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General Politics => Political Geography & Demographics => Topic started by: Democratic Hawk on September 13, 2004, 11:37:58 am



Title: Indiana
Post by: Democratic Hawk on September 13, 2004, 11:37:58 am
I've noticed that Indiana's politics are rather different than her midwest neighbours to the right (swinging Ohio) and to the left (Democratic Illiniois). Is there any particular reason for this?

I see Democratic Senator Evan Bayh should easily win re-election and it has plumped for Democratic governors of late. I'd have thought the state would be more competitive than safe Republican.

Dave


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: nomorelies on September 13, 2004, 11:39:11 am
Indiana is the only state not to speak officially English in the US. so their politics is very unique.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Democratic Hawk on September 13, 2004, 11:43:58 am
Indiana is the only state not to speak officially English in the US. so their politics is very unique.

Do they widely speak another language? I know that that they are nicknamed 'Hoosiers'. Does that have anything to do with it?

Dave


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: nomorelies on September 13, 2004, 11:46:49 am
When i was in Indianapolis i discovered that the state language is American!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thats why i love the way when you say to Americans that your counry is Imperialistic they scream outrage.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: MODU on September 13, 2004, 12:16:17 pm

Being one that works with British nationals, there is a big difference between European English and American English.  I don't think there is anything wrong with saying we speak "American."  But then of course, we can never seem to pass the amendment stating that "English" is our national language.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: jacob_101 on September 13, 2004, 12:21:01 pm
This is a good question.  I would also like to know why Indiana is so Republican.  It borders KY true, but also Illinois and Michigan?  Anyone from Indiana who can explain?


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: struct310 on September 13, 2004, 01:19:28 pm
I used to live in Indiana and one reason might be that the people like things simple in the state.  Liberals make things really complex in their plans (healthcare for one, mainly to hide the real socialist plan behind it).  The people really hate tax raises as well.  


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Reds4 on September 13, 2004, 01:39:17 pm
Indiana is very interesting, I have always wondered why it is so different than any state close to it, except Kentucky. Indiana probably has a higher population of rural voters and surburban voters than Ohio which could help the GOP there. There isnt a lot of urban area outside of Indianapolis.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: stry_cat on September 13, 2004, 02:10:07 pm
Indiana also is one of the very few states not to have the dreaded "Daylight Savings Time" A lot of their counties have opted out of that.  That's done b/c farmers hate DST (the chickens get up at sunrise regardless of what the US Government declares to be the time).  My guess is that the state is very rural  and as others have posted, the rural areas tend to be very Republican.  


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Gustaf on September 13, 2004, 02:39:34 pm
I don't know anything about Indiana really, but when this came up earlier several posters have pointed to the fact that Indiana is very rural, there basically aren't any big Democratic cities like in other Midwestern states. The idea is that rural areas in the Midwest are more or less the same though.

Also, it might be interesting to note that Indiana has always been more Southern than its neighbours. It's had a strong Klan presence for a long time I believe and also tended to swing with the Democrats on many occasions back in the 19th century.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Filuwaúrdjan on September 13, 2004, 02:40:37 pm
If we break Indiana into rough geo-political regions:

Gary-Hammond

A blue collar (more steel is made in Lake County than any other part of the U.S), heavily unionised area and by far the most Democratic part of Indiana

South Bend-Elkhart

The South Bend area is very "ethnic" (the largest Hungarian Community in the U.S is in the area) and fairly Blue Collar, while Elkhart is solidly Republican. Overall the region swings about *a lot*

Fort Wayne

With the exception of a few blue collar districts in Fort Wayne itself, Fort Wayne (along with it's suburbs) is a GOP stronghold (and has been since the Civil War)

The Corn Belt

Sterotypical Indiana: lots of farms and small towns, "rednecks", religious zealots... The Cornbelt covers most of the state and is the backbone of the Indiana GOP (and has been Republican since the Civil War).

Indianapolis and Suburbs

While Indianapolis itself leans Democrat, the wealthy suburbs of Indianapolis are the most Republican parts of the state with several counties voting for Bush with over 70% of the vote.

Muncie

The "Middletown" area is fairly centrist and tends to swing around a bit... (Clinton in '96, Bush in '00) it also has a quirky independent streak (Perot did well in the Muncie area in '92)

Indiana Coalfield

Basically an extension of the Southern Illinois Coalfield, the area includes Vermillion County (after Lake, the most reliably Democratic county in Indiana) and overall leans Democrat. The largest City (Terre Haute) is a traditional hotbed of Populism.

Ohio Valley

A traditional swing area, the Ohio Valley tends to be socially conservative and economically leftist and has a habit of producing large swings without little warning.
Democrats often do well in the (very) blue collar counties in the Southeast of the area.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: TG on September 13, 2004, 02:43:42 pm
Every person i know from Indiana has a "southern" accent for some reason.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Gustaf on September 13, 2004, 02:44:44 pm
Indiana voted for the Democratic candidate in the presidential elections of 1876, 1884 and 1892. Note that Indiana thus voted for the losing Samuel Tilden. It remained a swing state hovering about the national average for many decades and voted for Wilson in 1916.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Jake on September 13, 2004, 02:56:43 pm
When i was in Indianapolis i discovered that the state language is American!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thats why i love the way when you say to Americans that your counry is Imperialistic they scream outrage.

Get off this board troll


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: English on September 13, 2004, 03:12:50 pm
Indiana = Illinois minus Chicago.

The reason Indiana is heavily Republican is due to the absense of urban areas.
Indianapolis and Gary are easily outvoted by the suburbs, small towns are rural areas.

The only reason Illinois is heavily Democratic is because of Chicago.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: struct310 on September 13, 2004, 03:37:28 pm
If we break Indiana into rough geo-political regions:

Gary-Hammond

A blue collar (more steel is made in Lake County than any other part of the U.S), heavily unionised area and by far the most Democratic part of Indiana

South Bend-Elkhart

The South Bend area is very "ethnic" (the largest Hungarian Community in the U.S is in the area) and fairly Blue Collar, while Elkhart is solidly Republican. Overall the region swings about *a lot*

Fort Wayne

With the exception of a few blue collar districts in Fort Wayne itself, Fort Wayne (along with it's suburbs) is a GOP stronghold (and has been since the Civil War)

The Corn Belt

Sterotypical Indiana: lots of farms and small towns, "rednecks", religious zealots... The Cornbelt covers most of the state and is the backbone of the Indiana GOP (and has been Republican since the Civil War).

Indianapolis and Suburbs

While Indianapolis itself leans Democrat, the wealthy suburbs of Indianapolis are the most Republican parts of the state with several counties voting for Bush with over 70% of the vote.

Muncie

The "Middletown" area is fairly centrist and tends to swing around a bit... (Clinton in '96, Bush in '00) it also has a quirky independent streak (Perot did well in the Muncie area in '92)

Indiana Coalfield

Basically an extension of the Southern Illinois Coalfield, the area includes Vermillion County (after Lake, the most reliably Democratic county in Indiana) and overall leans Democrat. The largest City (Terre Haute) is a traditional hotbed of Populism.

Ohio Valley

A traditional swing area, the Ohio Valley tends to be socially conservative and economically leftist and has a habit of producing large swings without little warning.
Democrats often do well in the (very) blue collar counties in the Southeast of the area.

Gary-Hammond is more democratic not because of unions, but because of the high volume of African Americans living there.  
Indianapolis the city is lean democrat like you said, but in a comfortable margin say 4-5pts, Bush could sweep the downtown area and democrat Julia Carsons district.  As in Gary, Indianapolis city has a large African American population.  Southward in Bloomington, the college town, is where you'll find the most progressive part of Indiana.  The city claimed itself "gay friendly" and started promoting "gay tourism" to the area.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Filuwaúrdjan on September 13, 2004, 03:54:39 pm
Gary-Hammond is more democratic not because of unions, but because of the high volume of African Americans living there.  

While Gary is heavily Democrat, the rest of the area isn't (black pop. of Lake County is 25%) and is strongly Democrat because of Union ties.

Quote
Indianapolis the city is lean democrat like you said, but in a comfortable margin say 4-5pts, Bush could sweep the downtown area and democrat Julia Carsons district.
 As in Gary, Indianapolis city has a large African American population.

Black pop. of Indianapolis City: 25%

Quote
Southward in Bloomington, the college town, is where you'll find the most progressive part of Indiana.  The city claimed itself "gay friendly" and started promoting "gay tourism" to the area.

Bloomington doesn't really fit anywhere...


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: MODU on September 13, 2004, 04:07:46 pm

The nicest (?) thing I can say about Bloomington is that my ex lives there.  hahaha . . . outside of that, the campus of Indiana University is quite beautiful.  With that being the issue, the town is relatively dead for 3 months of the year, along with the economy.  However, there is a modern business sector forming right on the interstate.  Last time I was there, I counted about 8 4+ story office buildings being built, as well as a decent commercial sector.  I will say in about 10 years, Bloomington will be a MAJOR business hub in the region.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: muon2 on September 13, 2004, 04:34:39 pm
Indiana = Illinois minus Chicago.

The reason Indiana is heavily Republican is due to the absense of urban areas.
Indianapolis and Gary are easily outvoted by the suburbs, small towns are rural areas.

The only reason Illinois is heavily Democratic is because of Chicago.
I agree. I would add also IN = western OH minus Toledo. Though western OH lacks the coal area of southern IL/IN. The corridor including Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus share many social and political similarities.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ilikeverin on September 13, 2004, 08:42:02 pm
Every person i know from Indiana has a "southern" accent for some reason.
No, every Hoosier you have met does not have a Southern accent 8) ;)


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ilikeverin on September 13, 2004, 08:43:54 pm
Indiana is the only state not to speak officially English in the US. so their politics is very unique.

Do they widely speak another language?

Naw.

Quote
I know that that they are nicknamed 'Hoosiers'. Does that have anything to do with it?

Dave

That's our adjective for 'person from Indiana' :)

We're special, because no one knows exactly where the nickname came from *spooky noises*


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ilikeverin on September 13, 2004, 08:44:59 pm
I used to live in Indiana and one reason might be that the people like things simple in the state.  Liberals make things really complex in their plans (healthcare for one, mainly to hide the real socialist plan behind it).  The people really hate tax raises as well.  

What can be more simple than 'the government pays for your healthcare' :D :D :D


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: MODU on September 13, 2004, 09:00:17 pm
I used to live in Indiana and one reason might be that the people like things simple in the state.  Liberals make things really complex in their plans (healthcare for one, mainly to hide the real socialist plan behind it).  The people really hate tax raises as well.  

What can be more simple than 'the government pays for your healthcare' :D :D :D

OH, I know.  You can pay my taxes.  :)  That'll be simple for me.  hehehe


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: The Vorlon on September 13, 2004, 09:01:14 pm

A short, but essentially accurate summary ;)

Brevity is the soul of wit.

I salute you sir !


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: nclib on September 13, 2004, 09:36:22 pm
A lot of people say that Indiana is conservative/Republican because of its rural-ness, but actually many states are more rural and less Republican than Indiana (including Midwestern states such as Minn., Iowa, and Wisc.)

Perhaps Indiana is Republican because it has relatively few ethnic whites, Hispanics, or Asians.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: struct310 on September 13, 2004, 10:15:27 pm
A lot of people say that Indiana is conservative/Republican because of its rural-ness, but actually many states are more rural and less Republican than Indiana (including Midwestern states such as Minn., Iowa, and Wisc.)

Perhaps Indiana is Republican because it has relatively few ethnic whites, Hispanics, or Asians.

Actually there are a ton of Hispanics in Indianapolis and the city is becoming Little Mexico.  A street I frequented as a kid turned from vintage 50s style to the ugly and beaten down Hispanic shops like we have here in Arizona in the ghetto parts of town.  And I wouldnt assume Asians are very democratic, it depends on where they are at.  The vote swings either way with Asians.  You are right about ethnic whites, unless you count the Amish, who vote republican.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: MN-Troy on September 13, 2004, 11:57:55 pm
Indiana = Illinois minus Chicago.

The reason Indiana is heavily Republican is due to the absense of urban areas.
Indianapolis and Gary are easily outvoted by the suburbs, small towns are rural areas.

The only reason Illinois is heavily Democratic is because of Chicago.

If the Chicago suburbs voted heavily Republican like their Indianapolis surbubs do, then the Chicago effect would be negated. Other than that, your analysis is spot on.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Bandit3 the Worker on September 14, 2004, 12:02:51 am
I used to live in Indiana and one reason might be that the people like things simple in the state.

Yes, conservatives have simple minds.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Bandit3 the Worker on September 14, 2004, 12:05:02 am

Make them.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ○∙◄☻tπ[╪AV┼cV└ on September 14, 2004, 12:31:21 am
Indiana voted for the Democratic candidate in the presidential elections of 1876, 1884 and 1892. Note that Indiana thus voted for the losing Samuel Tilden. It remained a swing state hovering about the national average for many decades and voted for Wilson in 1916.
Samuel Tilden didn't really "lose".


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: English on September 14, 2004, 04:11:03 am
A lot of people say that Indiana is conservative/Republican because of its rural-ness, but actually many states are more rural and less Republican than Indiana (including Midwestern states such as Minn., Iowa, and Wisc.)

Perhaps Indiana is Republican because it has relatively few ethnic whites, Hispanics, or Asians.

Minnesota has the twin cities and the Duluth/Northeast area, all of which are heavily Democratic. These can and do outvote the rural and suburban regions
Iowa has Des Moines and blue collar cities such as Davenport and Iowa City.
Wisconsin has the liberal bastion of Madison, plus Milwaukee.
Indiana basically just has a small, but very deprived city, Gary, and urban Indianapolis.
WI & MN are not quite as rural in that there is a large liberal urban element in both. IA is probably as rural as Indiana, however it has a smattering of industrial, blue collar towns, which Indiana doesn't have. Basically the Democratic elements in Indiana are massively outvoted. I'm sure if Indianapolis doubled in size the state would be safely Democrat.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Nym90 on September 14, 2004, 08:56:49 am

The nicest (?) thing I can say about Bloomington is that my ex lives there.  hahaha . . . outside of that, the campus of Indiana University is quite beautiful.  With that being the issue, the town is relatively dead for 3 months of the year, along with the economy.  However, there is a modern business sector forming right on the interstate.  Last time I was there, I counted about 8 4+ story office buildings being built, as well as a decent commercial sector.  I will say in about 10 years, Bloomington will be a MAJOR business hub in the region.

Bloomington doesn't actually have an Interstate highway nearby, but your point is still taken. :)


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: MODU on September 14, 2004, 09:00:40 am

hahaha . . . well, it was a 6-laned road.  Thought it was an interstate (wasn't driving).  :)


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Filuwaúrdjan on September 14, 2004, 12:29:44 pm
What makes Indiana unique (most of it's political regions are spill-overs from other states, the Indiana Coalfield is very like the Illinois Coalfield, the Ohio Valley spans several states and has similer politics all over, as does the Cornbelt) is the ultra-GOP suburbs of Indianapolis


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Democratic Hawk on September 14, 2004, 12:37:56 pm
Both Indiana senators Lugar (R) and Bayh (D), despite a partisan divide, seem to be very popular incumbents, who command much bipartisan support.

Dave


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ilikeverin on September 14, 2004, 04:14:01 pm
Indiana basically just has a small, but very deprived city, Gary, and urban Indianapolis.

Indiana city populations:

1 Indianapolis-781,870
2 Fort Wayne-205,727
3 Evansville-121,582
4 South Bend-107,789
5 Gary-102,746

However... (Indiana county populations):

1 Marion (Indianapolis) 860,454
2 Lake (Gary) 484,564
3  Allen  (Fort Wayne)  331,849
4 St. Joseph (South Bend)  265,559
5 Elkhart  (Elkhart)  182,791
...
7 Vanderburgh (Evansville) 171,922


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Gustaf on September 14, 2004, 04:29:10 pm
Indiana voted for the Democratic candidate in the presidential elections of 1876, 1884 and 1892. Note that Indiana thus voted for the losing Samuel Tilden. It remained a swing state hovering about the national average for many decades and voted for Wilson in 1916.
Samuel Tilden didn't really "lose".

Well...he lost in the sense that he did not become president. But, yes, he was out-cheated by the Republicans, if that's what you mean... :)


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: bejkuy on September 14, 2004, 05:34:33 pm
I spent some time in Downtown Indianapolis 2 years ago while attending a conference.  I was amazed at the conservative feel of the downtown area (compared to any other big city downtown I have been to.)

I saw very little:

-anarchist type people
-evidence of a strong gay community.
-public indecency
-alternative lifestyle/weird hippy stuff.  You know the shops, street vendors, etc..

And a lot of:

-churches
-families
-clean streets.


As a lifelong west coaster (spent most of childhood in Portland and Eugene) it was stange for me to see a city this large with such a conservative feel.

No wonder the state is so conservative.

Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

It's just a conservative state.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: ilikeverin on September 14, 2004, 08:08:19 pm
But it's a nice white-picket-fence-and-nicely-mowed-lawns conservative place, not a guns-and-low-laxes-let's-kill-the-poor place.

And the locals are all so friendly :)

*obsession is fun! ;)*


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: 12th Doctor on September 14, 2004, 08:40:35 pm
When i was in Indianapolis i discovered that the state language is American!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thats why i love the way when you say to Americans that your counry is Imperialistic they scream outrage.

Well, I wouldn't say that I speak "American", but a legit point could be made that American English might be distinct enough from British English to almost be considered a different language.  Dutch, German and Swiss are all very similar as are , but are differnt languages none the less.  Perhapes, given 20-50 years there will be enough differences for distict seperation.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Filuwaúrdjan on September 15, 2004, 06:12:58 am
Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: minionofmidas - supplemental forum account on September 15, 2004, 06:33:06 am
Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)
Muncie's also got a pretty liberal uni, don't know how large it is. Once met a professor from there.


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: Filuwaúrdjan on September 15, 2004, 06:46:50 am
Also, in response to other posts, Muncie, Anderson, and Ft. Wayne are big-time blue-collar towns.  They each have huge GM factories.  But they are still Republican.

Ft. Wayne is (for historical reasons mostly) Republican (though some blue collar/ethnic parts of the City lean Dem. The suburbs are ultra-Republican) and "Middletown" proper leans Dem (though the county it's in swings about a lot)
Muncie's also got a pretty liberal uni, don't know how large it is. Once met a professor from there.

Ball State Uni IIRC


Title: Re:Indiana
Post by: minionofmidas - supplemental forum account on September 15, 2004, 06:51:42 am
I forgot the name.