies. It is notable, though, that he beat Dixiecrat icon George Wallace in the 1970 gubernatorial primary and handily won a full term months later. Brewer's experience in state politics (he also served as lieutenant governor, state representative and became the youngest speaker of the state house) could be an asset for RFK's plans, to expand the welfare state in dealing with the states. Like Bobby Kennedy at 46, the 43 year old governor would stand for a new generation of leaders. The only thing he lacks so far is experience in foreign policy.


Terry Sanford

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Age: 54
Homestate: North Carolina
Experience: President of the Duke University since 1969, Governor of North Carolina 1961–1965, North Carolina State Senator 1953–1955
Why he is considered: Terry Sanford was already rumored to be a running mate for John F. Kennedy's 1964 reelection campaign, though other sources claim he intended to keep then-vice president Lyndon Johnson on the ticket. Of course, that never went anywhere, as JFK was assassinated in 1963. As former governor from a state of the Upper South who is liberal-to-moderate, he's also a fair balance to RFK when it comes to experience and geography. However, like Albert Brewer, he lacks foreign policy experience and is out of politics for quite a while. Nevertheless, he is still respected among Democrats and also from an important battleground state.


George McGovern

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Age: 50
Homestate: South Dakota
Experience: U.S. Senator from South Dakota since 1963, U.S. Representative 1957–1961
Why he is considered: A liberal icon from the Great Plains, McGovern ran for president this year, but dropped out early in the primaries. Nevertheless, he has still a lot of fans among the Democratic base. Especially foreign policy doves supported him for several years right now. RFK originally appealed to this group as well in his 1968 campaign, but his alliance with President Johnson cost him support among anti-war activists. However, in a time when the U.S. involvement in Vietnam is largely over and Bobby Kennedy seems to have more trouble winning support in the South, McGovern may not be the ideal running mate despite his credentials in domestic policy as a staunch Great Society supporter.


James E. "Jimmy" Carter

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Age: 47
Homestate: Georgia
Experience: Governor of Georgia since 1971, Georgia State Senator 1963–1967
Why he is considered: Jimmy Carter falls into a similar category like Albert Brewer. Out of younger generation, he's a southern governor with mainly liberal stances. He made national news by declaring "the times of segregation are once and for all over" upon taking office as governor. That angered many social conservatives of the Old Southern Guard such as his predecessor and current lieutenant governor Lester Maddox. Although he's just one and a half years into his term, Carter already modernized the Georgia state government and passed progressive reforms. He would also be an asset in the South for RFK and his state may be critical in November. Governor Carter is also known as a man of high integrity and described as a likeable person. What speaks against him is that his gubernatorial experience is relatively short and that he has no experience in foreign affairs.


Stuart Symington

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Age: 71
Homestate: Missouri
Experience: U.S. Senator from Missouri since 1953, U.S. Secretary of the Air Force 1947–1950
Why he is considered: Stuart Symington is probably the biggest surprise on RFK's short list for vice president. A senator from Missouri for almost twenty years, he ran for Democratic presidential nomination against JFK in 1960 and lost. Back then, JFK also considered him a potential running mate before selecting LBJ. Symington's advanced age and his long time experience in the senate may not just appeal to elder voters, he would also bring a lot of experience to the table. His good connections at Capitol Hill may ease RFK to get his agenda through congress. In addition, he has credentials in foreign and defense policy. Another pro is that the senator is from a battleground state. However, as a long-time lawmaker with a certain stance and earlier presidential ambitions, he likely won't trade a safe senate mandate in return for an irrelevant role as vice president. If chosen and elected, Symington would certainly demand a wider range of responsibilities in foreign and domestic policy, an important role in the decision-making process and a say in making government appointments.


Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson

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Age: 60
Homestate: Washington (state)
Experience: U.S. Senator from Washington since 1953, U.S. Representative 1941–1953
Why he is considered: Like Senator Symington, Henry M. Jackson, better known as Scoop Jackson, has a very long experience in congress and could help Bobby Kennedy with the passage of his ambitious domestic agenda. His selection would also improve RFK's standing in the West. California, Oregon and Washington state were relatively close in 1968 and could decide the 1972 election and, for that reason, are top Democratic targets this cycle as well. However, a Jackson candidacy for vice president would alienate foreign policy doves, whose support for RFK has already been weakened. Despite being an outspoken liberal in domestic policy, Senator Jackson is a foreign policy hawk and would certainly demand a role in foreign and military policy. He's also not known as a staunch Kennedy supporter.


Carl Albert

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Age: 64
Homestate: Oklahoma
Experience: Speaker of the House of Representatives since 1971, House Majority Leader 1962–1971, House Majority Whip 1955–1962, U.S. Representative since 1947
Why he is considered: Carl Albert wouldn't be the first House Speaker to run for vice president. A long career in the House and various leadership positions, he would be an asset for RFK in passing legislation with his good connections in congress and his knowledge of the legislative process. Another pro for Speaker Albert is the fact that he comes from a swing state (Oklahoma). Although he is supported by southern members of the Democratic caucus as well, it is questionable whether he would actually bring in many additional votes from the South. It is also unclear, whether he is actually interested in the vice presidency as his speakership likely gives him more influence over the Democratic policy agenda. Polls indicate that Democrats remain in the majority after the election, even if a Republican wins the White House. The vice presidential nomination may therefore not be a step forward for Mr. Albert.


Orville Freeman

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Age: 54
Homestate: Minnesota
Experience: U.S. Secretary of Agriculture since 1961, Governor of Minnesota 1955–1961
Why he is considered: Despite being only 54 years old, Secretary Freeman has a long experience in the federal government after over ten years as head of the Agriculture Department. He has been a loyal cabinet member for both JFK and LBJ and is regarded as a person of integrity. In addition to his service in Washington, he has also six years of experience in the governor's chair. Although he is widely seen as qualified to take over the vice presidency, he has very limited experience in foreign affairs and is largely unknown to the American public. Freeman's homestate of Minnesota is also a Democratic stronghold and therefore not of a real asset in the general election. Maybe Freeman's lasting loyalty and his executive skills should be awarded by giving him a more important cabinet post after election, such as the Treasury Department.


The following individuals were mentioned as potential candidates but publically denied interest: Senator and former Vice President Hubert Humphrey (D-MN), Senator and Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT), Senator Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX), former Governor John Connally (D-TX), Governor Preston Smith (D-TX), Senator Lawton Chiles (D-FL), Senator Edmund Muskie (D-ME) and Supreme Court Judge and former Governor Pat Brown (D-CA)


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 05, 2018, 01:55:48 pm
Late June/early July 1972: Rockefeller and Reagan camps reach out to uncommitted delegates

Barely any news broke of the ongoing Republican nomination battle since the primary season ended up in a Rockefeller/Reagan deadlock. As various newspapers now report both campaign are in the process of reaching out to the uncommitted delegates. Spiro Agnew continues to abstain from endorsing either candidate but toned down his denials to reenter the race on a deadlocked convention floor, leading up to new speculation he might attempt to do so.


July 6, 1972: Kennedy’s vice presidential list down to three contenders, Albert Brewer rules out candidacy

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After talking to Bobby Kennedy, Alabama Governor rules out to run for vice president. He wants to finish his gubernatorial term and is rumored to seek a seat in the senate.

On the July 4 celebrations, Alabama Governor Albert Brewer, during a speech, ruled out to be the Democratic vice presidential nominee in 1972, but pledged to support Robert Kennedy over the fall and - if elected - as president. He reportedly phoned with the vice president about the campaign. Political observers wrote the governor wants to finish out his term by early 1975 and has an eye on the upcoming 1974 senate election in Alabama. Possibly challenging incumbent John B. Allen from the left for the Democratic nomination. Governor Brewer will also be the keynote-speaker of the 1972 Democratic National Convention and chair the platform committee.

In the days leading up to the nominating convention, unconfirmed reports from the RFK campaign’s inner circle state the presumptive nominee’s vice presidential shortlist is now narrowed down to three candidates that are subject to closer vetting and interviews: Senator Stuart Symington, Governor Jimmy Carter and Secretary Orville Freeman. Bobby Kennedy said he will announce his pick at the convention.


July 10 – 13, 1972: DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION

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Opening

On July 10, 1972, Democrats gathered together for their National Convention at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Unlike four years earlier, no riots are expected. And unlike the Republicans, there is only one Democrat left for the nomination: Vice President Bobby Kennedy. At the final day, when the nominating ballots are cast, Kennedy wants to announce his vice presidential running mate and deliver his acceptance speech. As reports indicate, his list is down to Senator Stuart Symington of Missouri and Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter. Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman is formally also among the three finalists, but political observers from the DNC now report, they don’t expect him to be picked. Accordingly, President Lyndon Johnson strongly urged RFK to pick a running mate that helps him in the South.

The July 10 opening went through with organizing stuff.


July 11: The day of the party platform and Hubert Humphrey

The second day was mainly devoted to the party platform. The most important points Democrats call for:

- Implementation of the Civil Rights policies enacted during the Johnson Administration, complete desegregation in the South and implement new policies where necessary such as the labor market.
- Universal healthcare similar to the bill sponsored by Senator Ted Kennedy
- Increase the minimum wage and link it to inflation. This part was very controversial with the moderate more business-friendly wing
- A solution for draft dodgers: RFK is supposed to come up with an amnesty plan. However, the subject was too controversial for specifics in the party platform
- Increased funding for housing
- Programs for crime prevention to fight crime on the streets

- A continuation of détente policy of President Johnson with the USSR and Red China; lasting peace in South East Asia
- Increase in foreign aid, especially in Asia and Africa to prevent the spread of communism and totalitarian regimes.

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Senator Hubert Humphrey at his convention speech, in which he strongly made the case for Democrats and Vice President Kennedy as the nominee

The day was finished with a highlight: Hubert Humphrey’s speech. The senator and former candidate thanked his fellow Democrats for their support and pledged to work hard to get Bobby Kennedy elected. “We have to make sure that Vice President Kennedy enters the White House coming January. He will continue the work of the past twelve years with passion, leadership and integrity”, he remarked. And he also warned of Republicans. Especially Ronald Reagan was his target: “We as a nation can’t afford Ronald Reagan, who will undo all the great things we have archived in the times since the New Deal. This is not an Eisenhower Republican, this is Barry Goldwater all over again. Spiro Agnew won’t be much better either. And don’t be fooled by Governor Rockefeller. He’s a nice man and sounds like a moderate, but make no mistake about it: He’s not your savior and his policies would be influenced by the Republican right.” The former candidate closed his speech with a fiery pledge for civil rights and an all-inclusive society.


July 12: Major speeches and great enthusiasm

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Speaker Albert encourages his fellow Democrats to fight for victory in November

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Governor Albert Brewer of Alabama at the convention site, here with his wife; as keynote speaker with a passionate address to Democrats, he gets a lot of attention. Media observers regard him as a rising star of the party

July 12 was shaped by a series of speeches by notable Democrats from all over the country. The mood at the convention hall was very enthisastic. The party and its supporters seem totally fired up. The opening and keynote address was delivered by Alabama Governor Albert Brewer, who arose as a young star of his party since beating George Wallace in the 1970 race for governor. Wallace himself abstained from the convention, saying he won’t witness “the crowning of another Kennedy”. However, Governor Brewer was celebrated by the delegates and visitors. Surely, a lot of delegates would see Brewer as vice presidential candidate, but he ruled out to run for that office and is rumored to prepare a senate run in 1974. In his half hour long address, the governor spoke of civil rights, economic opportunity and called for more investments in the infrastructure. A special part was his mentioning of “the new South”. "We ought to let division, hatred, lawlessness and injustice behind us. It is time to move forward in a spirit of cooperation, understanding and frankly love. Only as a united people we can be successful. And despite our proud heritage, the south wasn't always on the right side of history. But today we came together to work towards a better future for each and everyone. And by everyone, I mean really everyone. We can't afford to let anybody behind", he remarked as the delegates cheered.

In the afternoon hours, Democratic congressional leaders including Speaker and Convention Chair Carl Albert spoke. They praised the record of the Johnson Administration and emphasized the need to build on that progress. A planned appearance by 88 year old former president Harry S. Truman had to be cancelled, as he was struggling with his health. A surprise guest speaker was Hollywood actor Cary Grant, who endorsed Bobby Kennedy. He joked of Ronald Reagan, saying “if you want a man from Hollywood, there are better choices than The Gipper. I respect him, but he would be a dangerous president”, he said.

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President Johnson speaking: He defended the record of his presidency and encouraged his party to build on the progress of the JFK/LBJ years. He also spoke favorable about Bobby Kennedy and pledged to give him his full support

The evening was President Lyndon Johnson’s time. In a passionate speech, the outgoing president reflected on the now almost twelve Kennedy/Johnson years and defended his record. “We made unprecedented progress. Possibly more than in any other time in history”, the president argued. And he added: “to ensure the lasting success of this progress and the continuation of our vision, we need a president with the skills and the compassion to build on and meet challenges of the future. That man is my friend, Bobby Kennedy.”  LBJ also once more called on congress to enact the Ted Kennedy bill for an expansion of healthcare, saying the government must "invest in human capital and not solely in the pharma industry."

At the end of the day, the nation saw a Democratic National Convention energized by its leaders and the platform, which is probably the most liberal one ever. The New York Times wrote that liberals have now definitely taken over the national party.


Next: The presidential nomination, Bobby Kennedy's vice presidential pick and the road towards the Republican National Convention


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 06, 2018, 07:13:51 am
July 13, 1972: Final day of the DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION

★★★ BREAKING from the DNC: BOBBY KENNEDY nominated; selects JIMMY CARTER for VICE PRESIDENT ★★★


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Jimmy Carter, the governor of Georgia, here with his wife Rosalyn, has been selected as the vice presidential candidate by Bobby Kennedy

Breaking News from the Democratic National Convention: Vice President Bobby Kennedy has been nominated by the delegates as Democratic presidential nominee. He received almost 87% of all delegate votes. Right after the vote, he announced that Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter would be his vice presidential running mate. Carter publically accepted the offer and said he would fully devote himself to the campaign. With Carter's selection, the Kennedy campaign made a major decision for the fall strategy. Obviously RFK listened to LBJ's advice to pick a southerner for vice president. Jimmy Carter is certainly an asset here; especially his homestate of Georgia could be critical in November. This Democratic ticket of Kennedy at 46 years and Carter at 47 is also one of the youngest in history (both will turn 47 and 48, respectively, in October, the month before the election).

Insiders report that Kennedy made the decision based on the advice of the president and others, but also on the interviews with other candidates. Accordingly, Senator Stuart Symington demanded more influence than RFK was ready to give him. Secretary Orville Freeman, who was among the three finalists, said he would accept the offer but was concerned about the ticket's appeal in the South. It also reported that Freeman would be awarded for his loyalty by becoming Secretary of the Treasury in a Kennedy Administration. Jimmy Carter seemed interested in the position and found personal chemistry with the sitting vice president. However, all these information is not official.


The presidential ballot
✓ Robert F. Kennedy: 2,785
George Wallace: 275
Hubert Humphrey: 71
Others/abstain: 70

The vice presidential ballot
✓ Jimmy Carter: 2,711
George McGovern: 117
Henry M. Jackson: 40
George Wallace: 35
Others/abstain: 298


Jimmy Carter accepts vice presidential nomination

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Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter smiles as he receives a standing-ovation from the delegates during his speech

Right after the nominating ballots were cast, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter accepted his nomination for vice president. The highlights of his speech:

GOVERNOR CARTER: Delegates to this convention, Ladies and Gentlemen, members of the press and my fellow citizens: With a deep gratitude and a sense of humility, I accept your nomination for the vice presidency of the United States. Being entrusted with his awesome responsibility is one of the greatest honors I have received in my life. [...]

Today, I want to speak to you as a man, who grew up in the South and run a peanut farm before entering politics. But more importantly, I speak to you as a citizen concerned about our future and the future of our children. To ensure them a bright future, we must work together to eliminate any form of discrimination because of race, gender or age. We must work together to make sure each and everyone has a shot for a bright life in dignity, financial safety and access to healthcare. And we also have to make sure, we life in lasting peace. For this mission, I want to bring in my experience and knowledge to assist Robert Francis Kennedy as the next president of the United States. I will work closely with him to guide this wonderful nation of ours. [...]

Now, let us join forces as Americans. Not as Southerners or Northerners, as Easterners and Westerners. There is no such thing. We are all Americans. Now let's march as one people united in its belief in democracy, human rights and freedom. Thank you very much. Thank so very much.


During his speech and especially afterwards, Jimmy Carter received a standing-ovation from delegates. "Jimmy! Jimmy!", they screamed. It seems as his selection is well received among Democrats.


Bobby Kennedy accepts nomination for president

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Vice President Robert Kennedy, as he walks on the podium the accept the Democratic nomination for president

When Bobby Kennedy walked on the podium after a brief introduction by his wife Ethel, many observers remembered the 1964 Convention, when the then-Attorney General spoke and received twenty minutes of applause. Now eight years later, there was a similar enthusiasm in the air on that occasion when RFK himself was the party's nominee. The highlights of his address:

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: My fellow Democrats, distinguished guests and members of the press, Mr. President, Senator Humphrey, Speaker Albert, Governor Brewer, Governor Carter and my fellow Americans: I cannot tell you how deeply moved I am to accept your nomination for President of the United States. [Massive applause]

Over the course of this campaign, I met many thousands of our fellow citizens. They told me about their lives and what positive impact the policies of the last two administrations had on them. But they also told me about their needs, concerns and fears. There is nobody who I remember more than a black girl in Virginia, that told me how she was struggling to find a job. Her family found a place to live thanks to our housing legislation. She also told me about her brother, who died in Vietnam. Nothing else symbolizes more the achievements and challenges in the years ahead alike. In other words, what I want to do for all of you, my fellow Americans, is simple: I want to build on the progress we made in twelve years of Kennedy and Johnson. And I want to find new solutions of new challenges that will arise in the time to come as we enter the third century of the American experience. [...] I want that every men, women and child in this nation has a fair chance for a safe home, a decent job and protection against discrimination. I also want every men, women and child to live in a lasting and stable peace.[...]

It is almost twelve years ago that we begun this journey. Thanks to my brother, our beloved John F. Kennedy, and our President Lyndon B. Johnson, we have made unimagined progress. I want to build on and renew this spirit that guided us through the 1960s and into the 1970s. Let us, we Democrats, stand united as a force of progress, liberty and peace. Let us not hand over this great country to a deeply divided Republican Party which puts the progress we've made in danger. Thank you so much. God bless you, and God bless the United States.


Massive applause; delegates scream "Bobby! Bobby! Bobby!"

As the Democratic National Conventions comes to an end, Democrats seem united and extremely energized to defend the White House. Their ticket will be KENNEDY/CARTER.

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The 1972 Democratic banner


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cold War Liberal on January 06, 2018, 11:41:12 am
KENNEDY/CARTER '72!!!

Pretty much my dream ticket right there! :D


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 07, 2018, 06:05:49 am
July 31, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

Following the enthusiastic Democratic National Convention, the Kennedy campaign goes with momentum into the general election. He widens the gap to the Republican rivals to an unprecedented level. While President Johnson also benefits from the trend, the GOP voters are again exactly tied between Ronald Reagan and Nelson Rockefeller. Some polls on Jimmy Carter were also conducted. It seems as he is an asset to the ticket, though not an overwhelming factor.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 57%
Disapprove: 38%


Polls for the 1972 presidential race

Republican Party presidential nomination

Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Governor Ronald Reagan: 48%
Undecided: 4%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Jimmy Carter's selection as Democratic vice presidential candidate?

Approve: 51%
Disapprove: 25%
Undecided or no opinion: 24%

Approval among Democrats: 83%

Question: Are you more or less likely to vote for the Democratic ticket with Jimmy Carter running for vice president?

More likely: 21% (among voters in former Confederate States: 52%)
Less likely: 10% (among voters in former Confederate States: 31%)
No difference: 69%


General election match-ups

Robert F. Kennedy: 52%
Ronald Reagan: 40%

Robert F. Kennedy: 51%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%

Robert F. Kennedy: 51%
Spiro Agnew: 42%


1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 50%
Republican: 40%


August 12, 1972: Spiro Agnew says he's "available" in the case of a deadlocked Republican Convention

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"I'm available as a compromise candidate if the convention remains deadlocked", Governor Spiro Agnew now says

A little more than a week before the Republican National Convention opens its doors, Spiro Agnew made big news: He now said that he considers to reenter the race if the convention remains deadlocked between Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan. Their delegates are only bound in the first round of voting. If both fail to get a majority rather than a plurality of the votes, the delegates are released and could technically vote for anybody they want. That procedure opens the door for a compromise candidate. "If that were to happen, I would be available for the party's well-being", the Maryland governor and former candidate said, "I think either of Mr. Rockefeller and Mr. Reagan should be the nominee. But if the delegates can't decide on one of them, we ought to think about a compromise candidate from the middle of the Republican spectrum. I would be ready to take over this role if entrusted by enough delegates". He first declined such plans but toned down in recent weeks.

Both the Reagan and Rockefeller camps denounced the suggestion in a first statement. The Gipper called it "undemocratic to nominate someone who won just a handful of delegates in primaries". Rocky publically agreed on this statement.


August 18, 1972: Rockefeller puts Nixon in charge as "Convention Campaign Chair" to secure nomination

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Is Tricky Dick back? Nelson Rockefeller puts him in charge to operate as his campaign's convention chair

Another big news days before the Republican National Convention: Nelson Rockefeller officially put Richard Nixon in charge as his campaign's convention chairman. Nixon's task is to make sure that all uncommitted delegates who pledged to vote for the New York governor so far keep their word. The former two-time GOP nominee, who endorsed Rocky back in January, is also expected to lead last-minute talks with the remaining uncommitted delegates that didn't endorse a candidate even after weeks of negotiations from both camps. Political observers described Nixon's hiring as "smart move" due to his skills and knowledge of the political process. "Will Nixon be Tricky Dick again?" titled the Washington Post in reference to Nixon's nickname.

The day after, Ronald Reagan named Senator Bob Taft Jr. (R-OH) as his campaign's convention floor manager. The Republican nomination remains as enthralling as a Hollywood thriller.

So far, Nelson Rockefeller has a very small advantage in bound delegates, but he can't rely on this. The odds are almost 50/50 between him and Ronald Reagan.


August 21 – 23, 1972: REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION

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Miami Beach, Florida: On a hot summer day, Republicans came together for their nominating convention. It will be the great and ultimate showdown between Nelson Rockefeller, the leader of the liberal wing, and Ronald Reagan, the leader of the conservative wing. The event will be subject to massive media covering around the world. There is also an unprecedented number of foreign journalists, especially from Europe and Latin America.

August 21: The opening, organization and first major speeches

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Before regular order begun, both candidates met for a personal conversation

Right after the convention opened and the two major camps organized themselves, Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan met in a Hotel Suite for a personal conversation. Afterwards, not much was made public. Both only commented that it was a "friendly talk with mutual respect".


The question over the naming of the vice presidential candidates in advance

Usually the organizing section is relatively uneventful, but the Reagan camp introduced a rule that would require both contenders to name a vice presidential candidate in advance. It was rumored that Reagan would pick Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee for vice president. Rockefeller's choice was wide open, but Spiro Agnew was frequently named to be on top of the list. The Rockefeller camp meanwhile fought hard to reject this rule, and they succeeded, as it was narrowly voted down. As various News Channels reported, Richard Nixon was mainly responsible to vote this statute down. Nixon in general seemed very present and talked to several delegates and other officeholders. One observer said "Tricky Dick is everywhere I watch."

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Senator Howard Baker (R-TN), a moderate, is reportedly Reagan's choice for the vice president. But as a proposed rule to name running mates in advance was defeated, the announcement was not made yet.


High profile speakers

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Senator Barry Goldwater and former Governor Bill Scranton

The day closed with two high profile speakers from each faction to speak. First was Senator and 1964 nominee Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), who made the case for Ronald Reagan in his speech. After his speech, former Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton spoke on behalf of the liberals and urged to support Nelson Rockefeller. However, both speakers were not interrupted and they didn't attack the other candidate personally.


August 22: The party platform

Political observers who hoped to read a trend which faction had actually an advantage were disappointed when the platform was implemented. Both sides got some victories, but a lot of other points were very vague. At least on topics with disagreements. More detailed were sections were both largely agreed (like a tougher law and order policy).

Main Republican goals:

- Tax cuts for the middle class and business to stimulate growth [a compromise, with a small tendency towards the Reagan camp].
- Deregulation of the Energy Market [victory for Reagan positions]
- Less bureaucracy in the federal government and a commission to study waste and fraud [both candidates largely agreed on this]
- Tougher law and order policy and more prevention [both sides agreed]
- Social Security, Medicare and Medical remain intact, fully funded and improved. Waste and fraud were it exists has to be eliminated [mainly a victory for Team Rockefeller]
- The Republican Party is committed to anti-discrimination laws and calls for more women in leading positions [mainly agreed by both sides, small tendency towards Rockefeller]
- More funds for the infrastructure [largely a Rockefeller priority]
- The war on poverty has to be reorganized and more autonomy to the states [victory for Reagan]

- A tougher stance against the communist block without ending current talks [mainly a Reagan priority]
- A deeper partnership with Latin America [a Rockefeller goal, tough the Reagan camp agreed on the headline, no details given]
- Stop decreasing the defense spending [largely a compromise; Rockefeller wanted to slow down the post-Vietnam budget cuts by the Johnson Administration, while Reagan wanted at least a freeze and later an increase]

The day ended with speeches of the congressional leadership (Senator and Convention Chair Hugh Scott and House Minority Leader Gerald Ford).


Next: The GREAT showdown at the presidential ballot and the shortlist for the vice presidential nomination!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Kingpoleon on January 09, 2018, 09:56:09 am
Rockefeller/Goldwater or Rockefeller/Hatfield doesn’t sound too bad.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Jaguar4life on January 09, 2018, 10:49:28 am
I’m calling for a Reagan/Rockefeller ticket to unite the party


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 11, 2018, 03:35:12 pm
August 23, 1972: Final day of the REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION

★★★ BREAKING from RNC: ROCKY CLINCHES!! ★★★


Breaking News from the Republican National Convention: Nelson Rockefeller clinches presidential nomination by razor-thin margin on first ballot, defeating rival Ronald Reagan.



Age: 46
Homestate: Tennessee
Experience: U.S. Senator from Tennessee since 1967
Why he is considered: Originally reported to be Ronald Reagan's vice presidential choice, Tenneessee Senator Howard Baker would also be a good pick for Nelson Rockefeller. A moderate, he comes from the Upper South and could add strenght to the ticket in a region, that is largely skeptical towards the New York governor. At 46 years, he's also from a younger generation compared to Rockefeller at 64. Furthermore, Baker has a full six year senate term in experience (and is currently running for reelection in November). However, he's not personally familar with the newly selected nominee and widely unknown outside of Tennessee.

The following individuals were mentioned as potential candidates but publically denied interest: Former Governor George Romney (R-MI), Former Governor William Scranton (R-PA), Senator Edward Brooke (R-MA), Senator Margarethe Chase-Smith (R-ME), Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), Senator John Tower (R-TX), Senator and Minority Leader Hugh Scott (R-PA), Senator Richard Schweiker (R-PA) and former Senator Thomas Kuchel (R-CA).


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on January 12, 2018, 03:20:45 am
I'm excited about this TL! Keep it going! Looking forward to a Rockefeller versus Kennedy race. I'd favor RFK, but would be fine with Rockefeller as well.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 13, 2018, 07:01:08 am
★★★ BREAKING: THE ROCKEFELLER VICE PRESIDENTIAL PICK: It’s GERALD FORD! ★★★


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Congressman and House Minority Leader Gerald Ford of Michigan has been selected for the vice presidential spot

Breaking News from the Republican National Convention: The Rockefeller campaign officially announced the selection of Representative and House Minority Leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan as Nelson Rockefeller’s vice presidential running mate. The 59 year old congressman, who has 24 years of experience at Capitol Hill, has accepted the governor’s offer to join the ticket. According to insiders, Rockefeller wanted to offer the position to Ford first, while Oregon senator Mark Hatfield was the second choice. George Romney was reportedly the major force behind the selection of his fellow man from Michigan and is, according to observers, almost certain to assume a top-cabinet job if Rockefeller gets elected. The pragmatic and well-liked Ford is supposed to strengthen the ticket in the Mid-West and, if elected, ease the passage of major legislation.


Ronald Reagan addresses convention

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Before Rockefeller, Ford and their wives could give their speeches, Ronald Reagan delivers his address. The hall cheered as the Gipper entered the stage. “Ron! Ron! Ron!”, screamed hundreds of delegates. Many of them held their Reagan signs high and swung the American flag.

GOVERNOR REAGAN: Governor Rockefeller, Mrs. Rockefeller, Congressman Ford, Mrs. Ford, Senator Scott, delegates to this 1972 Republican convention, distinguished guests here and my fellow Americans: First, let me thank you so much for your lasting support. I cannot tell you how grateful Nancy and I are for your support and warm welcome. First of all, let me congratulate my colleague and friend, Nelson Rockefeller, for winning the Republican nomination for president. And may I personally note, that the kindness of yourself, Governor, and Mrs. Rockefeller is something that Nancy and I greatly remember. Now you asked me to say a few words, yet I have only prepared for a victory speech [convention hall laughs]. Well, now, let me first remark, that I believe the Republican Party has enacted a platform, that gives us hope for future. Hope, to regain our national greatness through growth, opportunity, self-determination and a strong stance on the world stage. Hope, to move this country into a different direction, than the other party offers. They tell us once again, that higher taxes, more bureaucracy, further violation of private rights and a selling out of American value and prestige in the world are the answer to the problems of our day. I reject that message. [massive applause] [...] Now let us work together from this the day forward, to offer the people of this great nation a cause to rally upon, so that America can be once again that shining city upon a hill. Thank you very very much.

At the end, Ronald Reagan received a standing ovations from the convention delegates, guests as well as the podium. Even a lot of Rockefeller supporters gave him a massive applause. He left the podium not as beaten contender, but more as a "almost nominee". It didn't seem as his days were over at all, despite narrowly losing the nomination in his first try.


Gerald Ford accepts vice presidential nomination

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After the vice presidential balloting was completed, with Gerald Ford winning over 85% of the vote, Representative Gerald Ford gave his speech to accept the nomination for vice president. He was introduced by his wife Betty.

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Governor Rockefeller, Mrs. Rockefeller, Governor Reagan, Mrs. Reagan, delegates to this convention and my fellow citizens: Thank you! I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your confidence that you put in me. I humbly accept your nomination for vice president of the United States. [Applause]. I spoke before this convention yesterday already as candidate for Speaker of the House. Now, all of a sudden, I stand before you as a candidate for President of the Senate [laughter goes through hall]. Aware of the immense challenges ahead, I look forward to be a true partner for President-to-be Rockefeller and help him in any way possible. I want to use the relationships to my colleagues in the congress to pass an agenda that will help out nation to prosper and remain that arsenal of democracy that we have been for over two centuries. [...] Let me finish by once more thanking Governor Rockefeller for his trust and confidence in me. I am deeply honored to represent our party in this upcoming election and look forward to contribute to our victory on November the seventh. Thank you all.


Nelson Rockefeller gives acceptance speech

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Last but not least was Nelson Rockefeller's acceptance speech. He was greeted by a massive applause when his wife Happy introduced him as the next president of the United States.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Wow! Thank you! My gallant wife Happy, Governor Reagan, Mrs. Reagan, Congressman Ford and Mrs. Ford, Chairman Scott, delegates to this convention, distinguished guests, members of the press and my fellow Americans, all the millions that are watching: With a deep gratitude and a sense of humility, I accept the nomination of President of the United States! [Massive applause, "Rocky! Rocky!" calls] Now, first, let me thank my for approving my suggestion to nominate Congressman Gerald Ford for the vice presidency. I have no doubt he will make a great vice president, of which this nation can be proud of. Let me also thank very much my friend Ronald Reagan for a very tough but fair fight and a contest of ideas over the last months. I know how it feels like running for and not winning the nomination. But you, Ron, you came much closer than me in your first attempt [laughter goes through hall]. And I do believe, that your best days are still ahead. Like I believe, that America's best days are still ahead. That, however, requires bold leadership in the years ahead. The motto of our campaign is Peace, Freedom and Prosperity. These are my goals for America, as we are on the brink to enter the third century of this great experiment. I want to make sure, that each and everyone in this country has a shot to succeed. No matter of race, color and gender. Therefore, as president, I will do everything to eliminate discrimination against anyone. Especially women and blacks must be target of your efforts. [...] Peace through strength and respect for human rights around the globe. Through the rule of law, not through violence. Through partnerships, especially with countries of Latin America and Africa. To spread democracy, a free-market economy and prosperity with it. To stabilize world peace, that we, our children and grandchildren, can live in peace. [...] Prosperity through a pragmatic approach to economic policy. As less intervention as possible, as much as needed to preserve fair conditions, to protect to environment. I also call upon a massive investment into our infrastructure and improve our schools [...] And freedom through the rule of law and a respect for every American who is playing by the rules. [...] That is the vision Congressman Ford and I offer America. And as a great general once said: There is no substitute for victory!

As Nelson Rockefeller finished his speech, he received standing-ovations and a minutes long applause. They delegates cheered and hold their Rockefeller-Ford signs high.

Now that Republican National Convention closed, the general election will be KENNEDY/CARTER versus ROCKEFELLER/FORD.

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Republican campaign signs for 1972


August 25, 1972: Polling special! Released by Gallup

Two days after Nelson Rockefeller's nomination, Gallup conducted a series of polls for the presidential race. Bobby Kennedy is still in the lead, but a "convention bump" for the Republicans is already measureable. Gallup also asked about Gerald Ford and, for the first time, some states were polled.


General election match-up

Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%

Question: Do you approve or disapprove Gerald Ford's selection as Republican vice presidential candidate?

Approve: 45%
Disapprove: 23%
Undecided or no opinion: 32%

Approval among Republicans: 80%


Question to Reagan supporters: Do you plan to vote for Nelson Rockefeller in the general election?

Yes, definitely: 39%
Lean yes: 28%
Lean no: 20%
Certainly not: 13%


Polls by states (potential battlegrounds)

Alabama
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 37%

California
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%

Iowa
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%

Michigan
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%

New York
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%

Wisconsin
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on January 13, 2018, 08:23:40 am
Lol, you somehow still got part of the campaign to be Ford v Carter.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 15, 2018, 01:43:57 pm
August 27, 1972

★★★ BREAKING: Former Georgia Governor LESTER MADDOX launches third-party presidential campaign ★★★


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BREAKING NEWS from Savannah, Georgia: Lester Maddox officially launches a third-party presidential campaign. The former Georgia governor and his running mate, Maryland businessman George P. Mahoney, are running as candidates for the newly founded anti-establishment American Independent Party to oppose Robert Kennedy and Nelson Rockefeller in the November general election.

"America needs a real choice in November. But when I look at the nominees of the two major parties, all I can see are two out-of-touch elitists. Two liberal East Coast establishment career politicians, that come from the wealthiest families in this country. And these two fellows tell us, they stand for the common man? That is a joke!", said former Georgia governor Lester Maddox at his first campaign event in Savannah, Georgia. A crowd of over 5,000 cheered, as Maddox was standing in the sun. "It is about time that the ordinary American takes back this nation from the arrogance of the Washington insiders and elites, who don't give a damn for states' rights as prescribed in the American constitution", he continued his speech. And added: "In just a few years, lawlessness has spread all over this country, an erosion of morality taken place and holy things like family and faith have been under siege. I, like millions of Americans, won't stand by and witness the next out-of-touch elitist, whether his name may be Kennedy or Rockefeller, take over and bankrupt this country."

He has long been a critic of the political establishment and the party elites in Washington, but now he officially entered the ring: Former Georgia Governor Lester Maddox, actually a conservative southern Democrat, declared a presidential run to oppose Vice President Bobby Kennedy, Democratic nominee, and Governor Nelson Rockefeller, the Republican nominee. With George Wallace taking himself out of consideration, already eying a comeback in the Alabama gubernatorial election of 1974, Lester Maddox is the most famous Dixiecrat in the country. Supporting racial segregation, he served as governor of his state from 1967 to 1971. He had to step down after one four year term during the 1970 election, since the Georgia constitution still prohibits governors to seek immediate reelection. Instead, he ran for lieutenant governor and was elected, serving under current governor Jimmy Carter, with whom Maddox is often at odds over several issues. Carter himself just became the Democratic nominee for vice president, what likely makes Georgia one of the most contested and, on election night, watched states in this election.

Maddox' vice presidential running mate will be George P. Mahoney of Maryland; a businessman who ran - and lost - for several offices in his homestate. He was the 1966 Democratic nominee for governor. Running on a pro-segregation platform two years after President Johnson signed to Civil Rights Act into law, Mr. Mahoney was defeated by pro-civil rights Republican Spiro Agnew, who was an unsuccessful candidate for the Republican nomination this year.

Maddox and Mahoney will run as the nominees of the American Independent Party, which was founded in 1968 but didn't run a candidate that year after George Wallace declined for private reasons. Their platform calls for a repeal of most civil rights laws of the Johnson Administration, claiming it was a violation of states' rights. Other major demands are a strong law-and-order policy, congressional term-limits and a reform of campaign finance. "Giving America back to the ordinary man", is an often quoted phrase in their program. Critics accuse the candidates and supporters of racism.

What didn't came as a surprise, was George Wallace's appearance at Maddox' first rally. He and other prominent Dixiecrats endorsed - or are about to endorse - the Maddox candidacy. However, it is de-facto impossible for Maddox to get elected by winning 270 electoral votes in November. He could nevertheless throw the final decision to the House of Representatives if he wins enough southern states to prevent Kennedy or Rockefeller from winning the necessary 270 votes. That may provoke a constitutional crisis, if neither RFK nor Rocky gives up and Democrats only hold a majority with southern states, that would support Maddox. Nevertheless, this is pure speculation at this moment, though a close Kennedy/Rockefeller race increases the chances for an electoral deadlock.

The Democrats didn't immediately react to Maddox entering, though President Johnson probably wished for better news on his 64th birthday. In a brief statement, Nelson Rockefeller slammed Maddox as "a yesterday's man, who should have no business in running the country". When asked about the Maddox candidacy and whether he'd support it, Ronald Reagan said: "Although it is correct that I also want to see more things going back to the states, I do not support Lester Maddox. I support Governor Rockefeller and urge everyone else to do so". It also remains to be seen, from which side Maddox takes more support away - Democrats and Republicans?

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The Maddox/Mahoney campaign's logo


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 16, 2018, 03:11:35 pm
August 31, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

Bobby Kennedy still in the lead, but Nelson Rockefeller is slowly closing the gap following his nomination and the apparent Republican unity. Maddox was already included in the national poll, as well as all the state's polls.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 53%
Disapprove: 40%


General election match-ups
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 6%


Polls by states

Alabama
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Lester Maddox: 33%
Nelson Rockefeller: 28%

Arkansas
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Lester Maddox: 20%

California
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Connecticut
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Delaware
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 33%
Lester Maddox: 31%
Nelson Rockefeller: 30%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Illinois
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Lester Maddox: 17%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Massachusetts
Robert F. Kennedy: 53%
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Michigan
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Minnesota
Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 7%

Navada
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New York
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Lester Maddox: 1%

New Jersey
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New Mexico
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

North Carolina
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 11%

Oklahoma
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 5%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Oregon
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Pennsylvania
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

South Carolina
Lester Maddox: 38%
Nelson Rockefeller: 30%
Robert F. Kennedy: 26%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 38%
Lester Maddox: 18%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Washington state
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Lester Maddox: <1%

West Virginia
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 36%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Wisconsin
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%


Gallup and the New York Times also released an electoral map, reflecting the current polling numbers. Rated as toss-ups are only states in which polling is exactly tied or battleground states, that were not polled at the moment. Shadings in states that were not polled yet reflect their general rating (based on previous elections, electorate etc.). Most of them are states with a general leaning towards one party or the other.

The current map shows the “absurd” situation that Nelson Rockefeller is slightly ahead in the electoral vote, although the most recent Gallup national poll has him trailing Bobby Kennedy by three percent. However, all light blue or red shaded states are within the margin of error and could go either way in the end. For example New York and California, were both are neck-in-neck. Especially New York will be interesting to watch. RFK would likely have this state in his bag against most any other Republican, but Rocky’s big homestate bonus, where he easily won four gubernatorial elections, turns this into a battleground. Rocky is currently slightly ahead there, after the previous polls showed a small Kennedy lead.


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Nelson Rockefeller: 241 electoral votes
Robert F. Kennedy: 237 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 25 electoral votes
Tied: 35 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 47%
Republican: 43%


September 3, 1972: Two presidential and one vice presidential debate scheduled for autumn

For the first time since 1960, the two respective campaigns agreed that their candidates will participate in live televised debates. Two presidential debates between Bobby Kennedy and Nelson Rockefeller are scheduled to take place on September 25 and October 22. The second debate will be in the format of a townhall, where selected voters directly ask the candidates their questions. In addition, there will also be – for the first time in U.S. history – a vice presidential debate on October 15 between Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford. As the debate commission decided to invite only candidates with at least 15% support nationally in opinion polls, Lester Maddox was not asked to participate so. However, that may change, as the commission confirmed. Howard K. Smith of ABC News, who already moderated the Republican debate in spring, was selected as moderator for the two presidential debates, while Barbara Walters will moderate the vice presidential showdown.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on January 17, 2018, 10:38:11 am
LOL at Maddox. I predict he will underperform Wallace ’68 in real life, though he may force an EC deadlock. In the end, I think RFK wins narrowly by carrying NY and GA with very close margins.

I'm curious to see a Carter/Ford VP debate.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 20, 2018, 07:10:19 am
★★★ The campaign throughout September ★★★

Candidates stump the campaign trail and make their cases to the voters

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Vice President Bobby Kennedy interacts with supporters at a New York campaign rally; September 5, 1972

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller in the midst of a cheering crowd in Miami, Florida; September 8, 1972

As we entered September, all three major candidates and their running mates went on the campaign trail to make their case to the voters. The Kennedy campaign spent a lot of money and efforts in southern and upper southern states they believe are worth it: Tennessee, Florida, Texas, Kentucky and North Carolina. Georgia is also highly contested, as recent polls showed a near-tie between Kennedy, Maddox and Rockefeller. RFK reportedly had the largest and most enthusiastic crowds. Especially when he referred to his brother: Saying the journey JFK begun must be continued after the election. Nevertheless, Bobby Kennedy also tried to emphasize the need for a new generation to take over the United States rather than just running for "the fourth term of JFK and LBJ", although he frequently referred to the 35th and 36th president and their record that must be continued. "Governor Carter and I are standing for a new generation of leaders", Kennedy told his supporters, "but we want to stand for all Americans, regardless of age, gender or skin color."

Nelson Rockefeller launched a 50 state campaign, saying he wanted to visit every state until election day. Also in an effort to demonstrate his stamina since down-ballot Democratic candidates pointed to his age (64). Bobby Kennedy and Jimmy Carter refrained from such comments. "Attacking Governor Rockefeller's age would not just be inappropriate, it would also be an insult on our president, who is the same age", he said. Rockefeller himself did not respond to this issue. Many of his efforts are devoted to the Midwest, New York and California, where polls are very close. Among southern states, Rocky heavily targets Florida, where 17 electoral votes are at stake and polls have shown him with a fair, though not overwhelming, lead. His primary win over Ronald Reagan gives him additional confidence to carry the state, as Richard Nixon did in 1968 despite losing nationally. The Rockefeller campaign is also very active in Kentucky, were he polls ahead of Kennedy and a strong third-place Maddox, and Arkansas, where his younger brother Winthrop is the governor. In fact, Winthrop Rockefeller has been the first Republican governor in that state for a long time and Richard Nixon just barely lost four years earlier. Vice presidential nominee Gerald Ford spent most of his time in the Midwest, including his homestate of Michigan. Polls here are almost tied in most states, while the Rockefeller/Ford team is running ahead in usual battleground Ohio (the reason why Rocky decided to reduce the number of radio ads here). On the campaign trail, the Republican nominee stressed his experience in government and business, saying he could run the country effectively as a pragmatist. “Governor Rockefeller is not just talking, he makes things happen. A vote for Governor Rockefeller is a vote for results”, a prominent radio spot claimed.


Maddox harshly attacks Kennedy and Rockefeller

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Lester Maddox at a Maryland rally on September 12, 1972, attacking the Democratic and Republican candidates

While Bobby Kennedy and Nelson Rockefeller and their running mates abstain from personal attacks against each other, Lester Maddox does not hesitate attacking both tickets with drastic rhetoric. He denounced both of the major candidates as “out-of-touch elitists” over and over again. “One Kennedy in a century is enough. We don’t need another sonnyboy, who is the hippie's candidate”, the former Georgia governor said about RFK. He also hit Nelson Rockefeller, denouncing him as “some rich Yankee fellow who doesn’t give a damn for states’ rights”. “As citizen movement, we need to take back our country from the elites”, Maddox further said. His campaign also focused on social issues, saying he wanted to return to strict law-and-order (although the Republicans also stressed law-and-order policies) and a reinvention of religious awareness. A cornerstone of his campaign was the call for a repeal of civil rights laws, claiming they violate states’ rights.

Democratic vice presidential candidate and current governor of Georgia Jimmy Carter denounced the Maddox/Mahoney ticket, saying they are “appealing to the worst elements in our past”. Nelson Rockefeller directly confronted Maddox by describing him as “a yesterday’s man”.
 

Lyndon Johnson campaigns for RFK; Ronald Reagan engaged for Rocky

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President Lyndon B. Johnson at a Texas rally for the Kennedy/Carter ticket as well as local Democratic candidates; September 16, 1972

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Governor Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy on tour in California, campaigning for the Rockefeller/Ford ticket as well as down-ballot Republican candidates; September 18, 1972

As mid-September approached, President Lyndon B. Johnson finally got into the campaign on Bobby Kennedy’s behalf. Some observers speculated he would refrain due to his good personal and political relationship with Governor Rockefeller. White House insiders told the press, the president, however, phoned with the governor and told him he would campaign for Kennedy and not against Rockefeller. But in the end, LBJ’s a party’s man. Starting on September 16, LBJ made ten speeches in his homestate of Texas over four days, were RFK is slightly ahead in the polls but not granted to win, especially due to Maddox’s candidacy. Between September 20 and 24, the president also campaigned in Oklahoma, Florida and North Carolina for his vice president; praising him as “a smart leader with a compassionate vision, fully qualified to take over the job. Jack Kennedy would be proud of him.” Remarkable is that this is the first election where Lyndon Johnson and his personal friend, former Texas governor John Connally, are on opposite sides in a presidential contest. Connally, who is also famous for sitting next to President Kennedy when he was shot in Dallas in 1963, recently changed his party registration to Republican and endorsed Rockefeller for president already in late 1971. In August, Connally was named chair of the Rockefeller campaign in Texas.

Meanwhile, Ronald Reagan demonstrated his loyalty to the Republican Party: After a bitter fought battle over the Grand Old Party’s nomination, the California governor remained very present in the public eye. He stumped the campaign trail for the Rockefeller/Ford ticket and his fellow Republicans. Reagan is well aware that his homestate of California is could be critical on election night. "We can't lose a single vote in the Golden State", the governor remarked. Especially with Bobby Kennedy's popularity, the Gipper knows that his colleague from New York needs help at the West Coast. Reagan was even offered to chair the campaign in California but turned it down in favor of former Senator Thomas Kuchel (Richard Nixon was first asked, but now serves as campaign chair in Florida). It absolutely seems as Ronald Reagan has made peace with the liberal wing of his party at the moment; at least for political reasons: If he wants to run for president again, in 1976 if Rocky loses or does perform poorly in his first term, or in 1980, when a President Rockefeller would be either be term-limited or defeated for a second term, he also needs support from moderates and liberals. Therefore, it is also no surprise that he urged conservative Republicans turn out on election day. It's also reported, though not confirmed, that Rockefeller offered Reagan to take foreign missions on his behalf, should he win the presidency. That briefly led to some speculation Reagan may join a possible Rockefeller cabinet, until the Gipper said he wants to serve out his gubernatorial term until January 1975. As California doesn't have a term-limit, he is also speculated to run for a third term should the 1976 Republican nomination be safe for a President Rockefeller. Rocky himself reportedly asked the Gipper to run again and keep the nation's largest state under a Republican governor. Amidst of these speculations, Republican vice presidential candidate Gerald Ford said a Rockefeller Administration would consist members with "different political backgrounds and stances" and that Rocky would like to govern as a pragmatist rather than on ideology. "Governor Rockefeller is committed to solve problems, not appease the political right or left", Ford remarked. Vice President Kennedy responded by warning that the right wing of the Republican Party would "cripple a Rockefeller presidency".


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 21, 2018, 06:06:12 am
September 22, 1972: New (pre-debate) presidential polls are out! Released by Gallup

Ahead of the first presidential debate on air, Bobby Kennedy is still leading Nelson Rockefeller in the national polls. Despite just little move in state-wide polling, the map changes in RFK's favor, a tie in New York and Illinois prevent him from hitting 270 electoral votes, while Rocky falls slightly below 200 votes. However, all margins are close enough that there can be many switches with just slightly different numbers in the battlegrounds.


General election match-ups
Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%

Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Lester Maddox: 7%


Polls by states

Alabama
Lester Maddox: 36%
Robert F. Kennedy: 30%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Arkansas
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Nelson Rockefeller: 34%
Lester Maddox: 20%

California
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Colorado
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Lester Maddox: 30%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Illinois
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Lester Maddox: 17%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Michigan
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Minnesota
Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 7%

New Hampshire
Nelson Rockefeller: 54%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: <1%

New Jersey
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New York
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 2%

North Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Oklahoma
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Oregon
Nelson Rockefeller: 50%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Pennsylvania
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 37%
Lester Maddox: 19%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 6%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Washington state
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Wisconsin
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 2%


State of the presidential race according the current polls:

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Robert F. Kennedy: 242 electoral votes
Nelson Rockefeller: 195 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 34 electoral votes
Tied: 67 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



September 23, 1972: Lester Maddox sues debate commission... and fails; Mahoney creates controversy over Housing Act

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"The fight for our cause continues", says Lester Maddox after his lawsuit was defeated in court

Just before the first presidential debate, Lester Maddox sued the debate commission by demanding to participate. He argued that the minimum of 15% support national polls are "ridiculous" in light that he is leading some statewide polls in the South. The debate commission ahead of the decision changed the rules to "15% of national polls or ahead in five states" (Maddox is currently ahead in four). A federal court just dismissed the lawsuit on September 23, 1972, two days before Robert Kennedy and Nelson Rockefeller face each other for the first time. Maddox responded by saying he would continue is fight and that such decisions would lead to "further erosion in public trust into our system." He challenged Kennedy and Rockefeller to other debate formats, but both major candidates so far showed little interest in such a discussion. Bobby Kennedy mainly ignored Maddox' attacks on him, while Rocky repeatedly called him a "yesterday's man". Jimmy Carter, however, addressed the third-party campaign and accused Moddox' running mate George Mahoney of racism when he demanded a repeal of the Fair Housing Act of 1968, saying it is a "white man's right to live in a black-free neighborhood." Nelson Rockefeller at one of his rallies slammed Mahoney in response by saying "it is everybody's right to have a Mahoney-free government."


Next: The PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE on ABC between ROBERT KENNEDY and NELSON ROCKEFELLER. Stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 24, 2018, 03:16:13 pm
September 25, 1972

★★★ THE FIRST PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE ★★★

★★★ Robert F. Kennedy vs. Nelson Rockefeller ★★★


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HOWARD K. SMITH: Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen: Welcome to this first presidential debate in the 1972 election here at the historic grounds of the University of Virginia. I’m Howard K. Smith of ABC News and your moderator for tonight's debate. This is the first televised exchange for a presidential election since 1960. Now, let us welcome two major candidates for president of the United States, who received at least 15% support in national polls. Welcome Vice President Robert F. Kennedy of New York, the Democratic nominee for president. [Applause] And welcome Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller of New York, the Republican nominee. […]

 
The economy, taxes and prosperity

Now let us begin. The first topic is the economy, taxes and achieving prosperity. My first question goes to Vice President Kennedy. Mr. Vice President, despite the recent economic recovery, we have not returned to the 1960s growth levels. Nevertheless, you have proposed billions of dollars in spending for social programs such as healthcare and education. Are you asking the American people to pay more for these programs?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I am not asking the average citizen to pay more in taxes. I have proposed to freeze defense spending after 1974, when the spending cuts implemented by President Johnson expire. As we pulled out of Vietnam successfully, the savings give us additional funds for the most needy people in this country. With the expected growth rate of over four percent, the federal government will also collect more in taxes without raising them. That’s how we pay for proposals, that everybody will benefit of.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Your model is very optimistic, Mr. Vice President, and you know that. It is based on a sound economy over a four year period. And to be honest, in the policies you have put forward so far I don’t see many measures that lead to a return to 1960s growth rates, which would be necessary for your model. Let alone external factors beyond our control such as a worldwide slowdown. Therefore, we need different polices to promote growth to achieve prosperity for all. I have outlined such policies and believe I have the capacity to implement them.

HOWARD K. SMITH: You already mentioned it: Your economic program. Would you share some details with us, Governor Rockefeller? And afterwards, we’d like to listen to your plans, Vice President Kennedy.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Our economy can do much better than it does right now. My approach is a pragmatic one: We are implementing a 10% tax cut for low and middle incomes by 1974 what will stimulate the economy, especially the consumption market. At the same time, I will freeze defense spending immediately instead of further cuts. In addition, I will cut out waste and fraud off the federal government what will save us additional funds. I will also appoint a commission of politicians, businesspeople and the labor community to study options to deregulate certain economic segments like the energy market.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I am opposed to a deregulation of the energy market, what will be bad for the consumer in the end. These deregulation policies often got us into trouble, and you should know better, governor. Some of these proposals were forced into the Republican platform by Governor Reagan and his friends, mainly from the Goldwater ranks. On top of my agenda is an increase of the minimum wage that will benefit the working poor. I think helping them is more important than giving away billions of dollars in tax revenue from the federal government. Money, that we need for education, economic development, urban development and the environment. From these programs and initiatives, all Americans will benefit and enjoy a higher quality of life.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Just a follow-up on that, Mr. Vice President: Does that mean, you are also opposed to tax cuts?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: I don’t believe that a tax relief in addition to the measures passed under the current administration are the best way forward. I want to be honest: We have great challenges: poverty, education, environment and infrastructure. If we want to meet these challenges and keep our fiscal house in order, we ought to leave tax rates at their current level. I’m not asking for the middle class to pay a single penny more. An increase of the minimum wage, which Governor Rockefeller obviously opposes, will automatically generate more revenue, without raising taxes. Does that mean I don’t see any room for future relieve? No. I promise to review the situation by the end of my first term and then make common-sense proposals.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: If I may… it is not correct that I oppose the minimum wage. As governor, I passed one of the first minimum wage laws in America. Just for the record. If elected president, I will study the situation and decide with lawmakers. At the moment, I see some room for an increase, though we also need the tax cut I proposed. Maybe we can link this to a tax reform? Gerald Ford and I are committed to work with congress on this.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Well, the Republican platform avoided the subject entirely because the Reagan camp vigorously opposes a minimum wage.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: [shakes his head] I don’t know why you constantly bring up Governor Reagan during your campaign and this debate.


Foreign and defense policy

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HOWARD K. SMITH: Thank you. I want to switch to foreign affairs and defense. Governor Rockefeller, the United States has formally withdrawn from Vietnam, yet over the past weeks hostilities between the North and South have almost doubled. If the North starts another military offensive while you are president, how would you respond?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Well, first, I won’t lay out military strategies in advance for a hypothetical event. That would have to be discussed at the appropriate time based on the exact situation. But let me make one thing crystal-clear: If Hanoi choses to violate the Paris Accords, what I don’t hope, a Rockefeller/Ford Administration won’t stand by and watch this nation being humiliated by a third-rate country at the world stage. In addition to direct action, we would also evaluate what the roles of the Soviets and Chinese are and take prompt action. Now, don’t misunderstand, I’m in favor of détente policies for the cause of world peace, but we can’t have this as a one way street and therefore make sure Beijing and Moscow don’t get away with supporting a regime, that violates a peace treaty in its desire to take over South Vietnam, a sovereign nation. At least if evidence shows, they support an offensive, my administration would take bold action.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Thanks, your time is up, Sir. Vice President Kennedy, same question to you and your response to the governor?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: That is completely hypothetical. There have always been some battles going on between communist forces and South Vietnam in some areas, even after the treaties. If a wider operation by the North were to be executed, I would carefully evaluate the situation. However, I rule out the deployment of any American ground forces. Now, with that being said, I don’t expect this question even to be discussed in the future. We ought to hold up the Paris Peace Treaties and be involved for an even longer lasting perspective on lasting and stable peace. The final goal has to be a unified Vietnam under a democratic system and a leadership of the people’s own choice. I know, that this is far away at the moment, and as long as the country remains divided, we should prevent any further war. Governor Rockefeller in his answer did not rule out sending U.S. forces to Vietnam again. That is a clear difference between us.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: With all due respect, Mr. Vice President: Your answer is an invitation for the Vietcong and the regime to launch another attack on a sovereign nation. Because they know, we won’t respond with force, only with talk. I strongly oppose such a view, and you even depart from the policies of President Johnson and Secretary Katzenbach. And before you accuse me of talking us into a war: I don’t want to send troops or resume bombing, nobody wants this, but we have to keep all options on the table.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: So, you don’t rule it out? The Vietcong might actually start another offensive just to provoke us and divide our country as they have done in ’68. I think there is a great chance that happens. I know that you, governor, don’t want another war and would never accuse you of that. However, make no mistake about it: If the Vietcong starts such an attempt, the Republican right around Governor Reagan will push a Rockefeller Administration to a military response that includes the use of forces on the ground.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: There you go again! [laughter at the audience]

HOWARD K. SMITH: Please…

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Bobby, I don’t know what’s your obsession with Governor Reagan that you constantly bring him up? I would like to remind you that you are running against me, Nelson Rockefeller. You are not running against Ronald Reagan. During the Republican primaries, Governor Reagan and I used to have differences on certain issues or on the approach how to reach certain goals. But he is an honest man.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 24, 2018, 03:33:28 pm
Civil rights and crime

HOWARD K. SMITH: Our final segment is civil rights and crime. However, I want us to focus more on crime and law and order, since there are bigger differences between you two than on civil rights. Mr. Vice President, in recent years, America experienced an unprecedented level of violence on the streets. While Republican demand a tougher law and order policy, the Johnson Administration seemed reluctant to intervene with federal resources in recent years. Just a few months ago, President Johnson said the long-term solution would be an improvement of social conditions. Is that your stance as well and what are your plans if elected?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: The president is right on this, and this is why my platform consists not only an expansion and improvement of the welfare state, but also steps to enforce civil rights laws even better. What I have proposed in addition is an increase of funds for crime prevention programs. Both for existing ones as well as new ones. We have to tackle to problems by the roots and just fight the symptoms. The solution to our problems is not just a law and order policy that Republicans call for.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: I think that you have an overall too romantic view on these problems. While I agree that we need a strict enforcement of civil rights laws or the passage of additional ones where necessary, Now, crime prevention programs: I am open for additional money, but these programs should be managed by state and local governments and not federal bureaucrats. A problem that we haven’t addressed is the abuse of drugs, that is not just happening on the streets, but also in the military. As president, I will implement a zero tolerance policy towards drugs, as I have done as New York’s governor.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Tougher punishment won’t solve single problem on a long term basis. Instead, we dramatically increase prison population, what costs as billions of dollars and destroys lives.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Why should I abide by the rule if there is no or a weak punishment? That’s the question needs to be answered. I get it, that this alone isn’t the whole solution, but an element…


Closing statements

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HOWARD K. SMITH: All right, we have to leave it there and come to the closing statements. Mr. Vice President, you go first.

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: My fellow Americans: In the past twelve years, we have made giant steps towards equality and justice for all. We landed a man on the moon. Among many other things. But the vision of the New Frontier and Great Society needs continuation. Having been the servant of you in these years in the executive and legislative branches of government, I have the compassion not just to continue on this progress, but also brings that great land of ours to a higher level. Governor Carter and I offer America a new generation of leadership that America cannot just stand tall in the world, but also care for the needy and let everyone reach his or her goals by making sure, each and everybody plays by the same rules. It is that vision that drives me on and the reason why I would like to serve as your president. Let us together strive for the stars. Thank you for listening, good night and may god bless all of you.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Governor Rockefeller, your closing statement.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Thanks. My fellow Americans: In a little more than one month you will decide in free elections who will become the 37th President of the United States and lead this nation into the third century of its existence. I want America to celebrate its bicentennial under three main headlines that are our campaigns motto: Peace, freedom and prosperity. To reach these goals together with you, I laid out specific proposals and how I want to achieve them: By a pragmatic approach to governing in a partnership with you and the congress. Beholden to nobody, I want an efficient government to be the servant of the people and a voice for peace in the world. That is why Congressman Gerald Ford and I ask for your support in November. Thank you, god bless you and good night.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Thank you, Vice President Kennedy, thank you Governor Rockefeller. I also want to thank you all at home for your interest in our program, have a good night and don’t forget to vote. Election day is November the seventh.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on January 27, 2018, 04:57:27 am
Setember 27, 1972

Post-debate polls: Most viewers see Nelson Rockefeller as winner

Ad-hoc polls released on September 27, 1972, showed that most viewers regard Nelson Rockefeller as the winner of the first debate. The New York governor also ahead in most categories.


Q: Who you think won the debate over all?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 52%
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Undecided or tie: 12%
 

Q: Who won the argument about the economy and taxes?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 56%
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 33%
Undecided or tie: 11%
 

Q: Who you think won the debate over foreign policy?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Undecided or tie: 9%


Q: Who do you think won the argument over crime?
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 53%
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Undecided or tie: 9%


Q: Who do you think brings more experience to table and has the better administrative skills?
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Undecided or tie: 12%
 

Q: Who did you find more authentic and likeable?
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 51%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Undecided or tie: 8%


September 30, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

The tide is turning! Nelson Rockefeller's good debate performance gives him a boost in the polls. He's now leading the national polls and also ahead in the state electoral count. President Lyndon B. Johnson's approval rating has remained stable in the low to mid-50s during the entire year.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 40%


General election match-ups
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%

Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 5%


Polls by states

Alabama
Lester Maddox: 37%
Robert F. Kennedy: 30%
Nelson Rockefeller: 28%

Alaska
Nelson Rockefeller: 51%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Arkansas
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Nelson Rockefeller: 33%
Lester Maddox: 18%

California
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Delaware
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 34%
Lester Maddox: 30%
Nelson Rockefeller: 30%

Illinois
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Lester Maddox: 18%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Michigan
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 5%

Nevada
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New Jersey
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 3%

New York
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

North Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Oklahoma
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Pennsylvania
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Nelson Rockefeller: 36%
Lester Maddox: 19%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
Lester Maddox: 7%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Washington state
Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Wisconsin
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 1%


The current polling map by state (in states that weren't polled this time, the previous numbers or partisan leaning are used):

()

(✓) Nelson Rockefeller: 298 electoral votes
Robert F. Kennedy: 203 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 34 electoral votes
Tied: 3 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Republican: 46%
Democrat: 45%


October 1, 1972: Bobby Kennedy promises amnesty for all Vietnam draft dodgers

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How to deal with thousands of draft dodgers of the Vietnam era? This was a question that came up as an issue in recent months. Many of them fled to Canada or Europe and couldn’t come back to the United States due to potential prosecution. Several public voices demanded amnesty or some form of clemency. Senator George McGovern (D-SD) was at the forefront of such efforts, but President Johnson, who has the sole power to grant pardons or amnesty for federal crimes, has shown little interest in the subject so far. Vice President Kennedy meanwhile had long been in favor of some clemency, but avoided the subject to avoid a controversy with his boss. However, sources now claim, LBJ was not against RFK publically demanding so. During an October 1 Michigan rally, Kennedy announced his support for an unconditional amnesty for Vietnam-era draft-dodgers. “I stand before you as a representative of an administration that ended the military draft. The next step is that we allow Americans back into the country, who avoided being drafted under an unfair system at that time”, the vice president said. “It is time we put Vietnam to rest once and give these young men the chance to come out of the shadows and live the American dream”, RFK added. He also said he would issue an unconditional amnesty shortly after the swearing-in.

Nelson Rockefeller immediately responded by rejecting an unconditional amnesty. During a joint appearance with Ronald Reagan in California, he said: “I oppose amnesty as proposed by Mr. Kennedy. While I don’t want to return to a draft, it was unlawful at the time to desert from military service. Nevertheless, I recognize that this issue needs to be addressed appropriately. If elected president, I will develop a detailed plan that allows draft-dodgers to come back and apply for a pardon under certain conditions. We ought to grant a second chance, but not for free.”

Third-party candidate Lester Maddox tried to use this opportunity to come back into the public spotlight after not being invited to debate, vigorously rejected any clemency and accused RFK of “immorality and lawlessness” and spoke of a “giveaway for traitors”. He rejects any form of clemency and cites draft dodgers as one reason “why morality has been under siege in America.”


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 01, 2018, 01:41:34 pm
The first half of October

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Governor Nelson Rockefeller on the campaign trail in New York City; October 7, 1972

On October 4, 1972, the debate over healthcare resumed when Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA) once more tried to force his universal healthcare bill through the senate committee. However, his efforts were not successful and even President Johnson now showed little hope to pass anything of significance during the remaining congressional session. However, he frequently spoke about the measure and said Bobby Kennedy would get it done as president. RFK, although he frequently mentioned healthcare for all and expressed his staunch support for the bill, tried to gain some ground back after his modestly successful debate performance. During the first half of October, the Rockefeller/Ford camp mainly set the topics of the campaign: The New York governor repeatedly stressed a tougher law and order policy and called for more restrictive anti-drug laws. The issue was also one were all Republicans agreed as Rockefeller received strong support from conservatives for his comments. Generally, it seemed that the conservative wing of the party finally assembled behind Rocky. Ronald Reagan now toured the whole country for the ticket as well as down-ballot Republican candidates (both liberal and conservative contenders). The Gipper also appeared in a handful of television ads and political talk shows. In addition, the Republicans tried to attack Bobby Kennedy on his spending proposals. Vice presidential nominee Gerald Ford, already preparing for his debate with Jimmy Carter, warned of "out of control spending that would cause inflation and bankrupt our treasury."


October 15, 1972

★★★ THE VICE PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE ★★★

★★★ Jimmy Carter vs. Gerald Ford ★★★

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Highlights of the debate

BARBARA WALTERS: Good evening, Ladies and Gentlemen. It is my pleasure to welcome you to the first vice presidential debate in American history in this 1972 presidential election; live from San Francisco. My name is Barbara Walters of ABC News, and I’m your moderator tonight. Now, let us welcome the two major candidates for the second highest office in the nation: Please welcome Governor Jimmy Carter of Georgia, the Democratic candidate for vice president, who is running alongside the incumbent vice president, Robert F. Kennedy. [Applause] And let us also welcome Representative and House Minority Leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan, the Republican candidate for vice president, who is running on a ticket together with New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller. [Applause]. Welcome to both of you once again here from San Francisco, California.

Now, let us begin. My first question, which goes to both of you, is what the American people can expect of you. In other words: What would be your role as vice president? Congressman Ford, we start with you.


REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Thank you Barbara and the League of women voters for hosting us tonight. You asked what kind of a vice president I would be? I would continue the tradition of post-World War II vice presidents, especially with Richard Nixon, that were actively involved in the administration’s policy, advise the president and his cabinet and take over certain responsibilities that the president asks for. Governor Rockefeller already offered me to play a role in dealing with the congress, and I believe that with over two decades of experience in the House I can be helpful to implement his agenda. In addition, Governor Rockefeller offered me to be involved in foreign affairs and travel the world on his behalf and represent this great nation of ours. That would describe my role as vice president.

GOVERNOR CARTER: Thank you very much for this important question. Probably the most important question in this debate. Now, I would have a great role model in the vice presidency, should I be entrusted with this high office. And that is Robert Kennedy himself. I believe that he has filled this role with passionate convictions and great honor over the last four years. Similar to President Johnson gave him, Robert Kennedy would give me certain responsibilities to assist him in governing and coming up with own projects and ideas. He asked me to chair a commission to reform the government apparatus as I have done as governor of the great state of Georgia. I would also travel and talk to world leaders on President Kennedy’s behalf. It would be a great honor for me.

BARBARA WALTERS: Thank you. I just want to follow-up on this for moment: Governor Carter, you already mentioned that Robert Kennedy encouraged you to come up with own initiatives as vice president. What would be such a project you like to focus on as vice president?

GOVERNOR CARTER: As I already mentioned, I would like to focus to make government more efficient as I have done in Georgia. That would also include negotiations with states over the management of certain programs like Medicaid and federal aid for education. As a state governor, I think that I have to knowledge to be involved in this particular subject and advise the president.

BARBARA WALTERS: Congressman Ford, same question to you.

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Well, there are several challenges we face, and therefore I find it difficult to single out one particular issue. Together with Nelson Rockefeller, I intend to focus on three big headlines, that are our campaigns motto: Peace, freedom and prosperity. I’m sure we will talk about each one more in detail during this debate, as did the two presidential nominees on September 25.

[…]

BARBARA WALTERS: Alright. The next question is about you and your running mates. On which issues or character aspects do you differ with your nominee? We start with Congressman Ford. Go ahead.

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Well, I don’t think that there are any major differences between Governor Rockefeller and myself. I would not have accepted his offer in case of larger disagreements on policy or a personal dislike. And I think he wouldn’t either. Does that mean we have a hundred percent the same views and approaches to reach certain goals? No. Of course not. But I think we can discuss any differences with openness and candor and find a good and pragmatic solution. Nevertheless, the president makes the final decisions in any administration.

GOVERNOR CARTER: I actually agree with the general points Congressman Ford has made. I would like to add that Robert Kennedy and I have very different personal backgrounds. He comes from a Massachusetts family with influence and has over a decade of experience in the federal government. I’m a Southerner and grew up and worked on a peanut farm and served as governor of the great state of Georgia for almost two years. But that only reflects how diverse America is. And Robert Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson over the past four years prove that such a constellation can work very well.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 01, 2018, 02:08:42 pm
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BARBARA WALTERS: Thank you both. Governor Carter, I want to come to the issue of civil rights. While you ran for governor in 1970, you adopted moderate segregationist views and ran on such a platform. But when you became governor, you declared that the times of racial segregation and discrimination are once and for all over. Some voters actually felt betrayed by your move and accused you of flip-flopping or a basic lack of convictions. What is your response to that, and what are your views on civil rights? And can voters this fall expect that a Kennedy/Carter Administration will not change positions after getting in?

GOVERNOR CARTER: I have specified my views and tone after the 1970 election and expressed my views at both my gubernatorial inaugural address, as well as my speech at the Democratic National Convention. I can assure you that a Kennedy/Carter Administration will be a strong and passionate advocate of civil rights, justice and equality. And you can be sure that I will do everything I can to advance those who need assistance by the federal government in exercising their basic rights that are granted in both the U.S. constitution as well as the civil rights legislation enacted under the Johnson Administration.

BARBARA WALTERS: Your response, congressman?

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Well, Barbara, you name it. I think it is highly questionable that Governor Carter ran on a different rhetoric than he later governed. Probably he felt he couldn’t win this election by being open from the beginning on. Let me be clear, I don’t question Governor Carter’s commitment to civil rights, but the question about his statements prior and after the Georgia election is something my opponent has to explain to the voters. With that being said, I’d like to add that I have been in favor of civil rights over my entire public career and as member of the House I voted in favor of all major legislation on this subject. I would also like to point out that Nelson Rockefeller has long been a champion for civil rights, enacting legislation in New York and donating for civil rights leaders. A Rockefeller/Ford Administration will stand up for civil liberty and equal rights; for minorities and women alike.

BARBARA WALTERS: Just to follow-up, on that, governor: Does that mean you would not run the same campaign again?

GOVERNOR CARTER: There is always something you can do different in the past. We ought to learn from it and do better in the future. That’s my general view.

BARBARA WALTERS: You want to comment on that, Congressman Ford?

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: No, I don’t have a comment. Thank you.

[…]

BARBARA WALTERS: As we are nearing the end, I want you to get into foreign policy briefly. Congressman Ford, the issue of Vietnam and how deal with a potential violation of the Paris agreement has been discussed in the last presidential debate and the campaign trail. So, if North Vietnam was to launch a new offensive on the south, how would you advise Nelson Rockefeller if you two get elected?

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: Here I can just repeat what Governor Rockefeller already made clear: We do not intend to get involved into another military confrontation and we are willing to keep up the Paris Peace Accords. If the communists chose to challenge us, we will respond with diplomatic pressure and military action. What exactly I would recommend depends on the circumstances, but I would certainly not want America to be humiliated again.

BARBARA WALTERS: The same question to you, Governor Carter. How would advise Robert Kennedy in such a situation?

GOVERNOR CARTER: I fully agree with Robert Kennedy that we should not get into another ground war. Of course, we will stand by our ally South Vietnam, not just militarily, to uphold the 1971 Peace Accords. Everything else will depend on the situation.

BARABRA WALTERS: But you would favor a limited military operation?

GOVERNOR CARTER: That, as a I said, depends on the situation. Of course we need some military action should our personnel be directly threatened.

[…]

BARBARA WALTERS: Now it is time for the closing statement. Congressman Ford goes first, then Governor Carter.

REPRESENTATIVE FORD: My fellow Americans: I am not standing here today as Republican vice presidential nominee for my personal benefit, nor does Governor Rockefeller in this campaign. We are reaching out to each and everyone of you because we, with our skills and eperience, are guided by the belief and the compassion that we can serve the American people in an administration of honesty and pragmatism to promote growth, progress, liberty and world peace. These core principals are the engine of our campaign and I hope we convinced you that this is the right choice for America. So that you will entrust as with America's leadership on November the seventh. Thank you, good night and god bless all of you.

GOVERNOR CARTER: My fellow Americans: Tonight I came before you as a candidate for the American vice presidency. I grew up and worked on peanut farm. But I have been fortunate enough to serve as governor of the state Georgia and now been asked by Robert Kennedy to be his vice presidential candidate. This is a great honor. The reason I am here is because I want all Americans to strive for their hopes and dreamers, no matter of gender, race or color. In a world of peace, stability and economic prosperity. This is the America Robert Francis Kennedy and I want to work for every single day if we are entrusted with the leadership of our great country. Thank you for listening, good night and may god bless all of you.

BARBARA WALTERS: That was our debate of the two major candidates for vice president. I hope you enjoyed our program. Good night.


October 16, 1972

Post-debate polls: Gerald Ford mainly seen as winner

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Ad-hoc polls released on October 16, 1972, showed a second Republican win after the presidential debate and Nelson Rockefeller's subsequently rising numbers: Most viewers felt that Gerald Ford won the contest on air. Similar to the presidential debate, Democrat Jimmy Carter seemed a little more sympathic as person, while Gerald Ford made a good impression with his knowledge and political skills.


Q: Who you think won the debate over all?
Representative Gerald Ford: 51%
Governor Jimmy Carter: 34%
Undecided or tie: 15%

Q: Who you think has the better qualifications to be vice president or (if necessary) to assume the presidency?
Representative Gerald Ford: 57%
Governor Jimmy Carter: 30%
Undecided or tie: 13%

Q: Who did you find more likeable as a person?
Governor Jimmy Carter: 44%
Representative Gerald Ford: 39%
Undecided or tie: 17%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on February 02, 2018, 03:27:24 am
Very well written! It was fun how RFK had his there you go again moment in the first debate.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 02, 2018, 03:51:19 am
This is great! Actually, I'd answer that Carter won the VP debate- his answer about the VP role was great, while Ford was vague and didn't really say anything.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Joey1996 on February 02, 2018, 09:07:50 am
Hmm, I'm assuming this election prolongs the realignment of the parties? At least until 1980


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 03, 2018, 06:19:56 am
October 17, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

Nelson Rockefeller remains in the lead, as the first polls after the vice presidential debate were released. It looks like the Republican ticket gained significant ground since their nominating convention. Meanwhile, swing state polls remain extremely close: California is tied again after Rocky took a small lead the last time. On the other hand, he has polled slightly ahead in New York and, for the first time, in Pennsylvania. Wisconsin is back in the Kennedy column, while Illinois is tied in this poll. Rockefeller has also taken the lead in Delaware and Arkansas. The latter is close race between him and Kennedy, since Maddox is taking about a fifth of the vote here. Although the state is usually leaning Democratic, Rocky benefits from his brother Winthrop, who is the sitting governor of the state and actively engaged for his brother.


General election match-ups
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%

Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 5%


Polls by states

Arizona
Nelson Rockefeller: 52%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Arkansas
Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Robert F. Kennedy: 32%
Lester Maddox: 17%

California
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Connecticut
Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Delaware
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Lester Maddox: 30%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Illinois
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Lester Maddox: 18%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Michigan
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Lester Maddox: 5%

Montana
Nelson Rockefeller: 54%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 1%

New Jersey
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 3%

New Mexico
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New York
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

North Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Pennsylvania
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

South Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 34%
Lester Maddox: 34%
Nelson Rockefeller: 25%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 42%
Nelson Rockefeller: 38%
Lester Maddox: 17%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 8%

Vermont
Nelson Rockefeller: 52%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Wisconsin
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%


The current polling map by state (in states that weren't polled this time, the previous numbers or partisan leaning are used):

()

(✓) Nelson Rockefeller: 293 electoral votes
Robert F. Kennedy: 140 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 26 electoral votes
Tied: 79 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Republican: 46%
Democrat: 43%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 03, 2018, 06:20:59 am
The road ahead in mid/late October

Kennedy/Carter campaign tries to regain lost ground

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Vice President Kennedy gives an autograph at a rally in Pennsylvania; October 16, 1972

As Nelson Rockefeller consolidated his polling numbers following the vice presidential debate and the lack of interest on the draft dodgers issue, the Kennedy campaign increased the number of ads in key states. The candidate also appeared on local radio shows during his campaign trips and tried to go back into the offensive with new policy proposals: A massive infrastructure package with hundreds of billions of dollars, a national agency to oversee environmental protection and a job program for women. Nelson Rockefeller subsequently accused Kennedy of “lending if not stealing ideas”. At the same time, the Republican candidate said he would run such an environmental agency more effectively than Democrats. He also pointed out that infrastructure was originally his proposal, as the governor demanded infrastructure investments during the Republican primaries already. A New York Times political analyst, reflecting on Rocky’s surge, wrote that the Democratic campaign basically lacked a defining political issue in this campaign, “party because Democrats ran and tried to implement all these policies for years, and because Nelson Rockefeller seemed to offer popular measures as well with a fresh and new approach after twelve years of Democratic presidents.”

Nevertheless, many political observers still expected Kennedy to win a close race in the end and quite three major reasons: First, the fascination from the name Kennedy and his visibility as vice president in the last four years; second the lack of a major foreign and domestic policy crisis and third the solid approval rating of President Lyndon Johnson. Lester Maddox turned out to be less of a risk, according to polls, as he was taking support away from Republicans as well.


Reports over an alleged RFK-Marilyn Monroe affair and the rumored "secret agreement with Rocky"

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Comes an alleged affair with Marilyn Monroe back to haunt Bobby Kennedy in the election?

Various magazines, on October 17, started printing stories about an alleged affair between Robert Kennedy and late actress and model Marilyn Monroe a decade earlier. Unnamed sources claimed the then-Attorney General carried on the affair with the actress early in his brother's administration. Late President Kennedy, according to these reports, also had an affair with Monroe prior to his younger brother. The Los Angeles Times picked up the story and wrote on October 19 that sources close to Republican National Committee Robert Finch spread the story (Finch is the lieutenant governor of California and was nominated for the position with the support of both Nelson Rockefeller and Ronald Reagan after Richard Nixon suggested his appointment). Accordingly, the affair ended with Monroe's tragic death in August 1962 at the age of 36.

Although down-ballot Republican candidates as well as George Romney addressed the issue, Nelson Rockefeller himself declined to comment. As did his running mate Gerald Ford. On October 21, 1972, one day before the final television debate between the two major nominees, newspapers wrote that there was a secret agreement between them: Nelson Rockefeller would not comment on the alleged affair with Monroe, while the Kennedy campaign would abstain from bringing up Rockefeller's remarriage with Happy Rockefeller in 1963 (some rumors suggested that Rocky himself had been engaged with various private secretaries). Something similar was already rumored to be a secret accord between Rockefeller and Reagan during the Republican primaries, since the Gipper himself also divorced and later re-married with his wife Nancy.

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Nelson Rockefeller and his wife Margaretta Fitler Rockefeller, known as "Happy": Both divorced from their previous spouses in 1962 and got remarried a year later, what hurt the governor politically. According to unofficial sources, Rocky agreed to silence about an alleged relationship between RFK and Marilyn Monroe. In return, Bobby Kennedy would not bring up the remarriage issue again.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 03, 2018, 09:32:25 am
Rockfeller seems likely to win, and I'd probably be fine with that if I was alive then. Still, go RFK!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 05, 2018, 10:28:40 am
October 22, 1972

★★★ THE SECOND PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE ★★★

★★★ Robert F. Kennedy vs. Nelson Rockefeller ★★★

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Highlights of the debate

HOWARD K. SMITH: Good evening ladies and gentlemen for the second and final presidential debate of the 1972 presidential election. I’m Howard K. Smith of ABC News, your moderator for tonight. We are live from St. Louis, Missouri. This debate is in the format of a townhall, where selected voters directly ask questions to the candidates. As moderator, I shall intervene if necessary or for a follow-up question. Now let us welcome to two major candidates in this election: Welcome Vice President Robert F. Kennedy, the Democratic nominee. [Applause]. And welcome Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, the Republican nominee. [Applause] Welcome to you both, and let us begin. The first question is from the gentleman over there with the red tie, and it goes to the vice president.

MAN I: Mr. Vice President, thank you for being here tonight. Just recently, there were reports upon a relationship between you and late Marilyn Monroe ten years ago. You said they were not true. I believe you. But I would like to know whether you would publically admit mistakes as president?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thank you. Of course I will admit mistakes. And I will make them, just like everyone else does, especially if you are in such an important position. But we ought to learn from mistakes and do better next time. In the case of this reports that came out recently, I have nothing to apologize for, because I did nothing wrong. I find it sad when certain Republican circles try to spread such false rumors, although I know that Governor Rockefeller has not initiated this.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Same question to you, Governor Rockefeller.

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Would I admit mistakes? I would absolutely, yes. Because I trust the American people. However, that also depends on the situation itself. Because on certain occasions, it can weaken the American position in the world if the president makes himself vulnerable. Therefore each situation has to be studied in advance.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Do you want to comment on the Monroe reports, governor?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: No, I have no comment. I also do not approve the publication. The Rockefeller/Ford campaign is about improving people’s lives and securing world peace, not about personal issues. I think Vice President Kennedy is an honorable man.


HOWARD K. SMITH: The next question is for the governor and from that lady over there.

WOMAN I: Governor Rockefeller, you spoke about improving life conditions for women and ending discrimination against women. I want to thank you for being passionate about this issue, but would like to know what specific policies you propose to reach this goal?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: Good question! First, let me say that a president or the federal government can implement certain policies, but that all discrimination won’t go away without an effort by all citizens and local authorities. What I want to do as president is the enactment of an improved equal pay law and legislation to protect women from violence. I am also in favor an equal rights amendment to the constitution. In addition, the federal government’s executive branch should live by example. As president, I will appoint more women to important positions and would also consider a woman for the Supreme Court if given the opportunity to nominate a person for our highest court. My wife Happy is also passionate about that issue and I’m sure she will come up with additional proposals that as president I will support.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Vice President Kennedy, how do you answer that question?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Throughout my whole career I have been devoted to equal rights for everyone, women, blacks and other minorities. I think that the Kennedy/Johnson years have an unprecedented record on equal rights and I want to continue this struggle. I have to say that I endorse all things Governor Rockefeller just outlined as well. Additionally, I propose a jobs training program for women, what would give a lot of women more financial safety and benefit our economy through their talent. For this reason, it also important that we expand federal aid to education, that was first passed by President Johnson in 1965.


HOWARD K. SMITH: The next question is from the gentleman over there. It is for Vice President Kennedy.

MAN II: Vice President Kennedy, my family are German immigrants. We still have relatives in East Germany, but visiting them is still very difficult. Would you, as president, be willing to normalize relations with East Germany and other satellite states of the USSR? And why hasn’t that been subject to the talks between the Johnson Administration and Moscow?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Well, I would like to have a normal relationship with any country in the world. However, as you understand for sure, that is only possible under certain conditions. The door to the communist world has been opened in direct consultations in late 1968 with President Johnson’s state visit in Moscow. The West German government under Chancellor Brandt has also taken action to normalize relations. That doesn’t come overnight and I fully understand that it is hard if family relations fall victim to foreign policy affairs.

MAN II: So, you can’t say what you will do, Sir?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Well, I will seek to continue the talks with the USSR and other countries behind the iron curtain. But at the same time we have to make sure that countries who want normal relations with us behave a certain way. For example, our citizens must be protected from arbitrarily imprisonment when they enter their territory. I wish I could give you a better answer with your family, but hope you understand that.

MAN II: I do, thank you.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Governor Rockefeller?

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: What the vice president said that certain conditions must be fulfilled for other nations to normalize relations is correct. Nevertheless, we must be outspoken against a country that locks its citizens up behind a wall because their leaders are afraid to lose their power. We ought not to normalize this kind of tyranny.

[…]

HOWARD K. SMITH: Our last question is from the woman right there with the yellow shirt. Go ahead, madam.

WOMAN II: My question, to each of you, is plain and simple: If elected president, what would be your first executive action?

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: My very first action would an executive order that future government jobs can only be assigned to firms who pay the minimum wage of 2.50 dollars per hour. Right afterwards, I will introduce a new version of the Fair Labor Standards Act to increase the minimum wage to this amount.  

GOVERNOR ROCKEFELLER: If given the honor to serve as 37th president, I will issue an executive order on January 20, 1973 donating my entire presidential salary to sick children. I have enough money, I won’t take a salary and won’t take a pension.

HOWARD K. SMITH: Thank you both very much for your appearance here today and thanks to our viewers. Good night, and please vote on November the seventh.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 06, 2018, 11:45:08 am
October 23, 1972

Post-debate polls: Bobby Kennedy ahead

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The second presidential debate was a success for Bobby Kennedy, according to the most recent poll. After viewers saw Nelson Rockefeller as clear winner of the first on air contest and Gerald Ford performed well in the vice presidential debate, the Kennedy camp has every reason to be pleased with polling results of this townhall discussion.


Q: Who you think won the debate over all?
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 54%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 39%
Undecided or tie: 7%

Q: Who you regard as more comptenent to be president after the townhall debate?
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Undecided or tie: 9%

Q: Who did you find more likeable as a person?
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy: 55%
Governor Nelson Rockefeller: 37%
Undecided or tie: 8%


The closing days of October

With no more debates to be held, the candidates and their prominent supporters were almost 24/7 on the campaign trail. The Rockefeller team heavily turned its focus on California now. Governor Ronald Reagan increased the number of appearances in his homestate, knowing it might be tipping point. On October 24, the Rockefeller campaign made a strategic decision by involving Richard Nixon into the California campaign, appointing him campaign chair (previous chair, former Senator Thomas Kuchel was named his deputy). Nixon previously headed the campaign effort in Florida, but Rocky felt comfortable that the Sunshine state would be in his column (as polls suggest) and that the former vice president’s knowledge and political skills were more needed in his original homestate at the West coast.

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Nelson Rockefeller speaking to a crowd in Santa Barbara, California; October 27, 1972

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Governor Ronald Reagan gives a speech in Bakersfield, California, on behalf of Nelson Rockefeller and Republican congressional candidates; October 28, 1972

On the Democratic side, Bobby Kennedy focused heavily on New York, a state he absolutely needs, especially if California goes Republican. He also made several campaign stumps in North Carolina, Georgia, Missouri and Texas. In the latter, President Johnson and his political machine were actively engaged to secure the Lone Star State for his vice president. The president also toured North and South Carolina as well as Georgia in joint appearances with vice presidential nominee Jimmy Carter and Alabama Governor Albert Brewer. A dispute came at a Chicago rally, when Mayor and political boss Richard J. Daley refused to campaign with Bobby Kennedy. Both had long disliked each other and even a reported phone call by the president couldn’t change Daley’s mind. Instead, the vice president got help from his former rival and predecessor in the vice presidency: Senator Hubert Humphrey was frequently at RFK’s side, especially in the mid-west, which proved to be a pivotal region as several states were extremely close. Illinois, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan were on top of the Democrats' targeted states. Interesting was that classical bellwether state Ohio seemed not so much contested after polls showed a sizeable Rockefeller lead. On October 28, an unnamed source claimed the Kennedy campaign had given up on Ohio. A spokeswoman of campaign declined to deny the report.

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RFK on the campaign trail in Detriot, Michigan; October 29, 1972

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President Johnson speaks with the press at a North Carolina rally for Bobby Kennedy; October 30, 1972

On the issues, both sides mainly sticked to their messages and the Monroe story seemingly faded away since Nelson Rockefeller refrained from any personal attacks against his opponent. The only one who wanted to use the story for political gain was Lester Maddox, whose campaign lacked media coverage. Maddox in response repeatedly accused the media of dishonesty and a bias against him. Nevertheless, it seemed as the former Georgia governor would carry Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana with a plurality of the vote. In South Carolina, he was tied with Bobby Kennedy and Georgia seemed to vote Democratic thanks to Jimmy Carter. In addition, Maddox was expected to reach double digits in some other southern states. Although some political observers still expressed concern the Maddox/Mahoney campaign would throw the presidential election in the House of Representatives, a New York Times analyst wrote the chances were, according to his calculations, below 10%, while Bobby Kennedy would have a 50% chance to win 270 electoral votes. He subsequently gave Nelson Rockefeller a 40% chance to garner 270 or more electoral votes on election day.

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Lester Maddox, running as the anti-establishment candidate, is still playing dirty on his opponents, especially on Robert Kennedy


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 07, 2018, 05:59:02 am
October 31, 1972: New polls are out! Released by Gallup

The second last poll release before election day again shows a dead heat between the two major candidates. After falling back in recent weeks, Bobby Kennedy regains some support. The state-by-state surverys remain extremly close and flexible what makes a serious prediction for November 7 very tough. Meanwhile, President Lyndon Johnson seems to finish his White House tenure with robust numbers.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 56%
Disapprove: 37%


General election match-ups
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%

Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Lester Maddox: 6%


Polls by states

Arkansas
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Lester Maddox: 21%

California
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Colorado
Nelson Rockefeller: 50%
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Delaware
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 38%
Lester Maddox: 29%
Nelson Rockefeller: 28%

Hawaii
Robert F. Kennedy: 55%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Illinois
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Robert F. Kennedy: 37%
Lester Maddox: 19%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Michigan
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 7%

New Jersey
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 2%

New York
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%

North Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Oklahoma
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Oregon
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Pennsylvania
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Lester Maddox: 1%

South Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 35%
Lester Maddox: 32%
Nelson Rockefeller: 29%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Nelson Rockefeller: 35%
Lester Maddox: 20%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Lester Maddox: 7%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 11%

West Virginia
Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 5%

Wisconsin
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 1%


The current polling map by state (in states that weren't polled this time, the previous numbers or partisan leaning are used):

()

Robert F. Kennedy: 254 electoral votes
Nelson Rockefeller: 252 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 26 electoral votes
Tied: 6 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



1972 congressional elections – generic ballot

For which candidate would you vote in the congressional elections?

Democrat: 47%
Republican: 44%



Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 07, 2018, 09:31:51 am
I'm predicting a narrow Rockfeller victory, but this is going to be tense. On the one hand an election thrown to congress would be fun, but dealing the Dixiecrats a deathblow would be even more fun- so since AL, LA and MS weren't polled, I'm still hoping that the New South Democrats like Albert Brewer will prevail and give RFK a win in the south :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 07, 2018, 01:44:05 pm
I'm predicting a narrow Rockfeller victory, but this is going to be tense. On the one hand an election thrown to congress would be fun, but dealing the Dixiecrats a deathblow would be even more fun- so since AL, LA and MS weren't polled, I'm still hoping that the New South Democrats like Albert Brewer will prevail and give RFK a win in the south :P

They will be polled in the final round just before election day. :P But polls are polls, we'll see what happens on election night (with legendary Walter Cronkite), which I intend to begin within the next few days.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 10, 2018, 06:50:34 am
November 1, 1972

BREAKING: RFK briefly hospitalized after apparent collapse after Texas rally


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BREAKING NEWS: As members of the Kennedy campaign just officially confirmed, the vice president collapsed right after a campaign rally in Austin, Texas. The collapse occurred backstage after he finished a 45 minute speech, the third on this day on his tour through the Lone Star state. President Lyndon Johnson and Senator Lloyd Bentsen joined the Democratic nominee on his trip. Immediately after, the Secret Service took care of the situation and the vice president was hospitalized for four hours. As insiders said, the collapse was caused by a late consequence of the attempted assassination in June 1968, where then-candidate Kennedy was hit and had to rest for several weeks (afterwards he ended his campaign and became LBJ's running mate). Robert Kennedy was released in the evening hours and left the hospital building through a secret backdoor.

First reports of this afternoon falsely claimed that it was President Johnson who was hospitalized after suffering another heart attack. Obviously the presidential convoy created some confusion at the hospital. That was quickly debunked and a White House spokesman criticized the reporting.


Nelson Rockefeller sends good wishes

Immediately after the news of RFK's collapse broke, Governor Rockefeller expressed his good wishes for his opponent and said, he hoped that the vice president could return quickly to the campaign trail. His running mate Gerald Ford remarked the incident should not be politicalized and urged other Republicans to refrain from negative comments. Bobby Kennedy publically thanked Rocky for his notes and described him as a "decent man".


November 2, 1972: RFK back on stage

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As nothing happend: Bobby Kennedy back on stage, here in San Diego, California; November 3, 1972

On November 2, RFK was back on tour in Oklahoma and later California and thanked supporters for their good wishes. However, he didn't address health issues in his speeches after one of his doctors affirmed the public, he would be healthy enough to serve as president under immense stress.


New York Times: "A remarkable fair campaign"

In light of RFK's brief hospitalization, a New York Times editorial described the 1972 election as a remarkable fair campaign, referring to Bobby Kennedy's and Nelson Rockefeller's behavior. "It never became something personal between the two major nominees", the article reads. And finished with the phrase: "Whoever wins this election, America's next president and vice president are going to be two men of great integrity, what will be beneficial for the American cause at home and abroad".


November 5, 1972: FINAL POLLS are out! Released by Gallup

Two days before election day, the last polls were released and still show a close race. The undecided numbers are at an all-time low.

While RFK has regained a small lead in California, New York is again exactly tied. As is Connecticut, for the first time in this campaign. In the South, Lester Maddox' lead has almost been eaten up thanks to Jimmy Carter and Albert Brewer. In Florida, the efforts of Governor Reubin Askew paid off as Rocky's lead dropped. The opposite is true in Arkansas, where the GOP candidate is ahead again. Meanwhile, Michigan and Wisconsin remain very close. In the latter, Nelson Rockefeller regained a small lead, while Bobby Kennedy improved his numbers in Ohio after deciding to resume campaign ads and campaign stops by Hubert Humphrey.


General election match-ups
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%

Nelson Rockefeller: 45%
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Lester Maddox: 5%


Polls by states

Alabama
Lester Maddox: 36%
Robert F. Kennedy: 32%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Arkansas
Nelson Rockefeller: 36%
Robert F. Kennedy: 33%
Lester Maddox: 22%

California
Robert F. Kennedy: 48%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Connecticut
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Delaware
Nelson Rockefeller: 43%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 5%

Florida
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 11%

Georgia
Robert F. Kennedy: 39%
Lester Maddox: 32%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Illinois
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Lester Maddox: 3%

Indiana
Nelson Rockefeller: 51%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Lester Maddox: 2%

Iowa
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Kentucky
Nelson Rockefeller: 42%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 16%

Lousiana
Lester Maddox: 36%
Robert F. Kennedy: 34%
Nelson Rockefeller: 26%

Maryland
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Lester Maddox: 10%

Michigan
Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Lester Maddox: <1%

Mississippi
Lester Maddox: 41%
Robert F. Kennedy: 32%
Nelson Rockefeller: 25%

Missouri
Nelson Rockefeller: 46%
Robert F. Kennedy: 43%
Lester Maddox: 8%

New Jersey
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Lester Maddox: 1%

New York
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Lester Maddox: 1%

North Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 44%
Nelson Rockefeller: 41%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Ohio
Nelson Rockefeller: 50%
Robert F. Kennedy: 46%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Oklahoma
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Lester Maddox: 4%

Pennsylvania
Robert F. Kennedy: 49%
Nelson Rockefeller: 48%
Lester Maddox: 1%

South Carolina
Robert F. Kennedy: 36%
Lester Maddox: 34%
Nelson Rockefeller: 27%

Tennessee
Robert F. Kennedy: 41%
Nelson Rockefeller: 38%
Lester Maddox: 19%

Texas
Robert F. Kennedy: 45%
Nelson Rockefeller: 40%
Lester Maddox: 9%

Virginia
Nelson Rockefeller: 44%
Robert F. Kennedy: 40%
Lester Maddox: 13%

Washington state
Robert F. Kennedy: 50%
Nelson Rockefeller: 47%
Lester Maddox: 1%

Wisconsin
Nelson Rockefeller: 49%
Robert F. Kennedy: 47%
Lester Maddox: 1%


The current polling map by state (in states that weren't polled this time, the previous numbers or partisan leaning are used):

()

Nelson Rockefeller: 238 electoral votes
Robert F. Kennedy: 222 electoral votes
Lester Maddox: 26 electoral votes
Tied: 52 electoral votes

Light blue/red = lead within 5%
Standard blue/red = lead between 5% and 10%
Dark blue/red = Double digit lead



November 6, 1972: Candidates finish campaigns, spend election day in New York

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November 6, 1972: Nelson Rockefeller's last rally in Newark, New Jersey

This Monday, both major candidates finished their long and hard campaigns in New York City. RFK's last campaign stump was in the Bronx with his running mate Jimmy Carter, President Johnson (who later flew back to Texas) and Hubert Humphrey. Nelson Rockefeller's last campaign event was across the Hudson River in Newark, New Jersey with Gerald Ford and George Romney. The last poll has him regaining a small lead in this pivotal state. Kennedy then returned to his election night party at Madison Square Garden. Rocky was just a few blocks away: At the Rockefeller Center, where he would spend election day with his running mate (who briefly returned to Michigan to cast his vote) and the entire Rockefeller family.


★★★ NEXT: ELECTION NIGHT on CBS!! Stay tuned! ★★★


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 11, 2018, 06:23:37 am
★★★ United States presidential election –
Tuesday, November 7, 1972 ★★★


CBS News Coverage of Election night 1972. With legendary Walter Cronkite.

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WALTER CRONKITE: Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen. It is my pleasure to welcome you to our CBS News coverage of the 1972 United States presdiential election. After more than a year of intense campaigning, we are finnally at the decision point. Who will lead America into its bicentennial? Vice President and Democratic nominee Robert F. Kennedy or Governor and Republican nominee Nelson Rockefeller? Will the Democratic Party retain the White House for a fourth consecutive term or will Nelson Rockefeller reclaim the Oval Office for the Republican Party? Will he accomplish what Richard Nixon failed twice? Tonight, we will find out. One thing is clear: The election is expected to be very close and we have a slim chance third-party candidate Lester Maddox will win enough electoral votes in the South to prevent an outright majority of 270 votes.

We begin our program with a short look at the poll closing times in each states:


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I also want to show you the blank electoral map for this election. All the gray will be filled with color tonight. States carried by the Democratic ticket of Robert F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter will be red, states won by the Republican ticket of Nelson Rockefeller and Gerald Ford will be displayed in blue. States won by American Independent Party candidates Lester Maddox and George Mahoney will be shaded in yellow. States whose polls have closed, but are too close or early to call will be painted in green.

()

Now, we take a short break before the first results will come in. Stay with us.


6 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome back to our program. It is now six o'clock here in Washington DC and the polls in the first states have closed. These are Kentucky and Indiana. While Kentucky is too early too call and expected to be close, we can already say with confidence that Nelson Rockefeller has won the state of Indiana and its 13 electoral votes. So, Governor Rockefeller picks up the first votes tonight.

()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 13 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 0 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 0 EV.
Too close/early to call: 9 EV.


7 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: Good evening America, welcome back to CBS News election night coverage. It's been an hour since polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky. And while we projected Nelson Rockefeller would win Indiana, we still can't call Kentucky. Our men and women out there report that Lester Maddox has taken about twenty percent of the votes while Governor Rockefeller is slightly ahead. We'll see if that trend continues. [...] But now: polls closed in Vermont, Virginia, Georgia, South Carolina and Florida. So far, we can only project Nelson Rockefeller the winner in Vermont. This is a typical New England state that likes liberal Republicans. No wonder that Nelson Rockefeller is so much ahead that we already give him the state. Interesting to watch will be Georgia, homestate of Jimmy Carter and Lester Maddox. Our first numbers show the Democratic ticket ahead. This is encouraging news for Team Kennedy! We take a short break here.

()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 16 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 0 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 0 EV.
Too close/early to call: 58 EV.


7.30 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: It's 7.30 p.m. and we're back with our program. While we still can't call any of the states polls closed in the past 90 minutes, we can add important battlegrounds North Carolina and Ohio to the too early column. Another states polls just closed is West Virginia. We can already declare Bobby Kennedy the winner in this state. He wins his first six electoral votes. That was also the first state we called for President Johnson four years ago, but West Virginia lost one elector following the 1970 census.

()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 16 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 6 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 0 EV.
Too close/early to call: 96 EV.


7.53 p.m. – BREAKING: ROCKEFELLER CAPTURES KENTUCKY!


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WALTER CRONKITE: And we have our first extraordinary state call between any poll closings! We join the colleagues from ABC News and call the state of Kentucky for Nelson Rockefeller, who apparantly won by a plurality. The polls were right in Kentucky and we award the nine votes up for grabs to the Rockefeller/Ford camp, that has now won 25 votes in total. Very important victory for the Republican ticket. [...] Now, es we near eight o'clock, a lot major states will close their polls. Stay with us after a short break!

()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 25 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 6 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 0 EV.
Too close/early to call: 87 EV.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on February 13, 2018, 10:16:04 am
I (also) expect Rockefeller to pull this off and would have been fine with it, had I been alive. Though I'd support RFK with enthusiasm. Go RFK!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 13, 2018, 03:05:15 pm
★★★ CBS News Election Coverage continues. With Walter Cronkite ★★★


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8 p.m.

WALTER CRONKITE: We continue our program of coverage of election night 1972. At eight p.m. we have polls closing in several states, including a handful of battlegrounds, where a large junk of electoral votes are at stake. I’d like to begin in New England, where four projections can already be made: First, the state of New Hampshire. A bastion of liberal and moderate Republicans: Nelson Rockefeller carries the state with over 55% of the vote. The same in Maine, where the governor is also that much ahead, that we can award these electoral votes to him. Massachusetts is different: Vice President Kennedy wins his original homestate by a fair margin. These 14 electoral votes go into the Kennedy/Carter column. We also have a projection for Rhode Island: The Democratic ticket is winning easily. Nevertheless, we still don’t have a winner in Connecticut. Nelson Rockefeller is just behind by a single point with about seventy percent in. That turns out to be closer than expected. It would be an upset if Rocky manages to win here.

Polls also closed in New Jersey, Illinois, Michigan, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Maryland, Delaware and Missouri. Neither of them can be called yet. But I hear that Kennedy is ahead in New Jersey, what would be an important win for the Democratic candidate.

We have a winner in Mississippi, though, and it is Lester Maddox! He has taken the first southern state! Maddox is also leading with about 40% of the vote in Alabama, but this state is still too early to call. Meanwhile, Kansas seems to be decided: Nelson Rockefeller, not surprising, has taken the state and adds seven more electoral votes to his tally.

Our map at the moment has Nelson Rockefeller ahead with 40 electoral votes. Bobby Kennedy is at 27 and Lester Maddox at seven.


()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 40 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 24 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 7 EV.
Too close/early to call: 264 EV.


8.30 p.m.

BREAKING: CBS PROJECTS THAT KENNEDY WINS GEORGIA!


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WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome back, ladies and gentlemen. I have a very important call to make: Jimmy Carter has delivered! The governor and former peanut farmer delivers his homestate of Georgia and its twelve electoral votes for Bobby Kennedy. Apparently the Democratic ticket is ahead by seven points and Lester Maddox has no chance to overcome this lead. That means, Bobby Kennedy has reason to hope for more electoral votes from the South. Votes, that he badly needs. With Georgia being called in his favor, he has won a state President Lyndon Johnson failed to carry twice. Nelson Rockefeller is a close third with just over 25% of the vote in Georgia. That is disappointing, but doesn’t hurt his overall chances to be elected president tonight. It is, though, a very important victory for Robert Kennedy. However, I also have a setback for the Democrats in case they hoped for Alabama: We can now confirm that Lester Maddox is winning his second state by a fair margin. This is also a setback for the liberal Democratic governor Albert Brewer, who fought hard for Kennedy over the course of this campaign, but turned down the vice presidency. Lester Maddox' win shows a potential Brewer candidacy for the senate in two years won’t be a cakewalk for the rising star. On the other hand, George Wallace will closely watch tonight, since he is supposed to seek the governorship again in 1974.

Now it’s half past eight and the polls just closed in Arkansas. We don’t have a winner here, but Nelson Rockefeller runs ahead in the state, where is brother Winthrop is the governor.

Our map now stands 40-39-16 in terms of electoral college votes in Rockefeller's favor. Still a lot climb for the 270 needed.


()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 40 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 39 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 16 EV.
Too close/early to call: 249 EV.


8.46 p.m. – BREAKING: FLORIDA WON BY NELSON ROCKEFELLER!


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WALTER CRONKITE: And we interrupt the break with a major projection. Not too surprising, Nelson Rockefeller emerges victorious in Florida, just as polls predicted. The New York governor wins in the Sunshine state with about 45% of the vote and captures 17 important electoral votes. He’s now at 57 electoral votes. We’ll be back soon with more polls closing. Stay tuned!


9 p.m.

CBS: Kennedy wins Maryland; Rockefeller strong in Connecticut and New Jersey, overperforms with blacks


WALTER CRONKITE: Nine o’clock, and we have several more polls closed. First, I’d like to name states we can already call: Colorado, Wyoming, Arizona Nebraska and both Dakotas voted for Nelson Rockefeller and Gerald Ford. That adds a modest number of electoral votes to the Republican column, which is now at 85. On the Democratic side, we project the Kennedy/Carter won in Minnesota, home of Hubert Humphrey. And Lester Maddox won a third state: Louisiana. Ten more votes for the former Georgia governor. In Wisconsin, it is too early for a serious projection, as the vote is extremely close. The same in New York, where 41 electoral votes are being awarded. Along with California, this will be the most watched state tonight. My colleagues out there confirmed, New York is very, very close at the moment, with about twelve percent in. […] And, as I just heard, we received word that Robert Kennedy has won the state of Maryland. Briefly I want to focus on Connecticut again and provide an update: We still don’t have a winner here, but I just received word that Governor Rockefeller has pulled ahead by roughly a thousand votes. Wow!

And another update: The tide in New Jersey has reportedly turned! Nelson Rockefeller has now overtaken Robert Kennedy's lead and is favored to carry the state. We received word that the governor is overperforming in urban areas and with African Americans. The same is true in Washington DC, where Governor Rockefeller has won almost 20% of the vote due to stronger support from blacks.

Let’s take a look at the map. Nelson Rockefeller ahead, but it's still very early. This is going to be a long night!


()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 85 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 59 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 26 EV.
Too close/early to call: 278 EV.


9.17 p.m. – BREAKING: ROCKEFELLER TAKES VIRGINIA AND NEW MEXICO, CRACKS 100 ELECTORAL VOTES


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WALTER CRONKITE: And… I just received word about two more less surprising calls: Virginia and New Mexico go to the Rockefeller/Ford column. Governor Rockefeller has exceeded 100 electoral votes now. But still no gamechanger has been called. We return after a short break for more coverage. Stay with us!

()

Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 101 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 59 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 26 EV.
Too close/early to call: 262 EV.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 15, 2018, 01:30:50 pm
★★★ CBS News Election Coverage continues. With Walter Cronkite ★★★

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9.38 p.m. – BREAKING: OHIO CALLED FOR ROCKEFELLER!


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WALTER CRONKITE: And we come back for a very important call. One and a half hours after polls closed in Ohio, we can present a winner: As the polls suggested, Nelson Rockefeller has won the state by a fair margin. This is a very important win for the New York governor. As our reporters out there said, Governor Rockefeller is expected to end up with about 51% or 52% of the votes, compared to approximately 45% for Vice President Kennedy. Truly a setback for RFK, who decided to resume campaigning after the last polls showed he may close the gap. Remember that four years ago, Ohio was called much later and became the state that put President Johnson over the top. As things now stand, I see Nelson Rockefeller slightly favored, but things could change rapidly if Texas, Pennsylvania and either New York or California end up voting for Kennedy/Carter.
 
Ah, and… I just hear on one line here, that Nelson Rockefeller is also projected to take the state of Oklahoma. Another eight votes go into his column. Now the Republican ticket is way ahead, but still far away from the 270 electoral votes needed. Here’s the map:

 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 134 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 59 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 26 EV.
Too close/early to call: 229 EV.
 
 
10 p.m.
 
WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome back to CBS coverage of the 1972 presidential election. I’m your moderator, Walter Cronkite. It is ten p.m. and we have poll closings in Iowa, Montana, Idaho, Nevada and Utah. And we can call all of them except for Iowa and Nevada for Nelson Rockefeller and Gerald Ford. That is no surprise at all and adds a modest number of electoral votes to the Republican column. Meanwhile, I have a more important call for Governor Rockefeller: He has won Missouri. Another state he flipped from President Lyndon Johnson in 1968. And one more state is now called: Connecticut. Robert Kennedy has narrowly hang on here after retaking the lead. With 99% of the precincts in, the vice president pulled it off with about 50% to 48%. That provides some relief for the Kennedy campaign. Our current map has Rockefeller way ahead with 159 to 67:
 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 159 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 67 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 26 EV.
Too close/early to call: 220 EV.
 
 
10.24 p.m. – BREAKING: KENNEDY HANGS ON TEXAS, ROCKEFELLER WINS NEW JERSEY, MADDOX SOUTH CAROLINA


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WALTER CRONKITE: We have interrupt the break for three important calls: Bobby Kennedy has managed to win the state of Texas! A pivotal victory for him in President Johnson’s homestate. The president campaigned hard for his second-in-command here in recent weeks. Nevertheless, the result is closer than expected since polls showed him ahead by at least five points. We project that Kennedy has won 46% of the vote compared to Rockefeller’s 44%. About nine percent are going to Maddox in the Lone-Star-State. Nevertheless, a win is a win. 26 electoral votes for RFK. The Rockefeller/Ford campaign never counted on them. What they counted on is New Jersey. I guess they’re now paying big attention to the state, where the Republican standard-bearer finished his campaign yesterday and is now reportedly the winner. 17 crucial votes for Mr. Rockefeller. News also broke on South Carolina, where Lester Maddox has won a narrow three-way contest. This brings Maddox’ tally up to 34 electoral votes. Likely that is going to be his total number in the end, and we have to see whether that prevents the other two from garnering 270 electoral votes. The loss of South Carolina is not good for Vice President Kennedy, although he has still more than one reasonable path to victory. We go to a quick commercial and return in a moment.
 
[…]
 
WALTER CRONKITE: It’s 10.35 p.m. and I have two additional calls of less significance to make: That concerns the states of Delaware and Nevada, where Nelson Rockefeller has been declared the winner. Delaware is somewhat surprising since neighboring Maryland voted for Robert Kennedy and the senate race seems to favor the young Democrat Joseph Biden here. Looking at the map, there is a lot of blue, but that could change once big battlegrounds are called. I expect this to happen within the next one or two hours. But it is possible that a winner won’t be produced until California is decided.
 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 181 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 93 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 163 EV.
 
 
11 p.m.
 
WALTER CRONKITE: Eleven o’clock, ladies and gentlemen! And while polls are now closing at the entire west coast, we are far away from the election of a new president. Washington state, Oregon and California are all too early or too close call. But I have a big projection to make, and that is Pennsylvania. We have now enough reliable numbers to give the state to Vice President Kennedy. A large prize with 27 electoral votes. According to our projections, the vice president will carry the states by a margin of roughly three percent or about 100,000 votes. Nevertheless, I also have a call for Republicans: We now put Arkansas to Nelson Rockefeller’s column. He won the state in which his brother Winthrop holds the governor’s chair with about 39% of the vote against Bobby Kennedy and a strong third place for Governor Maddox.
 
Checking the map, Nelson Rockefeller is leading with 187 to 120 electoral votes. That is the exact same number Richard Nixon won in 1968. More to come. Very likely at least.

 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 187 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 120 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 190 EV.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 17, 2018, 05:57:27 am
11.20 p.m. – BREAKING: NORTH CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE FOR KENNEDY!


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WALTER CRONKITE: After securing Pennsylvania and its 27 electoral votes, Bobby Kennedy continues to close the gap: Five minutes ago, North Carolina was called for the vice president. And just this moment, we got confirmed, that he won neighboring Tennessee as well. Both are important victories that gives the Democrats reason to hope. Tennessee is another state that voted for Richard Nixon in 1968. However, Nelson Rockefeller has flipped more states from 1968 than Bobby Kennedy so far.
 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 187 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 143 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 167 EV.



11.20 p.m. – BREAKING: ROCKEFELLER CARRIES ILLINOIS!


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WALTER CRONKITE: Is this a turning point for tonight? It is now official that Nelson Rockefeller has managed to win the state of Illinois. This is a huge, huge win for the Republican candidate. It is also the first time that this swing state goes to a GOP nominee since 1956. With almost 94% counted, Governor Rockefeller stands at 49% of the vote, while Vice President Kennedy received 47% so far. A margin, RFK can hardly overcome with the remaining votes to be counted. Especially because they came from more Republican leaning districts. Therefore, we call Illinois for the Rockefeller/Ford camp.
 
That is our map. Nelson Rockefeller has now crossed the 200 electoral votes mark.

 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 213 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 143 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 141 EV.
 
 
11.40 p.m. – BREAKING: KENNEDY TAKES MICHIGAN; IOWA CALLED FOR ROCKEFELLER


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WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome back to our election night coverage. I have two very important projections: The first is on the state of Michigan. Gerald Ford failed to accomplish what Jimmy Carter has done: He couldn’t deliver his homestate, as Robert Kennedy outperformed the Republican ticket by a slim margin. With almost all votes counted, the vice president can be awarded with 21 additional electoral votes. That means, the efforts of vice presidential nominee Gerald Ford as well as former governor George Romney did not pay off, despite Rockefeller doing very well with African Americans. After the loss of Illinois, this victory keeps hope alive for Kennedy supporters, that their standard-bearer has still a decent shot at winning and become the nation's 37th president. However, another state in the Midwest can also be called: Iowa votes for Nelson Rockefeller by a fair margin. The governor managed to flip another 1968 Johnson state despite Hubert Humphrey’s presence in the last weeks. Is that sign that points to a Rockefeller victory tonight? I think, at this point, we have to confess that Nelson Rockefeller is more likely to be elected president than Bobby Kennedy. But the vice president could still win with New York, California, Washington, Hawaii and Wisconsin. And potentially Oregon as well. But it's hard to deny that Governor Rockefeller is better positioned to garner 270 electoral votes.
 
Looking at our map, Governor Rockefeller is ahead by almost 60 votes. He needs additional 49 to get elected. California or New York in addition to Alaska and Oregon would put him over the top. If he wins both New York and California, he’s through and it won’t be even close. Bobby Kennedy must win both in order to get over the 270 finish line, in addition to Washington state and Wisconsin. And the latter is far from certain to vote for Kennedy, since the last polls showed a dead heat. Right now, I say the odds are 50% Rockefeller, 25% electoral college deadlock and 25% Kennedy. We’re back in a moment, stay with us.

 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 221 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 164 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 112 EV.

 
12 a.m.; November 8, 1972

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WALTER CRONKITE: We’re at midnight now here in Washington and are still waiting for the election of a new president. At this hour, polls of the last two states closed. Hawaii and Alaska. Both can already be called without a surprise. Hawaii goes to Bobby Kennedy and Alaska to Nelson Rockefeller. I would also give you a brief update on congressional races: It seems as the Democrats maintain control over both legislative chambers. Notable senators such as Republican John Tower of Texas and Tennessee's Howard Baker, another Republican, have been reelected to their posts.
 
 
12.07 a.m. – BREAKING: ROCKEFELLER DECLARED WINNER IN NEW YORK, BARRING RFK FROM REACHING 270 ELECTORAL VOTES!


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WALTER CRONKITE: Ladies and Gentlemen, we interrupt the current report on down-ballot races as I have received very important news from the state of New York. According to various sources, with 96% of the votes in, Nelson Rockefeller has won his homestate by a close margin of less than a half percentage point. That means, that Robert Kennedy has no path left to reach 270 electoral votes. Even if the wins all the rest; meaning the states at west coast. But even that seems doubtful since Governor Rockefeller is favored to win in Oregon and possibly California and Wisconsin. As he now stands at 265 electoral votes, he needs just another state to cross the finish line. And it is very likely that he wins at least Oregon. I guess the celebration at the Rockefeller Center will now begin.
 
[…]
 
Before we go into the break, we have now a winner in Wisconsin: Bobby Kennedy hangs on and earns eleven electoral votes. Nevertheless, he can’t hit 270 anymore since New York is included in the Rockefeller/Ford tally. Take a look at the map:
 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 265 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 179 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 60 EV.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 18, 2018, 06:14:29 am
12.33 a.m. – BREAKING: NEW YORK TAKEN BACK FROM ROCKEFELLER!


As New York is taken back to undecided, Kennedy wins Washington State, Rockefeller takes Oregon: Election comes down to New York and/or California! Electoral College deadlock now impossible!


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WALTER CRONKITE: Welcome back to election night coverage. I’m your moderator, Walter Cronkite. I have to say that I have never seen an election like this. News just broke that New York has to be taken back from Nelson Rockefeller! As later returns came in, the election is again too close to call in the Empire State, where both candidates have their official residence. I assume this is a huge shocker for the Rockefeller camp while the Kennedy people, already fallen into a state of mourning, have reason to be hopeful again. So, the call for New York was premature and we, as well as other stations, have to apologize for the call. Now, with that being said, this does not mean Robert Kennedy carried the state. We just have to take it back to the undecided tally, as it is so extremely close. Therefore, Nelson Rockefeller has not lost the state yet, he has just not won it. Just to demonstrate how close New York is, take a look at the vote count:
 
NEW YORK (98% reported)
Nelson A. Rockefeller (R): 3,438,409 (48.99%)
Robert F. Kennedy (D): 3,430,303 (48.96%)
Lester Maddox (A): 84,223 (1.20%)

While New York and California likely take another hour or so, we have enough confidence to give Washington state to the vice president and Oregon to the governor. That means effectively the election comes down to New York and/or California. Nelson Rockefeller can end this thing by winning either of them. With New York alone, he would be at 271 electoral votes, one more than needed. With California alone, Rockefeller would end up with 275 electoral votes. If he carries both of them, his tally adds up to 316. Bobby Kennedy has to win both if he wants to move into the Oval Office coming January. If he carries both, he'd win with 274 electoral votes. These three scenarios are now all options left. That also means, an electoral college deadlock won't occur. The only thing that can happen now is a recount in one of the decisive states.
 
 
()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 230 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 188 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 86 EV.
 
 
CBS PROJECTS: DEMOCRATS MAINTAIN CONTROL OF CONGRESS


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WALTER CRONKITE: While the presidential election comes down to New York and California, both a nailbiter, we have a major projection to make that concerns the United States congress: We are now certain that the Democrats will remain in control of the United States senate. Republicans gained seats in Virginia, North Carolina, Oklahoma and New Mexico. The Democrats picked up Maine, Delaware and South Dakota. Possibly Colorado, but that remains to be very close. Notable is the loss of Republican Margaret Chase-Smith in Maine, who lost to Democratic challenger William Hathaway. Mrs. Smith has been the first woman to be elected in her own right to the senate. At the age of 76, she may now retire, but is also rumored to take a position in a possible Rockefeller Administration.

In the House of Representatives, we are also confident that the Democrats maintain their majority. As of now, they won 201 seats. That is 17 short of a majority, but with the remaining districts to be counted, CBS projects Democrats will likely end up with a similar number than in the previous congress, which was 233. The Republicans have won 173 seats at this point. We expect them to win just above 200 mandates.

That means, if Nelson Rockefeller is elected president this night, he will have to deal with a Democratic congress. If Robert Kennedy pulls this off, he will find himself into a similar position than President Johnson in the past two years. Menaing, it wouldn't be as easy as for LBJ in his first five years, but things certainly can get done. We will keep you up to date in both the presidential and down-ballot races. Now return to a short break and will be back in moment. Stay with us.



1.04 a.m. – BREAKING: KENNEDY NARROWLY WINS NEW YORK! ELECTION TO BE DECIDED BY CALIFORNIA!


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WALTER CRONKITE: Ladies and Gentlemen, we are now confronted with a brand new situation: With 100% of the vote in New York counted, we received word that Vice President Robert F. Kennedy has carried the state with a very, very narrow margin of 49.0% to 48.8% of the vote. This is stunning! Really stunning! After the Empire State has already been called for the Republican ticket, we now have these 41 electoral votes go to the Democratic ticket. Bobby Kennedy badly needed this victory in his homestate. He stands now at 229 electoral votes. One less than Nelson Rockefeller. In other words: The state of California will decide the 1972 presidential election! Whoever wins the Golden State and its 45 electoral votes, wins the White House. It couldn't be much closer as it is now up to Ronald Reagan's homestate to determine who will be the 37th President of the United States. It's going to Nelson Rockefeller with 275 electoral votes or Robert Kennedy with 274 electoral votes.

As we are told, the vote count in California is a little slow, just above 50%. No clear trend is visible at this early stage. Both candidates are within a single percentage point! We can now also project that the Republicans hang on Colorado in the senate race. Kentucky is now also reported to be a narrow GOP win. That means, the Democrats will control the chamber with 53 seats, including Independent Harry F. Byrd of Virginia, who caucuses with the Democratic Party. That's a net loss of one seat for the Democrats. Republicans hold 46 seats, with conservative James Buckley of New York caucusing with the GOP. Yet, the House is divided 224 to 206 in the Democrats' favor. Five districts remain to be called. We go to a short commercial and will be right back. Stay with us for the ultimate decision!



()
 
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 230 EV.
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 229 EV.
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV.
Too close/early to call: 45 EV.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: El Bayamés on February 18, 2018, 11:13:50 am
OwO


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 18, 2018, 01:56:15 pm
Damn, I did not expect this. Go Kennedy!
Also, both Rocky and RFK would do well to give Chase Smith a prominent administration role.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sentor MAINEiac4434 of Lincoln on February 18, 2018, 02:52:05 pm
KENNEDY FOR ME


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cold War Liberal on February 18, 2018, 03:38:53 pm
KENNEDY FOR ME


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on February 18, 2018, 07:22:28 pm
If I had to guess, California seems like the place to go more to Rockefeller (seeing as it was a more-often-than-not Republican state in those days), though I can see the Schmitz/John Birch types in Southern California detracting from crucial otherwise-Republican votes. In either case, I have no dog in this fight; if I know President Johnson (the poster), it'll be a Rockefeller win--particularly since the alternative is a resurgent conservatism that kinda sorta gets in the way of the title of this piece.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: El Bayamés on February 18, 2018, 10:36:56 pm
KENNEDY FOR ME


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on February 18, 2018, 10:39:03 pm
If I had to guess, California seems like the place to go more to Rockefeller (seeing as it was a more-often-than-not Republican state in those days), though I can see the Schmitz/John Birch types in Southern California detracting from crucial otherwise-Republican votes. In either case, I have no dog in this fight; if I know President Johnson (the poster), it'll be a Rockefeller win--particularly since the alternative is a resurgent conservatism that kinda sorta gets in the way of the title of this piece.


You could argue though California was Republican because of Nixon and Reagan (both being from CA ) .



1976 was due to Carter being a terrible fit for CA and 1988 was due to HW being VP of a popular president from CA


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 21, 2018, 03:51:10 pm
1.54 a.m.: PRESIDENT ROCKEFELLER! CALIFORNIA PUSHES ROCKY OVER THE TOP!


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★★★ BREAKING NEWS: California decides election in favor of Nelson Rockefeller! Bare majority in Golden State pushes Rockefeller/Ford ticket over the finish line with 275 electoral votes. Nelson Rockefeller elected president! ★★★


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WALTER CRONKITE: There we are! Deep into the night, with 99% of the votes reported in California, we have the final decision: According to our reports, Nelson Rockefeller edged out Robert Kennedy with a slim 42,000 vote margin, or a half percentage point. Take a look at the current vote count:

CALIFORNIA (99.2% reported)
✓ Nelson A. Rockefeller (R): 4,045,867 (48.74%)
Robert F. Kennedy (D): 4,003,533 (48.23%)
Lester G. Maddox (A): 222,464 (2.68%)


With less than 80,000 ballots left to be counted in California, it is hard to imagine where RFK could find these additional 42,000 votes he has to pick up to overcome his current deficit. Considering from which areas ballots are left to be included in the vote count, we actually expect Nelson Rockefeller to widen his lead by a few thousands votes. Now, therefore, with California being de facto decided, CBS is calling this presidential contest by adding 45 electoral votes to the Republican column, which finally adds up to 275. Ladies and Gentlemen, that means the following: Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller will become the 37th President of the United States of America on January 20, 1973, succeeding President Lyndon Baines Johnson. After twelve years of Democratic rule in the White House, Governor Rockefeller, who we now refer to as President-elect Rockefeller, has won back the Executive Mansion for the Republican Party. At his side, Gerald Rudolph Ford of Michigan will be serving as the 40th Vice President of the United States. The incoming Rockefeller/Ford Administration will face a lot of challenges, both at home and abroad. One of them will be a Democratic congress. We have to see how Nelson Rockefeller will operate as president with his pragmatic governance approach. It is likely that he will attempt to form voting coalitions of the center to get is agenda passed, with Vice President-elect Ford playing a key role at Capitol Hill. In foreign policy, we do not expect a major departure from the Johnson policies of détente. Henry Kissinger, a protégé of the president-elect, is almost certain to take a major role in the administration on foreign policy.

For Bobby Kennedy, this is the biggest defeat of his political career. And maybe the second-biggest defeat in his life, after the tragic loss of his brother nine years ago. Considering that he started off this campaign as the clear favorite to succeed his relatively popular boss in the Oval Office, the election loss is a disappointment for him. Although we knew the race would be close going into the final days, RFK was still expected edge out a narrow win, especially with the push Jimmy Carter gave him in the South. It remains to be seen what Robert Kennedy will do after January, when he will be a former vice president at the age of 47. Interestingly, he is of the same age than Richard Nixon in 1960, who was also defeated as sitting vice president trying to succeed his boss. Nixon attempted a comeback eight years later and failed. What will become of Bobby Kennedy - we don't know yet.

We also have first reliable numbers on the national popular vote. Nelson Rockefeller not just edges out an electoral college victory, he also wins the popular vote with around 47.5%. Robert Kennedy received just below 46% and Lester Maddox a little more than six percent. These numbers may change to some degree until all ballots are counted, but we do not expect larger deflections from this result. Currently, Rockefeller's advantage is a slightly over a million votes. Looking at the projections, we expect him to end up with about 1.4 or 1.5 million votes more than RFK. That is far less than in 1968, but a lot more than JFK's narrow win against Richard Nixon in 1960. This is the final map:


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✓ Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 275 EV. (~ 47.5%)
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 229 EV. (~ 45.8%)
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV. (~6.3%)


And I just got word that Nelson Rockefeller will address the nation in about ten minutes. News also broke that Vice President Kennedy has called the president-elect, but will officially concede the race tomorrow - or I should say today - morning. We come back after a short break. Stay with us.

[…]

We now turn to the Rockefeller Center in New York City, where thousands of cheering supporters wait for Rocky to address the nation. After many years, Nelson Rockefeller has finally fulfilled his dream of becoming president. And now, Gerald Ford is entering the hall and walking to the podium. Ladies and Gentlemen, the vice president-elect of the United States.

CROWD: Jerry! Jerry! Jerry!

VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT FORD: Thank you all! Thank you so much! That is a tremendous honor. Betty and I are so grateful for all the support and the love we received in the past months. Tonight, the American people made their voices heard. And they have elected a man as their leader, who will be compassioned in serving this great nation. I couldn’t be prouder to stand by his side in implementing an agenda for all the people. I also want to thank Vice President Kennedy and Governor Carter for the spirited campaign they ran. We will be looking forward to work with these two outstanding men and reach out to the millions who voted for them. Be assured, that a Rockefeller/Ford Administration will be the servant of all Americans and work hard to earn the trust of all the people! Now, please join me in welcoming the next president of the United States, please welcome Nelson Rockefeller!

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America’s new leadership duo: President-elect Nelson Rockefeller and Vice President-elect Gerald Ford at their victory celebration on election night


[Massive cheering, applause]

CROWD: Rocky! Rocky! Rocky! We want Rocky! We want Rocky!

PRESIDENT-ELECT ROCKEFELLER: Thank you very, very much! I thank you all from the bottom of my heart. First let me thank my friend Jerry for that magnificent introduction. I know you will be an outstanding vice president and true partner in guiding our nation.
Now… my fellow Americans: Thank you! Happy and I are deeply moved by the trust and confidence you have expressed tonight. I cannot tell you how grateful I am that you gave me the opportunity and the privilege to serve as your next president. Tonight, I want to thank all the millions who entrusted us with the awesome responsibility to lead the greatest country on planet earth as well as the many thousands of supporters and local organizers who made our victory possible. I also want to express my thanks and respect for all those citizens who did not vote for me, but participated in our democracy. To all of you, I say: Be assured, that I will work tirelessly to win your confidence and trust. I want to be the president of all Americans, working together with their congressional representatives of both parties to tackle our problems and make America a better place to live, to work and to prosper. Let us work together in a spirit of trust and mutual respect and a deep love for our wonderful land. To the world, I also have a message: America is and will always remain a force for peace and freedom. We do not seek to conquer or to dominate. We want peace and democracy. And: We are open for all those who want to come to America, live the American dream, contribute to and be part of our society. To our adversaries, I say: America does not want to be your enemy. We want a stable world and the self-determination of free people. We seek dialogue, not conflict. That does not mean we shrink from defending our allies and our values. But I am confident we can work out differences peacefully.
Let me now extend my profound respect for Vice President Robert Kennedy and Governor Jimmy Carter for a spirited campaign, that inspired millions across America and beyond. The vice president just called me on the phone. He congratulated us and offered his full cooperation, what I thankfully accepted. I wished him personally all the best. Vice President Kennedy is a decent man and we all owe him a deep gratitude for all he has done to enrich America. I am sure that he has a great future ahead of him. I also received a call from President Johnson, who expressed his congratulations and offered his help in the transition phase. The president invited me to the White House on Friday. I look forward to work with this great man, who has served his country with extraordinary compassion, until the inauguration and beyond.
Today, we celebrate the victory of American democracy going into its bicentennial soon, but tomorrow we will go back to work. For you. The American people. Remember, this is all about you, not me. So, thank you again, good night, god bless you and may god bless the United States of America.



WALTER CRONKITE: That was live from New York City, the words of President-elect Rockefeller… a term I still have to get used to. To finish with a few personal words, I think this has been a moving and classy victory speech. I rarely saw a winner who spoke that friendly of his defeated opponent. At this late hour, we end our program and encourage you to tune in again soon. Thank you and good night.

NEXT: Bobby Kennedy's concession speech and the final state-by-state results


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: El Bayamés on February 21, 2018, 06:19:13 pm
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!! Bobby! :(


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: The Saint on February 22, 2018, 03:17:39 pm
YES NELSON WOOOOO LETS GOOOOOOOOOOOO


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 22, 2018, 04:45:39 pm
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on February 22, 2018, 06:50:22 pm
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 24, 2018, 06:34:58 am
November 8, 1972

Vice President Kennedy officially concedes presidential election

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As the final result was not known until two o’clock, Bobby Kennedy decided to deliver his concession speech the next morning after calling Nelson Rockefeller at night. He was introduced by his running mate Jimmy Carter, who thanked all supporters for their lasting support and called on Democrats to support the incoming administration. For Carter, the election was just a temporary loss: He could return to Georgia to continue his governorship, but already made his name well known nationally and proved his electability in the South and beyond.

CROWD: Kennedy! Kennedy! Bobby! Bobby! [Applause]

VICE PRESIDENT KENNEDY: Thank you my friends. I appreciate your warm welcome. Thank you Jimmy, for being an awesome running mate. I couldn’t be prouder of you all the people here who supported me long before I ran for the presidency and who worked their heart out for our mission. Thank you all again. Last night, I called Nelson Rockefeller and congratulated him on his election to the presidency. [CROWD interrupts: Nooooo!! ]. Please. Please. I know, this is a tough time for all of us. But a great character is not just shown in the joy of victory, but also – or even more – in the sorrow of defeat and in which manner we handle it. I am sad, but not bitter. The democratic process has worked its will. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose.
President-elect Rockefeller ran a positive campaign that rallied millions of Americans behind his cause and I expressed my respect for these Americans, who voted for him and Gerald Ford. I also offered him my full cooperation in the upcoming transition and beyond and expressed my hope, that he and Vice President-elect Ford will be successful in leading our nation. And I would urge each and every one of you to do likewise. Let us leave the division behind and unite as one country with equal rights and justice for all. And while I proposed different policies, I am not worried over the general course of America. Nelson Rockefeller has long served his country and the state of New York. There is no question about his qualifications and personal integrity to be our commander-in-chief. He is a good man.
Finally, I also want to express my thanks to President Lyndon Johnson for giving me the opportunity to serve at his side over the last four years as vice president and for his help on the campaign trail. And let me also thank all of you again. I will never forget how whole-hearted you have supported me over the years. Ethel and I will always be thankful to you. Please never forget: Our mission goes on! It goes on with you out there. Thank you again, god bless you, and god bless America.


The vice president’s campaign confirmed reports the next day that he visited President-elect Rockefeller at his New York office to congratulate him in person on the afternoon of November 8. Rockefeller’s office also confirmed the meeting and described the conversation as “very friendly and productive”.


President Johnson addresses the nation on election outcome

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President Lyndon B. Johnson chats with reporters at his Texas Ranch after commenting the election outcome in public


At his Texas ranch, President Lyndon B. Johnson went before the cameras to address the nation.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen here at the LBJ Ranch and my fellow countrymen: Yesterday, Americans have elected a new president in fair, secret and free elections. As soon as the election outcome was determined, I phoned President-elect Nelson Rockefeller and congratulated him and Vice President-elect Gerald R. Ford on a compassionate campaign and their victory. I look forward in working with Governor Rockefeller and invited him to the Executive Mansion coming Friday to discuss the transition that will take place in the next two months. I expect this to be a very smooth transformation of power. I have already instructed my staff and cabinet to prepare for this phase and reach out to his team, which will be organized as I speak to you. Americans can be certain the federal government functions at any time.
Having known President-elect Rockefeller for many years, I can assure the American people that the United States will be in good hands when he takes office in January of 1973. The first priority of my administration is now to ensure the incoming president has a good start and I sincerely hope you bestow your trust and confidence to President-elect Rockefeller, as needs it to lead this country with success. Let us also thank Vice President Bobby Kennedy for his outstanding service to our nation and his deep devotion for the cause of a better America. I am proud to have served with him and I wish him and his family personally and politically all the best. The same is true for Governor Carter, who, I am sure, will remain a passionate voice for our policies and I will always support him in this cause.
Thank you for your attention, and god bless America.


The president would return to Washington the next day and prepare for the transition and the final two months of his nine year presidency. As political observers noted in their writings, LBJ looked old and less vital than in the early years of his administration. Although he was at the same age than the incoming president (both 64), nine long years at the biggest job in the world and a near-deadly heart-attack had a price.


Press voices

As the press commented President Johnson's appearance, it was no secret that LBJ felt comfortable about his designated successor, who would not be an essential treat to his Great Society. The concern his legacy could be ripped apart died the day Nelson Rockefeller defeated Ronald Reagan for the Republican nomination. And possibly the Rockefeller victory ensures that the Gipper may never be president: Had RFK won, Reagan would have been the frontrunner for 1976 and thrown the liberal GOP wing into disarray. After the humiliating defeat in 1964, the liberal wing of the Republican Party now seemed stronger than at any time of the past two decades with their leader sitting in the White House soon. Now it remains to be seen how Nelson Rockefeller puts his administration together. He is likely to put leading liberals of his party such as George Romney in charge of important posts, but at some point he has to reach out to the conservatives. It also remains to be seen who will lead the Democratic Party into the next years now that both President Johnson and Vice President Kennedy will be out of office soon. It is possible that Hubert Humphrey emerges as the de-facto Democratic leader. Other names are Albert Brewer and Jimmy Carter, who represent a new and more liberal generation of southern Democrats. Some obeservers already wrote that the outcome of the 1972 presidential election may be one of the most consequential in the 20th century despite the fact that both major nominees had more in common politically than in many previous match-ups.


★★★ The full election results ★★★

Infobox

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Results by state

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Maps and graphs

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✓ Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller (R-NY)/Representative Gerald R. Ford (R-MI): 275 EV. (47.71%)
Vice President Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Governor James E. Carter (D-GA): 229 EV. (45.63%)
Former Governor Lester G. Maddox (A-GA)/Businessman George P. Mahoney (A-MD): 34 EV. (6.14%)

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Miscellanea

- With the passage of the 26th Amendment in 1971, this was the first election 18-21 year olds voted in a presidential election. Robert Kennedy won among this group 53% to 44%.
- Lester Maddox won 34 electoral votes, more than any other third-party candidate since Strom Thurmond in 1948 (who got 39). He also won more votes (6.1%) than any third-party contender since 1912.
- At 64 years, Nelson Rockefeller became the oldest first-time elected president since 1856.
- For the first time since 1876, a president has been elected who shares the same year of birth than his predecessor, as both Johnson and Rockefeller were born in 1908.
- The winner’s electoral vote share (275; or 51.1%) was smallest since 1876.
- Nelson Rockefeller won 21% of the black vote, the most for a Republican since Richard Nixon in 1960.
- While the losing ticket won the homestates of both nominees (New York and Georgia), the winning ticket did neither, as New York and Michigan voted not for Nelson Rockefeller and Gerald Ford.
- Nelson Rockefeller will become the wealthiest president upon his inauguration, surpassing John F. Kennedy. He will also become the first divorced and re-married president.
- As Democrats control congress, Nelson Rockefeller will become the first president who enters office without having a congressional majority for his party in either house since Andrew Johnson in 1865.


Senate results

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Dark red/blue = Democratic/Republican hold
Light red/blue = Democratic/Republican gain
Grey = No senate election in 1972



52 Democratic (net change (
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) -1 seat), 46 Republican (net change: (
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) +1 seat), 1 Conservative (net change: (
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) no change), 1 Independent Democrat (net change: (
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) no change)

Democratic gains: DE, ME, SD
Republican gains: NM, NC, OK, VA


House of Representatives

227 Democratic (net change (
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) -6 seats); 208 Republican (net change: (
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) +6 seats)


Congressional Leadership will be listed when the new congress assembles in January 1973.


Writer's note: The total numbers cast per state are real 1972 numbers, while the percentages are TL results. Next: The presidential transition and Nelson Rockefeller's cabinet selections!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 25, 2018, 03:49:27 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on February 25, 2018, 04:06:08 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.


I would say more of a John Kasich with Charisma(Remember Kasich was considered pretty conservative when he was in Congress, now he is considered a moderate).


I would say he could do well in the GOP primary for these reasons: He was very charismatic, he was very good of appealing to conservative and moderate voters without looking like a flip-flopper, and he probably would get a lot of support from the establishment.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 25, 2018, 04:12:34 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.


I would say more of a John Kasich with Charisma(Remember Kasich was considered pretty conservative when he was in Congress, now he is considered a moderate).


I would say he could do well in the GOP primary for these reasons: He was very charismatic, he was very good of appealing to conservative and moderate voters without looking like a flip-flopper, and he probably would get a lot of support from the establishment.

Maybe the GOP has moved so far right than Kasich or even Reagan look so moderate now. I'd actually find Kasich to be more of a Gerald Ford for his kindness and moderate views (though was actually more of a centrist and as far as I remember, Kasich once said he supported Reagan in 1976). Reagan would certainly do better than Jeb or Rubio, but I'm not sure he could beat Donald Trump.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 25, 2018, 04:16:28 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.

Hm, that might be the way we see him today, but Reagan did move the Republican party far to the right and basically erased the Rockfeller Republicans from existence. He's the founder of modern-day Republicanism, all of them are in his mold in the end. So without a President Reagan, I believe that we'd have a very different Republican party.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on February 25, 2018, 04:23:47 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.


I would say more of a John Kasich with Charisma(Remember Kasich was considered pretty conservative when he was in Congress, now he is considered a moderate).


I would say he could do well in the GOP primary for these reasons: He was very charismatic, he was very good of appealing to conservative and moderate voters without looking like a flip-flopper, and he probably would get a lot of support from the establishment.

Maybe the GOP has moved so far right than Kasich or even Reagan look so moderate now. I'd actually find Kasich to be more of a Gerald Ford for his kindness and moderate views (though was actually more of a centrist and as far as I remember, Kasich once said he supported Reagan in 1976). Reagan would certainly do better than Jeb or Rubio, but I'm not sure he could beat Donald Trump.

It really depends on how large the field is . If its 1 on 1 vs him and Trump from the beginning he can win as he can win IA ,SC, and NV(Reagan being from the West will help him win this state) and use that momentum to cruise towards the nomination, but if he has to go through a 17 candidate field he wont win.


The problem is this should have been the establishment's strategy from around late October 2015 if they wanted to stop Trump:


Support Cruz in IA(Yes Cruz is terrible but IA was really only going to be won by either him or Trump)
Support Kaisch in NH
Support Rubio in SC and NV

Then with Trump loses in each of the first four primaries he doesnt have any momentum going into super tuesday and its a race between Kasich, Cruz , Rubio for the nomiantion.  Instead they backed Jeb all the way until it was too late(Like after SC).


I would say the Establishment's arrogrance with trying to crown Jeb is a huge part what led to Trump.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Old School Republican on February 25, 2018, 04:35:02 am
This was great! Might even be for the best- without Watergate and Reagan, perhaps the era of polarization will never come in the intensity we're seeing today.
Rocky '76, RFK '80, RFK '84! :P

if you want to stop that , have some other GOP congressman become the Speaker of the House in the mid 1990s.


Agreed, though Reagan laid the ideological groundwork and moved the party to the right on many issues. But he understood how to make deals with Democrats and hold common-sense positions on some other topics (like gun control) and was pretty liberal in immigration. With this stance, he'd likely perform poorly in today's Republican Party (Reagan is actually some Jeff Flake with more charisma).

Rocky 76 and then RFK seems likely at this moment of history, but I'd just like to remind that several leaders including presidents came out of nowhere within a short period of time. Who heard of Barack Obama in 2000 or Bill Clinton 1984 outside of their constituencies? However, it's weird or funny to think about RFK being a major figure in the 1980s.

Hm, that might be the way we see him today, but Reagan did move the Republican party far to the right and basically erased the Rockfeller Republicans from existence. He's the founder of modern-day Republicanism, all of them are in his mold in the end. So without a President Reagan, I believe that we'd have a very different Republican party.

No they are much more like Gingrich than Reagan. Reagan was bipartisan, believed in working with both sides and wasnt that culturally conservative.

The fact is in OTL  the Republican party moving towards Reaganism(on economic issues) was inevitable at some point. After FDR the GOP's old coalition completely crumbled(Due to the North East becoming Democratic ) and the GOP were in the wilderness for 36 years(Rockefeller Republicanism was basically the only way that they could win elections and thats why that wing was powerful). During this time the South West and the Suburban population was growing rapidly and they were getting pretty disillusioned with big government, high taxation, and powerful union politics which dominated during that era and by the late 1970s had grown too strong for the Rockefeller Republicans to stop.


Now in this TL things may change since Nixon does not win in 1968 (as that was the year things started to change not 1980)





Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 25, 2018, 05:26:36 am
The transition: From LBJ to Rocky

November 9, 1972: President-elect Rockefeller puts transition team together, names Gerald Ford its head

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Vice President-elect Gerald Ford has already been assigned to an important task: He will chair the transition of Team Rockefeller

Two days after his election, President-elect Nelson Rockefeller went to work to prepare for his presidency: He named Vice President-elect Gerald Ford to be the head of the transition team. Media observers described Ford’s selection for this important role as an indication that the president-elect intends to give his second-in-command a major role in his government similar to Lieutenant Governor Malcolm Wilson in New York state, who Governor Rockefeller gave important tasks to do as well. When asked about the assignment, the president-elect responded with a smile: "I haven't selected Jerry to be standby equipment and to go to funerals".

Other notable people of the Transition Team include Republicans across the spectrum: Ronald Reagan has been appointed vice chair and will oversee the schedule. Long-time Rockefeller advisor Henry Kissinger is also joining the team, heading the foreign policy group. For Kissinger, this is an easy task as he already worked for President Johnson and has contacts to foreign leaders. Soon after, rumors began swirl that he would become Secretary of State. The team also includes outgoing Senator Margret Chase-Smith (R-ME), Congressman Pete McCloskey (R-CA) and former vice president Richard Nixon. After being voted out in Maine, Chase-Smith is also seen as a likely appointee in the new administration. In addition, she would give Nelson Rockefeller the opportunity to put a woman in a high position, as he said he would do during the campaign.

Rocky also began organizing the transition in New York state, as he would turn the governorship over to Lieutenant Governor and personal friend Malcolm Wilson sometime in January.


November 10, 1972: President Johnson meets President-elect Rockefeller at the White House

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From one president to another: LBJ and Rocky speak at the White House transition meeting

Day three after the election: On this Friday, President Lyndon Johnson welcomed President-elect Nelson Rockefeller to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue for a first meeting. The two men spoke for more than three hours and had lunch together. It was well known and visible that both men had not just a mutual respect for each other, both shared a similar view on government activism to improve life conditions. Both men also did not attack each other during the campaign, although LBJ was on RFK’s side and made speeches for his vice president. Vice President Kennedy and his designated successor Gerald Ford also had a transition meeting and joined the two presidents at lunch. As White House insiders said, the mood at lunch was very friendly and positive. Other notable people from both sides met as well. Henry Kissinger sat down with Secretary of State Katzenbach to discuss foreign affairs and a new round of negotiations with the Soviets.

At the end of their meeting, President Johnson and President-elect Rockefeller just gave a brief statement and praised each other (the press was mainly excluded except for the final statement). LBJ remarked the two would meet again very soon. Rocky added that he’s looking forward to consult with his predecessor frequently during his presidency and listen to the advice of the nation’s 36th president, who sat for nine years in the chief executive’s chair. "We won't find another individual other than Lyndon in our lifetimes who hold the job for over nine years. I look forward to get his opinions on a broad range of issues", the incoming president commented.

Later that day, President-elect Rockefeller met with congressional leaders for dinner to discuss the agenda of his first months in office. Senator Hubert Humphrey, who also participated, spoke of “very productive talks” with the incoming president and his deputy.


November 14, 1972: George McGovern slams Lester Maddox for RFK’s loss

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Senator McGovern: Lester Maddox is to blame for RFK's narrow defeat

It had been remarkably quiet among leading Democrats since election day, but a week after voters cast their ballots, Senator and former presidential candidate George McGovern (D-SD) slammed Lester Maddox for Bobby Kennedy’s narrow defeat. “Had Maddox not entered the race, RFK would be president-elect now. I hope we learn our lesson”, the senator with own presidential ambitions said. Most other leading Democrats declined to comment. And Hubert Humphrey remarked: "My focus is on the future and not discussions what might have been. That doesn't help a single American".


November 21, 1972: President-elect Rockefeller announces first cabinet nominations, Agnew to become Attorney General

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Left to right: Spiro Agnew, nominated for Attorney General; Thomas Kuchel, choice for Labor Secretary and John Anderson, nominee for Secretary of Agriculture

Exactly two weeks after his victory, President-elect Rockefeller announces his first cabinet picks: Spiro Agnew will join the administration as Attorney General. The Maryland governor and unsuccessful presidential candidate has accepted the offer to come to Washington and serve in the administration. As governor and during his campaign for the GOP nomination, Agnew presented himself as a staunch supporter of law-and-order policies but with a commitment to civil rights. Press observers described the selection as well taken, as Agnew was appealing to more conservative Republicans and voters, but not alienating Rockefeller's base of support from pro-civil rights groups. In a statement, Agnew said he was "deeply honored for this opportunity" and that he wants to serve the cause of "civil liberty and equal justice under law for everybody with no tolerance for violent criminals."

The president-elect’s office announced two more nominations: Former California Senator Thomas Kuchel, a liberal Republican, will head the Labor Department. President-elect Rockefeller and Senator Kuchel have a lot in common politically. Rocky noted that he will be a "champion for worker's rights". In addition, former Kansas Governor John Anderson has been selected to be Secretary of Agriculture. The Los Angeles Times already noted that Nelson Rockefeller apparently has a preference for governors to serve in his administration, as they are more familiar with running a government bureaucracy. Having been a governor himself, he obviously prefers to surround himself with people of similar experiences.


November 24, 1972: John Connally nominated for Secretary of Commerce

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Once a Texas Democrat, now a moderate Republican: Former Governor John Connally will join the Rockefeller Administration and be the head of the Commerce Department

Another important cabinet decision was made public this Friday: Former Texas governor and Navy Secretary (under JFK) John Connally, a personal friend of President Johnson, joins the Rockefeller Administration as Secretary of Commerce. Connally supported Rocky early on during the campaign and recently switched his party affiliation from Democratic to Republican. Now his loyalty gets rewarded and a native Texan a place in the new administration.


November 28, 1972: John B. Anderson tapped as White House Chief of Staff

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Representative John B. Anderson is set to become White House Chief of Staff, making him a key figure in the new president's team

And another John Anderson for Rocky: Congressman John B. Anderson of Illinois, a liberal Republican, received the nomination for the role as White House Chief of Staff. The 50 year old congressman, at Capitol Hill since 1961, has been involved in the transition team and actively supported the Rockefeller campaign. Although some conservative Republicans were skeptical behind closed doors, the president-elect’s confidence gave Anderson the job as head of the White House staff and key policy maker in the Executive Mansion. Anderson himself apparently did not expect the opportunity and said: “I am deeply thankful for the confidence President-elect Rockefeller has put in me. I look forward to assist our next president in leading America and do everything I can to contribute to the success of this administration”. Reports indicated that Vice President-elect Gerald Ford presented the choice, a fellow congressman from the mid-west, to his new boss. The incoming chief executive obviously very much liked "that fellow from Illinois" [as Rocky reportedly responded to the suggestion].


November 30, 1972: New polls! Released by Gallup

With his presidency nearing an end, President Johnson improves his standing among voters once again. A majority also thinks that his tenure was a overall success. Both Vice President Kennedy and President-elect Rockefeller get high grades as well. The American people obviously responded positively to Nelson Rockefeller's post-election message and are willing to give their new leader their trust.

President Johnson job approval
Approve: 60%
Disapprove: 36%


Questions

Q: No matter how you voted, do you feel that President-elect Rockefeller cares for you?
Yes: 78%
No: 16%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove President-elect Rockefeller's performance so far?
Approve: 83%
No: 11%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove how Vice President Kennedy handled his defeat?
Approve: 85%
No: 7%

Q: Do you regard Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency as a overall success?
Yes: 63%
No: 30%

Q: Which issue should President-elect Rockefeller give the highest priority after his swearing-in? [name one]
World peace: 28%
The economy: 19%
Civil Rights: 12%
Taxes: 10%
Infrastructure: 7%
The environment: 6%
Energy: 5%
Education: 3%
Government ethics: 2%
Others: 9%


Opinion of leading politicans

President Lyndon B. Johnson
Favorable: 59%
Unfavorable: 37%
No opinion/never heard of: 4%

Vice President Robert F. Kennedy
Favorable: 63%
Unfavorable: 34%
No opinion/never heard of: 3%

President-elect Nelson Rockefeller
Favorable: 65%
Unfavorable: 30%
No opinion/never heard of: 5%

Vice President-elect Gerald Ford
Favorable: 54%
Unfavorable: 27%
No opinion/never heard of: 19%

Secretary of State Nicholas Katzenbach
Favorable: 65%
Unfavorable: 33%
No opinion/never heard of: 7%

Senator Hubert Humphrey
Favorable: 55%
Unfavorable: 39%
No opinion/never heard of: 6%

Former Governor George Wallace
Favorable: 43%
Unfavorable: 40%
No opinion/never heard of: 17%

Former Governor Lester Maddox
Favorable: 30%
Unfavorable: 56%
No opinion/never heard of: 14%

Governor Ronald Reagan
Favorable: 52%
Unfavorable: 38%
No opinion/never heard of: 10%

Governor Jimmy Carter
Favorable: 50%
Unfavorable: 26%
No opinion/never heard of: 24%

Governor Albert Brewer
Favorable: 44%
Unfavorable: 21%
No opinion/never heard of: 35%

Governor Spiro Agnew
Favorable: 49%
Unfavorable: 35%
No opinion/never heard of: 16%

Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield
Favorable: 40%
Unfavorable: 29%
No opinion/never heard of: 31%

Senate Minority Hugh Scott
Favorable: 35%
Unfavorable: 22%
No opinion/never heard of: 43%

House Speaker Carl Albert
Favorable: 40%
Unfavorable: 27%
No opinion/never heard of: 33%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on February 25, 2018, 10:56:41 am
Nice! Many of the choices are great.
Also, hm, Agnew... Looks like the first scandal of the new administration has been set in motion :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on February 25, 2018, 12:21:06 pm
I'll be honest, the Agnew and (Bayard) Anderson picks seem strange to me--Treasury seems like the type of thing to generally be the province of former federal reserve leaders or whose who work in finance. I would assume that a New York loyalist would, meanwhile, be leading the Rockefeller White House. I believe Agnew's experience makes him more of an Attorney General type of candidate--he has legal credentials and would help to round out Rockefeller's "law and order" stance. In such a position, I could see him as being a sort of comic attack dog for the administration, helping to draw heat for more conservative policies while at the same time earning the adoration of "silent majority" types.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on February 26, 2018, 10:44:04 am
Fine updates! Both Rockefeller and RFK delivered very classy speeches after the election. Although RFK was my choice, Rockefeller would have my support as prez. So far mostly good appointments, except for the dude who later turned to be corrupt.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on February 28, 2018, 03:12:16 pm
December 4, 1972: President-elect Rockefeller makes key nominations on foreign and defense policy: Romney heads to the Pentagon, Kissinger for National Security Advisor, Scranton for UN Ambassador

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Left to right: George Romney has been picked as Secretary of Defense; Henry Kissinger will become National Security Advisor and Bill Scranton America's voice at the UN

Monday, December 4 saw major nominations for President-elect Rockefeller’s foreign and defense policy team: Long-time supporter and fellow liberal Republican George Romney, the former Michigan governor, will take over the job as Secretary of Defense. With the appointment, Mr. Romney reenters the political arena after being out of public office for two years. His nomination to a top job itself is hardly a surprise, though observers expected the 65 year old ex-governor to go to the State or Treasury Department instead. The selection is also interesting because then-Governor Romney made a heavy blunder during his brief 1968 presidential campaign by admitting the military had once “brainwashed” him. When asked about the issue from five years ago, President-elect Rockefeller spoke of “yesterday’s news” that should not be “over interpreted” for “poor wording”. Instead, he praised Romney’s leadership skills: “Governor Romney has been a businessman and successful governor. He has the capacity to lead a bureaucracy such as the Pentagon effectively. My goal is to have a very strong military but streamline processes inside the department, so that we deliver the best national defense with the lowest possible burden for taxpayers. A competent team of military experts around outgoing Secretary Clark Clifford will remain in place. I have full confidence in George and the employees of the Pentagon to manage this task and oversee the final end of the draft.”

Another important nomination was no surprise either: Henry Kissinger will play a key role in foreign policy in the new administration. The Rockefeller protégé and foreign policy expert, who also worked for President Johnson from 1969 to 1971, has been assigned to the role of National Security Advisor. That means he'll be in the West Wing and directly report to the president. Mr. Kissinger stands for some continuity in foreign affairs and is staunch supporter of a détente policy toward the USSR and Red China. Political observers suggested he may become Secretary of State before the announcement was made.

The post of the UN Ambassador has gained more stature in recent years, so that this nomination received some attention as well. Although being a loyal Rockefeller supporter and member of the transition, former Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton wasn’t on anybody’s shortlist for the Ambassadorship. Nevertheless, he accepted President-elect Rockefeller’s offer to take the job. Scranton has no foreign policy experience, but Nelson Rockefeller praised his “negotiating skills and a deep knowledge of world affairs.”


Who will be Secretary of State? Is the Gipper in play?

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Will Ronald Reagan become Secretary of State? Some observers raised this possibility

Kissinger out for Secretary of State… now what? That was the biggest question in Washington following the latest series of announcements by the president-elect’s office. Who would receive the nomination for the de-facto highest ranking cabinet position in Nelson Rockefeller’s Administration? Rumors were around since the election, but now more and more observers raised the question whether Ronald Reagan was a serious option for the State Department? Various reports, citing insider information, claimed the California governor and runner-up for the Republican nomination was under consideration by President-elect Rockefeller and his inner circle. He wouldn't be the first unsucessful candidate to take over the job as America's top-diplomat (a prime example is William H. Seward in President Lincoln's administration).

Originally the Gipper ruled out to join a Rockefeller Administration, but might he change his mind? His second term as governor will expire in early 1975 and so far he has sent no signals for a third term run. By taking the role as Secretary of State, Reagan could gain more credentials on foreign policy what would be beneficial for another presidential run in the future. The position would also allow him to remain a key player at the national stage for the next years. On the other hand, the Gipper would be required to implement Rocky's foreign policy. Especially with regard to détente and Latin America policy, there are differences which shouldn't be underestimated. And between the president himself and Henry Kissinger making foreign policy at the White House, the Secretary of State's role might be marginalized. For Nelson Rockefeller, there were ups and downs as well. On the one hand, he would have more control over his top rival within the party and get him out of domestic policy, on the other hand, he might prefer a loyalist at the State Department who shares more of his views in foreign affairs. In the end, it was both a chance and a risk for either side.

The president-elect's office, on December 9, announced that the final pick is likely to be made public between Christmas and New Year's Eve.


December 12, 1972: Mike Mansfield to step down as Senate Majority leader, Hubert Humphrey set to take position

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Senator Mike Mansfield (D-MT) surprisingly announced that he wants to step down as Democratic leader in the senate. Senator Hubert Humphrey (D-MN) has been designated to take over that powerful role

In the midst of all the discussions and speculation around the Rockefeller Administration’s formation, there is going to be a significant change on the Democratic side, too: Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield, leading his caucus since LBJ left congress in early 1961, announced he would step down as Democratic senate leader coming January. At a press gathering, he said: “In these changing times, I believe it serves our party, and more importantly the nation best, to turn over this position to a new leader. I want to suggest my dear colleague and friend Hubert Humphrey for the position. Hubert has the experience and passion to lead our caucus effectively. I am proud to have served for twelve years as Majority Leader and I enjoyed every minute of it. I will continue to represent the people of the great state of Montana and be available for any task or advice I am asked for by my party. Thank you very much.”

The move by Senator Mansfield came unexpectedly for the public. Even as he was turning 70 the next year, the political veteran from Montana made a very vital impression, though he was never a great showman and preferred working in the background. The selection of Hubert Humphrey, who was the sole candidate for the job, was well received among Democrats in congress and at the base. In addition, the two outgoing party leaders LBJ and RFK backed Humphrey for Majority Leader. The former vice president and passionate liberal warrior, who reentered the senate in 1971, was overshadowed by Bobby Kennedy in the last months after losing the Democratic nomination to the charismatic vice president. Before, he was also overshadowed by President Johnson’s dominance in the government apparatus. Now that LBJ would be gone and RFK was set leave the national stage as well – at least temporarily – Democrats looked for a new leader in the upcoming Rockefeller years. Humphrey seemingly was their man. Someone who was standing up for his cause, but also somebody, with whom future President Rockefeller could find common ground and build a personal relationship to get things done. They undeniably needed each other in the next years.


December 19, 1972: President-elect Rockefeller makes more cabinet nominations; Chase-Smith to become HHS Secretary, two more governors named

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Left to right: Margaret Chase-Smith for HHS Secretary; Walter R. Peterson is set to become Transportation Secretary and John Arthur Love will head the Interior Department

As Christmas neared, President-elect Rockefeller and his team announced more cabinet appointments. As expected, outgoing Maine Senator Margaret Chase-Smith, a moderate and the first woman elected to the senate, will become a member of the administration. She accepted Nelson Rockefeller's offer to take over the Department of Health and Human Services. Chase-Smith remarked that she is "excited to serve the 37th President of the United States in delivering results for the American people." The selection was well received among members of congress from both parties and the press.

The nomination for Secretary of Transportation went to another New England officeholder who just lost reelection: Outgoing New Hampshire governor Walter R. Peterson was ultimately selected for the post. Insiders reported that Nelson Rockefeller also considered Congressman Barry Goldwater Jr., son of Barry Goldwater and member of the House Transportation Committee, to appease the conservative wing, but negotiations in the end failed (publically this was denied).

And one more pick was made public that day: Secretary of the Interior would be outgoing Colorado governor John Arthur Love. Like previous Interior secretaries, the nomination went to a westerner this time as well.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Jaguar4life on February 28, 2018, 06:32:36 pm
Please let Ronnie Raygun be Secretary Of State.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 02, 2018, 01:32:35 pm
I'll be honest, the Agnew and (Bayard) Anderson picks seem strange to me--Treasury seems like the type of thing to generally be the province of former federal reserve leaders or whose who work in finance. I would assume that a New York loyalist would, meanwhile, be leading the Rockefeller White House. I believe Agnew's experience makes him more of an Attorney General type of candidate--he has legal credentials and would help to round out Rockefeller's "law and order" stance. In such a position, I could see him as being a sort of comic attack dog for the administration, helping to draw heat for more conservative policies while at the same time earning the adoration of "silent majority" types.

Well, I first thought about Agnew being AG, but you're right, that position fits him better. I didn't pick him in the first place since I had somebody else in mind, but that one might enter the stage later following Agnew. After some consideration, I edited the post and gave him the Justice Dept. instead of Treasury. A replacement here will be announced later on :P


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Alt-Male on March 02, 2018, 01:57:17 pm
>Helms still wins

God damn it.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on March 03, 2018, 04:45:44 am
Awh, was hoping Smith or Romney would get the State Department. Hoping it won't be Reagan.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 03, 2018, 07:16:30 am
December 30, 1972: Secretary of State pick announced at press conference: It's Richard Nixon!

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Former Vice President Richard Nixon speaks as President-elect Rockefeller introduced him as nominee for Secretary of State.


Bombshell in Washington! This morning, President-elect Rockefeller, joined by Vice President-elect Ford, went before the press to introduce his selection for Secretary of State. Afterwards, reporters were permitted to ask questions. A stunning move!

PRESIDENT-ELECT ROCKEFELLER: Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen, distinguished members of the press and my fellow Americans: Today I am delighted to present to you the man who I will nominate for the office of Secretary of State. After careful consideration and examination with my team, I have decided to offer the position to former vice president Richard Nixon. Yesterday, Mr. Nixon has accepted to serve as America’s chief diplomat in the Rockefeller/Ford Administration. Vice President Nixon brings a long experience in foreign affairs and a profound knowledge world affairs to the table and is, as I have determined, excellently qualified to be the head of the State Department. He will closely work with the president, the incoming White House staff and Doctor Kissinger to ensure that America will stand tall in the world by granting world peace and stability. Now, please come on stage, Dick, and say a few words, before we are taking some questions. Thank you all.

RICHARD NIXON: Thank you, my friends. Ladies and Gentlemen, I am deeply honored to stand before you this morning as the nominee for Secretary of State. I am deeply grateful for the trust President-elect Nelson Rockefeller has placed in me. I look forward in working with the new president, his whole team, the cabinet and the congress to the benefit of our great nation. I look forward to meet with senators from both sides of the aisle in the coming days to discuss the confirmation process and America’s role in the world. I will also meet with Secretary Katzenbach and his staff later today to ensure a swift transition at the State Department. Every American should know that the whole Rockefeller team, including myself, is taking this responsibity seriously. So, thank you again and now we are ready to take any questions.


REPORTER I: Mr. Nixon, did you expect to be offered this position? I mean, you were engaged in the campaign for President-elect Rockefeller. Is this the reward?

RICHARD NIXON: No, believe it or not, I have not anticipated any job offer and didn't ask for it. The only thing I told the president-elect on November the eight is that I would be open to give any advice he needs and that I want to be helpful in the transition wherever I can. Keep in mind that any former presidential candidate has not just friends in Washington [laughther goes through the room] , and nevertheless, the president-elect has decided to stick with me anyway. I appreciate that very much and will work hard to earn the trust of the senate, the American people and - later on - foreign leaders to advance the American cause.


REPORTER II: My question goes to President-elect Rockefeller: Sir, although Mr. Nixon has been cleared of any missdoings in the 1968 election, don't you find the nomination poses a risk for your incoming administration? I am referring to the Chennault case, of course. It is not hard to imigine that any new administration has more important tasks to do rather than to fight for senate confirmation of the Secretary of State candidate? Or what is your stance on that, Sir?

PRESIDENT-ELECT ROCKEFELLER: No, I don't regard this as a problem. As you said, Dick has been cleared of any charges and missbehavior. It may have been a mistake to employ certain individuals in retrospect, but we all do mistakes. Don't expect me to be a perfect president. I won't be one and never said I would be. Nobody ever will. The job of the senate members in this process is to evaluate, independently, whether Richard Milhous Nixon is fit to serve as Secretary of State. Whether he has the knowledge, the compassion and the competence to be America's voice in the world and lead the State Department bureuacracy effectively. I have the believe that he is uniquely qualified to take over this job. I expect the senate to approve the nomination very quickly after the inauguration, as Dick will soon meet with senators for direct conversations. He will be avaiable for any questions to our senators.


REPORTER III: I have one more question for Mr. Nixon. Mr. Nixon, how do you regard your role in the administration if confirmed? What do you stand for?

RICHARD NIXON: My role will be to implement President-elect Rockefeller's policies and advise him on all questions on foreign affairs. I want to make sure that America stands for freedom and democracy in the world and be a champion for peace. I look forward to continue talks with our allies in particular, Moscow, Beijing and others as well. We want partnership and stability with everyone. But not at any price, we are also determined to fight for our cause where necessary. Thank you.

PRESIDENT-ELECT ROCKEFELLER: Thank you guys. Have a nice day.


Mixed reactions

Congressional Republicans mainly praised Richard Nixon's selection as Secretary of State, though the conservatives hoped for Ronald Reagan's nomination. Incoming Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey said he has some questions for Richard Nixon on a wide range of issues, including his "integrity to serve". However, he emphasized to be open-minded and is scheduled to meet with Nixon in person on January 2. Pacifist Senator George McGovern (D-SD) already said he would vote against Nixon's confirmation. Immediately after, Attorney General nominee Spiro Agnew already stroke back when he accused McGovern of "ideological obstructionism."

The U.S. press was divided on the nomination. The Washington Post titled that "Tricky Dick is back on stage" and described his nomination as "risky", while others pointed out that Richard Nixon had a lot of credentials on foreign policy. It was also noted that with Nixon, Romney, Kissinger and Scranton in charge of foreign policy, the administration was expected to speak with one voice. The Chicago Tribune wrote: "Richard Nixon will not just be a stronger Secretary of State than Ronald Reagan because he has far more foreign policy expertise, but also because every foreign leader can be certain that he speaks for President Rockefeller. With Reagan, that would have been questionable, since both stand for very different policy approaches. That would have weakened his [Reagan's] position. Dick Nixon is more in line with the detente policy on one hand, and on the other hand he can't be accused for being weak on communism either. His nomination may be a little controversial given his past, but overall he is a very bold and strong choice."

The international press was mainly positive, pointing out that Nixon not just stands for some continuity, but that he is also a rational and professional choice.


Insiders: Reagan not picked for differences on Latin America

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It didn't take long for reports to come out why Ronald Reagan was snubbed, after indications strongly pointed in the direction that he would be picked over the last few days. On December 31, the New York Times wrote that not detente in general, military spending or Vietnam are responsible for the decision to chose Nixon. It was Latin America policy. President-elect Rockefeller, who is very interested in the region since he served as Latin America coordinator under President Franklin Roosevelt, is committed to be actively engaged in Middle America. He favors negotiations to give the Panama Canal back to Panama. President Johnson already indicated this was a serious option after a diplomatic crisis in early 1964. Since then, a majority of Democrats and moderate/liberal Republicans are in favor of such negotiations, while conservatives like Barry Goldwater strongly oppose such a move. They regard it as a "give-away", pointing out that United States built and paid for the important waterway. Accordingly, President-elect Rockefeller decided to offer the nomination to someone supportive of the negotiations. Finding that Richard Nixon has similar views on foreign policy and his deep interest in world affairs ultimately brought him the job. Nixon was also very loyal to Rocky on the campaign trail and the key player in securing the Republican nomination on the convention floor. Out of office since 1961 and following two unsuccessful bids for the White House, the nomination was a perfect opportunity for Nixon to get back on stage. Nelson Rockefeller for his part seemed ready to take the risk that the nomination might pose on Capitol Hill. Nevertheless, political observers are quite confident that Nixon will win confirmation easily with few more nay-votes than usual.


January 3, 1973: 93rd Congress convenes, certifies electoral college results and elects three new leaders

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Congressman John Jacob Rhodes of Arizona has been elected House Republican Leader to replace Vice President-elect Gerald Ford

On Wednesday, January 3, the 93rd Congress assembled for the first time. The first action was confirm the electoral college results from the November presidential election that were sent to Washington after the members of the Electoral College from each state cast their ballots in December. Outgoing Vice President Robert Kennedy, in his role as senate president, had the "painful duty" to certify and announce the final results. There were no unfaithful electors on either side and the Rockefeller/Ford ticket was now formally elected with 275 electoral votes.

On both sides, new leaders also had to be elected. The Democrats chose Hubert Humphrey as Senate Majority Leader to succeed Mike Mansfield with only one vote against. In the House, Democrats also had to pick a new Majority Leader after the death of Hale Boggs in the previous fall. The post went to Tip O'Neill from Massachusetts, who would be the second most powerful Democrat in the House after Speaker Carl Albert of Oklahoma. The House Republicans elected John Jacob Rhodes of Arizona to replace Vice President-elect Gerald Ford, who resigned his seat the next day, as their leader.


Congressional Leadership:
Senate President: Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY) (until January 20, 1973), Gerald R. Ford (R-MI) (starting January 20, 1973)
Senate Majority Leader: Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN)
Senate Minority Leader: Hugh Scott (R-PA)

Speaker of the House: Carl Albert (D-OK)
House Majority Leader: Tip O’Neill (D-MA) (replacing deceased Hale Boggs)
House Minority Leader: Gerald R. Ford (R-MI) (until January 4, 1973), John Jacob Rhodes (R-AZ) (starting January 5, 1973)



NEXT: Completion of the Rockefeller Administration and President Lyndon Johnson's farewell address. Stay tuned!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Cath on March 03, 2018, 08:20:15 am
Nixon ‘80.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 04, 2018, 05:25:54 am
January 6, 1973: President Johnson issues hundreds of pardons; grants clemency to Haldeman and Ehrlichman, expels Chennault

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On January 6, 1973, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed hundreds of pardons as one of his last acts in office. He granted clemency to a selected group of draft dodgers (an issue that is still unsolved overall), non-violent drug offenders in the U.S. Army and other individuals imprisoned for misbehavior in public offices.

Former Nixon campaign aides H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman were found guilty of attempting to sabotage the Vietnam peace talks in 1970 and subsequently went to prison. Co-conspirator and contactperson to the South Vietnamese government Anna Chennault was also sentenced to prison. President Lyndon Johnson now decided to grant an executive pardon that allows Haldeman and Ehrlichman to be released from prison by April this year. Chennault was also pardoned but is, under the president's order, required to leave the United States within 60 days after release.


January 9, 1973: President-elect Rockefeller keeps Joseph Barr as Treasury Secretary

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Secretary of the Treasury Joseph Barr has accepted Nelson Rockefeller's offer to stay in office. He served under LBJ since late 1968.

President-elect Rockefeller's choice for the Treasury Department was hardly forseeable. When asked on New Year's Day, he joked about naming his brother David, the Manhattan Investment Banker, but a 1967 law prohibits presidents from appointing family members into the cabinet (as President Kennedy did by giving the Justice Department to Bobby Kennedy). On January 9, the president-elect's office confirmed that incumbent Treasury Secretary Joseph W. Barr would retain his post. Barr, a Democrat, has served under President Lyndon Johnson since December 1968.


January 12, 1973: Final cabinet appointment: progressive Southern Democrat chosen for HUD

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Nobody saw this coming: Former Atlanta Mayor, businessman and civil rights advocate Ivan Allen Jr., a progressive Democrat, is Rocky's choice for HUD Secretary.

January 12, eight days before the inauguration, saw the completion of the Rockefeller cabinet. The Housing and Urban Development Secretary was the last cabinet position that had to be filled. And it was a huge surprise: Former Atlanta Mayor, businessman and civil-rights activist Ivan Allen Jr. has been selected to become President Rockefeller's Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Upon the annoucement event Nelson Rockefeller remarked: "I have determined that Mr. Allen is the very best choice for the HUD Department. He has a tremendous record on civil rights and is familiar with urban development and urban problems. With his experience in local government and business, Mayor Allen will oversee a federal housing program that I intend to implement as president. With his proud civil rights record, the mayor is uniquely qualified to oversee the implementation of fair housing legislation to make sure every American is able to participate in our society."

Allen's nomination was extremely well received among the liberal press and civil rights activists and underlined Rocky's commitment to civil rights. Allen, a progressive Southern Democrat, originally supported Bobby Kennedy in the 1972 election and is a passionate opponent of Lester Maddox (he also ran unsuccessfully for Georgia governor). Senate Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey spoke of an "excellent appointment" and even most congressional Republicans were supportive in public. Only a minor faction among the conservative Democrats were less joyful about the nomination. Allen thanked the president-elect for his confidence and said he would be delighted to work across the aisle to bring about positive changes for urban areas in America.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 08, 2018, 03:39:16 pm
President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Farewell Address; January 14, 1973

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Six days before his term would expire, President Lyndon B. Johnson gave his Farewell Address to America and the world. Originally scheduled as a live televised appearance from the Oval Office, LBJ in the last minute decided to give a speech before a larger audience. As civil rights was a defining issue of his presidency, several civil-rights leaders were participated to the event.

The president was welcomed by a cheering crowd when he entered the stage.

PRESIDENT JOHNSON: Ladies and Gentlemen, distinguished guests and my fellow Americans: Tonight, for the final time I directly speak to you as your president. I want to use this opportunity to talk about challenges and opportunities – and about the commitments that all of us have made together that will, if we carry them out, give America our best chance to achieve the kind of great society that we all want. In the past twelve years, we have made unimaginable progress on many fields. We made gigantic steps toward more justice for all Americans, protected civil and voting rights, lifted millions out of poverty, landed a man on the moon and made the world more safe with a comprehensive disarmament treaty. […]

Unfortunately, with one administration leaving, not all problems are gone that this very administration intended to fix. We still have a lot to do. First, we have to make sure that every American has access to quality healthcare. Healthcare must be a right for all, not a privilege of the few. We came much closer to this goal with the two major pieces of legislation I signed into law in 1965 and 1969. And I am really proud of it. But this fight must go on and never stop, never rest, before we have achieved it. And, I am sure, it will go on, because I believe in you. Second, we have to make sure that any discrimination because of race, age, sex or background is not just eliminated in statute books. It also needs an effort by the civic society across America to end hatred and intolerance and give everyone the chance to live in economic and social safety. We must learn to love each other like brothers and sisters. As the great late Abraham Lincoln once said, a house divided against itsself cannot stand. But remember, politicans alone are unable to reslove this issue and law can only provide the framework for a peaceful America. Real change has to start in our hearts and minds. Third, we have to continue to be an active player at the world stage and stand for peace, freedom and democracy. At the forefront of this effort have to be negotiations with all nations in the world, including advisories, to make our world a more safe one. […]

The greatest disappointment has been the war in Vietnam. Although we have been successful in preserving South Vietnam’s sovereignty and reached a peace agreement, America will never forget than thousands of its brave sons and daughters who were fallen in this conflict. We ought never to forget their sacrifice and the loss of their loved-ones. Their love of country will live on forever in America’s heart. As will Doctor King, who paid the ultimate price for his commitment. America will always be grateful to these warriors for good and their sacrafice is and will always remain inspiration for all of us and the generations to come.

Nevertheless, after nine years in the Oval Office, I can gladly report that, despite all challenges, America is in better shape than we found it. Late President Kennedy challenged Americans to explore new frontiers when he assumed office twelve years ago. After the sorrow and turmoil following his tragic death, I asked the American people to give me their trust and confidence. “Let us continue”, I urged. And we did continue. I am proud of all that we have achieved together. Therefore, I want to use this opportunity once more to thank all who contributed to our success. First, the two outstanding men who served as vice president during my administration. Hubert Humphrey and Bobby Kennedy. Two of our very finest. I am very grateful for the opportunity I had to work with them. Let me also thank the congress, the cabinet and the White House staff for their service to our nation and our cause. Without their efforts, we could not have been as successful as we were. Being your president for nearly a decade has been the honor of life and I shall never forget all the millions who trusted, and sometimes criticized me – for good or worse. Now, that this amazing period is coming to a close, Lady Bird and I will return to the place we proudly call home: Texas Hill Country. But be assured that I shall be available for any advice or and task my fellow countrymen ask for. I also shall be outspoken in the issues I care about: justice, fighting poverty and civil rights.

For America, a new chapter is to begin in just six days. New leaders are called on duty to meet both current and new challenges. Crisis will emerge when we feel safe the most and test our leadership and determination. But in the end, all these challenges will make us stronger and give Americans reason to believe in ourselves and our strengths, that we can meet any challenge. As we have done in all of our proud history. For this new challenges, I wish Nelson Rockefeller and his team all the best that he will be successful in leading America. And I hope you give him your trust and confidence as well, because only then he will succeed and elevate this great nation of ours to higher grounds.

Thank you all again, God bless you and God bless the United States of America!


[Standing ovations, applause]


The president's farewell address was received well among the press and Americans in general. A final Gallup survey, released on January 15, gave President Johnson a 63% approval rating. A number he last reached in 1966. The fact that LBJ invited several civil rights leaders was seen as a sign that he plans to be engaged in the civil rights struggle as Vice President Kennedy just said he would do. However, the main priority for the 36th president is going to be the construction of a presidential library in Texas that is soon to begin.


January 16, 1973: Nelson Rockefeller formally resigns as Governor of New York, Malcolm Wilson sworn in

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Malcolm Wilson (r) takes the oath of office as 50th Governor of New York, as President-elect Nelson Rockefeller, who resigned from the post, looks on

Four days before his inauguration as president, Nelson Rockefeller formally resigned the New York governorship, a post he held and shaped since 1959. Lieutenant Governor and Rockefeller protege Malcolm Wilson was subsequently sworn in as chief executive of the Empire State. He would serve out the ongoing term to January 1, 1975, with the prospect for reelection to full four year term in November 1974. As long as Wilson would be in the governor's chair of the second largest U.S. state in terms of population, he would be a reliable ally for the Rockefeller White House.


January 19, 1973: Final preparations for the inauguration


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The Inaugural Committee
requests the honor of your presence
to attend and participate in the Inauguration of

Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller
as President of the United States of America

and

Gerald Rudolph Ford
as Vice President of the United States of America

on Saturday, the twentieth of January
one thousand nine hundred and seventy-three
in the City of Washington

Jacob K. Javits,
Chairman


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on March 09, 2018, 03:33:23 am
LOL at Nixon being picked. Imagine a '80 race between Nixon and RFK.

The other appointees are mostly fine. Never heard of Allen before, but seems to a fine dude.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 10, 2018, 06:54:27 am
Chapter 3: ROCKY’S AMERICA –
The presidency of Nelson Rockefeller


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January 20, 1973

The Inauguration of President Nelson Rockefeller

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January 20, 1973 would be the greatest day in Nelson Rockefeller’s life. He was finally at his ultimate destination: The presidency.

It was a clear January morning in Washington DC, when President Lyndon B. Johnson and his wife Lady Bird welcomed President-elect Nelson Rockefeller and incoming First Lady Happy to the White House for a cup of coffee. At 11 a.m., the two presidents and their families were escorted to the eastern portico of the United States Capitol. Vice President Robert Kennedy and Vice President-elect Gerald Ford followed them.

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Like in 1969, Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall, the first black at the nation’s highest court, swore in the vice president. At 11.50 a.m., Gerald R. Ford took the oath of office as the 40th Vice President of the United States.

I, Gerald Rudolph Ford, do solemnly swear
that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States
against all enemies, foreign and domestic;
that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same;
that I take this obligation freely,
without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion;
and that I will well and faithfully discharge
the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.
So help me God.


A big applause took place after Gerald Ford, who seemed deeply moved, was sworn-in.

At 11.59 a.m., Nelson Rockefeller raised his right hand to repeat the presidential oath of office administered by Chief Justice Homer Thornberry.

I, Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller, do solemnly swear
that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States,
and will to the best of my Ability,
preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.
So help me God.



Right afterwards, the Marine Corps Band played hail to the chief and salute shots were fired in front of the Capitol. Nelson Rockefeller, with proud smile in his face, was now the 37th President of the United States.

As the crowd of over 750,000 cheered and applauded, the new president turned to the podium to deliver his inauguration speech.


PRESIDENT ROCKEFELLER: Chief Justice Thornberry, Vice President Ford, President Johnson, Vice President Kennedy, Senator Javits, Associate Justice Marshall, my fellow Americans and members of world community: As I stand here before you today, I feel a deep sense of humility and gratitude for the American people, who gave me the opportunity to serve for them for tthe years to come, beholden only to the constitution and laws the United States and god.

Today we are assembled here, with millions watching all over the world, to celebrate the peaceful transition of power. It has been a proud American tradition for almost two centuries when executive power is transferred from one president to his successor, who has been elected in free, due to fair elections. It is this shining example that makes America a very special country. But is more than just the transfer of powers, it also a moment of resolve and humility, as we are coming together as one nation, under god, to celebrate our democracy. I personally want to use this opportunity to thank President Johnson for his outstanding service to America in all over his unique career. I also once more want to thank Vice President Kennedy for his commitment to improve life conditions for all Americans. Thank you all.

My fellow countrymen, this is a special moment in history as we will soon celebrate our bicentennial. I am deeply honored to have to opportunity to guide this great nation into the third century of its existence. For us, it is now time to think about a vision for the third century of this great American experiment. My vision is inbounded in three headlines: First, prosperity. I want to work to improve life conditions of all Americans, so that none has to live in poverty. Every men and women must have the opportunity to use his or her potential for a decent job and the pursued of happiness. We also have to make sure that his prosperity is not just beneficial on a short term basis. I will soon submit to the congress, the people’s elected representatives, detailed plans for more economic growth and a fair tax system. I look forward to work with the congress, on all major issues, in a spirit of mutual understanding and commitment to improve the lives of our fellow Americans.

Second is freedom. But that means more than just these basic values enacted in our bill of rights. It means that we ensure all Americans have the same chances and the right to grow up, live and work in a world free of discrimination because of skin color or gender. Let America be the shining example how people of different backgrounds live together peacefully. Let us also be an example when it comes to protecting our enivironment. Living in freedom also means to live free from excessive pollution. Let us do more to protect the wondeful rivers, lakes, forests, deserts, monatains and plains we have. Give ourselves as well as our children and grandchildren the opportunity to breathe clean air and use clear water. Let us protect the natural beauties we are blessed with for the coming generations.

And the third headline is peace. Living in freedom also means, living in peace. That translates into a simple message to the world: America is committed, now more than ever, to a peaceful and stable world. We do not seek to conquer or dominate. Neither will we tolerate oppression in any form against allies of ours or other free countries. That means, we are open for productive and far-reaching talks with anyone. But it also means that will defend our values and our friends at any price. America stood not by when Pearl Harbor was attacked and a dictator tried to conquer and enslave the European continent. America stood not by when another dictator tried to conquer the Korean peninsula or when a sovereign country in South East Asia was attacked. America, under presidents of both parties, acted. And it will act under my leadership as well. I look forward to present a detailed foreign policy to the congress and the American people in the months to follow.

These three headlines contain a lot of challenges alone. And more, often hardly foreseeable, are to come. But Americans have traditionally responded to challenges with optimism and courage. That gives me great confidence that we can meet any challenge and withstand any force from the inside or the outside trying to undermine or divide us. I have great faith in the American people that we will enter this third century of our nation’s proud history stronger than ever before. At peace with itsself, its neighbors and the world, focused on real issues to deal with problems with a pragmatic appoach. For this great vision, I ask for your trust and confidence. And I ask each and every one of you to join me in this effort to make this land the one I used to be: A beacon of hope and liberty. Thank you very much, god bless you and god bless the United States of America.


[Applause]


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President Nelson Rockefeller and Vice President Gerald Ford are heading to the Inauguration ball, as First Lady Happy Rockefeller looks on

The day was concluded with the traditional presidential ball in Washington. After the inauguration, former President Lyndon B. Johnson flew back to Texas, where he received a hero’s welcome, as did former Vice President Robert Kennedy, who returned to the Kennedy Family Home in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts for a while.

January 20, 1973 was a day of celebration and renewal. The next morning, the Rockefeller Administration was getting to work.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 12, 2018, 03:31:13 pm
The first 100 days of the Rockefeller Administration


January 21, 1973: President Rockefeller signs first Executive Orders

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President Nelson Rockefeller signs his first Executive Orders and a proclamation on his first day in office; January 21, 1973

In his first full day in office, President Nelson Rockefeller signed a number of executive orders laying the groundwork for some important policies of his administration:

- As promised during his campaign, the president issued an executive order to reduce his annual salary to a symbolic dollar. Nelson Rockefeller, who became the wealthiest president in history, wouldn’t take a pension either under the decree he now signed. Instead, he will donate the money for sick children.
- The president established a commission consisting members of congress, business and labor leaders as well as public employees to study waste and fraud in the federal government and finding solutions to save money. Under the order, Vice President Ford has been assigned to chair the commission.
- Another executive order created “The President’s Infrastructure Counsel” to work out detailed plans for a gigantic infrastructure package. The commission is headed by former New York senator Charles Goodell, who will coordinate his work with the White House and the incoming Transportation Secretary.
- The president also signed a proclamation to express his support for the passage of a Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. constitution. The proposed amendment is designed to guarantee equal rights for all citizens regardless of sex; it seeks to end the legal distinctions between men and women in terms of divorce, property, employment, and other matters.
- In addition, Nelson Rockefeller signed a presidential memorandum that reaffirmed the administration's support for South Vietnam in light of the upcoming second anniversary of the Paris Peace Accords.


January 22, 1973: Supreme Court landmark decision: Laws criminalizing abortions are unconstitutional

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In a 8 : 1 decision, with Justice Byron White the only one against, the United States Supreme Court ruled that state laws criminalizing abortions are illegal. The Roe v. Wade ruling, although foreseeable with the court's liberal bench of judges, provoked conservative outrage nationwide. President Rockefeller expected this to happen and issued a brief written statement: “Since the question of abortions came up, I have opted the position, that government should have no business in interfering the most private decisions of women and their families. While I believe there should be limits how long abortions are permitted, I oppose a general abortion ban.” Vice President Ford stated the issue should be decided by the states but identified himself, like the president, as “pro-choice”. Generally, the White House tried to steer public attention away from the ruling and focus on the administration’s policies.


January 25, 1973: President Rockefeller to address congress and nation on February 22

As the White House just confirmed, President Nelson Rockefeller is scheduled to address a joint session of congress on February 22 to outline his policies. This is a substitute for the annual State of Union Address that is usually skipped in inauguration years.


January 29, 1973: Richard Nixon confirmed as Secretary of State following tenacious hearings

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Richard Nixon is finally back: After several hours of interviews, the senate confirmed his nomination as Secretary of State

A combined of 19 hours took the hearings by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for the Secretary of State nominee. Richard Nixon had to answer several questions on a broad range of political and personal issues. Democratic senators devoted a lot of time for questions on the Chennault Case and the involvement of Nixon campaign aides in the 1968 peace talks. Nixon vehemently denied to have ordered or even tolerated illegal actions by his campaign staffers. He also pointed to a 1969 FBI Report finding no evidence for his personal misbehavior. Ultimately, Nixon demonstrated his patience during the hearings and gave skillful answers what then led Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey to allow a floor vote on January 29. The upper house of congress confirmed the two-time Republican nominee with 77 senators in favor, and 22 against. All nay votes came from the Democratic caucus, among them notable senators like George McGovern (D-SD) and Edmund Muskie (D-ME). Pacifist Republican senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR) abstained, saying he couldn’t vote in favor but would not vote nay because of his sympathy for President Rockefeller. On the evening of January 29, at a small White House ceremony, Richard Nixon was sworn in as America’s new Secretary of State by Vice President Gerald Ford.


January 30, 1973: Cabinet confirmations complete

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The White House Cabinet Room, still with the decor of the Johnson Administration

That went through very quickly: It took ten days until the confirmation process of Nelson Rockefeller’s cabinet secretaries was complete. The senate approved all nominees of newly sworn in president. The first level appointees are now all at their respective posts and the Rockefeller Administration can function under regular order.

These are the results:

- Richard Nixon confirmed as Secretary of State: 77 aye, 22 nay
- Spiro Agnew confirmed as Attorney General: 84 aye, 15 nay
- George Romney confirmed as Secretary of Defense: 92 aye, 8 nay
- William Scranton confirmed as U.N. Ambassador: 95 aye, 3 nay
- John Connally confirmed as Secretary of Commerce: 87 aye, 13 nay
- Margaret Chase Smith confirmed as Secretary of Health and Human Services: 98 aye, 1 nay
- Thomas Kuchel confirmed as Secretary of Labor: 94 aye, 4 nay
- John Arthur Love confirmed as Secretary of the Interior: 97 aye, 2 nay
- Walter Peterson confirmed as Secretary of Transportation: 100 aye
- John Anderson confirmed as Secretary of Agriculture: 95 aye, 3 nay
- Ivan Allen confirmed as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development: 83 aye, 15 nay

* Treasury Secretary Joseph Barr did not need renewed senate approval, as he already served in the Johnson Administration since 1968. White House Chief of Staff John B. Anderson and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger aren’t required senate confirmation, as they are directly working for the president.


The Rockefeller Administration
(as of January 1973)

- President: Nelson Rockefeller (R-NY)
- Vice President: Gerald Ford (R-MI)

- Secretary of State: Richard Nixon (R-CA)
- Attorney General: Spiro Agnew (R-MD)
- Secretary of Defense: George Romney (R-MI)
- Secretary of the Treasury: Joseph W. Barr (D-IN)
- Secretary of Commerce: John Connally (R-TX)
- Secretary of the Interior: John Arthur Love (R-CO)
- Secretary of HUD: Ivan Allen Jr. (D-GA)
- Secretary of HHS: Margaret Chase-Smith (R-ME)
- Secretary of Agriculture: John Anderson (R-KS)
- Secretary of Labor: Thomas Kuchel (R-CA)
- Secretary of Transportation: Walter R. Peterson Jr. (R-NH)
- U.N. Ambassador: William Scranton (R-PA)

- White House Chief of Staff: John B. Anderson (R-IL)
- National Security Advisor: Henry Kissinger (R-DC)


January 31, 1973: First post-inauguration poll

As usual, newly sworn-in presidents start off their term with a pretty strong approval rating, known as "honeymoon". President Nelson Rockefeller enjoys such honeymoon, as he gets strong support from his fellow countrymen during the first days in office with polls showing that almost eight in ten Americans approve his job performance. It remains to be seen how long that lasts.

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 77%
Disapprove: 18%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 17, 2018, 07:54:40 am
February 2 – 7, 1973: President Rockefeller’s first foreign trip

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President Nelson Rockefeller and First Lady Happy Rockefeller, surrounded by reporters, visit the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin; February 6, 1973

Just announced the day before, President Nelson Rockefeller departed from Washington for a five day trip abroad. The early departure for meetings with world leader underlines the importance of foreign policy in the Rockefeller Administration. The president, who has long been interested in Latin America, begun his trip in Mexico for political consultations, discussing a broad range of issues. Afterwards, Nelson Rockefeller made stops in Guatemala, Costa Rica and Panama, where he visited the canal zone. During his talks, the new head of state reaffirmed his support for negotiations to turn over the Panama Canal Zone to the small country. Insiders confirmed that President Rockefeller will soon a present new impulses for Latin America Policy to the nation and the world. On February 4, Air Force One flew to Europe. With stops in London, Paris, Rome and finally West Berlin, where the president met with important leaders. In Germany, he visited the Berlin Wall and spoke with Chancellor Brandt about détente. In a brief press conference, both leaders emphasized the need for closer cooperation on foreign policy towards the communist bloc.

While President Rockefeller returned home on February 7, Secretary of State Richard Nixon traveled to Asia, where he made stops in Vietnam, Thailand and Japan. On his way back home, Nixon also toured Europe and met a Soviet delegation in Geneva.


February 13, 1973: Secretary of State Nixon announces new negotiations with USSR

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Following his first around-the-globe trip as Secretary of State, Richard Nixon announced a new round of negotiations with the USSR. The talks are scheduled to begin by summer 1973 and will consist not only a further reduction of conventional weapons, but also some elements of cooptation in other fields like a bilateral space mission. A year after President Johnson signed a historic treaty at Camp David, the new administration seeks to continue détente policies.


February 22, 1973

President Nelson Rockefeller’s Address to Congress

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As announced in January, President Nelson Rockefeller was welcomed at Capitol Hill for a speech before a joint session of the congress. After a month in office, the new president went before lawmakers to outline his policies.

SPEAKER ALBERT: Ladies and Gentlemen, members of congress: It my high privilege and distinguished honor to present to you the President of the United States!

PRESIDENT ROCKEFELLER: Speaker Albert, Vice President Ford, members of the House and Senate, members of the cabinet, members of the judiciary and the diplomatic corps, distinguished guests and my fellow Americans: Thank you very much for the kind introduction. I am deeply grateful to stand before you today and, after one month in office, to make my policy suggestions for the months to come. I also want to thank you very much for the productive role the congress has played early in my administration. A special thanks goes to the senate for the quick and smooth confirmation of my cabinet. It is this spirit of cooperation and mutual respect to find pragmatic solutions I intend to keep with all of you. Thank you again. [Applause]

During the first four weeks of my presidency, I had the opportunity to talk with the citizens of our nation, with many of you, the elected representatives of the American people, business and labor leaders as well as other political activists who believe in the cause of America. These conversations, although sometimes of different opinions, gave me a greater sense of awareness of our challenges and problems. And an even greater understanding of our strengths, the lie in diversity, civility, decency and the firm believe in the United States of America. Today, I am here to present my suggestions for improving the lives of Americans, strengthen trust in government and promote world peace.

Let me begin with some domestic policy proposals. I am glad the House Speaker, my dear friend Carl Albert, has agreed to put the Equal Rights Amendment before the House floor. I urge each and everyone of you, including our senators, to pass this important amendment to our constitution. I feel it is a necessity to everything we can to eliminate discrimination wherever it exists. While this nation has made huge progress, despite much being left, on civil rights for our fellow black Americans, we also must tirelessly work to eliminate and discrimination of women. [Applause] I furthermore call for specific actions on a legislative basis such as a renewed equal-pay law. Where possible, I intend to use the executive powers of the presidency to ensure fair conditions. [Applause]

Ensuring fair conditions and a life in prosperity not just requires civil rights laws, it also requires good economic conditions. A functioning and modern infrastructure is a key to a strong economy and the road to prosperity. That is why I call upon the passage of a bold program to rebuild our roads, railways, airports and bridges. I am glad to inform you, that Secretary of Peterson and former Senator Goodell, who heads the president’s infrastructure counsel, will soon present a detailed plan to the public and lawmakers. Be assured that the congress will be involved and invited to contribute with own ideas for an even better solution.

Another factor to ensure a prospering America is preserving the natural beauties of our blessed land and to make sure, that every American breathes clean air and has access to clean water. Therefore, my administration already presented legislation for the creation for a national agency to coordinate these efforts. I want to thank Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey for his cooperation and the senate vote that took place yesterday. I hope the house can agree on this bill soon and send it to my desk for final approval. [Applause]

[…]

On the foreign policy front, I already had the opportunity to speak directly with members of the world community and head of state from our allies. In my discussions with West German Chancellor Willy Brandt, an outstanding man, we agreed to continue talks with the USSR to promote world peace. I look forward to fair negotiations on a wide range of issues. That includes a reduction of weapons. But I want to make it absolutely clear: America is, and will always remain, the greatest power in the world. There will be no doubt! Neither will there be any doubt that we stand to our commitments and defend ourselves and our friends. That includes South Vietnam. I will soon send a delegation that consists Democrats and Republicans to Saigon for further consultations. I want to thank Secretary Richard Nixon for his efforts during his world trip earlier that month.

[…]

Ladies and Gentlemen, despite all challenges, we have to unique opportunity to make America, on its way into the third century of its existence, a better place to live, work and prosper and a force for good in the world. Together, in the spirit of cooperation, let us go to work. Thank you very much.



February 28, 1973: New Gallup-poll

President Rockefeller continues to benefit from his honeymoon. His speech before congress was also well received by most Americans.

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 75%
Disapprove: 19%


March 3, 1973: President Rockefeller signs Economic Opportunities Act of 1973

Immediately after taking office, President Rockefeller appointed a commission under the leadership of Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield, to review the so-called “War on Poverty”, a collection of social programs, that was enacted during the Johnson Administration. The goal was to review the success or failure of certain elements and make suggestions of improvements. In a record time, Senator Hatfield and his bipartisan group, presented a first bill for improvements. The new law now passed reorganized the Head Start Program that was overall considered a success but had some failing elements. Under the new regulations, the program’s administration was turned over the HHS Department. Advanced teacher training was also implemented under the legislation, which is the most far-reaching amendment to the original Economic Opportunities Act of 1964.


March 15, 1973: President Rockefeller signs milestone Environmental Protection Act of 1973 into law

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Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelhaus is President Rockefeller's nominee for administrator of the newly established EPA

A cornerstone of Nelson Rockefeller’s policies has always been the preservation of the environment. In his last year as governor, he spent more on the environment than the whole federal government. Although the issue was just a random topic in the 1972 presidential campaign, the administration quickly introduced legislation to establish a national agency to oversee and coordinate environmental policy. With wide support among Democrats, the bill, considered a milestone, passed congress and was signed into law by President Rockefeller on March 15, 1973. The same day, President Rockefeller announced that he would nominate Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus as first administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Conservatives were not enthusiastic about the new law. Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ), who led the coalition against passage, said it would hurt business and increase federal bureaucracy.


March 31, 1973: Congress passes Equal Rights Amendment

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Before the vote on the Equal Rights Amendment, demonstrators urged the congress to pass the measure. President Rockefeller supported their efforts

March 1973 was a very productive month at Capitol Hill: Following House passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, the senate now also passed the measure with the necessary two-thirds majority. President Rockefeller, who issued a proclamation to declare April “Women’s equality month”, welcomed the passage and urged the states to ratify the amendment as fast as possible.


New Gallup-poll

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 76%
Disapprove: 19%


April 3, 1973: President Rockefeller announces tougher anti-drug policies

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During a speech on April 3, President Rockefeller announced a tougher stance on drug policy and a national campaign against drug use

Drugs were an issue that many Republicans, and even some Democrats, felt that was neglected in the last years as the Johnson Administration did not much about it. President Rockefeller, aware that conservatives wanted him not just to focus on liberal issues, announced during a speech his administration would “forcefully” act on the drug problems with a two-point plan: First, more education. HHS Secretary Margaret Chase-Smith was directed to oversee a national anti-drug campaign to educate young people about devastating consequences of drug use. The congress, following negotiations led by Vice President Ford, approved a 50 million dollar budget for the program. Second, a tough law-and-order policy: The president emphasized the need for a “zero tolerance policy”. He urged states and municipalities to implement such policies and announced he would do so in the military.


Attorney General Agnew sharply attacks press after Rockefeller announcement

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Attorney General Spiro Agnew attacked the press for their response to President Rockefeller's speech on drugs

Although President Rockefeller’s speech on drugs received some media attention, most papers didn’t make it first-page headlines. Some editorials even criticized the tough law and order policy, warning of negative consequences like overcrowded prisons. Attorney General Agnew, who was a stanch anti-drugs advocate, used the opportunity for national attention. On April 6, he sharply criticized the press during a speech: “A small group of so-called experts in newspaper offices and self-appointed experts, willing to impose their out-of-touch views on the American people, criticized the president for making a tough stance of the epidemic of drugs. This is not just dangerous, it also demonstrates the lack of awareness of major problem. Furthermore, I find it troubling when certain newspapers try to play down the importance of this issue by making it third-rate article”. Conservatives and even some Democrats publically supported the attorney general in his assessment, while liberals and newspapers accused Agnew of “self-promotion”. Senator George McGovern (D-SD) said Agnew was "the worst A.G. of my lifetime."


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on March 17, 2018, 03:33:13 pm
I like how Agnew and McGovern are the attack dogs of both sides :P Also, other than the drug thing, I like the Rockfeller Administration so far! Hopefully they educate themselves about the harmlessness of marijuana, but oh well, I guess that's an issue for years later.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 20, 2018, 03:14:30 pm
April 21, 1973

BREAKING: NORTH VIETNAM LAUNCHES MASSIVE SPRING OFFENSIVE


Forces of the North Vietnamese Liberation Front, in a violation to the Paris Peace Accords, launched a massive military offensive against the South. President Rockefeller to summon with advisors: First major test for the new administration.


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It was not entirely unexpected as the news on April 21 broke: Communist forces of the North Vietnamese Liberation Front (NLF) begun to launch a massive military offensive against South Vietnam and the Thieu government. The offensive is a clear violation of the 1971 Paris Peace Accords. On the morning of this April 21, not even 100 days into the Rockefeller presidency, approximately 50,000 troops of the North crossed the demilitarized zone that separates the two Vietnamese countries. The invasion, supported by artillery, is aimed to force South Vietnam to finally give up and let the communist North take over the whole country. The two year period since the Paris Accords gave the North Vietnamese the opportunity to recover from the heavy loses of the preceding years. Meanwhile, the U.S. allied South Vietnam fell short of gaining own economic strength and heavily depends on American aid. Despite having almost a million man under arms, the Thieu regime struggled to beat off the offensive. Some American experts already estimated that the whole South could be “overrun” within a single month if the United States does not jump in. The question was: How determined was the Rockefeller Administration to respond?


President Rockefeller holds crisis meeting at the White House and weighs in various options

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President Nelson Rockefeller quickly summoned his inner circle to evaluate the situation in Vietnam: In the Oval Office, he is joined by Vice President Gerald Ford and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger

91 days into his presidency, Rocky faced the first major foreign policy crisis. Almost immediately after being briefed, the president cancelled all his meetings and public appearances for the next 48 hours to return to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. He assembled Vice President Ford, National Security Advisor Kissinger, Defense Secretary Romney and military leaders to the Oval Office for a crisis meeting. Secretary of State Nixon, for political talks in Israel, promptly went on board his airplane heading back to DC, what underlined the seriousness of the situation to the public.

Hawks in congress, especially the conservative wing of the Republican Party, already demanded a “forceful answer to communist aggression”, as Senator Barry Goldwater (R-AZ) remarked. The right GOP faction as well as some hawkish Democrats like Senator Scoop Jackson (D-WA), who opposed the treaty from the beginning on, saw their positions confirmed that the Paris Accords “weren’t worth the paper written on.” Governor Ronald Reagan, during a radio interview, even demanded to terminate the agreement. “The United States has shown goodwill under the previous administration, and what we have gotten in return is communist hostility and continuing violation of international law […] We must now send a signal, that the free world stands up to tyranny. It is obvious that communist regimes around the globe only understand force and bold action. I have full confidence in the administration to recognize this. We ought not to repeat the mistakes of the two previous administrations.”

For President Rockefeller, who said communist aggression would be retaliated with force during his campaign, it was critical long-term decision. On the one hand, he could hardly allow the South be overrun early in his tenure. On the other hand, a take-over could likely only be delayed and not prevented (sources claimed, that Henry Kissinger long before Rocky came into office privately expected South Vietnam to collapse by the middle of this decade) unless he was willing to commit American ground troops again. That was hardly an option anyway: Neither the congress was willing to approve enough funds for a ground war that failed already under Lyndon Johnson’s watch, nor was the American public ready for a larger U.S. involvement that would lead to thousands of deaths again.

Later the day, the White House confirmed that President Rockefeller would announce his response soon to the public.


Reports: U.S. Intelligence "severely underestimated threat"

Even before President Rockefeller was on air to announce what steps would be taken from his administration, various reports claimed that U.S. intelligence agencies hardly anticipated the spring offensive and its strength. As a result, the administration was obviously not prepared for any such military action of this magnitude what could further complicate an effective American response.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 24, 2018, 05:50:48 am
Late April 1973

President Rockefeller orders massive air strikes against NLF

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On April 23, 1973, the U.S. Air Force begun striking NLF troops at the president's order

At noon on April 22, 1973, after hours of consultations, President Nelson Rockefeller announced a series of air strikes against North Vietnamese forces, who crossed the demilitarized zone to attack South Vietnam. The president also ordered a U.S. special force, based in Thailand, to assist South Vietnamese Forces in their effort to beat off the communist offensive. In his public statement, he also warned Hanoi: “If the regime in Hanoi and the Vietcong chose to continue this newest aggression, they will be met with severe counter-actions that go beyond the South Vietnamese territory, which is under siege by a hostile power. The United States will not tolerate this kind of aggression”, the commander-in-chief said. In other words: The president threatens North Vietnam with military actions against its territory (air strikes against North Vietnam were suspended since 1968). The next day, a White House or State Department leak revealed that Secretary of State Richard Nixon was also in favor of air bombardments against Hanoi city. Others, like Vice President Gerald Ford and Secretary of Defense George Romney, pledged not to expand the bombing targets beyond invading troops.


Large support in congress, new anti-war demonstrations

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The decision to launch air strikes against invading NLF forces caused another major wave of anti-war demonstrations in America

With a few pacifist members of congress as exception, President Rockefeller’s response received large support from both parties in congress. Especially conservatives, usually critical of the president, praised Rocky’s tough response on North Vietnam. However, the Rockefeller Administration resisted calls to terminate the Peace Accords of 1971. Defense Secretary Romney openly warned this may “throw us back years.”

Meanwhile, a new series of nationwide anti-war protests emerged on April 23. Despite being of far less intensity, the demonstrations made international news. The largest anti-war rally took place in Washington DC, where approximately 30,000 people gathered together to expres their disapproval of most recent U.S. actions in South-East Asia. “Rocky, end the war! Rocky, end the war!”, they screamed as they were marching through the streets and standing before the White House. In addition, former Vice President Robert Kennedy issued a statement that he doesn’t believe, the air strikes will improve the situation on a long-term basis. His former boss, however, held a different opinion: During an event in Texas, former President Lyndon B. Johnson told a reporter that he is supportive of his successor's Vietnam policy.


Reports reveal President Rockefeller loses patience with Thieu government

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President Rockefeller is reportedly about to lose his patience with his South Vietnamese counterpart Thieu

In the final days of April, when Rocky was just about to celebrate his 100th day in office, the offensive was heavily slowed down as a result of massive air strikes by the U.S. Air Force and a rebound within the South Vietnamese military. White House leaks revealed that President Rockefeller just had a harsh telephone call with President Thieu, promptly telling him: “The American taxpayer isn’t paying billions of dollars in aid for your country that all these so-called soldiers immediately run away. America was bearing the main burden of this war for eight years and lost thousands of lives. It is now up to you to defend your country. I expect you to get you act together very fast.” Publically, the White House declined the president actually said this, but Secretary of Defense George Romney admitted that “Saigon has some homework to do.”


Secretary of State Nixon calls for USSR and China to pressure Hanoi, questions negotiations

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Is Secretary Nixon playing the bad cop for President Rockefeller?

On April 29, Secretary of State Richard Nixon publically urged Moscow and Beijing to play “a more productive role in resolving the situation.” And he added: “If the USSR and China are serious about negotiating with America to promote world peace, they also need to take action. Unless that happens, all their expressions remain empty talk. But the Rockefeller Administration is more interested in actual and measureable results rather than Sunday speeches.” When asked whether his administration would consider to cancel the upcoming negotiations Nixon just announced in February, President Rockefeller himself responded that this was “not on the table at the moment.” Some political journalists expressed their assumption that Nelson Rockefeller and Richard Nixon were playing a “good cop, bad cop” game with the Russians and Chinese. While the secretary would play the role of the hardliner who questions negotiations that the communist regimes actually want, the president would be a little softer in tone. As observers pointed out, Nixon was just the perfect man to play the role of bad cop due to his long and well-known staunch anti-communist stances throughout his career.


April 30, 1973

New Gallup-polls: 100 DAYS OF PRESIDENT ROCKEFELLER

Gallup conducted a series of polls after President Rockefeller just passed his 100th day in office. The president continues to ride on his post-inauguration popularity wave. Nevertheless, Americans are mixed about the Vietnam policy in general. Other key members of the administration were also polled. As of now, Richard Nixon is the only one a decent number of Americans still have reservations about, though his numbers improved since he became secretary of state. The work of congress is also mainly seen positive with a lot of undecideds here.


President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 76%
Disapprove: 18%


Questions

Q: Do you approve or disapprove President Rockefeller's decision to launch air strikes against the NLF?
Approve: 59%
Disapprove: 30%
Undecided: 11%

Q: Would you support an increasing military involvement in Vietnam?
Yes: 33%
No: 54%
Undecided: 13%

Q: Would you support increased American aid for South Vietnam?
Yes: 47%
No: 26%
Undecided: 27%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove President Rockefeller's foreign policy in general?
Approve: 67%
Disapprove: 21%
Undecided: 12%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove Vice President Ford's performance in office?
Approve: 68%
Disapprove: 15%
Undecided: 17%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove Secretary of State Nixon's performance in office?
Approve: 54%
Disapprove: 36%
Undecided: 10%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove Secretary of Defense Romney's performance in office?
Approve: 62%
Disapprove: 20%
Undecided: 18%

Q: Do you approve or disapprove the work of congress?
Approve: 47%
Disapprove: 31%
Undecided: 22%


May 5, 1973: Offensive comes to a halt, giving U.S. temporary relief

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South Vietnamese troops on a battlefield after the Vietcong withdrew from the place; May 5, 1973

Finally, on May 5, it was reported that the communist offensive came to a halt in Da Nang, South Vietnam. American air bombardments and troops from Saigon, supported by a small number of U.S. Special Forces, were able to stop the invaders, who lost at least 5,000 fighters within just two weeks. South Vietnamese President Thieu said forces under his command would now begin to push back and liberate those areas in the northern part of his country currently under NLF rule.

The success gives the United States and its ally at least some relief. Nevertheless, National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger reportedly told President Rockefeller and members of his cabinet in private conversations, that South Vietnam is not likely to survive the next 24 months. Especially the poor economic condition of the country was a major concern of Kissinger and his team. And apparantly a key factor why Hanoi felt another offensive would be worth fighting for, as they never abandoned their ultimate goal of a unified Vietnam under communist rule.


May 9, 1973: Congress approves aid package as president requests

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The passage of South Vietnamese aid through an increasingly skeptical congress is mainly the success of Vice President Gerald Ford, who was in charge of the talks on the administration's behalf

On May 9, 1973, congress approved a 250 million dollar package of aid for South Vietnam. The passage wasn’t as easy as some members of the administration anticipated. It took Vice President Ford to take a major role to resolve the issue with increasingly skeptical lawmakers. Nevertheless, the package was just a temporary measure until the year’s end until it had be renegotiated. President Rockefeller announced consultations with Saigon and talks with congress to evaluate how much South Vietnam actually needs for the coming years.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 25, 2018, 05:24:48 am
May 29, 1973: President Rockefeller announces dramatic cuts in Space Program

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President Nelson Rockefeller, at a dinner, said the American Space Program was a huge success, but announced its funding would be cut due to other priorities in the coming years.

As negotiations for the 1973/74 federal budget are going on, President Nelson Rockefeller announced that funding for the U.S. Space program would be cut by about half. Funding was already decreased during the last two fiscal years of the Johnson Administration, but LBJ rejected further cuts in the program he oversaw since the early 1960s. Now that the Rockefeller Administration plans spending increases in infrastructure, housing and the environment, other areas needed to save money in order to keep the federal budget somewhat in line. The president initially seemed open to break from his pledge not to cut defense spending, but Secretaries Nixon and Romney strongly urged to keep the defense budget as it was since such an attempt would alienate the conservative Republican faction.

On May 29, President Rockefeller and Democratic Senate Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey together announced that they came to a far-reaching overall agreement over the budget. Media observers wrote, that Rocky and HHH would get along very well behind the scenes.


May 31, 1973: New Gallup-poll

President Rockefeller's numbers dropped a little, but he remains overall very popular early into his administration.

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 71%
Disapprove: 22%


June 4 – 7, 1973: Ronald Reagan assigned to lead U.S. delegation to Vietnam

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Governor Ronald Reagan during his visit in Saigon; he was put in charge to lead an American delegation

Ronald Reagan was not appointed Secretary of State, but Nelson Rockefeller is aware that he has still a significant base of support within the GOP. The California governor remained visible during the first moths of the Rockefeller presidency, but largely supported the commander-in-chief. Especially Rocky’s response to the Communist Spring offensive received praise from Reagan. Now the Gipper gets his involvement in foreign policies: He was appointed head of an American delegation to visit South Vietnam for political consultations. The delegation’s task was also to evaluate South Vietnam’s condition and make recommendations with regard to American aid. On his way back to America, Reagan also made a stop in Japan, with the president’s approval, for talks about Japanese investments in California.

Once returned home, the Reagan delegation recommended over a billion dollars in aid to South Vietnam for the year 1974. Senators like Ted Kennedy (D-MA) said this sum was “ridiculous” and would never pass congress. Although the issue seemed to be settled until December 31, Vietnam continued to be a concern for the Rockefeller Administration.


June 10, 1973: President Rockefeller signs Anti-Drug Laws

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Back in April, the president announced a tougher stance on drug policy. A group of lawmakers around Senators Bob Dole (R-KS) and Birch Bayh (D-IN) subsequently worked out a package of bills to fight drug abuse. Since criminal law is mainly a state issue, the federal government could only implement measures within its authority. The military was a major factor here since several Republicans complained about drug abuse within the armed forces for a few years now. The bills include:

- The cornerstone of the entire package was the “Armed Forces Drug Responsibility Act”. This legislation allowed commanders immediate firing of drug consuming members of the armed forces. Furthermore, soldiers and commanders were required to report drug abuse immediately and could be imprisoned up to five years if they fail to do so.
- Drug Abuse and dealing within the District of Columbia, where the federal government has the power to legislate such matters, would be severely punished in the “D.C. Drug Abuse Reorganization Act of 1973”.
- The “Drug Prevention and Awareness Act” was a concession to moderates and liberals that authorized funds for a national anti-drug campaign. It also created a prevention program within the armed forces.

At the signing ceremony, Attorney General Spiro Agnew said his department would “forcefully implement” the new laws and spoke of a “zero tolerance policy”.

After the laws passed, several states announced to enact tougher statutes. Ronald Reagan called for it in California, while Nelson Rockefeller’s successor as governor, Malcolm Wilson, just signed the so-called “Wilson Drug Laws” the previous month.


June 15, 1973: At administration's pressure, U.N. Security Council condemns NLF offensive

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UN Ambassador William Scranton played a key role in the resolution's passage

Two months after the NLF begun invading South Vietnam, the UN Security Council formally condemned the military operation as violation of international laws. In most recent weeks, President Rockefeller publically declared that such a resolution would be a pre-condition for the start of arms reduction talks with the USSR and potential negotiations with Red China. With this stance, he followed Secretary Nixon’s recommendation after the Soviets declined to stop arms delivery to Hanoi. Afterwards, UN Ambassador William Scranton was highly praised for his leadership within the UN and the process. Even Barry Goldwater spoke of "bold American leadership provided by the administration."

As of mid-June, the South Vietnamese ground forces where able to push back the invadors. Already earlier that month, President Rockefeller ordered the suspension of most air strikes.


June 24, 1973: President Rockefeller signs “Compensation Act of 1973” for Japanese Americans

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On June 24, 1973, President Nelson Rockefeller just returned from a three-day trip to Japan. During his absence, congress passed the “Compensation Act of 1973” that appropriated compensation payments for Japanese Americans and their relatives who were de-facto imprisoned during World War II. In the years following 1942, at the order President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Japanese Americans living in the coastal areas of California where deported to certain camps due to the government’s fear of traitors and collaborators of the Japanese Empire. Rocky did not campaign on the issue, but a group of civil groups and organizations brought it to national attention in recent months. Back in February, President Rockefeller expressed his sympathy for legislation and called the internment a “deep injustice.” After the president signed the bill, he also issued a proclamation that formally revoked FDR’s Executive Order 9066 from February 19, 1942.


June 30, 1973: New Gallup-poll

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 73%
Disapprove: 21%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Parrotguy on March 25, 2018, 09:41:58 am
I like Romney and Scranton in this TL. Still RFK '80, but wouldn't terribly mind Romney either. I just hope Reagan's and Goldwater's wings are crushed for good, making it "Liberal Republicans vs Labour Democrats". Also, you write administration events very, very well! Good job!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 25, 2018, 03:07:31 pm
I like Romney and Scranton in this TL. Still RFK '80, but wouldn't terribly mind Romney either. I just hope Reagan's and Goldwater's wings are crushed for good, making it "Liberal Republicans vs Labour Democrats". Also, you write administration events very, very well! Good job!

Thanks! I think in any case a conservative wing of the Republican Party would certainly continue to exist and even be dominating in some states and maybe also get a candidate nominated under the right circumstances. For 1980, if the Republican nominee was to be a moderate or liberal, Romney would not be the most likely one in my opinion since he's even a year older than Rocky (four years with Reagan). Mark Hatfield, Richard Schweiker or Bill Scranton sound more plausible, possibly even John Anderson depending on how his career goes on. Ford to a lesser extent, since he never had presidential ambitions until he got into the Oval Office by succession.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Not_A_Man on March 26, 2018, 02:35:45 pm
Overall great TL, bit saddened by the Space Program cuts tbh but that was gonna happen anyway.  Keep it up!


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: TheBeardedOne on March 26, 2018, 05:00:36 pm
In this timeline where Nixon becomes Sec. of State in ‘72, does he ever become Governor in 62 for California? I am too lazy to go read through all 10 pages


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 27, 2018, 12:48:47 pm
In this timeline where Nixon becomes Sec. of State in ‘72, does he ever become Governor in 62 for California? I am too lazy to go read through all 10 pages

No, everything up to 1968 remains the same, but LBJ runs for another term and defeats Nixon with RFK, who survived the assassination attempt, as his running mate. In 1972, Nelson Rockefeller was elected president following a tough battle with Ronald Reagan over the Republican nomination and a close win over Bobby Kennedy in the general.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 27, 2018, 01:38:31 pm
July 2, 1973: South Vietnam declares victory in spring offensive

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Going into July, Saigon officially declared victory over the NLF in the most recent spring offensive. The Vietcong reportedly lost more than 15,000 troops since April, with at least 2,000 more missing. South Vietnamese casualties are about 900, while just three Americans were killed in action. The largest number of NLF soldiers retreated back to North Vietnamese territory, while U.S. intelligence believes that at least 3,000 fighters remain undercover on South Vietnamese soil and pose a danger with regard to potential sabotage acts. However, approximately 750 Vietcong members officially switched sides to escape the regime in Hanoi. While President Nguyen Van Thieu was skeptical in the beginning, Secretary of State Richard Nixon personally got involved and called upon Saigon to grant these deserters asylum or a legal status and not send them back. Originally, prisoners of war were exchanged in the 1971 Peace Accords, but that doesn’t apply to most recent cases.


July 5, 1973: Unpleased with CIA over Vietnam, President Rockefeller replaces Director Richard Helms

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CIA Director Richard Helms (l) was forced out of office over his handling of Vietnam by President Rockefeller, who subsequently appointed Kenneth Rush to the post

“The CIA underestimated the threat of a North Vietnamese offensive in spring. Even when signals were strongly pointing in that direction, the agency acted too slow and too little, what put the Rockefeller Administration under heavy pressure once the invasion begun. Only the quick response of the administration, independent preparations by Secretary Romney and his team for a hypothetical offensive and a better than expected performance by Saigon prevented the NLF from much larger gains”, reads a recent New York Times article, citing a secret Pentagon report. Newspapers across America wrote already back in May, that the U.S. intelligence severely underestimated the threat. Now the Pentagon itself confirmed these allegations after George Romney ordered to study the issue.

According to insiders, pressure from the White House and Capitol Hill on CIA Director Richard Helms mounted during the month of June. On July 5, his immediate resignation from office was made public. President Rockefeller was reportedly very unpleased with the entire situation and ultimately forced Helms out of office. Although the director officially resigned, it was well known that the president wanted him go. Chief of Staff Anderson, Secretaries Nixon and Romney also recommended to replace him with a loyalist of their own. Shortly after the ouster, the White House announced that Deputy Secretary of State Kenneth Rush would be nominated as new director of the CIA. Rush, a Republican, has experience in foreign affairs since briefly served as Ambassador to West Germany under President Johnson before becoming Richard Nixon’s Deputy at the State Department.


July 14, 1973: President Rockefeller signs historic American Urban Development Act of 1973 into law

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Above: The city of Detroit, ca. 1973; Below: President Nelson Rockefeller (r) in the midst of a crowd during the signing ceremony, with First Lady Happy Rockefeller (m) and Vice President Gerald Ford (l)

What sounded like an unspectacular legislation was in fact one of the most significant bills enacted in most recent years: The American Urban Development Act of 1973 creates a far-reaching urban (re)development program, worth ten billion dollars in just two years. Its goal is to build thousands of housing units for middle-class and low-income Americans, especially African Americans. “This legislation is also intended to eliminate slums as we know them and give hope to these communities”, remarked Housing Secretary Ivan Allen. Although many congressional Democrats, including Majority Leader Hubert Humphrey, favored a pure public option, the Rockefeller Administration and most Republicans favored a mixed public-private program. Ultimately, the Democrats agreed to a compromise presented by Vice President Ford, Secretary Allen and co-sponsoring senators Jacob Javits (R-NY) and Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX). As President Rockefeller said, the program may result into 20 billion dollars of investment into the economy and create new affordable living spaces for the average American “of all backgrounds”. HUD Secretary Ivan Allen and his department will oversee the implementation.

Neither the signing location nor date were selected by accident: July 14 was Vice President Gerald Ford’s 60th birthday and Detroit, a city with social problems and a large black community, was in his homestate of Michigan. With the signing ceremony, the president rewarded his second-in-command for the leading role he played in the legislative process in working with both Secretary Allen and lawmakers on Capitol Hill. The Washington Post wrote on Ford: “His selection for the vice presidency proved to be very useful for Rocky. Indeed, a major factor was the intention to help with legislation after his long congressional service and the high respect he obtained from both parties. In a certain way, Ford fills a similar role like RFK before him, who was also actively engaged the policy making.” And as various sources from the White House indicated, Rockefeller and Ford developed a close personal relationship following their inauguration since they barely knew each other before the successful 1972 campaign.


July 31, 1973: New Gallup-poll

President Rockefeller job approval
Approve: 70%
Disapprove: 22%


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on March 28, 2018, 08:54:04 am
Nice updates. Rockefeller is doing a good job except for the horrible drug policy.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: TheBeardedOne on March 28, 2018, 08:59:38 am
In this timeline where Nixon becomes Sec. of State in ‘72, does he ever become Governor in 62 for California? I am too lazy to go read through all 10 pages

No, everything up to 1968 remains the same, but LBJ runs for another term and defeats Nixon with RFK, who survived the assassination attempt, as his running mate. In 1972, Nelson Rockefeller was elected president following a tough battle with Ronald Reagan over the Republican nomination and a close win over Bobby Kennedy in the general.

Wow! The story is crazy so far. I predict Nixon running again - and winning


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: Sir Mohamed on March 28, 2018, 09:08:58 am
In this timeline where Nixon becomes Sec. of State in ‘72, does he ever become Governor in 62 for California? I am too lazy to go read through all 10 pages

No, everything up to 1968 remains the same, but LBJ runs for another term and defeats Nixon with RFK, who survived the assassination attempt, as his running mate. In 1972, Nelson Rockefeller was elected president following a tough battle with Ronald Reagan over the Republican nomination and a close win over Bobby Kennedy in the general.

Wow! The story is crazy so far. I predict Nixon running again - and winning

A third time, polling a William J. Bryan? Seems doubtful to me, especially since Rockefeller is a first termer now. I would hope for RFK to be elected in '80.


Title: Re: The liberal Republic
Post by: President Johnson on March 31, 2018, 06:00:23 am
Early August 1973: As Justice Department implements anti-drug policies, the Agnew–McGovern feud gets personal

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During a congressional hearing, Senator George McGovern and Attorney General Spiro Agnew couldn't hold back their mutual dislike for each other anymore

An August 4 report confirmed that, a month after the anti-drug laws went into effect, the Agnew Justice Department had already issued thousands of indictments against members of the Armed Forces and went after over 1,000 residents of Washington DC for drug abuse. During a congressional hearing, Attorney General Spiro Agnew defended his policies and emphasized the need for a “zero tolerance approach on drugs”. In contrast, the Agnew Justice Department did not seem enthusiastic about the prevention programs the bill package included as well. Senator George McGovern (D-SD), a liberal icon, slammed the Justice Department for exaggerating the execution of the new law and its punishment elements. As Agnew was interviewed by the senate judiciary committee, the exchange between Agnew and McGovern went personal following a question by the senator:

SENATOR McGOVERN: Attorney General Agnew: Your department has been assigned to oversee the entire implementation of the drug laws President Rockefeller signed in June. How do you explain, that your department has already issued countless indictments against members of the Armed Forces and DC residents, but not even requested half of the appropriated sum for drug prevention programs?

HON. AGNEW: Senator, as you are well aware, my department is primarily responsible for upholding federal law in this country. And as I have outlined earlier, I am an advocate of a zero tolerance policy towards drugs. I am following the president's instructions and my own convictions on the issue of the horrific drug epedemic, that the last Democratic administration badly neglected. You are also well aware, that the prevention program for the military is managed by the Pentagon. The fact that you constantly keep pressing myself on the issue while you haven’t requested Secretary Romney to testify leads me to the conclusion that you are abusing your oversight role for ideological purposes. I reject that kind of approach. This is not the role of senate, Sir.

SENATOR McGOVERN: Mr. Agnew, I don’t need any lessons from you about the role of this congressional body. You ought to…

[interrupts] HON. AGNEW: But obviously about the rule of law in this country. You are well aware that Secretary Romney…

[Interrupts] SENATOR McGOVERN: With all due respect, Mr. Agnew! I strongly reject your unkind interruption and your attitude here. What do you think who you are? I tell you one thing: As senator, I am determining the questions here and you have an obligation to answer them properly! Now, again: Why didn’t y